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Home, Health & Garden Show coming soon

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Article source: http://harrisondaily.com/news/business/home-health-garden-show-coming-soon/article_099727b2-0dca-11e8-bda0-6f7615f513ae.html

Seneca Master Gardeners host workshop

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Article source: http://www.fltimes.com/briefs/seneca-master-gardeners-host-workshop/article_1cbaa168-a396-5c81-b120-921a4f3533cc.html

Gardening classes for the little ones

Friday, Feb. 9, 2018 | 2 a.m.

Vegas Roots launches a Lil’ Roots Market Club this spring in partnership with the Whole Foods on Lake Mead Boulevard and Tenaya Way. The program will focus on teaching children ages 3-12 healthy eating habits and gardening tips. The classes started Feb. 7, and will be offered Feb. 21, March 7 and March 21 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The classes are segmented into three sections, including health and nutrition, a cooking demo with DIY crafts and on-site kids gardening. RSVP at Eventbrite.com or call 702-942-1500.

Article source: https://lasvegassun.com/news/2018/feb/09/gardening-classes-for-the-little-ones/

Jump-Start Your Garden Indoors

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Deep Cut Orchid Society Annual Orchid Show at Dearborn Farms in Holmdel, NJ

By Gretchen C. Van Benthuysen |

It’s the first day of February, the time of year gardeners’ thoughts turn to getting their hands dirty, whether that happens by starting seeds indoors for transplanting outdoors or checking outdoor shrubs and plants to bring indoors.

Die-hard gardeners have been perusing garden catalogs and websites since they began arriving in the mail and online around Christmas.

Every year new varieties of plants, shrubs and vegetables join the old faithfuls. The perfect time to plan that garden is when it’s cold outside.

And on those slightly warmer days, get outside and see if some of your hardy perennial herbs such as sorrel, sage or oregano may be awakening. Or trim the forsythia and bring the branches inside for forcing. (More on that below.)

For Monmouth County, which is mostly Zone 7A inland and Zone 7B along the shore, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Hardiness Zone Map, you should start seeds for broccoli, cauliflower and peas by the middle of this month. Lettuce, kale, cabbage and carrots by the first of March. Beans and squash April 1.

Already confused? Not to worry. There’s help everywhere.

Brock Farms in Colts Neck is hosting its first Indoor Gardening Day from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 17. Seminars on seed starting and lighting, creating fairy gardens and terrariums, and beekeeping and pollinator-friendly gardens are planned.

Assistant store manager Quinn Lahm said indoor gardening of all kinds has increased in popularity, especially hydroponics, and she wanted to highlight that.

“People want to get into it, but a lot of them don’t know the right way to start seeds,” she explained. “They don’t understand the basics. And they don’t want to appear dumb, or uneducated.

“I also wanted to do this event around the same time people are starting their seeds, especially the home gardener, the hobbyist,” she said. “It’s a nice open way to come, ask questions, and learn. We want to become their spot to get the help and advice they need.”

Lahm has worked here eight years and said millennials, in particular, are showing increased interest in gardening. And she would not be wrong.

Millennials (ages 18-34 in 2015, according to the Pew Research Center) are the fastest growing garden segment, according to a 2014 special National Gardening Association report, “Garden to Table: A 5-Year Look at Food Gardening in America.” In 2008 there were 8 million millennial food gardeners. In 2013 there were 13 million, up 63 percent. Millennials also nearly doubled their spending on food gardening from $632 million in 2008 to $1.2 billion in 2013.

Not only that, the report found that more households with children participated in food gardening, increasing participation during the same time period by 25 percent, from 12 million to 15 million.

“All of our events are kid-friendly and very, very hands on, but low pressure,” Lahm said. “The beekeeper (Rutgers Master Gardener and a branch secretary for the New Jersey Beekeepers Association Angela Juffey) is bringing milkweed and clay to make milkweed bombs so people can toss them into their gardens so they will have milkweed flowers for the pollinators and the bees.”

“I’m really, really into bees so I’m thrilled,’” Lahm said. “Actually, I’ve gotten the most buzz (yes, she said that on purpose) and the most positive feedback about that particular seminar so I’m really looking forward to that.”
Among the events planned for Feb. 17 are: Seed Starting Lighting Requirements for Indoor Growing; Making a Fairy Garden; Easy Terrarium Gardening; and Beekeeping Pollinator Friendly Gardens.

A longtime event that always goes over well is the annual Deep Cut Orchid Society show and sale in the greenhouse at Dearborn Market, 2170 Route 35, Holmdel.

The show runs Feb. 8-11. Show hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission and parking is free.

“If you want to enjoy these exotic blooms, but are worried that they are difficult to grow, don’t despair,” said Deb Bodei, Orchid Society president. ” There are plenty of fool-proof varieties that will flower again and again with the minimum amount of fuss.”

The event features garden exhibits and orchid displays by local and international orchid growers. American Orchid Society judges will award the best exhibit and orchid in show. Experts are available to answer questions. Raffles and silent auctions are planned throughout the show.

Guided tours and educational workshops are available for all levels of orchid enthusiasts. To coordinate a show tour, call Carol Abaya at 732-536-6215. For general information, call Show Chair Helen Kroh at 732-241-2483.

The Monmouth County Park System offers classes year round for adults, children and families, including two 90-minute classes this month appropriate for beginners on how to start seeds indoor.

The activity includes planting an early spring, self-watering seed tray with a variety of spring crops to get a jump-start. They are scheduled from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Feb. 24, and from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Feb. 28, at Deep Cut Gardens Horticultural Center, 152 Red Hill Road, Middletown. Each class costs $36.

A new class for adults, Native Plants for Pollinators, is scheduled from 12-1:30 p.m. Feb. 15 and costs $15. It explores the use of native plants to create a low-maintenance landscape whose blooms benefit native pollinators, such as bees and butterflies.

To register and see a list of additional activities, visit www.monmouthcountyparks.com 732-842-4000, ext. 1. or in person at the Thompson Park Administration Building, 805 Newman Springs Road, Middletown

Sickles Market, 1 Harrison Ave., Little Silver, offers gardening tips on its website broken down by month. They also offer  tips on indoor air plants, succulents, orchids, toxic and nontoxic house plants.

This month, the site warns us to keep an eye out for indoors pests such as white fly and scale, and suggests a systemic powder to prevent attacks all winter.

This time of year also is good for cutting branches from forsythia, pussy willow, quince and flowering cherry, peach and most fruit trees, for indoor displays.

Sickles’ florist suggests placing the branches in a large bucket of warm water, add a tablespoon of bleach (to stop bacteria from forming) and a teaspoon of liquid flower food. When the flowers begin opening, transfer to a vase with water and keep in a cool spot away from the sun. Mist frequently.

For more online tips, visit sicklesmarket.com.


This article was first published in the Feb. 1-8, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.

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Article source: http://tworivertimes.com/jump-start-your-garden-indoors/

Gardening: Tips on getting the best flowers this Valentine’s Day …

Valentine’s Day along with Mother’s Day are the busiest time of the year for the floral industry. Floral shops are well stocked grocery and big box stores bring in masses of pre-packaged cut flowers. Like most commodities, fresh flower market works on supply and demand meaning that the cost of fresh flowers increases dramatically during these two weeks.

Not all stores bring in the same quality of flowers or take the best care of their products. Think of fresh flowers as produce, you want the freshest available. Look for flowers that are just breaking bud or at the very least still have some flowers in the bud stage. Flowers that are in full bloom might make a great first impression but they die quickly making a bad lasting impression. Freshly cut flowers that have constant access to water should last between one and two weeks.

Florists will sell cut flowers but they specialize in floral arrangements. Flowers in a florist shop are kept in coolers and are only handled by their staff, when they are being conditioned, or put in an arrangement. Reputable florists know how long the flowers have been in the store and throw out them out when they begin to age. Flowers are their business, not a sideline. If florists don’t sell attractive arrangements and healthy flowers they don’t stay in business.

In self-serve displays customers are continually handling the packages of flowers. They take them out of the water, examine them and often drop them back into the bucket without checking to see if the stems are in water. If the level of water is low, or the container is crowded chances are that the stems will be dry until the next person handles them.

All bundles of flowers are wrapped in plastic sheaths that offer some protection protect from damage but constant handling can leave flowers looking bedraggled.

Large box stores and grocery stores bring in cut flowers that are already bundled and ready for sale. These stores count on the flowers to move fast, with very little work involved to keep costs down. Some outlets use inexpensive cut flowers to draw customers into the store.

Examine the flowers before making a purchase.

Roses are not all equal. To grow a long stemmed rose, all side shoots are removed ensuring that all the plants energy to go into a few select flowers. As a result the flowers are larger and cost more to reflect the labour and space used to produce fewer flowers.

When roses are fresh, their calyxes curve upwards towards the petals. As the flower ages, the calyxes turn downwards and the arrangement of petals are looser. Eventually a slight bump will cause the flower to shatter.

Beware of roses where all the flowers are in bud or the buds are hanging downwards. Florists call these “bullets” as the buds will never open.

Lilies are easy to force making them another popular Valentine’s Day flower. They come in many colors with a number of blooms on each stem. The flowers bloom in procession from the top to bottom extending the blooming time up to two weeks. Older flowers can be spotted as the pollen on the stamen will be loose. Word of caution, the pollen will stain fabrics.

Temperature plays a huge difference in how long cut flowers survive. The warmer the air temperature shorter the flower life. Florists will move cut flowers in and out of the cooler to insure the flowers look their best when needed.

In February, flowers should be wrapped before being taken outside into the cold.

When flower stems are not in water the bottom of the stems close allowing the stem to retain as much moisture as possible. When putting cut flowers into water, remove the bottom centimeter or half inch just before they are placed in water. After a few days, remove the stems from the vase, clean the vase, cut the stems and place back into clean water.

Examine all flowers before making a purchase to ensure the blooms will last as long as possible.

Linda Tomlinson is a horticulturalist and educator that lives near Rocky Mountain House. She can be reached at your_garden @hotmail.com

Article source: https://www.reddeeradvocate.com/community/gardening-tips-on-getting-the-best-flowers-this-valentines-day/

IN THE GARDEN: Salty snow may discolor lawn in spring

Take care when shoveling.

As a gardener, we need to use proper outerwear, including shoes, and use the proper tools. The snow shovel should be the right length for the person’s height.

A plastic shovel is lighter than the metal shovel. There are also ergonomic shovels available.

Before going outside, start stretching your muscles to warm up. Focus on stretching your extremities and back.

When shoveling, maintain good posture by keeping your back straight (the natural curve of your spine). Lift the shovel correctly by using your legs: bend at the knees. Keep the shovel close to your body while tightening your stomach muscles and then lift with your legs as if you are doing a squat. Scoop small amounts of snow, making sure to engage your shoulder muscles as much as possible. If the snow is deep remove snow in layers to lessen the snow load on your body.

Newly fallen snow weighs less. Wait until the snowplow has come by to complete your driveway. Use extra care when shoveling the snow at the end of your driveway. The snow that is pushed from snowplows have salt within the snow. Take smaller shovels and find a spot to dump the snow remembering the snow has salt in the contents.

Placing the snow that contains salts on your lawn may lead to a discolored lawn spot in the spring (salt causes burning effect).

Stay safe and enjoy the scenery.

Terri Harrison is a master gardener volunteer with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County. Look for more gardening tips in the Times Telegram or online at www.cceoneida.com.

Article source: http://www.timestelegram.com/entertainmentlife/20180206/in-garden-salty-snow-may-discolor-lawn-in-spring

In the Garden: Salty snow may discolor lawn in spring

As a gardener, we need to use proper outerwear, including shoes, and use the proper tools. The snow shovel should be the right length for the person’s height. A plastic shovel is lighter than the metal shovel. There are also ergonomic shovels available.

Before going outside, start stretching your muscles to warm up. Focus on stretching your extremities and back. When shoveling, maintain good posture by keeping your back straight (the natural curve of your spine). Lift the shovel correctly by using your legs: bend at the knees. Keep the shovel close to your body while tightening your stomach muscles and then lift with your legs as if you are doing a squat. Scoop small amounts of snow, making sure to engage your shoulder muscles as much as possible. If the snow is deep remove snow in layers to lessen the snow load on your body.

Newly fallen snow weighs less. Wait until the snowplow has come by to complete your driveway. Use extra care when shoveling the snow at the end of your driveway. The snow that is pushed from snowplows have salt within the snow.  Take smaller shovels and find a spot to dump the snow remembering the snow has salt in the contents. Placing the snow that contains salts on your lawn may lead to a discolored lawn spot in the spring (salt causes burning effect).

Stay safe and enjoy the scenery.

Terri Harrison is a master gardener volunteer with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County. Look for more gardening tips in the Observer-Dispatch or online at www.cceoneida.com.

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.uticaod.com/news/20180203/in-garden-salty-snow-may-discolor-lawn-in-spring

This week’s gardening tips: vegetables to plant in February

Plant seeds of beets, carrots, collards, corn (late February), Swiss chard, Irish potatoes (plant whole or cut tubers), kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard, radish, rutabaga and turnips.

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2018/02/this_weeks_gardening_tips_vege_4.html

A muddy garden is everyone’s worst nightmare, ALAN TITCHMARSH tells us how to prevent it

In summer they are less noticeable, for the grass grows rapidly even when you walk over it with increasing regularity (non-league football matches apart), but in winter with grass growth at a standstill it is not long before the greensward turns to mud on regularly traversed routes.

Now it is no earthly good telling yourself that you will not walk that way for a while, since it is human nature to take the shortest route from A to B.

No; what you need to do over the next few weeks is to make sure that the most frequently used pathways through your garden are as all-weather friendly as they can be.

If you always walk across the lawn in the same place, sink stepping-stones into the grass. It’s an easy thing to do.

On a day when the lawn is not squelchy, lay your slabs out in a pleasing but practical pattern from the place where you will set off to the place where you will arrive.

Article source: https://www.express.co.uk/comment/columnists/alan-titchmarsh/911762/gardening-tips-alan-titchmarsh-muddy-garden-path-prevention

Two tips can allow coneflowers to flourish

Our Jan. 24 “Spring Fever” gardening symposium was quite a success, with more than 200 attendees and an excellent program of presentations and demonstrations. The symposium was planned and carried out by our Craven County Master Gardeners, and as with their two previous symposia in 2013 and 2015, they did a wonderful job.

Bryce Lane, currently a lecturer emeritus at N.C. State University, was the keynote speaker with an overview of “eye popping perennials” for the home landscape. Lane gave the audience a lot of great information to go home with, and I was particularly interested in his suggestions for planting and establishing purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea).

Many of us have had the experience of planting coneflowers in the spring, enjoying a few flowers that first year, and then seeing no trace of the plants by the second year. To avoid this outcome, Lane suggests a two-part strategy that goes against the instincts of most gardeners, but one that should be given serious consideration anyway.

First, if your coneflowers are blooming when you purchase them at the garden center, clip off the flowers when you get home. If they’re not flowering, remove any flowers or flower buds that develop later, and keep this up for the duration of the first growing season. The idea is to direct the plants’ energies into vegetative growth and root development, rather than flower production.

Secondly, instead of planting your coneflowers straight into the garden soil the first year, pot them up into larger containers. This will be especially important for smaller-sized plants with sparse, underdeveloped root systems. Monitor the potting media so that it doesn’t get too dry, and keep the plants in a protected site during the winter months.

Plant the following spring when soil temperatures have begun to rise, and you’ll have larger plants with more developed root systems than you would have had the previous spring or summer. And that should greatly enhance both establishment and long-term performance.

Purple coneflowers are among the most popular of all perennials in American landscapes, partly because not all of the flowers are actually purple. Plant breeders have invested heavily in this species, and today you can find cultivars with purple, pink, red, orange, white and other shades, coming in a variety of flower forms.

Once established, purple coneflowers are tough and relatively low-maintenance; they are also avoided by deer, which is a big plus for many Craven County gardeners. Watch for these plants in the garden centers this spring, and consider giving Bryce Lane’s advice a try.

Landscape professionals and home gardeners continue to have questions regarding widespread cold damage to our landscape plants, and what we can expect to see this coming spring and summer.

Tim Minch, another speaker at our gardening symposium, has some answers for at least one group of plants. Minch told the audience that Camellia japonica flower buds are at risk of serious damage when temperatures reach 15 degrees. We saw those temperatures and lower in January, and as a result we can expect greatly reduced flowering from our japonica cultivars this winter and spring. The good news is that flowering should be back to normal in 2019 — unless we have another abnormal winter.

 

Tom Glasgow is the Craven County Cooperative Extension director. He can be reached at teglasgo@ncsu.edu.

Article source: http://www.newbernsj.com/news/20180202/two-tips-can-allow-coneflowers-to-flourish