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Hudsonville City Commission OKs bid for Chicago Drive enhancements

The Hudsonville City Commission has approved a bid for a project designed to transform a busy, noisy stretch of highway into a welcoming entryway.

A bid of $722,560 from Katerberg-Verhage Inc. was accepted during the Sept. 12 City Commission meeting. The work will include landscaping and other enhancements along Chicago Drive, which bisects the city and adjoins its southern downtown area.

According to the city’s website, the improvements will include the planting of pine trees along the north side of the road to help screen the railroad tracks.

In the median and on the south side of the road, decorative concrete and a variety of plantings will be used to help calm traffic through the downtown area and to draw motorists’ eyes to the business district on the south side of the roadway.

The city received three bids for the Chicago Drive landscape enhancements project. All three bids came in significantly higher than the city’s original projected estimate of $640,000.

The bids received were from Epic Excavating, $867,399; Kamminga Roodvoets, $847,973; and Katerberg-Verhage, $833,255.

City Manager Patrick Waterman said that immediately after the bid opening, design consultant M.C. Smith was asked to contact the lowest qualified bidder and seek out possible scope reductions or cost-saving ideas that would bring the project closer to the original budget.

Several options were identified that resulted in a savings of $130,695, bringing the total cost down to $702,560, plus a $20,000 contingency fund.

The items and their associated cost savings included the use of scored concrete in the median instead of stamped concrete ($53,662), decreasing the amount of topsoil removed ($49,100), reducing the number of planter pots in the Service Road median ($7,608) and reducing the number of trees along the north side of Chicago Drive ($7,737).

The commission also voted to approve a construction contract with the Michigan Department of Transportation that will allow the construction and maintenance of the improvements.

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/hudsonville/index.ssf/2017/09/hudsonville_commission_oks_chi.html

Pupils take part in new landscape design

When the pupils of Napier Central School were asked how they would like their planned new garden area to look some seriously creative and colourful ideas emerged.

And a few ambitious and slightly hopeful ones.

“We got some great ideas,” principal Ross McLeod said.

“Among them bike tracks and cafes,” he added with a laugh.

And a flying fox as well as a cable car down to the seafront also popped up.

While they won’t be part of the school’s planned new outdoor spread, lots of native plants and trees, along with pathways, interactive areas and seating will.

The new area will be at the southern boundary off Colenso Ave which was for many years the popular spot for the children as it was the site of six grand old pohutukawa and puriri trees.

“The children enjoyed playing around those gnarly old trees,” Mr McLeod said.

But they weren’t popular with everyone, and in late 2015 it was discovered that someone had gone on to the school grounds and drilled holes into the trees – then filled those holes with poison.

The limbs of the trees slowly died and they became brittle and dangerous, so the trees were felled to ensure the safety of the children.

Mr McLeod said the children, along with parents and past pupils, were upset and saddened that the grand old trees, so long a feature of the playground, had been attacked and had to go.

“It was sad,” 10-year-old Zoe Wakefield said.

The plans to restore the area sparked up last year with the youngsters and the community asked to submit ideas for what they would like to see, and landscape designer Charlotte Pedersen from Espaso Verde has incorporated some of the submitted ideas in her plan.

The native trees and plants will be traversed by pathways from the new entranceway, and the children will have seating as well as areas for adventure.

“It’s hoped the native plantings will attract native birds.”

Eleven-year-old Max Webber said there used to be a couple of kereru who called by, and he hoped they would return when the new recreational spread was in place.

Mr McLeod said the crucial fundraising to help see the project get under way in about three weeks and hopefully wrapped up by the end of the year, was now under way.

As well as raffles and mufti days and other events the school’s Board of Trustees would be seeking sponsorship from businesses and had already picked up support from Vidal Estate Winery.

Winemaker Hugh Crichton has selected five top wines which have been made available to the school for its fundraising sale.

“It is up and running,” Mr McLeod said, adding that the children who had been part of the design idea process were excited at the prospect of seeing their imaginations eventually take shape.

“It’s going to be cool,” Connor Kingsford, 11, said.

Article source: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/hawkes-bay-today/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503462&objectid=11921483

City of Turlock’s water conservation programs, services and incentives

The City of Turlock has implemented various tools and resources to assist with water conservation. The following list provides a summary of services available to consumers.

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

HOME WATER SURVEY KIT: The free DIY water survey kit helps determine efficient water use in the home. The kit includes information and tools on how to detect leaks, water saving devices such as aerators and low-flow showerheads, tips on low water-use landscaping and how to irrigate your landscape efficiently.

TEAM GREEN KIDS CLUB: This club offers the opportunity for young stewards to exchange ideas and information on how to work together to recycle, conserve and preserve the natural resources of our community.

COMMUNITY EVENTS: The City participates in various community events throughout the year to distribute information on water conservation and other environmental programs the City administers. Visit the Municipal Services booth at the next scheduled appearance at the Public Safety’s Open House on Oct. 7. Find more information on this event by visiting http://turlock.ca.us/policedepartment/getinvolved/publicsafetyopenhouse.asp

TURLOCK JOURNAL – CONSERVATION CORNER: This is a weekly editorial in the Turlock Journal, written by City staff to inform readers on relevant conservation information.

CITY OF TURLOCK’S WEBSITE: The City’s website offers many user-friendly tools and valuable information to help customers with their own conservation efforts at home, as well as the ability to report water wasting and storm drain pollution. Go to www.cityofturlock.org to check out some of these tools.

RESIDENTIAL WATER USE ONLINE MONITORING TOOL: City of Turlock utility customers can monitor their water consumption online as well as compare usage to similar homes in their neighborhood. To register an account and access the water monitoring tool, visit the City of Turlock website at www.CityofTurlock.org.

MUNICIPAL SERVICES AND GO GREEN NEWSLETTERS: These publications include recent water conservation information and is available on the City’s website, or customers can sign up to receive it via email. VARIOUS BROCHURES AND EDUCATIONAL PUBLICATIONS: Informational publications are distributed through various channels including utility bills, the City’s website, community events, and new customer packets to educate customers on water use efficiency.

RECYCLED WATER FOR RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL LANDSCAPE WATERING: The City of Turlock offers recycled water to residents and businesses in and around the City of Turlock. Recycled water is available to authorized users through a self-serve drive through system for landscape irrigation. Contact the Municipal Services Department at (209) 668-5590 to learn how to become an authorized user.

INCENTIVES

FREE CONSERVATION DEVICES: Low-flow showerheads, faucet aerators, and other water saving devices are offered to customers who pledge to commit to specific water conservation activities or submit the Home Water Survey Summary Card that is included in the Home Water Survey Kit.

HIGH EFFICIENCY APPLIANCE REBATES: Rebates for the purchase of high-efficiency toilets and clothes washers are available for up to $75 per toilet and $100 per clothes washer.

ONLINE CONSERVATION WORKSHOPS: The City offers an online water conservation class that allows customers reduce their fine for water wasting violations and excessive use penalties.

For questions or additional information, please contact Municipal Services at 209-668-5590 or visit the City’s website at www.CityofTurlock.org. Brought to you by the City of Turlock Municipal Services Department.

 

WATER CONSERVATION TIP #112

Reduce, reuse and recirculate: Make sure your swimming pools, fountains and ponds are equipped with re-circulating pumps.

Article source: http://www.turlockjournal.com/section/14/article/35046/

2018 street projects could enhance downtown aesthetics

Whenever Philip Weyhe posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://www.southernminn.com/northfield_news/news/article_bc43d243-7ebb-5d2d-8e6d-79bc62f9c651.html

Rice’s refocuses business on landscape maintenance

In my 20 years of consulting I have only worked with a few companies that had sales funnels, yet this simple measurement tool is as important as your profit loss statement.  This system is easy to set up and is extremely valuable in the sales process.  Companies that have them will have better quality leads, waste less time on unqualified prospects, and turn more proposals into contracts.  

Regardless of the markets you serve, commercial, residential, industrial, or if you do design build or maintenance, you will benefit from this simple measurement process.

So, What is a sales funnel?

For our purposes in the landscaping business a sales funnel is a system for measuring from the initial contact of a potential customer until the final sale.  The items that need to be tracked and measured are –

  1. The inquiry
  2. The lead
  3. The proposal
  4. The contract

 

The inquiry

The inquiry is a call that comes in that doesn’t become a lead.  Tracking inquiries helps determine how effective your direct marketing materials or your Internet marketing is.  For example, if you are trying to reach high-end clients, yet getting calls from people who can’t afford your high quality work, there may be a problem in your marketing materials, whether hard copy or electronic.  When ads are placed in magazines, newspapers, or direct mail, inquiries usually spike and this also helps determine what type of customer you are reaching . . . or not reaching.

It’s important that when calls come into your office these inquiries are screened properly; if not, unqualified prospects may become leads.  Unqualified leads just waste everyone’s time.  This process can be accomplished with good screening questions and proper training.  Large companies have, or should have, specialists to handle these calls; the reason for this is obvious.

The amount of inquiries should be counted and tracked each day.

The lead

A lead is a potential customer that fits the type of “targeted customer” you have identified and are looking for.  When these folks call, “lead sheets” should be filled out with all of the necessary information, including those screening questions we talked about above. 

If at all possible it’s best to book an appointment on that initial call and not say, Joe, John, or Sally will get back to you.  By adding this step it avoids the proverbial telephone tag even if you are using email to set your appointments.  Once the appointment is booked with your “lead”, they will most likely stop making phone calls to other contractors. 

Ideally, information for the lead sheet should be taken over the phone electronically and, if it is determined that the call is “qualified”, an appointment should be booked on the salesperson’s calendar electronically along with the lead sheet information.  Leads should be numbered and kept track of on a daily basis and entered into your sales tracking system.  If using paper lead sheets, the same process should take place, but it’s best to have the appointment entered directly onto the salesperson’s calendar. 

The proposal

Once the sales person/designer has the appointment with the prospect two things will happen.  The call turns into a proposal or it doesn’t.  If it doesn’t, a brief explanation of why should be turned in to the office where it’s being tracked.  By taking this step the office person knows the lead was taken care of in a timely way and what the result of this call was and why.  Without doing this step sometimes leads are neglected by having too much time pass between the call to the office and an actual appointment.  This is sometimes called “a leaky funnel”. 

If the call is successful and a proposal is needed, this should be sent to your office sales system as well.  Proposals can either be done during the first sales appointment or delivered to the potential customer at an agreed upon time.  

If your proposal doesn’t require a design, think about the idea of having a portable printer in your vehicle along with a computer.  There is no time like the present, while at the property, to prepare proposals.  The customer will be delighted when the door bell rings 20-30 minutes later with a formal proposal prepared in a branded company presentation folder.   My clients have reported this idea not only saved an enormous amount of time but helped them close 50 percent more jobs.  Why? This is because they try and close the job on the initial call, but enough on sales ideas let’s get back to the funnel. 

Once the proposal is created, it also should be numbered and tracked in your sales system.  If you try to “close” and get the job, great; but, if not successful then, an agreed upon time should be made when you will “check back”.  In other words, you are getting permission from the potential customer, in advance, to check in with him or her to “ask for the job”.  Many sales are lost because sales people don’t call back and ask for the job. 

The contract

If the proposal is accepted and a contract signed, in some organizations the sales process is over.  In others, especially with larger jobs, the salesperson may need to usher the job through until completion and invoicing. 

The pipeline

As these functions are occurring in your sales process and recorded in your sales funnel, the most important thing that results is your “pipeline”.  Your pipeline contains the potential leads and pending proposals in your funnel.  For example, if your company needs $1 million in new sales in the next 12 months and your close rate is 20% on the proposals you offer, then your goal needs to be five times your needed sales.  So your job as the owner/salesperson is to figure out how you are going to give proposals totaling $5M in your “target market”.  Now, you can see how important your sales funnel becomes. 

Most company funnel reports are in an Excel spreadsheet.  The project name is placed in the first column along the top followed by contact phone number, contact name, type of job, date submitted, amount of bid, the probability of getting the job as a percentage, and comments.  The information in this report should be ongoing and used in the company’s weekly sales meetings. 

There you have it, the basic information for a sales funnel.  Now all you need to do is set up the process described above and have the discipline to religiously follow it.  The companies that use this simple process have much greater control of their sales, usually have much better results and, in the end, make more money!

 

Ed Laflamme, LIC, grew the largest landscape company in Connecticut and sold it in 1999.  Ed then co-founded The Harvest Group with Bill Arman. He’s a professional speaker, author, business advisor, and coach serving landscape owners nationwide.  Visit www.harvestlandscapeconsulting.com to learn more about Ed and his company. Ed can be reached via ed@harvestlandscapeconsulting.com.

 

Article source: http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/ll-091317-rices-landscaping-redefined-refocuses-landscape-maintenance.aspx

Lonsdale police report for Sept. 3-9

Sept. 3

• Officer noticed two suspicious juveniles dressed in all black on Second Avenue Southeast. Juveniles fled on foot as the officer attempted contact. Officer was unable to locate the juveniles.

• Responded to a possible juvenile runaway on Twelfth Avenue Northeast. Juvenile located.

• Officer noticed a juvenile out after curfew on Halstad Ave. Juvenile released to parent.

• Responded to a medical on Fourth Avenue Southwest.

• Officer noticed a couple of juveniles on the roof of the concession stand at Jaycee Park. No damage found. Juveniles released to parents.

• Responded to a medical on Fourth Circle Drive Southeast.

• Officer checked on a suspicious occupied vehicle parked on Central Street West with no lights on. Occupants were waiting for a friend and decided to leave for home. Information only.

Sept. 4

• Received a fireworks complaint on Fig Street Northeast. Officer checked the area not locating anyone.

Sept. 5

• Received report of a male and female fighting on Central Street West. Officer checked the area not locating anyone.

• Responded to a domestic on Second Avenue Southwest. Verbal only; parties separated.

• Took information of two missing dogs on Seventh Avenue Northwest.

• Took a driving complaint of motorist driving fast and not yielding to pedestrians on Central and Railway Streets. Extra patrol requested.

Sept. 6

• Received request from Faribault Police to make contact with a party on Colorado Street Northwest. Contact made.

• Took a past action theft report on Birch Street Northeast.

• Received report of a dog found on Central Street East. Owner picked up the dog prior to officer arrival.

• Took report of a gas drive-off on Central Street East.

Sept. 7

• Responded to an alarm on Florida Street Southeast. Building secure; false alarm.

• Assisted with traffic control on Industrial Drive Southeast while construction material was moved.

• Received report of a suspicious occupied vehicle on Singing Hills Drive Southeast. Vehicle located; occupant was looking at landscaping for different ideas.

• Received request to check the welfare of a motorist who was hunched over and parked on the side of the road on Central Street West. Vehicle left prior to officer arrival.

• Officer checked on an occupied vehicle parked at Jaycee Park after hours. Officer located two adults involved in adult activities who were advised to leave.

Sept. 8

• Responded to a residential alarm on Florida Street Southwest. Officer cancelled prior to arrival.

• Received report of a suspicious occupied vehicle parked on Eleventh Avenue Northeast. Vehicle located; occupant was waiting in the area for an appointment.

• Responded to a medical on Delaware Street Southwest.

Sept. 9

• Received report of two juveniles operating an ATV on Ash Street Northeast. Officer checked the area and was unable to locate the ATV.

Article source: http://www.southernminn.com/lonsdale_area_news_review/news/article_76c4fe10-5db0-53f6-ade8-adc1c5562f3d.html

LSU students suggest ideas for former St. Luke facility

All the news you need, right at your fingertips.
Daily World

Article source: http://www.dailyworld.com/story/news/local/2017/09/13/lsu-students-suggest-ideas-former-st-luke-facility/661901001/

Detroit Design 139 to exhibit development achievements, aspirations

Fans of Detroit architecture, design, landscaping, and city planning—rejoice! An exhibit coinciding with the Detroit Design Festival showcases 38 innovative development ideas in practice and in the pipeline around Detroit.

Detroit Design 139 opens to the public Thursday, September 14 at 1001 Woodward, right across from Campus Martius. The exhibit will have docents for those coming in to see who have questions, along with planned events engaging the community in the future of Detroit design.

It’s like one of our best development maps on display.

The exhibit is divided into seven sections: the Riverfront, Urban Design, Neighborhood Planning, Mix Tape (Commercial Corridor Strategies), U of M Design Studio projects, Adaptive Reuse, and New Construction.


Out of the 38 projects featured, 18 are located outside the 7.2 mile downtown core. Director of Detroit City Planning Maurice Cox said that he hopes this exhibit will showcase the wide range of projects happening throughout the city and drive a community conversation in all 139 square miles of the city.

An international jury selected the top projects to be on display. The City Planning Department also brought in a wide variety of projects focused on neighborhood redevelopment. The exhibit includes new construction such as True North, innovative adaptive reuse projects like the Foundation Hotel, and a wide range of plans for the East Riverfront redesign.


A few other designs to note: a display on the State Fairgrounds project,renderings for the North End building with the Illuminated Mural, and an U of M project for a Sky Bar across from Eastern Market.




Melissa Dittmer, Bedrock’s Vice President of Architecture + Design, hopes this is the first of a biannual event where we can take a look at what has happened and what’s to come. Many areas of the city are not currently represented in this design exhibit. But as development grows and we continue these conversations, she says these ideas will continue to move from visionary to implementation.

Detroit Design 139 is open to the public from 12-7 p.m. daily starting on September 14. More information can be found here.

Article source: https://detroit.curbed.com/2017/9/12/16295820/detroit-design-139-architecture-exhibit

Why you need a sales funnel

In my 20 years of consulting I have only worked with a few companies that had sales funnels, yet this simple measurement tool is as important as your profit loss statement.  This system is easy to set up and is extremely valuable in the sales process.  Companies that have them will have better quality leads, waste less time on unqualified prospects, and turn more proposals into contracts.  

Regardless of the markets you serve, commercial, residential, industrial, or if you do design build or maintenance, you will benefit from this simple measurement process.

So, What is a sales funnel?

For our purposes in the landscaping business a sales funnel is a system for measuring from the initial contact of a potential customer until the final sale.  The items that need to be tracked and measured are –

  1. The inquiry
  2. The lead
  3. The proposal
  4. The contract

 

The inquiry

The inquiry is a call that comes in that doesn’t become a lead.  Tracking inquiries helps determine how effective your direct marketing materials or your Internet marketing is.  For example, if you are trying to reach high-end clients, yet getting calls from people who can’t afford your high quality work, there may be a problem in your marketing materials, whether hard copy or electronic.  When ads are placed in magazines, newspapers, or direct mail, inquiries usually spike and this also helps determine what type of customer you are reaching . . . or not reaching.

It’s important that when calls come into your office these inquiries are screened properly; if not, unqualified prospects may become leads.  Unqualified leads just waste everyone’s time.  This process can be accomplished with good screening questions and proper training.  Large companies have, or should have, specialists to handle these calls; the reason for this is obvious.

The amount of inquiries should be counted and tracked each day.

The lead

A lead is a potential customer that fits the type of “targeted customer” you have identified and are looking for.  When these folks call, “lead sheets” should be filled out with all of the necessary information, including those screening questions we talked about above. 

If at all possible it’s best to book an appointment on that initial call and not say, Joe, John, or Sally will get back to you.  By adding this step it avoids the proverbial telephone tag even if you are using email to set your appointments.  Once the appointment is booked with your “lead”, they will most likely stop making phone calls to other contractors. 

Ideally, information for the lead sheet should be taken over the phone electronically and, if it is determined that the call is “qualified”, an appointment should be booked on the salesperson’s calendar electronically along with the lead sheet information.  Leads should be numbered and kept track of on a daily basis and entered into your sales tracking system.  If using paper lead sheets, the same process should take place, but it’s best to have the appointment entered directly onto the salesperson’s calendar. 

The proposal

Once the sales person/designer has the appointment with the prospect two things will happen.  The call turns into a proposal or it doesn’t.  If it doesn’t, a brief explanation of why should be turned in to the office where it’s being tracked.  By taking this step the office person knows the lead was taken care of in a timely way and what the result of this call was and why.  Without doing this step sometimes leads are neglected by having too much time pass between the call to the office and an actual appointment.  This is sometimes called “a leaky funnel”. 

If the call is successful and a proposal is needed, this should be sent to your office sales system as well.  Proposals can either be done during the first sales appointment or delivered to the potential customer at an agreed upon time.  

If your proposal doesn’t require a design, think about the idea of having a portable printer in your vehicle along with a computer.  There is no time like the present, while at the property, to prepare proposals.  The customer will be delighted when the door bell rings 20-30 minutes later with a formal proposal prepared in a branded company presentation folder.   My clients have reported this idea not only saved an enormous amount of time but helped them close 50 percent more jobs.  Why? This is because they try and close the job on the initial call, but enough on sales ideas let’s get back to the funnel. 

Once the proposal is created, it also should be numbered and tracked in your sales system.  If you try to “close” and get the job, great; but, if not successful then, an agreed upon time should be made when you will “check back”.  In other words, you are getting permission from the potential customer, in advance, to check in with him or her to “ask for the job”.  Many sales are lost because sales people don’t call back and ask for the job. 

The contract

If the proposal is accepted and a contract signed, in some organizations the sales process is over.  In others, especially with larger jobs, the salesperson may need to usher the job through until completion and invoicing. 

The pipeline

As these functions are occurring in your sales process and recorded in your sales funnel, the most important thing that results is your “pipeline”.  Your pipeline contains the potential leads and pending proposals in your funnel.  For example, if your company needs $1 million in new sales in the next 12 months and your close rate is 20% on the proposals you offer, then your goal needs to be five times your needed sales.  So your job as the owner/salesperson is to figure out how you are going to give proposals totaling $5M in your “target market”.  Now, you can see how important your sales funnel becomes. 

Most company funnel reports are in an Excel spreadsheet.  The project name is placed in the first column along the top followed by contact phone number, contact name, type of job, date submitted, amount of bid, the probability of getting the job as a percentage, and comments.  The information in this report should be ongoing and used in the company’s weekly sales meetings. 

There you have it, the basic information for a sales funnel.  Now all you need to do is set up the process described above and have the discipline to religiously follow it.  The companies that use this simple process have much greater control of their sales, usually have much better results and, in the end, make more money!

 

Ed Laflamme, LIC, grew the largest landscape company in Connecticut and sold it in 1999.  Ed then co-founded The Harvest Group with Bill Arman. He’s a professional speaker, author, business advisor, and coach serving landscape owners nationwide.  Visit www.harvestlandscapeconsulting.com to learn more about Ed and his company. Ed can be reached via ed@harvestlandscapeconsulting.com.

 

Article source: http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/turnaround-tour-091517-sales-funnel.aspx

Monroe working on Lake Tye Park Park master plan

The city of Monroe is preparing for the future of a popular community park and the addition of another.

Master planning is about to begin for Lake Tye Park and approximately 140 acres owned by Cadman Inc., located near the Sky Valley Food Bank, Monroe Boys and Girls Clubs and Skykomish River Park. The latter will be transferred over and developed sometime after the process ends, said Monroe Parks and Recreation director Mike Farrell.

The Monroe City Council approved Mayor Geoffrey Thomas to sign a consultant agreement for the design of two separate plans in July with Seattle-based HBB Landscape Architecture. The concurrent projects are accounted for in the 2017 budget and costs are capped at $130,000. Farrell said the money is coming from Monroe’s parks department Capital Improvement Project fund.

The next step will be to seek guidance from the public. The city has put out a survey, and a “Pop-Up Studio” will be held 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. followed by an open house 6-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Sept. 15-16, at the Monroe Boys and Girls Clubs.

Farrell said both sites have similarities, such as water access, close proximity to neighborhoods and the potential to connect to regional trail systems. Each is also distinctly different, he said.

Attendance at Lake Tye has been growing, Farrell said. People are trying out new sports on the 40-acre lake, such as paddle boarding, and more regional events like wakeboard competitions and 5K runs on the 1.5-mile loop are being scheduled, he said.

Farrell said the increased use has put some pressure on facilities. The list for potential renovations also has been expanding. All are motivators for the city’s decision to create a new master plan for the park, he said.

Some of the final proposal for the 64-acre property will likely include refinement of what is already working, Farrell said. Hopefully some new ideas will come from the master plan project. He suggested landscaping, improved parking, new pathways and additions to the beach area, but the city wants to hear from the community, he said.

“It makes sense for us to go through this planning process to make sure we are designing something where we minimize conflicts, and we are actually able to add diversity of experiences at the parks and also address the changing demographics and the interests of our community,” Farrell said.

A number of other improvements are already detailed in Monroe’s 2015-2035 Comprehensive Plan, Farrell said. One will be to turn the natural grass fields, which have seen their share of wear and tear from soccer, lacrosse and football events, into all-weather turf fields, he said.

Lake Tye Park’s skate park was upgraded within the past two years, and the playground was leveled and reconstructed to have inclusive features for all ages this spring.

The last time Monroe established an entirely new facility was about eight years ago, Farrell said.

Monroe Rotary Park opened in 2008. The Monroe Rotary Club led fundraising efforts to pay for the ADA-accessible, all-weather youth baseball fields.

The Cadman site is essentially a blank slate for Monroe, Farrell said.

A master plan for the property was prepared in 1998 by Cadman Inc., Farrell wrote in an email. Once mining was complete, the Redmond-based company will convey the land to the city, per the terms for their use permit, he wrote.

Cadman is working with the Washington Department of Natural Resources to finish up reclamation of the site while the master plan is being completed, Farrell said. The handover is precipitating the future park’s master plan process, he said.

Farrell said he would like to see a loop trail constructed around the decommissioned mining pit, which now functions as a roughly 15-acre pond. He said he sees the wooded wetlands and shoreline habitat as an opportunity to install educational displays.

Flooding issues common to the area may limit options like playground equipment in some places, Farrell said. Once the master plan is complete, the city should have a better idea of environmental constraints, he said.

Newly arrived city administrator Deborah Knight said both parks could serve as a hub for residents and visitors wanting take advantage of the Sky Valley’s recreation opportunities. Monroe would be the place to start the day at and return to each night after spending time outside, she said. 

Knight said the city is very appreciative Cadman is donating the property.

Farrell said the parks could add links to the Centennial Trail and Sky to Sound Water Trail, which will stretch from the north and south forks of the Skykomish River, to merge with the Snoqualmie River and make its way out to the Puget Sound.

Farrell said the costs for implementing the master plans are unknown at this time. Those estimates will likely be a part of the documents. Developing timelines for different phases will also be a part of the process, he said.

“We are excited to get this project going and really look forward to a lot of input from the community, so we can provide — through these master plan designs — what the public wants for our community,” Farrell said.

Click here to take the city’s survey, and for updates on the master plans visit monroewa.gov.

 

Article source: http://www.monroemonitor.com/Content/News/Homepage-Rotating-Articles/Article/Monroe-working-on-Lake-Tye-Park-Park-master-plan/26/538/10784