Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Chelsea townhouse with modern Danish design asks a cool $11M

This Chelsea townhouse at 449 West 24th Street has some bragging rights both inside and out. Exterior-wise, the 21-foot-wide home is surrounded by greenery and outdoor space on a block of other historic townhouses. Inside, over 4,073 square feet, mid-century and Danish interior design has added a unique and modern touch. Big walls of glass, finally, connect the indoor and outdoor elements. If you’re digging the connection, the property has just hit the market for a cool $11 million.

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

The home is configured with a guest suite on the garden floor, and owner’s triplex above. The parlor floor is easily the main attraction, with a sunken living room that overlooks the lush rear garden through dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows.

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

Up a few stairs from the living room is a dining area and large, customized kitchen. White slatted floor-to-ceiling doors were added, likely concealing an insane amount of storage. Sliding doors partition off an office space.

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

The next floor up holds a spacious master bedroom suite, complete with built-in storage, a fireplace, and a dedicated terrace overlooking the rear garden.

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

The top floor houses two more bedrooms, a large bathroom and flexible media or office space. Skylights abound, an important detail to this light-filled interior. And who wouldn’t enjoy a fire under skylights on the top floor of this home?

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

Here’s a look inside the garden-level apartment, with a bedroom, kitchen and large den with a decorative fireplace. The living space opens to the front and back gardens.

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

Outside, the townhouse is surrounded by greenery. It’s got a front garden, rare to Manhattan townhouses, which adds additional privacy from the street. Outside, two terraces extend off the exterior. And the West Chelsea location puts you within walking distance to the High Line, Chelsea Piers and Hudson River waterfront.

[Listing: 449 West 24th Street by Kelly Elivo and Ever Elivo of CORE Real Estate]

RELATED:

Photos courtesy of CORE

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,


Tags :

,


Neighborhoods :

Chelsea


Article source: https://www.6sqft.com/chelsea-townhouse-with-modern-danish-design-asks-a-cool-11m/

Try these 6 tips for fabulous holiday decor

Expand

Transforming your home into holiday central can seem like an overwhelming task when you consider the expanse of décor trends out thereon Instagram. You start thinking about floral arrangements, tablescapes, mantels, wreaths and pretty soon there is too much to do and not enough time to do it.

To help you ease into holiday prep, we spoke to Molly Wood of Molly Wood Garden Design in Costa Mesa for advice on how to add festive style to your home without the stress.

“At the end of the day, if someone stands back and loves what they’ve created, that’s all that matters. The number one rule is that decorating is supposed to be fun,” said Wood.

These six tips from a local expert will get you started and help you find the joy in your party planning.

1. Simplify the space

“I would first do a general de-cluttering of your house because you’re going to be bringing more items into the space,” said Wood.  By clearing some of your everyday décor, you can create a blank backdrop that will highlight your holiday goods.

2. Choose 3-4 places to focus your décor

“Create more impact by choosing focal points like the entry table, kitchen island or mantel,” said Wood. Make the task of decorating more manageable by selecting a few areas that will set the mood without overwhelming your existing interior design.

3. Include elements of nature

“One of my must-haves is fresh greens. I always like to bring some sort of natural element into the story,” said Wood. Some of her go-tos include magnolia leaves, eucalyptus, dark greens, succulents, air plants and dried star pods because they have a long shelf-life and still look good when dried.

4. Say ‘yes’ to candles

“I like to bring out the Beeswax candles because it is a time for decadence. They smell good and burn clean,” said Wood. She also suggests displaying candles of varying heights and shapes— Think tall taper candles next to wide pillar candles.

5. Play up one color

“When you focus on one color it really becomes impactful. The hardest thing to do in all of design is editing, so maybe choose either red or green,” said Wood. The primary color can be balanced with a secondary color like gold, silver or black to make the traditional color pop.

6. Make the most out of your centerpiece

“It’s nice to have a few things that hold the table when nothing is there,” said Wood. She suggests a multilayered centerpiece with sections you can move off the table once the surface is set for a meal.

Article source: http://www.ocregister.com/2017/11/15/try-these-6-tips-for-fabulous-holiday-decor/

Natto Franco is the woman-helmed brand disrupting the streetwear game

For her latest creations that she specifically calls “drops”—explaining that she simply doesn’t create collections anymore—she draws inspiration from traditional sports uniforms in Japanese schools. “The two next drops include colors I’ve never done before. It’s mainly T-shirts made of stretched velvet. They are meant to resemble the T-shirts that young students wear in a P.E. class in Japan. It’s super cute,” she says.

 

HOMETOWN

Paris, France

GREEN THUMB BEGINNINGS

SEBAYASHI: Not a lot of people know this but I originally wanted to be a garden designer. I still talk about it. I love flowers and gardens. I always thought when I have a big house and lots of space, I could design my own garden with a river close by. And then one day my mom came up to me and said, “If you’re going to try to be a garden designer, you’re going to end up as a cashier at a garden store.” [laughs] That was the moment for me. I thought, if I’m going to design and it’s not plants, it’s going to be clothes. But it was really my father who got me interested in fashion. He used to work in advertising but he was always aware of what he was wearing. He bought and still buys stuff that may not be expensive but it’s the best thing you can find. He introduced me to thrift stores early on when vintage wasn’t a big thing in Paris. Around that time was also when he introduced me to the comfy, cozy, and cool Japanese menswear.

SILKSCREEN OBSESSIONS

SEBAYASHI: There’s this Japanese illustrator called Daisuke Ichiba. I’m basically obsessed with silkscreen artists. There’s a word for it in Japanese. It’s called “otaku.” It’s used for people who are obsessed with anime or rap. Everyone in Japan is “otaku” of something. These artists [that inspire me] are “otaku” of drawings and silkscreens. I’m also a very obsessive person. I like to explore everything about a subject. It could be a song, an artist, a place, or a thing. I still have these items of clothes with classic cuts from when I was a teenager. I looked back to when I was growing up and I realized what was going on aesthetically with the clothes. I’m very sensitive to when I was a teenager. It inspires me a lot as do books and collaging.

HUMOROUS AESTHETIC

SEBAYASHI: It’s a unisex brand, so I don’t say only girls or guys can wear a certain piece. My creative process also comes from the collages and color palettes I create. I think about what certain colors will look like when blended together. I don’t think about if girls will wear a print featuring another girl showing her boobs. Humor and how cool something looks is first for me. I also think streetwear is still a bit empty on the French scene. So for me there’s lots of room. People really think I do something unique here. But internationally, it’s important to not look at what everyone else is doing and just be true to yourself. That’s how you can have a unique identity.

Article source: https://www.interviewmagazine.com/fashion/natto-franco-woman-helmed-brand-disrupting-streetwear-game

Gardenwise: Remember November As Cleanup Time

Although there’s lot to do in the garden in November, refrain from cutting back ornamental plants with beautiful seed heads, such as the fountain grass and black-eyed Susan (shown in the foreground) pictured here.
Although there’s lot to do in the garden in November, refrain from cutting back ornamental plants with beautiful seed heads, such as the fountain grass and black-eyed Susan (shown in the foreground) pictured here.

Gardenwise: Remember November As Cleanup Time

By Susan Tito

By now, if you’re like most property owners on Long Island, you’ve dug out your trusty rake from your garage, shed or basement and have gotten to work on those expanding piles of leaves.

There’s no disputing that, for many people, November chores start and end with raking. However, if you take inventory of your property you’ll find there are many other activities that should be performed to winterize your landscape and ensure a glorious garden for next year.

For starters, get grounded — as in addressing the health of your soil. Now is the perfect time of year to add compost to your gardening beds and the root zones of trees and shrubs. Apply a 1-inch layer of this “black gold” — which is just teeming with beneficial microbes and nutrients — to create a healthier support system for your plants.

Many nurseries make their own compost and sell it by the yard, and will deliver it right to your property. Just grab a few shovels and some strong friends (preferably those who owe you a few favors) and you will be on your way to enriching your soil. If you’re not keen on turning your much-used driveway into a compost repository —even for the short term — you can purchase bags of compost at local garden and home centers.

This is also an excellent time of year to start your own compost pile, although you won’t be able to reap the benefits for a while. Start by performing a little “rakey” on your property: Shred leaves with a recycler mower, push into a pile and let them decompose.

Before you compost, you should perform a soil test for each section of your garden, including grassy areas. A comprehensive soil test will measure levels of acidity, nutrients and salt. Not sure where to begin? Cornell Cooperative Extension’s Horticulture Diagnostic Lab offers a soil-testing service. For more information, call 631.727.4126, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to noon.

At this time of year, you may be gearing up for the upcoming winter festivities, but weeds never take a holiday. Fear not — it’s not too late to pluck these pests from your landscape! Some weeds are perennial, such as dandelions, which go dormant but lie in wait until next spring, at which time they make an unwelcome return. Others are annual, such as crabgrass, and although their removal from your landscape means those plants are gone forever, they may have left you with a present — their progeny (seeds).

Getting weeds is an inevitable part of gardening, but getting rid of as many as you can now— along with their seed heads —means fewer to contend with next year.

While you’re busy weeding, there’s something else you should remove — dead and broken branches from trees and shrubs. Broken branches leave your woody plants more susceptible to disease and insect infestation, weakening them over time. A little pruning can go a long way toward ensuring their health, especially as we head into winter.

That’s when winds are especially brutal and can be more damaging than frigid temperatures. Protect young or borderline-hardy plants by wrapping them in burlap and spray broadleaf evergreens with an anti-desiccant, which acts as a protective coating, helping to conserve moisture for up to four months. The best time to do this is when temperatures are still above 40 degrees.

Even though the dog days of summer are behind us, it’s important that plants get adequate water until the ground freezes. Use a soaker hose or drip irrigation system and deliver moisture where it’s needed most — at the root zone.

There’s another thing you can do for your garden this month — nothing (at least when it comes to some of your perennials). To be specific, let them go to seed.

“Just like trees and shrubs, herbaceous perennials like black-eyed Susan, asters, and grasses can be beautiful as they go dormant,” said Mina Vescera, nursery/landscape specialist at Cornell Cooperative Extension in Riverhead. “Many have beautiful seed heads and fall foliage, and add habitat and forage for beneficial insects and birds.”

Now that I’ve added significantly to your to-do list for November (please direct any and all complaints to my editor at the East End Beacon), don’t be surprised if raking becomes less of a priority for you than it had in previous years. But take solace: I guarantee that your property will be better than ever come next spring!

Susan Tito
Susan Tito

Susan Tito is a freelance writer and proprietor of Summerland Garden Design Consulting (summerlandgardendesign.com). She earned a certificate in ornamental garden design from the New York Botanical Garden and is a member of the American Horticultural Society and Garden Writers Association. She can be reached at stito630@gmail.com.

Article source: http://www.eastendbeacon.com/gardenwise-remember-november-as-cleanup-time/

Northwestern wins 8 building design awards

The+Kellogg+School+of+Management+Global+Hub+at+2211+Campus+Dr.+The+Global+Hub+is+among+seven+buildings+at+Northwestern+that+received+design+awards+from+local+nonprofit+organization+Design+Evanston.The Kellogg School of Management Global Hub at 2211 Campus Dr. The Global Hub is among seven buildings at Northwestern that received design awards from local nonprofit organization Design Evanston.

The Kellogg School of Management Global Hub at 2211 Campus Dr. The Global Hub is among seven buildings at Northwestern that received design awards from local nonprofit organization Design Evanston.

Alec Carroll/The Daily Northwestern

Alec Carroll/The Daily Northwestern

The Kellogg School of Management Global Hub at 2211 Campus Dr. The Global Hub is among seven buildings at Northwestern that received design awards from local nonprofit organization Design Evanston.

Ally Mauch, Assistant Campus Editor

A local nonprofit recognized seven Northwestern buildings with eight design awards in categories ranging from landscape design to new construction, according to a Wednesday news release.

Design Evanston, an organization that aims to promote good design, announced awards for 28 local buildings.

On campus, the Patrick G. and Shirley W. Ryan Center for the Musical Arts was the only building to win two awards, one for landscape design and the other for new construction. The Dearborn Observatory, an administrative building located at 720 University Place, The Garage, the Kellogg School of Management Global Hub, the Ryan Field west parking lot and the Shakespeare Garden received one award each.

During the last announcement of awards in 2015, NU buildings collectively won two awards, the release said.

The Global Hub, which opened in March, won an award for interior design, as the building’s “fluid” form gives it the sense of “structure in motion,” according to the release.

“The sculpted, undulating form weaves around the building, revealing multi-level terraces and nestled spaces that foster informal social activity and business education collaboration,” the release said.

The Dearborn Observatory received an award in the rehabilitation/renovation/restoration design category. The observatory, a “historic gem,” underwent renovations in 2015 and 2016 that included repairs to the building’s windows, sections of the roof and the wrought iron walkway, according to the release.

The Shakespeare Garden, renovated in spring 2016, won in the landscape design category. The garden, added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1988, is maintained by the Garden Club of Evanston.

A previous version of the caption on this story misstated how many buildings won design awards. Seven buildings won awards. The Daily regrets the error.

Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @allymauch

Comments

Article source: https://dailynorthwestern.com/2017/11/15/campus/northwestern-wins-8-building-design-awards/

Big garden in a small space

As we settle into autumn, it is such an unexpected pleasure to see some remaining blooming plants in Ronald Doyle’s garden at 945 Hillview Drive. In addition to more than 150 roses, he has coreopsis, petunias, anemones, Jupiter’s beard, gaura, honeysuckle, ice plant, zonal geraniums and, in season, a stunning display of giant phlox. Other trees in the front yard include crepe myrtle, flowering crabapple, tulip tree, Japanese maple, and a giant cedar that anchors the corner at Ross Lane.

Ron has been gardening here since 1985. Much of the property was just gravel when he moved in. Some of the garden design is by his late wife, Eva-Maria vonChamier. He uses TID water for irrigation. Two dump-truck loads of soil and amendments have been brought in.

The garden paths are of hazelnut shells, which he first saw at the Oregon Garden in Silverton. Presumably the sharp edges of the shells discourage snails and slugs, but Ron has good reason to believe otherwise. Well, it looks really good! There is a very large and graceful metal arbor in the back yard that Ron designed, based on something he had seen in France. The magnificent display is contained in the relatively small lot of 90 by 130 feet.

The fragrant roses are an amazing array of varieties and colors, including a very large Cecile Bruner that has finished blooming. Other plants that are past the bloom stage now but provide color at other times of year are rhododendron, azaleas, lilac, mock orange, oriental poppy, lilac, iris, daphne, bellflower, clematis and lilies. Ron has tomato plants in a raised bed, grapes, and raspberries. Both a Granny Smith apple tree and cherry tree grafted to supply five varieties of the fruit are in the back yard. An especially lovely oregano fills in among flowering plants in the front.

Doyle’s garden was Garden of the Month in September of 2012, but was not featured in the Daily Tidings at that time.

The Ashland Garden Club has been selecting Gardens of the Month, from April through September, since 2000. Nominations are gratefully received at aogardenclub@gmail.com. Check out the club’s website at ashlandorgardenclub.wordpress.com or come to the meetings at 12:30 on the first Monday of the month, October through May, at the Community Center on Winburn Way.

 

Article source: http://www.dailytidings.com/news/20171115/big-garden-in-small-space

Arboretum lights up for ‘Moonlight’ event

— For two weekends every year the JC Raulston Arboretum, tucked away near N.C. State’s campus, stays open into the evening to showcase the garden at night, with light displays taking over the garden.

For Moonlight in the Garden, the arboretum partners with Southern Lights of Raleigh to bring visitors a custom designed light display, complete with walkway lined lanterns and color changing light shows.

Moonlight in the Garden

The arboretum, which opened in 1975, covers more than 10 acres. The gardens contain a diverse collection of plants, all of which have been adapted for landscape use. Most of the garden follow a formal design or theme and some sections were designed and built by students taking landscape horticulture classes. The arboretum is maintained by volunteers and relies on public support and donations.

Moonlight in the Garden

The Moonlight in the Garden event is one of the ways the arboretum raise funds to keep admission free for the rest of the year.

In addition to the displays, the event also includes food trucks, local apple cider, live music and fire pits.

Moonlight in the Garden wraps up this weekend. It runs Thursday through Saturday. Admission is $10 for Arboretum members, $20 for non-members and $5 for children ages 12 years and younger.


Lindsay A. Underwood covers the Triangle on her blog, Welcome to Raleighwood.

Article source: http://www.wral.com/arboretum-lights-up-for-moonlight-event/17114148/

TWRA Regional Office Receives Pollinator Garden Grant

The TWRA Region 3 office has received a grant from the national Bayer Feed a Bee program to install a pollinator garden at its Crossville office. This national program has allotted $500,000 in grants to establish foraging plots for pollinators in all 50 states by the end of 2018. The Feed a Bee program has funded a total of 71 projects through the initiative to increase forage for bees and other pollinators across the country since its inception.

As one of the 13 recipients of grants awarded during the second selection cycle of this two-year initiative, TWRA has received $5,000 to fund its planting project.

The Region 3 office will install a pollinator garden and extend a warm season grass and forb area. Not only will the garden beautify the regional office, it will provide an example of how native plants can be utilized to improve habitat for individual home and landowners.  Míme Barnes, TWRA Information and Education Coordinator said, “A healthy ecosystem creates healthy wildlife. We’ve come far enough to understand that natural areas matter and that our yards collectively have an impact on wildlife. A small garden filled with native flowers in someone’s front yard means something.”

Bees have been documented as the most important group of pollinators in the United States. Loss of habitat and excessive use of pesticides has been recognized as the greatest contributor to pollinator loss. Initiatives to help pollinators across Tennessee have been in place for years through many state and federal programs. “We’re dedicated to the TWRA mission to preserve, conserve, manage and protect fish and wildlife. This garden is a terrific example of much greater things taking place across the state. We encourage everyone to consider what they can do for pollinators and wildlife on their own property,” said Ms. Barnes.

Landscape Solutions of Crossville will be installing the garden and donating some materials. Scott Clymer and Joe Sooter, co-owners, are well known in the area for their landscape design and garden center. Clymer and Sooter have focused on sustainable measures in their design since the start of their business in 2004.

Mr. Clymer said, “It’s great to bring beauty to a yard and provide for wildlife. Pollinator gardens are an easy way to attract birds and butterflies. Landscape Solutions is dedicated to the Crossville community and happy to be a part of TWRA’s project.”

 

For more information on the Feed a Bee grant or the TWRA regional office, visit tnwildlife.org.

Article source: http://www.chattanoogan.com/2017/11/14/358512/TWRA-Regional-Office-Receives.aspx

Tucson landscape designer’s award-winning project has a must-see view

Contact Tucson freelance writer Elena Acoba at acoba@dakotacom.net.

Article source: http://tucson.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/tucson-landscape-designer-s-award-winning-project-has-a-must/article_0889d583-ed8a-5f9e-a7b9-a3c7000fc48b.html

grimshaw-designed botanic garden in oman will become the world’s largest ecological oasis

grimshaw architects, arup engineering, and haley sharpe design have collaborated to present the ‘oman botanic garden’, the largest of its kind within the arabian peninsula. designed with guidance from his majesty sultan qaboos bin said al said, the eco-park will celebrate and conserve the country’s botanic diversity with hundreds of endangered species and also house a visitor center, education and research facilities.

oman botanical garden
all images © arup/grimshaw

 

 

located 35 kilometers from muscat, in the foothills of the al hajar mountains, the ‘oman botanic garden’ has a unique site condition.  it is one of only a few locations in the world where the ancient sea bed is still visible after tectonic activity elevated the bed to 100 meters above sea level. arup and grimshaw worked with the existing natural ridges and ravines that traverse the site to design the buildings and walkways, carefully integrating them within the spectacular undulating land.

oman botanical garden
the eco-park will be located 35 kilometers from muscat, in the foothills of the al hajar mountains

 

 

the complex program requirements of the unique ecological environment and educational facilities required a balance between visitor comfort and ecological comfort. the design strategy incorporates passive and active shading, natural daylight optimization, and cooling and efficient plant irrigation. orientation of the sunlight, weather patterns and human behavior have also informed the design of visitor flow through the site.

oman botanical garden
the design is carefully integrated within the undulating landscape

 

 

‘the oman botanic garden is an astonishing project with many layers of interwoven cultural and environmental significance,’ says keith brewis, grimshaw partner. ‘its scale and diversity is truly world-leading, and we are honored to work as the architects for a project that has the conservation of bio-diversity as a core design driver.’

oman botanical garden
two biomes house a diverse collection of plant life 

 

 

ed clarke, associate director and project manager added, ‘at arup we have enjoyed the many unique challenges presented by the oman botanic garden; from designing natural and authentic landscapes to recreating the cool mists of the khareef. more than 700 of our multi-disciplinary engineers and specialist designers were engaged to explore and find solutions that would befit such an ambitious and creative brief. the oman botanic garden must surely be one of the most marvelous projects in the world.’

oman botanical garden
the eco-park will celebrate and conserve the country’s botanic diversity with hundreds of endangered species a

oman botanical garden
the park will also house research and education facilities 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Article source: https://www.designboom.com/architecture/oman-botanical-garden-grimshaw-arup-11-14-2017/