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Tim’s Tips: It’s time to say goodbye to your dead plants

My guess is that we have found out that it can be very cold in November. Not just cold temperatures, but record cold temperatures.

The cold temperatures that we had killed off the rest of your annual flowers and any of your remaining vegetable plants. Now is the time to pull those plants up and dispose of them.

In some cases, you can throw them on the compost pile and turn them into valuable compost for your gardens. But if you had a problem with fungus diseases on your flower or vegetable plants, it may not be a good idea to try to compost the diseased plants.

Spores are the “eggs” for next year’s diseases. They form on the leaves and stems of the plants. If your compost pile does not heat up enough to kill the spores, you can wind up with compost that can spread the diseases back into your gardens. It is always a better idea to dispose of the diseased plants rather than trying to compost them.

Once you rake up the leaves in your yard, you can add them to the compost pile. Leaves are slower to break down in the compost pile. There are compost-accelerating products, available at most garden centers, that you can sprinkle onto the leaves to make them break down faster.

Once the leaves are off the lawn, it is time to mow the grass one last time. If you don’t mow the grass, your lawn goes into winter with long blades. Rain and snow can mat down the blades of grass. This creates the perfect environment for a disease called snow mold.

Snow mold breeds in the constantly wet environment of the matted-down blades of grass. The snow mold can kill the grass.

In some cases, the grass will grow back, but I have seen extreme cases where the grass is killed and it never comes back. If the grass dies, then you go into the spring with the need to reseed parts of your lawn.

It is so much easier to cut the grass to a height of 11/2 inches. This will make the blades short enough to prevent snow mold from getting a foothold in your lawn.

If you haven’t gotten around to protecting your broadleaf evergreens from the dry winter winds that are coming, you had better get cracking. You can wrap your plants with burlap, or you can apply a product called Wilf-Pruf to the leaves of your evergreens.

Wilt-Pruf puts a waxy coating on the leaves, and the waxy coating cuts down the moisture lost to the wind by 30 to 50 percent. Wilt-Pruf must be applied to the evergreens when temperatures are above 40 degrees, and the wax needs to dry in daylight hours.

If you look at the calendar, we are about a week away from Thanksgiving. Around Thanksgiving, people begin to decorate their home for the holiday season.

If you put evergreen boughs in your planters, it is better to put those boughs in the planters now rather than trying to do so after the soil in the planters freezes. We have gotten our first shipment of boughs in at the store. If the weather cooperates this weekend, it would probably be an item to put onto the to-do list.

Well, that’s all for this week. I’ll talk to you again next week.

¢¢¢

Tim Lamprey is the owner of Harbor Garden Center on Route 1 in Salisbury. Do you have questions for Tim? Send them to ndn@ecnnews.com, and he will answer them in upcoming columns.

Article source: http://www.newburyportnews.com/news/lifestyles/tim-s-tips-it-s-time-to-say-goodbye-to/article_6abef7e2-253e-5d8f-ace0-5ec35deb3565.html

THE GARDEN SPOT: Holiday cooking safety tips

The holiday season has begun and with that comes thoughts of family gatherings and holiday meals.

Let’s be careful not to spoil the good times with sickness brought on by negligence in the kitchen. Even if you don’t enjoy the family gatherings, food poisoning is not the way to get out of it early.

This article contains a few holiday food safety tips from the Department of Agriculture, the Food Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Auburn University’s Food Systems Institute.

There are four main concepts to apply to all food safety situations —clean, separate, cook and chill. The points made below reinforce these concepts:

• Refrigerate perishables and leftovers within two hours. The faster you can get them to under 40 degrees, the safer. Leaving foods on the counter or table all afternoon for family members to “graze” is not safe.

• To chill leftovers faster, put them in smaller containers.

• Check your refrigerator temperature; make this a new holiday tradition. Refrigerator should be between 32 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit and your freezer should be below 0.

• Don’t overcrowd the refrigerator. It needs to circulate the air to keep everything cool.

• Don’t thaw on the counter (or outside). Thaw in the refrigerator or in cold water, changing the water out every 30 minutes.

• Cook your turkey to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit at the thickest part of the bird. If you stuff it, the stuffing must reach 165 degrees also. This can overcook the turkey, so think about skipping that extra step of stuffing the bird and cook your stuffing in a casserole dish.

• Ham should be cooked to 140 degrees Fahrenheit if it is marked as coming from a USDA inspected plant and is labeled as fully cooked. If the ham is smoked or fresh, cook it to 145 degrees Fahrenheit. If there is no USDA inspection, cook it to 165 degrees.

• Meats and poultry, soups and stews, cold salads like chicken, tuna and macaroni will be OK for about four days in the refrigerator. So if you can’t eat it all by Sunday, freeze it before then.

• Reheat leftovers to 165 degrees.

• Pecan pie does not have to be refrigerated. Of course, there’s never any leftovers anyway.

— For information on topics related to the home and garden, contact any office of the Alabama Cooperative Extension System. The Limestone County Office is located at 1109 W. Market St. in Athens. Office hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call 256-232-5510 or visit www.aces.edu.

Article source: http://www.enewscourier.com/news/lifestyles/the-garden-spot-holiday-cooking-safety-tips/article_7dac4df6-ca1a-11e7-a6dd-f7219b636c26.html

Put out the winter welcome mat for birds

I recently returned home from a week away to find the birds had emptied their feeders in my absence. Once the feeders were cleaned and restocked, however, I was amazed at how quickly they discovered the new supply of food and then invited all of their friends over for a party. At least, that’s how I like to imagine it—the tiny chickadees and finches display such spunk and personality it’s easy to believe they’re in cahoots with one another.

In summer, when a wide variety of food is plentiful, birds use most of their energy foraging, nesting, and raising their young. As the weather turns cold, however, insects disappear and other foods diminish, so birds are in constant search of food just to stay warm. For the birds’ benefit, winter feeding is most helpful when it provides concentrated forms of fats and oils that are easily converted to energy.      

In my garden, I have four feeders filled with various rich foods to attract the greatest number of species, including safflower seed for cardinals, black oil sunflower seed for wrens and sparrows, and thistle seed for finches. The feeder that tempts the most interesting birds, however, is the suet feeder. I particularly like to watch the brightly colored woodpeckers and sleek nuthatches that seek out this high-calorie food.

When time allows, I prefer to my own suet. The recipe is simple: I soften one cup lard and one cup of crunchy peanut butter in the microwave (heat at half power for 30 seconds, then stir and heat again as needed), and then add one cup whole wheat flour, and two cups each of uncooked quick oats, cornmeal, and raisins.  (Recipe makes 4 suet cakes.)

Nuts can also play a big part in keeping birds healthy in winter, as they contain even more oil than seeds. When the weather is especially bitter, I supply peanuts as a treat and sometimes splurge on pecans or walnuts too. 

Foods grown in the garden will also be appreciated, as long as they last. Berries are the greatest enticement. Cedar, holly, dogwood, barberry, cotoneaster, beautyberry, and several of the viburnums, such as cranberry (V. trilobum) and nannyberry (V. prunifolium) are all excellent food choices.

Birds can be attracted by the dried seed heads of some flowers, such as sunflowers and coneflowers, and they’ll devour fruits with relish. Crabapples straight from the tree are favorites, but providing fresh fruit, such as orange halves or grapes, and dried fruits, like raisins and cherries, will help birds maintain a varied diet in winter.   

Other key features for a bird-friendly garden during the cold season are clean water and plenty of cover. Some birds will use roost boxes to stay warm in winter, especially those that typically nest in tree cavities or make themselves at home in a birdhouse, such as bluebirds. If you want to increase the number of birds roosting in your garden, remember these tips…

Leave Birdhouses Au Naturel

Brightly painted birdhouses are cute, but birds prefer a home that blends into the landscape rather than attracts notice.  If you choose to paint, however, take location into careful consideration, as dark-painted houses may become too warm when heated by the sun.

 

No Perches Please

Natural nesting sites don’t offer perches; instead, nearby branches serve as landing pads.  The same should be true of man-made houses, because perches offer a balancing spot for predators that can reach inside the box.

 

Purchase the Right House for Native Birds

Buy or build houses that are specific for the birds that you see in the garden.  A bluebird requires a box that is 6 to 8-inches tall with a 4-inch square floor and an entrance hole that is 1-1/2 inch diameter.  A larger bird would need a bigger box.

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/life/style/2017/11/14/put-out-winter-welcome-mat-birds/864260001/

Put out the winter welcome mat for birds

I recently returned home from a week away to find the birds had emptied their feeders in my absence. Once the feeders were cleaned and restocked, however, I was amazed at how quickly they discovered the new supply of food and then invited all of their friends over for a party. At least, that’s how I like to imagine it—the tiny chickadees and finches display such spunk and personality it’s easy to believe they’re in cahoots with one another.

In summer, when a wide variety of food is plentiful, birds use most of their energy foraging, nesting, and raising their young. As the weather turns cold, however, insects disappear and other foods diminish, so birds are in constant search of food just to stay warm. For the birds’ benefit, winter feeding is most helpful when it provides concentrated forms of fats and oils that are easily converted to energy.      

In my garden, I have four feeders filled with various rich foods to attract the greatest number of species, including safflower seed for cardinals, black oil sunflower seed for wrens and sparrows, and thistle seed for finches. The feeder that tempts the most interesting birds, however, is the suet feeder. I particularly like to watch the brightly colored woodpeckers and sleek nuthatches that seek out this high-calorie food.

When time allows, I prefer to my own suet. The recipe is simple: I soften one cup lard and one cup of crunchy peanut butter in the microwave (heat at half power for 30 seconds, then stir and heat again as needed), and then add one cup whole wheat flour, and two cups each of uncooked quick oats, cornmeal, and raisins.  (Recipe makes 4 suet cakes.)

Nuts can also play a big part in keeping birds healthy in winter, as they contain even more oil than seeds. When the weather is especially bitter, I supply peanuts as a treat and sometimes splurge on pecans or walnuts too. 

Foods grown in the garden will also be appreciated, as long as they last. Berries are the greatest enticement. Cedar, holly, dogwood, barberry, cotoneaster, beautyberry, and several of the viburnums, such as cranberry (V. trilobum) and nannyberry (V. prunifolium) are all excellent food choices.

Birds can be attracted by the dried seed heads of some flowers, such as sunflowers and coneflowers, and they’ll devour fruits with relish. Crabapples straight from the tree are favorites, but providing fresh fruit, such as orange halves or grapes, and dried fruits, like raisins and cherries, will help birds maintain a varied diet in winter.   

Other key features for a bird-friendly garden during the cold season are clean water and plenty of cover. Some birds will use roost boxes to stay warm in winter, especially those that typically nest in tree cavities or make themselves at home in a birdhouse, such as bluebirds. If you want to increase the number of birds roosting in your garden, remember these tips…

Leave Birdhouses Au Naturel

Brightly painted birdhouses are cute, but birds prefer a home that blends into the landscape rather than attracts notice.  If you choose to paint, however, take location into careful consideration, as dark-painted houses may become too warm when heated by the sun.

 

No Perches Please

Natural nesting sites don’t offer perches; instead, nearby branches serve as landing pads.  The same should be true of man-made houses, because perches offer a balancing spot for predators that can reach inside the box.

 

Purchase the Right House for Native Birds

Buy or build houses that are specific for the birds that you see in the garden.  A bluebird requires a box that is 6 to 8-inches tall with a 4-inch square floor and an entrance hole that is 1-1/2 inch diameter.  A larger bird would need a bigger box.

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/life/style/2017/11/14/put-out-winter-welcome-mat-birds/864260001/

IN THE GARDEN: Saving seeds from the garden

Our gardens produce thousands of seeds each season. You can save money and nurture flowers for the future by collecting and saving seeds. If we didn’t save seeds, we wouldn’t have the many wonderful heirloom varieties we enjoy today.

You can save seeds from all kinds of plants. Annual flowers are easy for beginners since they produce a lot of seeds. Vegetables such as beans, tomatoes, lettuce and peppers are good candidates for edible plants.

Start by harvesting from your best plants. Choose disease-free plants with qualities you like; for example, the best flavored vegetable or the most beautiful flower.

Always harvest mature seed. Learning when seeds are ripe enough to collect is a lot like picking tomatoes: experience will teach you.

When flowers begin to fade, keep an eye on the forming seeds. Mature seeds usually are brown or dark in color. Plants with pods such as beans are mature when the pods are brown and dry. Seeds also will require a drying process, which can take a week or more, in a protected area that has good air circulation. Keep your saved seeds in an envelope or lidded jars, marked with the variety name and the date. Store in a cool, dry place until planting time.

There are two ways to collecting seed: the dry method (used for most flowering plants) and the wet method (for fleshy type fruits such as tomatoes or melons). To learn more, visit our website at www.cceoneida.com.

Many local resources also are available to help you. Consider being a part of a seed exchange where you can share seeds with others. Many libraries, such as the Kirkland Town Library, now offer seed exchanges, offering heirloom, locally saved seed. Preserve your local garden heritage through seed saving.

Rosanne Loparco is a master gardener volunteer with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County. Look for more gardening tips in the Times Telegram or online at www.cceoneida.com.

Article source: http://www.timestelegram.com/entertainmentlife/20171114/in-garden-saving-seeds-from-garden

IN THE GARDEN: Saving seeds from the garden

Our gardens produce thousands of seeds each season. You can save money and nurture flowers for the future by collecting and saving seeds. If we didn’t save seeds, we wouldn’t have the many wonderful heirloom varieties we enjoy today.

You can save seeds from all kinds of plants. Annual flowers are easy for beginners since they produce a lot of seeds. Vegetables such as beans, tomatoes, lettuce and peppers are good candidates for edible plants.

Start by harvesting from your best plants. Choose disease-free plants with qualities you like; for example, the best flavored vegetable or the most beautiful flower.

Always harvest mature seed. Learning when seeds are ripe enough to collect is a lot like picking tomatoes: experience will teach you.

When flowers begin to fade, keep an eye on the forming seeds. Mature seeds usually are brown or dark in color. Plants with pods such as beans are mature when the pods are brown and dry. Seeds also will require a drying process, which can take a week or more, in a protected area that has good air circulation. Keep your saved seeds in an envelope or lidded jars, marked with the variety name and the date. Store in a cool, dry place until planting time.

There are two ways to collecting seed: the dry method (used for most flowering plants) and the wet method (for fleshy type fruits such as tomatoes or melons). To learn more, visit our website at www.cceoneida.com.

Many local resources also are available to help you. Consider being a part of a seed exchange where you can share seeds with others. Many libraries, such as the Kirkland Town Library, now offer seed exchanges, offering heirloom, locally saved seed. Preserve your local garden heritage through seed saving.

Rosanne Loparco is a master gardener volunteer with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oneida County. Look for more gardening tips in the Times Telegram or online at www.cceoneida.com.

Article source: http://www.timestelegram.com/entertainmentlife/20171114/in-garden-saving-seeds-from-garden

Police release York College robbery suspect photo

Spring Garden Township Police have released a photo of the man they say robbed a York College student at gunpoint two weeks ago.

Police say Laquan Rumsey also tried to rob two other people on the campus on Oct. 29. As of Monday, Nov. 13, police are still looking for Rumsey.

Rumsey, 19, of the 1500 block of West King Street, West York, faces charges of robbery, simple assault, theft and receiving stolen property.

Attempts: According to police, Rumsey approached two people in the area of the dorms on York College’s west campus about 1:50 a.m. and made a rude comment to one of them.

The two kept walking, and Rumsey then approached them from behind and tried ripping the backpack off one of them, court documents state. Police say he pulled a handgun and pointed it at the two.

More: Police ID York College robbery suspect

More: York College increases security measures

“Unsuccessful at stealing the backpack, the male was pulled away by his friends and he walked off,” Detective Dony Harbaugh wrote in charging documents.

Another victim was leaving the area of the dorms when Rumsey approached him and said he had a “beef” with him, police said. The victim told Rumsey he didn’t know what he was talking about, court documents state.

Police say Rumsey pulled a gun out and told the victim to empty his pockets. The victim put his hands up and told Rumsey he didn’t have anything before getting on the ground, according to charging documents.

Rumsey then walked off, police said.

Robbed of phone: Police say a man was walking through a parking lot when Rumsey ran up behind him and asked him what he was looking at.

Rumsey then pointed the gun at the man’s chest and told him to give him his cellphone, documents state.

He ordered the man to give him the unlock code for the phone, and then he ran off, according to police.

Following the robbery, police worked with York College campus safety officers and looked through surveillance footage of the area during the alleged incidents. 

From there, police released images from the footage, according to charging documents. Police say they received tips and were able to name Rumsey as the suspect.

Charges were filed for Rumsey on Nov. 3, and as of Monday, Nov. 13, he has not been arrested.

Anyone with information on Rumsey’s whereabouts is asked to call Spring Garden Township Police at (717) 843-0851.

Tips may also be submitted to York County Crime Stoppers on its website or by text. 

— Reach Christopher Dornblaser at cdornblaser@yorkdispatch.com or on Twitter at @YDDornblaser

Article source: http://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/2017/11/13/police-release-york-college-robbery-suspect-photo/858799001/

GET OUT IN YOUR GARDEN – NOVEMBER TIPS FROM OUR EXPERT

 

Dear Gazette Gardeners,

With the clocks going back this means winter officially begins, however there is still plenty of time for you to prepare your garden before the weather gets too bad. 

It is time to start prepping your garden so that it is protected against the frosty winter weather. It’s really easy to forget about your garden over the colder months, but by having that final Autumn tidy-up you can be assured it will look better over Winter and will really benefit next year too.

 

Keep Planting:

There’s still plenty of time for you to start growing new plants and crops.

· October to December is the perfect time to start growing garlic. Be sure to keep them covered though, as birds love garlic.

· Why not plant some broad beans too? These will be ready for harvest mid-summer, perfect for those summer barbeques.

· Prune your roses, however different types of rose need to be pruned in different ways.

· Plant winter bedding to give you an extra splash of colour. Wall flowers, Primulas and Violas are all fabulous.

· Make sure you move tender plants like herbs indoors.

· Make sure you move indoor plants to an area where they can get as much sunlight as possible. Due to the nights coming in earlier, they need as much sunlight they can get.

· To prevent tulip fire infection, plant your tulip bulbs now!

 

Tools and Equipment Maintenance:

Be sure to remove any soil and debris from all tools so they are not kept damp and start to rust. Ensure the lawn mower is clean and unclogged and ready for the first cut of the year. If you have a petrol mower, you will also need to remove all unleaded fuel from the tank, as it doesn’t keep and can prevent your mower from running smoothly during its usage. Whilst we still have some dry weather, why not treat any wooden surfaces in your garden, give them a good clean and brush down then apply a suitable treatment to keep them looking brand new.

Top Tip: Make sure you check all your wooden tools for any rough edges, sand them down, then coat in linseed oil to keep them well maintained.

 

Winter Wildlife:

Why not leave out a pile of arranged sticks and cuttings behind the garden shed, out of plain sight for insects and hibernating hedgehogs to safely take cover from the harsh winter weather. Birds can also be a gardener’s best friend during cold winter months. They keep unwanted insects out of your garden that you won’t want to eat your winter plants. Make sure you keep plenty of bird seed out to entice birds into your garden and keep those pest insects away. Why not invest in a bird bath or a bird house/box to ensure you get regular visits?

 

Pruning:

· Lift and divide overcrowded sections of herbaceous perennials and cut back any yellowish foliage

· For a simple but stunning display for next spring, plant up a terracotta pot of hyacinth bulbs

· For some winter colours in your garden, plant pansies or violas, heather and trailing ivy

· Plant a magnolia tree for a gorgeous spring show

 

Lawn care:

As we turn to winter, make sure your lawn is leaf free to ensure you do not provides winter shelter for unwelcome garden pests. A thick layer of leaves will smother the lawn and weaken the grass. Additionally, although your lawn may look like it hasn’t grown much, you will need to keep on top of the mowing and give it one last winter feed.

Top tip: Avoid walking on your lawn if it’s frosted, as this can also damage the grass.

 

Tips and Tricks:

Here are a couple of hints for bits and bobs that will help your garden this month.

· There is still time to plant daffodil bulbs ready for spring

· Harvest your last crops of the year – you should still be able to collect a few potatoes for those hearty stews!

· Replace any damaged glass in the greenhouse ready for winter

· Invest in a mushroom kit! They are really easy to grow and adds a nice touch to any garden.

· Enjoy the last of your Autumn colours – the bright purples, gorgeous golds and awesome oranges will soon disappear so make the most of them!

 

Winter Colour

If you delay in pruning your roses some have fantastic colourful hips one such example is Rosa glauca which has orange ones. Hellebores also known as Christmas rose, should also begin to come in to flower now and the Niger varieties look great. My last favourite for this time of the year is Colchicum, planted in dappled shade, their bright pink flowers look amazing when everything else can look a bit drab.

Jason Harker

JASON IS A PROFESSIONAL GARDENER AND LANDSCAPER, AND OWNER OF JHPS-GARDENS LTD.

HE REGULARLY WRITES A PIECE FOR OUR WEBSITE, PLUS THE SENTINEL NEWSPAPER,

AND IS A GO TO EXPERT ON BBC RADIO STOKE’S GARDENING PROGRAMME.

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Article source: http://www.stonegazette.co.uk/2017/11/get-garden-november-tips-expert/

Oakland Hills Firestorm Survivors Share Tips On Preventative Landscaping

KCBS_740

OAKLAND (KCBS) – In some cases, which home survived the wine country fires and which didn’t depended on what was growing around the house. KCBS reporter Doug Sovern says survivors of the Oakland Hills Firestorm 26 years ago are sharing the lessons they learned about fire safe landscaping.

You won’t find any shredded bark or wood chips anywhere near Sue Piper’s home in Hiller Highlands. Twenty-six years ago, her house was one of the more than 3,000 destroyed by the Oakland Hills Firestorm. Now she knows better than to use flammable mulch or plants shrubs and trees that can spread fire.

“What you want to avoid are things like rosemary or common juniper or California sage brush.” Piper says. Avoid Douglas Fir, Monterey Pine and eucalyptus as they all have “high oil content,” according to Piper.

Piper suggests to place gravel or stone right around your house, five feet of nothing flammable, 30′ feet of defensible space with no overhanging branches.

“And you want to remove vegetation and items that could catch fire from the ground and under your deck. So if you’re storing your firewood under your deck, that’s not a place to store it.” Piper explains.

Piper says you should plant things like succulents, winter Jasmine, ground cover that’s less likely to burn. That doesn’t mean you can’t grow rosemary in your herb garden. Just don’t let it turn dry and woody. “You can’t just plant and forget. You have to maintain it,” Piper advises. “Ongoing maintenance what’s really important.”

Piper and a crew of volunteers maintain the Gateway Emergency Preparedness Center. A demonstration garden along Tunnel Road and Highway 24 where the do’s and don’ts of what to plant and what not to plant, how to get ready for earthquakes and the next wildfires are on display.

“We’re only as strong as our weakest link in the neighborhood. And we know not only to our family and our property but our neighbors family property to keep that defensible space up.”

©2017 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All rights reserved.

 


dougsovern01 250 Oakland Hills Firestorm Survivors Share Tips On Preventative Landscaping

Article source: http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2017/11/13/oakland-hills-firestorm-survivors-share-tips-on-preventative-landscaping/

Planting succulents? Follow these tips for a stellar Central Coast garden

Q: I want to add succulents to my Mediterranean garden. What should I know about succulents and their environmental needs?

Carol D., Cambria

A: “Succulent” refers to plants that have a unique ability to store moisture in fleshy stems, leaves or roots. They are not a family in themselves, but are represented in many plant families. Like cacti and succulents, many plants found in dry regions of the world have adapted to dry climates by storing moisture in their tissues. While cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti.

Succulents need little care other than removing withered blossoms. They can be fed in early spring using low nitrogen, slow-acting fertilizer such as fish emulsion or kelp, or by using a balanced fertilizer like 10-10-10. Fertilizer for succulents should be diluted at a rate of ¼ of what is recommended.

Both Mediterranean plants and succulents have similar growing requirements — sun to semi-shade and little water. They can be planted with plants that have similar needs.

Both succulents and Mediterranean plants survive in soil that lacks an abundance of humus and is well draining. They do not thrive in wet clay soil, and need protection in climates that fall below 30 degrees F for any length of time.

Succulents can be planted in pots and placed around the garden or indoors in a sunny window. Pots need to have a hole in the bottom for drainage. Use a fast-draining soil mixture with pumice, perlite or decomposed granite or a commercial soil mixture made specifically for succulents.

After they’re planted, succulents and Mediterranean plants require little care, other than sun or semi-shade and good drainage. It is no wonder they play a major role in Central Coast gardens.

Lee Oliphant is a UCCE Master Gardener.

Article source: http://www.sanluisobispo.com/living/home-garden/article183822006.html