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Turning pages with home and garden books

Although the official start of summer is still weeks away, Memorial Day weekend serves as the unofficial kickoff to all things summertime.

And one of the best things about summer is more time to kick back and read a good book on the beach or in your own backyard sanctuary.

But summer reading doesn’t always have to be limited to the latest pop fiction. For gardening and decorating enthusiasts, leafing through brightly colored pages filled with flowers, gardening tips and décor advice offers a relaxing way to spend a sunny afternoon.

Here are seven books, available at the Anderson Public Library, to add to your home and garden summer reading list:

“Chez Moi: Decorating Your Home and Living Like a Parisienne”

Written by French interior designer Sarah Lavoine, this is the quintessential guide for those who love French style. Lavoine covers every room of the home from the living room to outdoor spaces and even includes some of her gardening secrets, beauty tips and recipes. Beautiful full color illustrations and photographs add interest to each page, and the book’s smaller size makes it the perfect portable beach read.

“Studio: Creative Spaces for Creative People”

Author Sally Coulthard takes a look at studio spaces in this newly published coffee table book. She gives examples of five different “inspirations” or decorating styles: bright, mono, natural, industrial and collected. The reader gets the added benefit of a visual tour of the studios of many different artists, from crafters and fashion designers to fine artists and writers. Coulthard then walks the reader through the process of designing their own studios. This is a wonderful resource for any work-from-home creative.

“Dream Décor: Styling a Cool, Creative and Comfortable Home Wherever You Live”

Will Taylor, interior designer and founder of a wildly popular decorating blog, Bright.Bazaar, walks the reader through what he considers the six key elements to creating a new interior design scheme: color, pattern, texture, furniture, lighting and accessories. He then travels the globe to explore the dream styles of 11 homes, from a Mediterranean Marvel in Greece to a Coastal Retreat in the Hamptons.

“Better Homes and Gardens’ 150 Quick Easy Furniture Projects”

Ready to channel your inner DIY expert? This book offers a variety of color photos and step-by-step instructions for simple projects that will spice up any room. From dressers and desks to chairs and buffets, you’ll find projects for every space in your home, including the backyard deck. This is a great reference for anyone wanting to give new life to a tired piece of furniture.

“Vegetable Gardening: The Complete Guide to Growing More Than 40 Popular Vegetables in Any Space”

Is planting a garden on your summer bucket list? This essential guide by expert gardener Carol Klein is perfect for beginners. Klein guides readers through every step of gardening, from planning and planting to harvesting and even serving your homegrown veggies.

“Gardening on a Shoestring: 100 Fun Upcycled Garden Projects”

Merge your love of recycling and gardening by trying your hand at some of the projects in this unique book by gardener Alex Mitchell. Instructions for making a “living salad wall,” creating a sweet pea tunnel and making pots out of newspaper are just a few of the innovative projects you’ll find inside this eclectic guide.

“Darling Dahlias Mystery Series”

If you enjoy fiction and gardening, check out this mystery series that combines the two. Set in the 1930s, the books by popular author Susan Wittig Albert follow the mystery-solving adventures of a garden club in the fictional town of Darling, Alabama. With six books in the series, you’ll have enough mysteries to keep you reading all summer long.

Article source: http://www.heraldbulletin.com/community/turning-pages-with-home-and-garden-books/article_e6533bb4-fc32-53f6-83ed-cc5f7693a86e.html

Getting Started with Flower Gardening: Tips for the Novice Gardener



You can picture it in your mind’s eye: lush expanses of colorful flowers brightening you backyard from spring through summer. It all sounds wonderfully inviting. For the novice gardener, it also may seem overwhelming. The good news is that you don’t have to start big to have a pleasing patch of color outside your window. It’s okay, and advisable, to start small and get your feet wet—or in this case, your hands dirty. Just let your gardening knowledge grow along with your garden, expanding your selection of flowers a little each year.

So where do you begin? What things are important to consider as you plan your flower garden? Laura Mazur, a Kent master gardener and landscape designer, who also likes to restore old houses, offers some guidance. An initial consideration is choosing annuals or perennials or a combination of the two. While perennials for the most part take care of themselves season after season, annuals, as the name suggests, must be planted anew each spring. Before you opt only for perennials because they don’t require replanting, consider the bloom time for both types of plants, says Mazur. “Annuals will last through autumn,” says Mazur, adding, “Perennials have a bloom time of two to six weeks. For maximum color throughout the season, it’s a good idea to have a mixture of annuals and perennials because all types of flowers don’t start and stop blooming at the same time.” For color options, Mazur suggests simply choosing colors that you like. “For annuals,” says Mazur, “choose colors that you are particularly fond of and would enjoy seeing year after year. For annuals, choose colors that suit your mood now, in the shorter term.” In her own garden, Mazur uses a combination of annuals such as petunias (bright, funnel-shaped flowers), marigolds and zinnias (both part of the daisy family) and perennials such as day lilies, phlox (clusters of colorful scented flowers) and columbine (part of the buttercup family).

To better ensure success, Mazur recommends choosing flowers that are easy to grow, such as drought-tolerant zinnias. By contrast, says Mazur, marigolds tend to need more water and are less able to withstand dry conditions. “When it comes to flower care,” says Mazur, “always pay close attention to the requirements printed on the tag that comes with the plant, and follow the directions given. If you ignore those instructions, your plants might survive, but they won’t thrive.” To supplement natural rainfall, Mazur recommends watering deep less often rather than watering shallow more often. Good care of flowers, she adds, also includes the appropriate use of mulch to keep weeds at bay, maintain an even soil temperature and keep moisture at a healthy level. But don’t overdo the mulch, says Mazur, noting that one to two inches of hardwood bark mulch is sufficient.

Mazur’s last bit of advice for the novice flower gardener is simple: Have fun! And enjoy the beauty of your small patch of colorful flowers.

To see how all of these tips and more can fit together for an eye-pleasing view, Mazur offers tours of her garden by appointment. She can be reached at 330-678-8760.

Article source: http://www.ohio.com/homes/getting-started-with-flower-gardening-tips-for-the-novice-gardener-1.769867

Tips for Container Gardening

Al Young will present tips for container gardening in Jackson, WY and Teton Valley, ID.

Event Contact

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Website:
tetonparksandrec.org

Article source: http://www.jhnewsandguide.com/calendar/community/tips-for-container-gardening/event_2ae2f2be-1980-11e7-8f2e-5cb9017bb5bf.html

Five tips for container gardening success



Container gardens let you easily dress up your balcony and patio, create a colorful welcome for guests and keep edibles close at hand for cooking and entertaining. They’re also a terrific way for new gardeners to get started. Increase your success growing vegetables, herbs or flowers in a container with these tips.

• Proper plant selection: Select the right plants for the container and growing conditions. Closely check the plant tags for information to help in your decision. Create attractive combinations with plants that look good together and require the same growing conditions.

• Don’t be afraid to mix flowers, herbs and vegetables: This is a great way to have beauty and flavor on your patio, deck or balcony. Scour gardening magazines and the internet for free container planting plans like those featured on the Bonnie Plants website.

• Select the right container: Choose a container large enough to accommodate your plants. The bigger the pot, the more moisture it can hold, maximizing time between waterings. A small pot with a large plant must be watered several times a day during hot weather and fertilized more frequently. Use a container with drainage holes made from material suited to your gardening style and climate. Even if you could provide the exact amount of water your plants need, nature may intervene with an extra dose or two. Drainage holes prevent water from building up in the bottom of the pot, leading to root rot.

Avoid black and metal pots that can heat up in the summer sun and damage tender plant roots. Terra cotta pots are a traditional favorite. They are attractive, heavy and dry out more quickly than some other materials. Glazed pots are beautiful, but tend to be pricey and heavy to move. Plastic pots are affordable, come in a variety of styles and don’t dry out as quickly as terracotta. Then there’s the sturdy half whiskey barrel. This planter is a longtime favorite, but be sure to drill drainage holes in the bottom if it doesn’t already have them.

• Potting mix: Invest in a quality potting mix that holds moisture, yet provides drainage. These are usually a combination of peat moss, compost or coir to hold moisture, and perlite or vermiculite to aid in drainage. Leave garden soil in the garden, not in containers.

• Watering: Check the soil moisture in your container gardens at least once a day and more often if the pots are small or temperatures high. Water thoroughly when the top inch of soil is dry and allow the excess to run out the drainage holes. This shows you have moistened the potting mix, top to bottom, encouraging a robust root system.

Extend time between waterings with self-watering pots. Their built-in water reservoirs provide water to the plants as the soil dries. Fill the reservoir as needed and make sure there is a weep hole. This allows excess water to drain out of the reservoir instead of oversaturating the soil.

• Fertilization: Incorporate a slow-release fertilizer into the potting mix at planting. This type of fertilizer provides small amounts of nutrients over a longer time period. Follow label directions and reapply as recommended on the fertilizer label.

As your container plants thrive and you enjoy the flavorful vegetables and herbs and gorgeous flowers they provide, you’ll soon look for more spaces to incorporate container gardens into your landscape.

Melinda Myers has written more than 20 gardening books and hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything: Food Gardening For Everyone” DVD set and the nationally syndicated Melinda’s Garden Moment TV radio segments. Visit melindamyers.com

Article source: http://www.theoaklandpress.com/lifestyle/20170524/five-tips-for-container-gardening-success

Gardening Tips: May 20, 2017

This weekend, Earl May’s Tim Rundlett answered your questions including what are the best perennials to plant in full sun, why a rose bush has not bloomed in a couple of years and how to get it blooming again, and if there are any plants that naturally repel mosquitoes. Get your answers in this video!

If you have a question for Tim, click here and submit your question.

Article source: http://whotv.com/2017/05/22/gardening-tips-may-20-2017/

Five tips for container gardening success



Container gardens let you easily dress up your balcony and patio, create a colorful welcome for guests and keep edibles close at hand for cooking and entertaining. Theyre also a terrific way for new gardeners to get started. Increase your success growing vegetables, herbs or flowers in a container with these tips.

Proper plant selection: Select the right plants for the container and growing conditions. Closely check the plant tags for information to help in your decision. Create attractive combinations with plants that look good together and require the same growing conditions.

Dont be afraid to mix flowers, herbs and vegetables: This is a great way to have beauty and flavor on your patio, deck or balcony. Scour gardening magazines and the internet for free container planting plans like those featured on the Bonnie Plants website.

Select the right container: Choose a container large enough to accommodate your plants. The bigger the pot, the more moisture it can hold, maximizing time between waterings. A small pot with a large plant must be watered several times a day during hot weather and fertilized more frequently. Use a container with drainage holes made from material suited to your gardening style and climate. Even if you could provide the exact amount of water your plants need, nature may intervene with an extra dose or two. Drainage holes prevent water from building up in the bottom of the pot, leading to root rot.

Avoid black and metal pots that can heat up in the summer sun and damage tender plant roots. Terra cotta pots are a traditional favorite. They are attractive, heavy and dry out more quickly than some other materials. Glazed pots are beautiful, but tend to be pricey and heavy to move. Plastic pots are affordable, come in a variety of styles and dont dry out as quickly as terracotta. Then theres the sturdy half whiskey barrel. This planter is a longtime favorite, but be sure to drill drainage holes in the bottom if it doesnt already have them.

Potting mix: Invest in a quality potting mix that holds moisture, yet provides drainage. These are usually a combination of peat moss, compost or coir to hold moisture, and perlite or vermiculite to aid in drainage. Leave garden soil in the garden, not in containers.

Watering: Check the soil moisture in your container gardens at least once a day and more often if the pots are small or temperatures high. Water thoroughly when the top inch of soil is dry and allow the excess to run out the drainage holes. This shows you have moistened the potting mix, top to bottom, encouraging a robust root system.

Extend time between waterings with self-watering pots. Their built-in water reservoirs provide water to the plants as the soil dries. Fill the reservoir as needed and make sure there is a weep hole. This allows excess water to drain out of the reservoir instead of oversaturating the soil.

Fertilization: Incorporate a slow-release fertilizer into the potting mix at planting. This type of fertilizer provides small amounts of nutrients over a longer time period. Follow label directions and reapply as recommended on the fertilizer label.

As your container plants thrive and you enjoy the flavorful vegetables and herbs and gorgeous flowers they provide, youll soon look for more spaces to incorporate container gardens into your landscape.

Melinda Myers has written more than 20 gardening books and hosts The Great Courses How to Grow Anything: Food Gardening For Everyone DVD set and the nationally syndicated Melindas Garden Moment TV radio segments. Visit melindamyers.com.

Article source: http://www.dailytribune.com/lifestyle/20170524/five-tips-for-container-gardening-success

Tips and trends for today’s smart gardening

Tips and trends for today’s smart gardening

• Try xeriscaping. Instead of turf grass, integrate plants that require less water in your landscape, such as yucca, sedum, salvia, hens and chicks, and some ornamental grasses.

• Have a small city lot? Plant flowering dwarf shrubs. Popular varieties are ‘Spilled Wine’ and ‘My Monet’ weigelas, and the Seaside Serenade series of hydrangeas, which require little pruning.

• Plant pollinator magnets to attract bees, butterflies, hummingbirds and insects to your urban and suburban landscape. Pollinators need food throughout the seasons. Plants such as ‘Blue Yonder’ veronica, ‘Midnight Prairieblues’ indigo, ‘Trevi Fountain’ lungwort and ‘Miss Kim’ Korean lilac can provide it.

• Succulents are hot. The water-retaining, fleshy-stemmed plants are exotic eye candy in beds and containers. Now there are more varieties, colors, shapes and sizes available than ever before. Echeveria and hens and chicks are especially popular this spring, said Jessie Jacobson, owner of Tonkadale. “Succulents are easy-care once you get the hang of it.”

• Get kids excited about gardening with fantasy fairy gardens. (Tonkadale offers a variety of accessories, houses and plants to create the whimsical mini-landscapes.) “Fairy gardens are an activity kids can do with grandparents,” said Jacobson.

LYNN UNDERWOOD

Article source: http://www.startribune.com/tips-and-trends-for-today-s-smart-gardening/423830693/

Diarmuid Gavin to offer gardening tips at Lime Tree Theatre

BOTH seasoned and beginner gardening enthusiasts will have the rare chance to learn from the best in the business this week, as Diarmuid Gavin offers a glimpse into his life in landscaping at a Limerick event.

Fans of the celebrity gardener will be pleased to discover that he is kick-starting his national tour in Limerick’s Lime Tree Theatre this Thursday, and is set to spill the beans on his experiences at some of the most prestigious flower shows in the world.

An Evening with Diarmuid Gavin on May 25 will see the celebrated gardener present an evening of fun on all things beds, borders and the world of gardening.

“I am very excited to be launching the national tour in Limerick, a great city in a great county,” said Mr Gavin, who will also be revealing some mischievous antics at the Chelsea Flower Show and talking about the history of outdoor design.

Audiences will be treated to a wide range of gardening tips and advice, in the first of a national tour of shows for the landscaper to the rich and famous.

Article source: http://www.limerickleader.ie/news/what-s-on/251410/diarmuid-gavin-tips-at-lime-tree-theatre.html

Master Gardener Volunteers provide spring tips for north central Ohio residents

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Article source: http://www.richlandsource.com/life_and_culture/master-gardener-volunteers-provide-spring-tips-for-north-central-ohio/article_6aec3e98-3ee6-11e7-8b3f-8769ca2a3575.html

Gardening tips for May long | 980 CJME – CJME.com

Summer has virtually arrived with the May long weekend and that means many gardeners will be busy in the backyard.

For those wondering what can be planted and what can’t because of the chillier temperatures at night, Rick Van Duyvendyk of Dutch Growers and host of Garden Talk on 980 CJME and 650 CKOM has some answers.

“You can get all your seeds in the ground, that’s important,” he explained. “Get your potatoes in the ground, your onions, your garlic, you can get a lot of your pea seeds in the ground, your beans. You can plant a lot of those kind of things.”

However, Van Duyvendyk added gardeners have to be careful about bedding plants this early into the warmer months.

“Like your tomatoes and peppers and some of the cabbage, cucumbers because [of] the late night temperatures.”

He said it’s a good idea to harden these plants off, which means keeping them out during the day and bringing them in at night for a few days so they become acclimatized.

Don’t have a backyard or garden? No problem.

“Container gardening is becoming huge,” he said.

Van Duyvendyk recommended buying a potting soil that’s sufficient at holding moisture

Garden Talk airs on 980 CJME and 650 CKOM Sundays at 9 a.m.

Article source: http://cjme.com/article/1252227/gardening-tips-may-long