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Garden tips for your May garden – Visalia Times-Delta – Visalia Times

With all the rain we have had this winter and early spring, May should be a glorious month in the garden.

This is a month I spend as much time as possible in my garden, not just working but also enjoying Mother Nature.

Annuals:  Plant summer annuals early in the month so they will have time to establish good roots system before summer.  Shaded areas can be brightened up with bedding begonias, caladiums, coleus, impatiens and New Guinea impatiens.

These plants can also be grown in a large container in an area under a tree full of roots. Be sure to use a saucer under the pot to prevent tree roots from growing into your container.

For those sunny areas, try amaranths, bedding dahlias, celosias, cosmos, dianthus, gomphrena, marigolds, petunias, portulacas, salvias, sunflowers, and zinnias. 
Last summer, I planted seeds of tithonias, also known as Mexican sunflowers.  They grew to be 4 ft. tall with bright orange flowers, and were quite a show-stopper in the garden.

Herbs: Time to plant basil, borage, catmint, hyssop, lemon balm, parsley, summer savory, rosemary, thyme, and yarrow. You don’t have to grow one type of each herb.

For instance, basil has many different varieties: cinnamon, lemon, lettuce-leaf and Thai.  Be adventurous and try something new.

Lawns: Renovate warm season lawns like Bermuda and St. Augustine by dethatching them with a vertical mower. Add fertilizer, and they will spring back better than ever. Mow Bermuda lawns ½-1″ and fescue lawns 2-3″ tall. 
Mowing fescue lawns too low will encourage weeds and require more water. Mowing warm season lawns too high will encourage thatch to develop. Change the direction and pattern when mowing,

Perennials: Visit your local nurseries. Right now they are full of new plants and adding new ones all the time. Look for coreopsis, lantanas, ornamental grasses, salvias, succulents, verbenas, and yarrows.

Pick up a fragrant shrub to put by the front door, garden seat or path. It will give you years of pleasure.

Vegetables: Plant beans, corn, cucumber, eggplant, melons, okra, peppers, pumpkins, summer squash, and tomatoes. When buying tomatoes, be sure to read the label. 
“Determinate” means the plans will grow to one height, and all the fruit will ripen at once, which makes them great for canning.

“Indeterminate” means the vine will keep on growing and producing all season.  Also, look for the letters V, F, N, and T next to the cultivar’s name. These letters indicate disease resistance to Verticillium and Fusarium wilts, nematode and Tobacco mosaic virus.

Critter Control:  Blast aphids, mites, and spittlebugs with a jet of water. If infestations are extremely heavy, try using an insecticidal soap.

Check for hornworms, the enemy of all tomato growers. The best method for removal of hornworms is to handpick them off the plant. You can also use Bt (Bacillus Thuringiensis).

However, use with care, as it will kill any other caterpillars or butterflies. Look for natural enemies like assassin bugs, lacewings, lady beetles and praying mantis.  
If you have them in the garden, they will go after those nasty pests and protect the balance of nature.

Garden chores:

  • Pinch back growing tips of bedding plants to promote branching and compact growth.
  • Fall blooming chrysanthemums should be pinched back to 6.  Place a wire basket around plants to support branches as they grow. Continue pinching until July.
  • Some spring-blooming perennials, like Mexican sage and other salvias, need a trim. Cut them back after their flower display, then fertilize and water. 
  • Prune spring-flowering shrubs and vines (clematis, forsythia, lilac, wisteria) when they finish blooming.
  • Pull weeds before they set seeds.
  • Fertilize lawns, roses, shrubs and vines. Give acid fertilizer to azaleas, gardenias, and rhododendron as soon as they finish blooming.
  • Paint fruit trees trunks with a 50/50 mix of white latex paint and water to prevent sunburn.
  • Thin out fruit on fruit trees and grapes. This prevents marble size fruit and improves quality. Also, tree branches and vines may break if too much fruit is left on the tree. In general, leave on the tree or vine only what you can realistically use. Citrus and nut trees will thin fruit on their own.
  • Test sprinklers and emitters. As days get warmer, increase watering times, but follow your area’s water rules.

Finally, don’t forget Mother’s Day. Remember Mom with a big bouquet of flowers or perhaps a lovely potted plant.

Where can the UCCE Master Gardeners be found this month?

For answers to all your home gardening questions, call the Master Gardeners in Tulare County at (559) 684-3325, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9:30 and 11:30 am; or Kings County at (559) 852-2736, Thursday Only, 9:30-11:30 a.m; or visit our website to search past articles, find links to UC gardening information, or to email us with your questions:  http://ucanr.edu/sites/UC_Master_Gardeners/

Article source: http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/05/05/garden-tips-your-may-garden/101217498/

Simple tips for a successful garden | News | agrinews-pubs.com

GREENFIELD, Ind. — During the late-spring months, a popular outdoor activity for many is planting a garden, with the hopes of harvesting fresh produce in summer.

According to Roy Ballard, the Purdue Extension agriculture and natural resources educator in Hancock County, no matter the impediment, including a lack of ground space for raising vegetables, if someone wants to grow something, they can.

“No matter the physical limitations, if you want to grow something, there is a way to grow it,” he said, adding it also is important for people to plant vegetables they love, not ones they and their family won’t enjoy.

Not using them, he noted, would be a waste of the growing space, as well as a waste of the food.

If a person enjoys eating and cooking with tomatoes, they should just focus on growing those, because even if they don’t have an acre of land to set aside for a garden, they still can grow a few tomato plants in pots on their porch, he said.

Ballard shared three tips for individuals that are planting their gardens in containers.

1. Pots or containers that are being utilized for planting vegetable seedlings need to be pretty large, at least five gallons, because even though the plant may seem small, as it grow, its roots will try to extend as down deep as possible in the soil.

2. Before using a container as a growing space, it is important to clean it out thoroughly, so plants aren’t cross contaminated from anything in the pot.

3. Drainage holes are vital, especially when using containers for growing plants, because the water needs a way to get out.

Another tip Ballard shared is that if a person is planting tomatoes, they should make sure to have at least five gallons of soil for the plant. To fully utilize the space in the pot, he suggested that people can plant lettuce around their tomato, and while their tomato grows, they will be able to harvest lettuce to enjoy.

Ballard added that if individuals do have a big area of land for gardening, they need to remember it is important to not overcrowd plants, because although the seedlings may look small, when they start to grow, they will crowd and shade out other plants and could stop airflow, which would exacerbate plant disease problems, particularly if the morning dew is not able to dry.

Article source: http://www.agrinews-pubs.com/news/simple-tips-for-a-successful-garden/article_888ea729-ebf7-5414-bc79-dc1e9a21af17.html

Your Garden: Memorial Day tips – WCSH

Your Garden 5/27/2017

Article source: http://www.wcsh6.com/news/local/your-garden-memorial-day-tips/443504364

This week’s gardening tips: the last tomatoes of the season

This week’s gardening tips: by now, most tomatoes have set their main crop, and blossom drop will likely increase at this point. Tomato plants are less inclined to set more fruit when they already have several clusters of tomatoes to ripen. Also, high summer temperatures (days in the 90s and nights in the 70s) interfere with pollination. So don’t be surprised if more of the flowers start falling off without setting fruit as we move into June. It’s just that time of year.


When gladioluses finish blooming, prune the faded flower spike but leave the foliage intact. The foliage will produce food that is stored in the newly developing corm, insuring a large, healthy corm that will bloom well next year.

The intense heat of summer has arrived, with daytime highs reaching the 90s and nighttime lows staying in the 70s. Although we are past the best time for planting hardy trees and shrubs, many heat-tolerant vegetables, bedding plants, summer bulbs, palm trees and tropicals do well planted in the heat.

Mow lawns as often as you can between rains. Allowing lawns to get overgrown before mowing is detrimental to the health of the grass. Avoid mowing the lawn when the grass blades are wet. This increases problems with clippings clumping and matting on the lawn surface. Or, use a bag attachment.

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Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2017/05/this_weeks_gardening_tips_the.html

Your Garden: Memorial Day tips | WCSH6.com – WCSH

Your Garden 5/27/2017

Article source: http://www.wcsh6.com/news/local/your-garden-memorial-day-tips/443504364

June Gardening Tips

With the start of June we now welcome summer and our gardens are in full force. With summer we have to keep our gardens watered regularly and keep an eye out for insect and disease problems. Below are gardening tips to help your garden grow through the month of June.

Lawn

  • Mowing at the correct height and frequency is one of the most important things you can do keep your lawn thick and weed free. Different turf types have different ideal mowing heights. Centipede, bermuda and zoysia lawns are best kept at 1″ to 1 1/2″.  St. Augustine lawns need to mowed at 3″ to 4″ high.
  • Be sure to check mower blades and sharpen if dull.  Dull mowing blades will shred grass rather than cut it.  Grass that has been shredded can leave a brown or grayish cast over the lawn.  Shredding or ripping of grass blades instead of clean cuts can leave the lawn more susceptible to diseases.  Blades should be sharpened every month or two.
  • Seeds of centipede, bermuda, and certain varieties of zoysia can be sown in June but need frequent watering to germinate. Do not allow grass seed to dry out after being sown. St. Augustine grass cannot be established by seed.

Trees, Shrubs and Flowers

  • Mid- to late June is an excellent time to take softwood cuttings of shrubs to start new plants. Some shrubs propagated in this manner are spirea, boxwood and azalea.
  • Flower containers should be watered daily during summer. Allow water to drain all the way through the pot. Make sure drainage holes are open in the bottom of the pot to avoid water logging that can lead to root rot.
  • Remove dead flowers from bedding plants to get more flowering. Removing the dead flowers or “deadheading” prevents the plants from not flowering and going to seed and before summer is over.

Fruit, Vegetables and Herbs

  • Plant sweet potato slips in June for fall harvest.
  • Most vegetables require 1″ of water per week. Avoid wetting the foliage of plants when watering as this increases disease problems. Use soaker hoses or drip tape to apply water at ground level.
  • Remember to fertilize your tomatoes as they are growing.  Fertilize with 2-3 tablespoons per plant after plant has started to set fruit and 4-6 weeks thereafter throughout the growing season.  Use 8-8-8 and 10-10-10.  Keep fertilizer 4-6″ from the plant’s stem to avoid fertilizer burn.
  • Scarecrow not scaring away birds or squirrels from your garden? Instead, try tying pieces of colored cloth or tin pans to loose strings so the wind can blow them and clash them together. Random motion is the key to alarming the birds and squirrels away from the garden.

For your gardening, landscape, and lawn questions contact the Wayne County Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Plant Clinic on Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 am to 1pm.  The plant clinic is a free service open to any Wayne County resident that has home gardening questions.  One can reach the Wayne County Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Plant Clinic by phone at 919-731-1433, e-mail at Master.Gardener@waynegov.com, or stopping by Room 100 of the Wayne County Extension Office (208 West Chestnut Street, Goldsboro).  People contacting the plant clinic with questions are encouraged to bring samples and/or pictures that could help in reaching a solution.  Extension Master Gardeners are trained volunteers with the Wayne County NC Cooperative Extension Service.

Jessica Strickland is an Agriculture Extension Agent, specializing in horticulture for North Carolina Cooperative Extension in Wayne County.  Horticulture program information can be found at http://wayne.ces.ncsu.edu/Forward any questions you would like answered from this week’s column to Jessica.Strickland@waynegov.com.

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Article source: http://goldsborodailynews.com/blog/2017/05/27/june-gardening-tips/

Garden tips for your May garden – Visalia Times

With all the rain we have had this winter and early spring, May should be a glorious month in the garden.

This is a month I spend as much time as possible in my garden, not just working but also enjoying Mother Nature.

Annuals:  Plant summer annuals early in the month so they will have time to establish good roots system before summer.  Shaded areas can be brightened up with bedding begonias, caladiums, coleus, impatiens and New Guinea impatiens.

These plants can also be grown in a large container in an area under a tree full of roots. Be sure to use a saucer under the pot to prevent tree roots from growing into your container.

For those sunny areas, try amaranths, bedding dahlias, celosias, cosmos, dianthus, gomphrena, marigolds, petunias, portulacas, salvias, sunflowers, and zinnias. 
Last summer, I planted seeds of tithonias, also known as Mexican sunflowers.  They grew to be 4 ft. tall with bright orange flowers, and were quite a show-stopper in the garden.

Herbs: Time to plant basil, borage, catmint, hyssop, lemon balm, parsley, summer savory, rosemary, thyme, and yarrow. You don’t have to grow one type of each herb.

For instance, basil has many different varieties: cinnamon, lemon, lettuce-leaf and Thai.  Be adventurous and try something new.

Lawns: Renovate warm season lawns like Bermuda and St. Augustine by dethatching them with a vertical mower. Add fertilizer, and they will spring back better than ever. Mow Bermuda lawns ½-1″ and fescue lawns 2-3″ tall. 
Mowing fescue lawns too low will encourage weeds and require more water. Mowing warm season lawns too high will encourage thatch to develop. Change the direction and pattern when mowing,

Perennials: Visit your local nurseries. Right now they are full of new plants and adding new ones all the time. Look for coreopsis, lantanas, ornamental grasses, salvias, succulents, verbenas, and yarrows.

Pick up a fragrant shrub to put by the front door, garden seat or path. It will give you years of pleasure.

Vegetables: Plant beans, corn, cucumber, eggplant, melons, okra, peppers, pumpkins, summer squash, and tomatoes. When buying tomatoes, be sure to read the label. 
“Determinate” means the plans will grow to one height, and all the fruit will ripen at once, which makes them great for canning.

“Indeterminate” means the vine will keep on growing and producing all season.  Also, look for the letters V, F, N, and T next to the cultivar’s name. These letters indicate disease resistance to Verticillium and Fusarium wilts, nematode and Tobacco mosaic virus.

Critter Control:  Blast aphids, mites, and spittlebugs with a jet of water. If infestations are extremely heavy, try using an insecticidal soap.

Check for hornworms, the enemy of all tomato growers. The best method for removal of hornworms is to handpick them off the plant. You can also use Bt (Bacillus Thuringiensis).

However, use with care, as it will kill any other caterpillars or butterflies. Look for natural enemies like assassin bugs, lacewings, lady beetles and praying mantis.  
If you have them in the garden, they will go after those nasty pests and protect the balance of nature.

Garden chores:

  • Pinch back growing tips of bedding plants to promote branching and compact growth.
  • Fall blooming chrysanthemums should be pinched back to 6.  Place a wire basket around plants to support branches as they grow. Continue pinching until July.
  • Some spring-blooming perennials, like Mexican sage and other salvias, need a trim. Cut them back after their flower display, then fertilize and water. 
  • Prune spring-flowering shrubs and vines (clematis, forsythia, lilac, wisteria) when they finish blooming.
  • Pull weeds before they set seeds.
  • Fertilize lawns, roses, shrubs and vines. Give acid fertilizer to azaleas, gardenias, and rhododendron as soon as they finish blooming.
  • Paint fruit trees trunks with a 50/50 mix of white latex paint and water to prevent sunburn.
  • Thin out fruit on fruit trees and grapes. This prevents marble size fruit and improves quality. Also, tree branches and vines may break if too much fruit is left on the tree. In general, leave on the tree or vine only what you can realistically use. Citrus and nut trees will thin fruit on their own.
  • Test sprinklers and emitters. As days get warmer, increase watering times, but follow your area’s water rules.

Finally, don’t forget Mother’s Day. Remember Mom with a big bouquet of flowers or perhaps a lovely potted plant.

Where can the UCCE Master Gardeners be found this month?

For answers to all your home gardening questions, call the Master Gardeners in Tulare County at (559) 684-3325, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9:30 and 11:30 am; or Kings County at (559) 852-2736, Thursday Only, 9:30-11:30 a.m; or visit our website to search past articles, find links to UC gardening information, or to email us with your questions:  http://ucanr.edu/sites/UC_Master_Gardeners/

Article source: http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/05/05/garden-tips-your-may-garden/101217498/

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Tips for your summer garden

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Article source: http://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/columnists/master-gardener/tips-for-your-summer-garden/article_08ecde79-5ad4-5de1-820e-7688280d90b4.html

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