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Seattle kids to discover environmental decision-making, one garden at a time

For Megan Bang, an associate professor at the University of Washington, school gardens are an academic passion, a way to create hands-on science experiences for students, improve their mental health and get them outdoors more often.

For 15 years, she’s worked to make gardens a center of learning and a way to teach responsible environmental decision-making. With the help of a $2.9 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), she’s now working with Seattle Public Schools and the nonprofit Tilth Alliance to build learning gardens at three schools, as well as creating a new model for an ecosystems curriculum and providing training for teachers.

“We teach kids to understand plant cells and the plant life cycles,” said Bang. “But do we teach them in a way that shows that plant’s relationship to the soil, or to the bugs?”

Many of Seattle’s public schools already have gardens, but most are funded by PTAs, and not all are used as part of classroom lessons, said MaryMargaret Welch, science program manager at Seattle Public Schools.


Education Lab is a Seattle Times project that spotlights promising approaches to persistent challenges in public education. It is produced in partnership with the Solutions Journalism Network and is funded by a grant from the Bill Melinda Gates Foundation.

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The new, NSF-funded project, which has a four-year timeline, will focus on kindergarten through third-grade classrooms at Viewlands, Leschi and Maple elementary schools. The schools were chosen because they have significant percentages of low-income students.

In Bang’s view, school gardens can encourage students to think critically about issues like water consumption, biodiversity and energy usage — based on observations they’ve made in the field, like real scientists. For example, students at the three schools may be given the opportunity to design their own gardens based on factors like weather patterns and soil-plant interactions.

“Monitoring real-world resources is complicated, and they’re not easily observable because they’re interconnected. Part of what I’m after is having a citizenry that’s capable of engaging in those real 21st-century problems, ” said Bang.

Parents and teachers will help design the garden curriculum at each of the three schools.

Combining forces with the larger community is what the grant team hopes will give the project some continuity and buy-in, as well as cultural relevance.

“Garden education is kind of associated with white, middle-class folks. But there are types of gardens that aren’t based in Western European traditions,” said Sharon Siehl, the Youth Education director for Tilth Alliance, the Seattle-based organic urban gardening nonprofit that’s helping with the project.

As she’s done in past projects, Bang said she plans on incorporating cultural context into the garden lessons, such as helping students understand methods of cultivation among indigenous populations.

The new project is one of many recent efforts to help Seattle schools adapt to a new set of national science standards, which call for teaching science in a way that fosters student interest in pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

When the four years are up, the team hopes they’ll have enough research to make a case for expanding the model to all Seattle schools.

Article source: http://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/training-seattle-kids-for-environmental-decision-making-one-garden-at-a-time/

New Design For Friends Of Liliuokalani Gardens

Nelson Makua and Na Makua Designs created a centennial design for Lili`uokalani Gardens that brings the Queen to the gardens named for her.

“For quite a while time, some of us have visualized what it might have been like for the Queen to visit the gardens in Hilo, a place she visited often through 1913,” said garden enthusiast K.T. Cannon-Eger. “We know she considered having a home built for her in Hilo and corresponded with John T. Baker about those plans. Illness prevented her travel to Hilo after 1913. Although she knew the garden acreage was set aside in early 1917, her death on November 11, 1917, precluded her ever seeing the gardens completed.”

“The board of directors of Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens is thrilled with Nelson Makua’s design which shortly will appear on tee shirts and tote bags among other centennial celebration uses.”

Makua has been an artist and designer on the Big Island for more than 40 years. Born and raised in Kailua, Oahu, he and his ‘ohana moved to the Big Island in 1975, where they reside in Puna, the original home of the Makua ‘ohana.

“My ancestors were part of the migration from Tahiti to Hawaii who settled in Kalapana in the district of Puna,” Makua said. “Living here gave me the opportunity to connect with ‘ohana, it was like coming home.”

He is best known for his design work, with clients in Hawai‘i, the mainland and Japan. He is a two time Na Hoku Hanohano award winner for graphic design and is the only artist to have created six years of Merrie Monarch Festival posters with his limited edition “Pele” series.

Makua’s first 2003 poster has now become a collectors’ item. His 2008 Merrie Monarch poster received the prestigious Pele Award for best illustration by the Hawaii Advertising Federation.

Last year, Nelson was honored as a MAMo Awardee for 2016 in recognition for his artistic contribution as a Native Hawaiian artist.

In 1999 Nelson and his son Kainoa, created a line of casual Hawaiian wear under the brand of Nä Mäkua. “Na Makua gives us a visual voice to express our views and feelings as native Hawaiians, creating images that speak out to other Hawaiians and honor our rich heritage.” They retail their apparel and art on their website www.namakua.com.

As well as being an artist and designer, Nelson has been the director of the annual Merrie Monarch Invitational Hawaiian Arts Fair for the Merrie Monarch Festival for the past 14 years. He is also the director of the Moku O Keawe Marketplace at the Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival and along with his son Kainoa, they produce their annual Na Mäkua Invitational Christmas Gift fair in Hilo.

Though Nelson was classically trained in drawing, painting and photography, he has been a digital artist for more than 20 years. “The digital age has opened up a whole new world of creating for the artist, with countless possibilities. Guided by my kupuna before me, I consider myself a Hawaiian living in my own time, creating images that reflect my time and place.”

To find out more about the garden centennial or to purchase fund raising tee shirts or tote bags, please go to the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens page on Facebook or contact Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens at P.O. Box 5147, Hilo HI 96749.

Banyan Gallery near the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel is one retail outlet for people who live in the Hilo area.

Article source: http://www.bigislandvideonews.com/2017/07/17/new-design-for-friends-of-liliuokalani-gardens/

Valley Community Foundation Helps Build Adam’s House Memorial Garden

SHELTON, Conn. – A $2,500 grant from the Valley Community Foundation helped volunteers with Adam’s House construct a front garden that encircles the memorial walkway at the nonprofit grief education center at 241 Coram Ave.

Adam’s House Founder and Executive Director Allison Wysota said, “We are thrilled that our front garden surrounding our memorial walkway is now a beautiful, welcoming space that will offer peace and healing not only to grieving children and families that enter our program, but to all in the Shelton community that pass by our doors.”

As part of the Adam’s House “Healing Hearts” program, children can create a commemorative brick to place on the memorial walkway to honor and celebrate the life a loved one.

The Valley Community Foundation grant funded the plantings and construction of the gardens that encompass the memorial walkway.

“Valley Community Foundation President and CEO Sharon Closius works closely with our program officer and community grants committee to make smart investments in the changing needs and opportunities of the Valley,” said Alan Tyma, VCF Board Chair.

“One focus of the Foundation is to strengthen the impact of small nonprofits, those with fewer than two full-time or fewer than four part-time staff, by supporting a variety of community engagement efforts. Based on their presentation, Adam’s House should be a valuable member of our community for a long time.”

The Olde Ripton Garden Club in Shelton led by Garden Designer Renee Marsh, owner of A Simpler Place, contributed the project’s landscape design.

Twelve volunteers from the Shelton office of Nasdaq made up the labor force that turned Marsh’s landscape design into reality. During a warm, sunny day, the Nasdaq volunteers cheerfully planted a new array of hydrangeas, lilies, catmint, roses, a dogwood tree and other plantings to create the memorial walkway landscaping and front garden.


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Article source: http://shelton.dailyvoice.com/neighbors/valley-community-foundation-helps-build-adams-house-memorial-garden/716507/

Ideas from the Buzz Around Hamburg Garden Walk

Last weekend I had only limited time to visit gardens during the Buzz Around Hamburg Garden Walk. Still, the experience in just three gardens reminded me of the value of the whole regional phenomena. (Western New York offers five weeks of walks, tours and Open Gardens that comprise about 1,000 private gardens that you can visit.)

No matter where you go, gardens will surprise you, stimulate ideas, and may even change your mood and outlook for an entire day, week, or longer – as the following did for me.

Bright colors and hospitality

Some gardens just say “Come in, sit down, have a beverage, and stay awhile!” That is the Washut and Kelkenberg garden in Hamburg, one of my perennial favorites.

The café-like setting, with great cushioned seats and multiple umbrella tables, is visually exciting and just feels like a happy place. Gardener Kathy Kelkenberg told me the original idea was to buy one picnic table with umbrella, but somehow one became three, and now? “When we put the umbrellas down, the party is over – it looks like nothing,” she said.

Good reminder to us all: Provide seating and tables – generously – so that people will want to stay.

While first impressions in this garden are of brightness, color and furnishings, it’s also a study in garden design and use of space. For instance, how would you use the space in a village corner lot, to allow for some privacy?

The banana plant in the Washut/Kelkenberg garden. (Derek Gee/Buffalo News)

The gardeners created a west-facing perennial border (great for pollinators as well as passers-by) that faces the sidewalk and is backed by shrubs that close off the yard.

Inside, garden paths effectively create outdoor rooms and lead guests to specific planting beds and artifacts. A pondless waterfall, surrounded by proportionate shrubs and flowers, divides the café area from other sections and provides a calming effect.

One visitor wrote in the Guest Book: “This is a good place to meditate – with my eyes wide open!” I agree. Beyond design, the garden also shows off special plants. Bright planters overflow with grasses and tropicals, looking effortless, but with more analysis you can identify a lot of fine gardening and experience underlying this appealing garden.

I really did not want to leave this space, but I took with me the determination to brighten up my seating areas and to keep my eyes open for more dramatic containers. And I must sit still more often and just look.

(Note: See more photos of the Washut and Kelkenberg garden in Hamburg – as well as gardens in Lockport and Lackawanna – in this Sunday’s Home Style section.)

Make an original statement

I asked Marg Rust, who coordinates Buzz Around Hamburg, what garden I should show on TV this season – maybe a newer one that I hadn’t shown or written about?

“The Povinelli garden,” she said. “It’s, well, less about plants and more about really amazing hardscape and design creations. They’re so original.”

She was surely right … cobblestones salvaged from a factory floor on Ohio Street, slate from old Hamburg Village sidewalks, a potting table made from original posts that were part of a porch built in 1882 (dated and signed by the craftsman), a collection of cobalt-blue glass panes that stand behind yellow daylilies – salvaged from St. Brigid’s Church, built in 1859 and burned in 1968.

Another treasure – that most people would have left to deteriorate – is a Goshen Glide Settee that Tom Povinelli’s parents bought in 1940. It spent decades “moldering in a barn” before he restored it.

Treasures came from many places to create this most original garden. Janet and Tom Povinelli trucked in a 2-ton boulder from Gernatt Asphalt Products that they informed is a “Leaverite.” They said that with a wink. Then I learned: People who move boulders like to say, “Leave ‘er right there.”

The original Povinelli approach didn’t end with hardscape items. They transformed a hilly mount of grass into the most unexpected, dramatic, Japanese-inspired raked-stone garden. This flat, quiet space is surrounded by a round berm, with woolly thyme covering the inner wall. You must see it next summer, or if you’re lucky, make friends sooner with these cool, creative people.

My thought leaving this garden: Sometimes artistry – being “original” – is a matter of keeping one’s eyes open and having the imagination to see an object that others don’t, and knowing that it’s worth keeping, restoring or repurposing. The Povinellis certainly have the eyes for it.

Dave and Barb Whittemore’s garden in Hamburg was also featured in The Buffalo News in 2015. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News file photo)

Intense, passionate collectors

The Whittemore garden is an Open Garden and a tour bus destination this season, and I’ll take people to it whenever I can. Words, and even pictures, don’t capture the intensity of these artistically arranged and densely packed collections of hostas (more than 350) and dwarf conifers and perennials, complemented by moving train sets no less.

Barb Whittemore told me this happens often: A woman carrying a garden tour map starts down the ramp into the back garden, and will gasp and turn around, saying “Oh, I’ll be right back!” Return she does, leading her husband, who’d chosen to stay in the car after seeing enough gardens that day. This one is also for him.

In fact I can’t imagine who would not be impressed by so many plants, so beautifully tended, in a small yard, with the additional achievement of making several railroads operational. The Whittemores are diligent, passionate, accomplished, and eager to share.

When you see gardens on tour, remember how much these people are giving of their time and effort, and the risks they are taking, exposing their taste and choices.
It’s such a gift.

The fourth garden

After touring that day I returned home with the intention of doing some computer work and starting some laundry. My garden called me instead. There they were: the fluffy, pink Filipendulas and the hedge of Sorbaria blooming, the bright daisies surrounding a yellow rose, and so many daylilies just opening – one more delightful than the next.

I was so happy I’d dragged out the blue birdbath and blue bottles for the bottle tree, and I’d made the little fountain work. It’s not a showplace garden like those amazing ones, but it’s my favorite of all. And that may be the important thing: Garden for the joy of it, whether guests are coming or not.

Sally Cunningham is a garden writer, lecturer and consultant.

Save

Article source: http://buffalonews.com/2017/07/14/ideas-buzz-around-hamburg-garden-walk/

Down to Earth: Creating An Artistic Hydrangea Garden

The layers of a landscaped hydrangea garden include trees for a visual ceiling and much-needed shade, along with herbaceous plants such as day lilies. Shown is the North American Hydrangea Test Garden at Heritage.

Article source: https://www.capenews.net/sandwich/columns/down-to-earth-creating-an-artistic-hydrangea-garden/article_b29d6110-0bd6-5b3f-853a-8b30ca147f76.html

The garden tours are here

July is always a fun month where the garden begins to fill with constant color as this is the time when all the annuals begin their consistent blooming until the autumn frosts arrive. Often it is hot, but that is the kind of weather I thrive in, so I absorb as much of it as I can as I know it will be short lived. July is also the month for the garden tours, both locally and regionally. This is everyone’s chance to get a glimpse into some backyards to witness some very creative design work.

I personally love to go on garden tours as I find them to be a great resource for new ideas, a chance to see new and different design elements and get to talk to other gardeners along the way. When we stay in our own yards day in and day out, our outlook on things becomes a bit tunneled. By going out and seeing what other people do opens the door of creativity once again to allow you to explore new and unique things.

There are always many things to see on these tours; not only can you take a friend and enjoy them with a nice visit along the way, but you can throw all sorts of thoughts around.

The main thing you will see is an abundance of plants. That is always a thrill as oftentimes there will be some plants that many people have never seen before and find exotic or interesting. Some might be non-hardy tropical where others might be a new hardy perennial for our area that isn’t common yet. Annuals are always a thrill as they produce that intense and abundant color for the rest of the season. There can be some very unique specimens in this genre also. It is on one of these garden tours that I had discovered the annual penstemon called red phoenix and have had it in my garden every year since.

Not only are there great perennials and annuals on the tour, but also many interesting trees and shrubs. Sometimes they are the common species, but many times there is one in the bunch that really stands out and takes notice. It is for these specific reasons that I enjoy the tours so much!

Many gardens have unique statuary and garden art. Some are whimsical, some are quaint or funny, and others command attention. Some gardens will have birding elements such as baths, feeders and houses of numerous types, and others will have various types of water features. All of these accent pieces can really add a sense of calm to the garden space for a little evening relaxation.

Patios and decks often accompany these gardens too. Some are simple and others are very elaborate that may include extraordinary outdoor kitchen spaces. Some will have pergolas and others will have tables and large umbrellas with comfortable sitting spaces. Many of them may give you great ideas for your own space when that next project demands a little creativity.

This year there will be four gardens on the tour. Each of these four gardens will be very different from the other, allowing you a large array of things to think about. Tickets are $8 in advance and $10 the day of the tour, which will be available at any of the homes you get to first. Advanced tickets can be obtained via the AAUW bookstore, the Arts Center, Country Gardens Floral, Lloyds Motors, the Garden Gate and Don’s House of Flowers. Proceeds from the tour go to support the AAUW Endowment Fund at the University of Jamestown. The foundation provides grants and funding for projects that promote equality for girls and women.

The tour sites this year will be Kimm Avans, 418 4th Ave. SE; Frank and Stephanie Jensen, 1605 3rd Ave. NE; Alan and Mary Sargent, 3161 Highway 281 N; and yes, I will be on the tour again this year at 1601 7th Ave. SE. It will be a great day for a tour, and I would love to see you all there supporting this wonderful cause while touring the beautiful gardens for a pleasant evening out. Don’t forget to take many pictures and bring a notebook to write down the ideas you find most interesting. I hope to see you all there!

Article source: http://www.jamestownsun.com/life/garden/4298160-garden-tours-are-here

Mass Hort celebrates 10th anniversary of Bressingham Garden

On Tuesday, July 25, Massachusetts Horticultural Society will host some of the most renowned horticulturists for a symposium and reception. The day has been organized in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Bressingham Garden of the Gardens at Elm Bank.

Editor’s Note: The following was submitted by Mass Hort.

On Tuesday, July 25, Massachusetts Horticultural Society will host some of the most renowned horticulturists for a symposium and reception. The day has been organized in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Bressingham Garden of the Gardens at Elm Bank.

The symposium will be kicked off by the designer of the Bressingham Garden, Adrian Bloom. Bloom is a gardener, author, nurseryman, and photographer who developed his own renowned Foggy Bottom garden more than 50 years ago. He has designed gardens in North America and Germany, authored several books, and has presented for BBC “Gardener’s World” and WGBH “Victory Garden.”

Bloom has been awarded the Victoria Medal of Honour by the Royal Horticultural Society and Roland White Medal by Mass Hort. He will share the story of how the Bressingham Garden came about and how inspirational gardens can be a catalyst for enthusing more gardeners to create and enjoy success in much smaller gardens.

Also speaking will be Michael Dirr, expert on woody plants, and author of “The Manual of Woody Landscape Plants.” Dirr will present on advances in ornamental plant breeding that can enrich our gardens. Award-winning garden designer, author and lecturer Kerry Ann Mendez will present on perennials that can be incorporated into your landscape design to both add impact and reduce maintenance. Hydrangea expert Mal Condon will focus on hydrangea varieties that can be used in your landscape and how they have been used with great impact in New England gardens.

Using the Bressingham Garden as a backdrop, attendees will gain an understanding of what and how to plant for the greatest impact. Additionally, Russell’s Garden Center will be on-site selling plants that are being featured throughout the day. Proceeds raised from the event, as well as a portion of plant sales, will support the Bressingham Garden and future projects.

The symposium will run from noon-5 p.m. Additionally, Mass Hort will host a reception from 5:30-7:30 p.m. featuring the Hort Panel of Champions. Bring your plant questions to test 300-plus years of combined expertise of Adrian Bloom, Mal Condon, Michael Dirr, Wayne Mezitt, and Kerry Ann Mendez. We’ll also have an open mic session to hear memories of some of the 200 volunteers who helped install the garden, as well as wine, beer and hors d’oeuvres.

For more details, schedule and to register, please visit www.masshort.org.

Symposium hours are noon-5 p.m.

Reception Hours are 5:30-7:30 p.m.

Registration is $99 for the symposium, $25 for the reception, $119 for both.

Article source: http://wakefield.wickedlocal.com/news/20170714/mass-hort-celebrates-10th-anniversary-of-bressingham-garden

julia jamrozik + coryn kempster play with color in vertical line garden

working with patterns, order, color and density, the ‘vertical line garden’ installation, presented for the international garden festival in quebec, canada, is a play on formal traditional gardens with contemporary readymade means and hyper unnatural materials. the main material forming the installation, barricade tape, is typically used to delineate a perimeter and keep people out of a particular area. here however it is used precisely to bring visitors into the space and entice them to inhabit it.


the interior space of the ‘vertical line garden’ designed by the canadian duo
all images © coryn kempster

 

 

the ‘vertical line garden’ installation designed by canadian artists julia jamrozik + coryn kempster, is meant to be experienced, explored, and occupied. for this purpose custom bent steel and fabric lounge chairs are provided.


the barrier tape that forms the installation is being activated by a light breeze

 

 

julia jamrozik + coryn kempster’s ‘vertical line garden’ along with its canopy of colorful lines is both graphic and playful. as a space it encourages interaction without being prescriptive about use. while adults enjoy the comfort of the loungers and take pleasure in the moment of repose that the garden provides, youngsters use the tape as maze to run through, frolic in and explore.


the barrier tape being activated by a strong gust of wind

 

 

drawing on the formal language of historical garden design, and the contemporary means of mass-produced safety and construction materials, ‘vertical line garden’ is a graphic and spatial intervention. the installation introduces man-made elements into the cultivated natural environment of les jardins de métis. through this juxtaposition of the manufactured and the natural, a dialogue is created, based on the shared theme of protection and necessary safeguarding.


an engulfing space for adults to repose and for young ones to interact with the porous installation


the strands of tape vary in length for young ones to run through


detail view of the manmade barrier tape


detail view of the manmade barrier tape


a contemplative space to linger for people of all ages


the movement of the wind reveals the porosity of the installation


a full multi-sensory experience
image © martin bond


the ‘vertical line garden’ installation seen from afar

 

 

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: apostolos costarangos | designboom

Article source: http://www.designboom.com/art/julia-jamrozik-coryn-kempster-color-vertical-line-garden-07-14-2017/

Ideas from the Buzz Around Hamburg Garden Walk – The Buffalo …

Last weekend I had only limited time to visit gardens during the Buzz Around Hamburg Garden Walk. Still, the experience in just three gardens reminded me of the value of the whole regional phenomena. (Western New York offers five weeks of walks, tours and Open Gardens that comprise about 1,000 private gardens that you can visit.)

No matter where you go, gardens will surprise you, stimulate ideas, and may even change your mood and outlook for an entire day, week, or longer – as the following did for me.

Bright colors and hospitality

Some gardens just say “Come in, sit down, have a beverage, and stay awhile!” That is the Washut and Kelkenberg garden in Hamburg, one of my perennial favorites.

The café-like setting, with great cushioned seats and multiple umbrella tables, is visually exciting and just feels like a happy place. Gardener Kathy Kelkenberg told me the original idea was to buy one picnic table with umbrella, but somehow one became three, and now? “When we put the umbrellas down, the party is over – it looks like nothing,” she said.

Good reminder to us all: Provide seating and tables – generously – so that people will want to stay.

While first impressions in this garden are of brightness, color and furnishings, it’s also a study in garden design and use of space. For instance, how would you use the space in a village corner lot, to allow for some privacy?

The banana plant in the Washut/Kelkenberg garden. (Derek Gee/Buffalo News)

The gardeners created a west-facing perennial border (great for pollinators as well as passers-by) that faces the sidewalk and is backed by shrubs that close off the yard.

Inside, garden paths effectively create outdoor rooms and lead guests to specific planting beds and artifacts. A pondless waterfall, surrounded by proportionate shrubs and flowers, divides the café area from other sections and provides a calming effect.

One visitor wrote in the Guest Book: “This is a good place to meditate – with my eyes wide open!” I agree. Beyond design, the garden also shows off special plants. Bright planters overflow with grasses and tropicals, looking effortless, but with more analysis you can identify a lot of fine gardening and experience underlying this appealing garden.

I really did not want to leave this space, but I took with me the determination to brighten up my seating areas and to keep my eyes open for more dramatic containers. And I must sit still more often and just look.

(Note: See more photos of the Washut and Kelkenberg garden in Hamburg – as well as gardens in Lockport and Lackawanna – in this Sunday’s Home Style section.)

Make an original statement

I asked Marg Rust, who coordinates Buzz Around Hamburg, what garden I should show on TV this season – maybe a newer one that I hadn’t shown or written about?

“The Povinelli garden,” she said. “It’s, well, less about plants and more about really amazing hardscape and design creations. They’re so original.”

She was surely right … cobblestones salvaged from a factory floor on Ohio Street, slate from old Hamburg Village sidewalks, a potting table made from original posts that were part of a porch built in 1882 (dated and signed by the craftsman), a collection of cobalt-blue glass panes that stand behind yellow daylilies – salvaged from St. Brigid’s Church, built in 1859 and burned in 1968.

Another treasure – that most people would have left to deteriorate – is a Goshen Glide Settee that Tom Povinelli’s parents bought in 1940. It spent decades “moldering in a barn” before he restored it.

Treasures came from many places to create this most original garden. Janet and Tom Povinelli trucked in a 2-ton boulder from Gernatt Asphalt Products that they informed is a “Leaverite.” They said that with a wink. Then I learned: People who move boulders like to say, “Leave ‘er right there.”

The original Povinelli approach didn’t end with hardscape items. They transformed a hilly mount of grass into the most unexpected, dramatic, Japanese-inspired raked-stone garden. This flat, quiet space is surrounded by a round berm, with woolly thyme covering the inner wall. You must see it next summer, or if you’re lucky, make friends sooner with these cool, creative people.

My thought leaving this garden: Sometimes artistry – being “original” – is a matter of keeping one’s eyes open and having the imagination to see an object that others don’t, and knowing that it’s worth keeping, restoring or repurposing. The Povinellis certainly have the eyes for it.

Dave and Barb Whittemore’s garden in Hamburg was also featured in The Buffalo News in 2015. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News file photo)

Intense, passionate collectors

The Whittemore garden is an Open Garden and a tour bus destination this season, and I’ll take people to it whenever I can. Words, and even pictures, don’t capture the intensity of these artistically arranged and densely packed collections of hostas (more than 350) and dwarf conifers and perennials, complemented by moving train sets no less.

Barb Whittemore told me this happens often: A woman carrying a garden tour map starts down the ramp into the back garden, and will gasp and turn around, saying “Oh, I’ll be right back!” Return she does, leading her husband, who’d chosen to stay in the car after seeing enough gardens that day. This one is also for him.

In fact I can’t imagine who would not be impressed by so many plants, so beautifully tended, in a small yard, with the additional achievement of making several railroads operational. The Whittemores are diligent, passionate, accomplished, and eager to share.

When you see gardens on tour, remember how much these people are giving of their time and effort, and the risks they are taking, exposing their taste and choices.
It’s such a gift.

The fourth garden

After touring that day I returned home with the intention of doing some computer work and starting some laundry. My garden called me instead. There they were: the fluffy, pink Filipendulas and the hedge of Sorbaria blooming, the bright daisies surrounding a yellow rose, and so many daylilies just opening – one more delightful than the next.

I was so happy I’d dragged out the blue birdbath and blue bottles for the bottle tree, and I’d made the little fountain work. It’s not a showplace garden like those amazing ones, but it’s my favorite of all. And that may be the important thing: Garden for the joy of it, whether guests are coming or not.

Sally Cunningham is a garden writer, lecturer and consultant.

Save

Article source: http://buffalonews.com/2017/07/14/ideas-buzz-around-hamburg-garden-walk/

Navy Yard apartment gives residents free rooftop produce garden

WASHINGTON — F1RST Residences just upped the game for luxury apartment amenities in Washington, giving residents access to fresh, rooftop-grown produce.

The new 325-unit Navy Yard apartment building’s first tenants began moving in this spring.

Related Gallery




New luxury buildings in Capitol Riverfront — 1 with ballpark views

The two latest apartment buildings to come online in the Capitol Riverfront neighborhood near Nationals Park push the luxury envelope for renters.


The building has partnered with Up Top Acres to design and maintain a vegetable and herb garden on the roof, so residents can have access to a variety of produce through the summer and the fall.

There will be no cost for residents to participate in the garden program, and it will be entirely cared for by Up Top Acres.

The 470-square-foot garden will yield roughly 500 pounds of produce each year, including tomatoes, peppers, cilantro, parsley, thyme, rosemary, arugula, basil and zucchini.

“F1RST is giving its residents a community-supported agriculture program,” said Up Top Acres co-founder Kristof Grina. “This new farm will transform an underutilized part of the rooftop into a vibrant, productive living ecosystem — and bring ‘farm-to-table’ right in the same property.”

F1RST has already made extensive use of its rooftop.

The building, at First and N Streets in Southeast, includes a rooftop pool and hot tub, dog park, grills and D.C.’s only residential “stadium-style” seating with views into Nats Park.

The one- and two-bedroom apartments rent for $2,000 to $3,500 a month.


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Article source: http://wtop.com/business-finance/2017/07/navy-yard-apartment-gives-residents-free-rooftop-produce-garden/