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Garden designer Martyn Wilson has chosen to use his industrial …

Martyn Wilson’s 2017 garden design for Hampton Court Palace Flower Show with which he is supporting Oxfordshire charity Ucare.

Article source: http://www.oxfordtimes.co.uk/news/15244293.Steel_yourself__industrial_garden_will_raise_awareness_for_cancer_charity/

Rooftop garden competitors give final proposals

The Gallagher Theater hosted the finalists of the Student Union Rooftop Garden Competition on Thursday, April 20, as teams presented their final presentations.

Teams were given 15 minutes to present the entirety of their garden followed by a 5-minute question and answer with the judging panel.

The final six teams came from an original lineup of 24 groups of five students representing a range of departments and schools around UA. Students from agricultural sciences, engineering, business and design all brought their perspectives and expertise to the planning of the Student Union Memorial Center (SUMC) rooftop garden.

At the beginning of the semester, SUMC administration created a competition for students at UA to team up and design an all-inclusive development and production plan for a garden built on space allocated by the Student Union. Competitors were free to get creative as they liked as long at the garden produced food for the Campus Pantry and union restaurants.

Decisions had to be made about every aspect of the garden including labor scheduling, harvest planning and nutritional analysis. Each group brought different perspectives the choices in front of them.

RELATED: Student teams pitch plans for Rooftop Garden Competition

When it came to choosing a growing technique, teams had limited options. The two prominent choices were a soil-based garden or a hydroponic garden. The latter relies on a nutrient rich irrigation system passing through the roots at all times. 

However, one team included a method of gardening that judges didn’t expect to see. Team 2, made up of Chetan Bafna, Alex Garcia-Ramirez, Maria Marzano and NaRayah Runyon, designed a “fogponics” greenhouse. Fogponics takes advantage of a soilless system like hydroponics, but by exposing crop roots to a nutrient rich fog, gardeners will be able to use 70 percent less water than the already low-water hydroponics approach. 

“Fogponics is relatively new,” said Garcia-Ramirez, a senior studying biosystems engineering, mathematics and mechanical engineering. “We would be conducting research in this garden”.

One aspect of the garden that saw many different approaches was labor scheduling. 

Teams were told to design the garden with a budget of $50,000, including the first year’s labor and maintenance cost. While most teams chose to create two or three student part-time positions lead by a gardening expert, Team 13 proposed a different solution. 

Team 13 was made up of members from UA’s Students for Sustainability (SFS) organization. They described their labor plan as “Student led, student fed,” conscripting volunteers from SFS and other environmentally-conscious organizations.

RELATED: Rooftop garden competition highlights the future of food production

Growing properly nutritious food was also a focus. 

“People between the ages of 19 and 30 aren’t getting half of what they need,” said Catalina Fernandez-Moores, a junior studying biosystems engineering and mechanical engineering and a member of Team 7.

The main goal for the Rooftop Garden Competition is to help alleviate food insecurity on campus. However, it also presents a great opportunity for students to better educate themselves about where their food comes from.

“This project is what I call phase two of the Campus Pantry initiative, that is the soil and roots of where the idea came from,” said Todd Millay, director of the Student Unions.

In fact, incorporating public education was the subject of many questions posed by the judges for the competitors. 

“Our overall goal is to beautify and educate the campus,” said Nicholas Tritz, a junior studying civil engineering. Tritz and the rest of Team 3 made education an integral part of their presentation.

Education is what it all comes back to in university initiatives, and the Rooftop Garden Competition is no exception. In January, Millay and the Office of Student Engagement had hopes for the opportunities that could come from a simple utilization of space.

“The thought was ‘Can we get students engaged in this, really blow it up, make it a big deal so that students can be participating in growing food for their fellow students,” Millay said.  

Now, four months later, dozens of students have dedicated their time and energy to seeing this competition out to its full potential. 

“We’ve learned more in this competition than we ever did in any class,” said Joseph Lewandowski, a senior studying mathematics and Spanish.

To get a look at what the Rooftop Garden will look like in the fall, come to the final ceremony in Gallagher Theater on Thursday, April 27th from 5-7:00 pm. First, second, and third place winners will be announced. This event will mark the beginning of the next phase of this initiative, that will eventually become a permanent garden at the SUMC.


Follow Chandler Donald on Twitter.


Article source: http://www.wildcat.arizona.edu/article/2017/04/rooftop-garden-competitors-give-final-proposals

The Headley-Whitney Museum’s A Garden Affair takes the art of the …

The Headley-Whitney Museum will welcome guests onto the grounds Thursday through Sunday. Attendees can visit vendor kiosks, tour museum galleries and grounds, enjoy lectures and programs ,and sample local food trucks. The event benefits exhibitions, programs and education at the museum.

The fête kicks off from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday with cocktails and appetizers prepared with local produce. The event marks the reopening of the museum’s iconic Shell House. Inspired by 17th- and 18th-century European shell grottos, the building has been closed since 2011.

Garden-related lectures are planned for Friday and Saturday. Ben Page, a Nashville landscape architect known for his historically inspired work, will present an informal talk about garden design at 10 a.m. Friday. The New York Times best-selling author Andrea Wulf will discuss the lasting impact of America’s first settlers and their gardens, and sign copies of her book, at 6 p.m. Friday. Scientist, author and arborist Tom Kimmerer will speak on the conservation of Kentucky and Tennessee woodland pastures at 10 a.m. Saturday. French garden architect Philippe de Boncourt will share his process of transforming impression into interpretation into garden design at 6 p.m. Saturday.

The event runs daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday at the museum, 4435 Old Frankfort Pike. Tickets start at $10 for lectures, demonstrations, activities and garden vendors. Go to HWMAGarden.com for tickets and more information.

Article source: http://www.kentucky.com/news/local/counties/fayette-county/article146423279.html

10 Tips for Water-Conscious Garden Design

Note: This post contains affiliate links, which helps fund our Recycling Directory, the most comprehensive in North America.

How green does your garden grow? If your yard requires an abundance of water to maintain that brightly colored curb appeal, it might score high in hue but low in landscape sustainability.

It’s true the earth is made up mostly of water, but only 1 percent of the world’s water is actually usable. While California has made a turn for the wetter, according to the weekly U.S. Drought Monitor, about 14.1 percent of the contiguous U.S. is still classified as experiencing moderate to exceptional drought, as of the end of February.

Even if you don’t reside in a drought state, incorporating something called xeriscaping into your landscape design is essential for the well-being of our planet by protecting our precious resources. Xeriscaping — a landscape and garden design approach that uses water conservation techniques — reduces or eliminates the need for supplemental water from irrigation systems. It works by incorporating drought-tolerant plants as well as those native to the region.

While I’ve been living an eco-friendly lifestyle for many years, as a California resident, my green thumb techniques have been limited to decks and patios. So, I consulted with gardenista Teryl Ciarlo, who says it doesn’t matter if you have a lawn, a patio or want to start your first mini garden — it’s time to get your hands dirty! Ciarlo is a West Los Angeles landscape designer who believes gardening an hour a day keeps the doctor away. According to Ciarlo:

“Gardening and working with soil reduces stress, lowers blood pressure, improves mental health and raises endorphin levels.”

Ciarlo shared with me some surprising tips that we can all incorporate this Earth Day and beyond to help save water, save money and improve our health.

10 Tips for Water-Conscious Garden Design

1. Catch Rainwater

April showers certainly bring May flowers, but they can also be used to water your yard and garden, and even wash your car. According to RainBarrelGuide.com, for every inch of rain that falls on a “catchment area” of 1,000 square feet, approximately 600 gallons of rainwater can be collected. That’s a lot of water that would otherwise be wasted, which equates to serious savings for homeowners.

If the thought of ugly, oversize gray barrels in your yards makes your inner designer cringe, fear not. Ciarlo says catchment options range from stylish storage tanks to pretty planters that double as rainwater catchers. Try her favorite, the Rain Wizard Rain Barrel Urn from Good Ideas. This barrel helps you harvest rainwater and even air-conditioner condensation, and the flat back lets you optimize outdoor space.

“Rainwater sliding off a polymer, metal, ceramic or real slate sloping roof into collection barrels is safe for secondary uses like garden irrigation,” says Tim Gentry, vice president of technical services at DaVinci Roofscapes. “Roofs like these do not tend to leach chemicals or pollution into the water.” In fact, their 100 percent recyclable, USA-made, synthetic roofing tiles contain inorganic pigments permanently bound into the polymer tiles that meet California Proposition 65 protocols and certify that the products do not release or discharge toxins into water. Savings, safety and style? That’s what I call smart.

2. Sprinkle Sparingly

If you’re like me, you’ve over-watered everything on more than one occasion. While we all have good hydration intentions, the average American family is devoting a whopping 30 percent of the household water usage to lawn and garden watering. You probably know to turn off the sprinklers when it rains, but you should also water in the early hours of the morning to reduce evaporation.

3. More Gravel, Less Grass

Gravel doesn’t require the water that grass does. Photo: Teryl Designs

By removing portions of your grass and installing gravel or decomposed granite instead, you can save water — while also cooling your home — by surrounding the space with canopy trees for extra shade. According to the Arbor Environmental Alliance, one large tree strategically placed in a yard can replace 10 room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours per day.

Create a gravel sitting area with a farmhouse table and chairs. Add pops of color with upcycled benches, recycled pillows and comfy throws. Ciarlo says gardens shouldn’t just be viewed from the kitchen window but experienced year-round. She believes excellent landscape design incorporates season-less gardens, with plants peaking all year.

“I have a deep affection for being able to provide my clients with the classic ‘California dreaming’ reality, using the indoor and outdoor living spaces as the path,” she says. “Homeowners and their guests always gravitate toward the garden or terrace if you lead the way by making it cozy and inviting.”

4. Use Drought-Tolerant Plants

Contrary to popular belief, succulents aren’t the only plants that are drought-tolerant. Beautiful herbs like rosemary and lavender are not only fragrant and great for cooking or freshening your indoor air, it turns out they’re extremely water-conscious. For fantastic border plants, try Little Ollie shrubs; they’re a clean, compact-growing shrub that requires very little attention or water. My husband’s kind of plant!

5. Add Rain Gutter Catch Basins to Your Rain Gutters

Catch your rainwater with a basin at the bottom of your drain. Photo: Shutterstock

While that may be a tongue twister, redirecting rainwater to a drought-tolerant herb garden or storage tank is, well, savvy. Aesthetics-driven readers, take a breath: There are very discreet underwater storage tanks that hold quite a bit of water without being an eyesore. And, slim fit isn’t just for men’s shirts. Nowadays, you can even find slim, wall-mounted tanks that can run alongside walls and fences, like this one. Just attach a hose and water your yard. Your neighbors will be green with envy.

6. Collect Gray Water from Your Sinks

It’s surprising how much gray water we produce every day without realizing it. By merely saving water that would otherwise go down the drain (i.e., waiting for the faucet to warm up) or used to rinse fruit and vegetables, you can repurpose this to water your potted plants. Even water left over in drinking glasses and water bottles can be collected in a pitcher.

Don’t forget to fix all leaks from hoses or pipes. This is not only vital to prevent mold, but if you have a leak, you’re wasting water. A great way to spot leaks is to check your water meter at the beginning of a two-hour window of no water use. Then, check again at the end of the two hours. If the number has risen, you have a leak.

7. Add Mulch to Trees and Plants

Did you know mulch discourages weed growth, minimizes water runoff and retains moisture? By adding a few inches of compost or mulch around trees and plants, this will slow the evaporation of moisture, allowing your garden plenty of time to take a long sip of water. Mix mulch with all your soil to encourage moisture retention in the entire yard.

8. Install a Drip Irrigation System

Sprinklers are out; drip irrigation systems are in. If you aren’t familiar, you’ll be thrilled to know that drip irrigation systems save 50 percent more water than sprinklers, with little to no water loss from runoff or evaporation. They can be installed anywhere, from large yards to individual planters. A drip irrigation system allows total control over the amount of water supplied to each designated area. They work wonderfully with mulched areas, thoroughly soaking the moisture-retaining mulch sans the runoff.

9. Think About the Needs of Bees

Bees need a place to land. Your garden could be one of them. Photo: Shutterstock

According to Ciarlo, bees pollinate one-third of all food, but we’re seeing fewer of them due to climate change and habitat loss. Bees pollinate a plethora fruits and vegetables, including broccoli, apples and squash (and even almonds!). They require flowering plants and herbs to thrive, and with the popularity of suburban lawns and the destruction of native landscapes, bees are rapidly disappearing.

Good news! You can encourage bee production by planting flowering trees and clover in your yard or in planters on patios. Also, avoid chemically treating plants and flowers since chemicals can negatively affect a bee’s system, human health and the entire ecosystem. Bees like volume in their flowers, so plant plenty of the same type of bloom together. A few good examples are lilacs, lavender, sage, wisteria and verbena — they’re not just practical, but bee-autiful!

10. Plant a Tree — or Three!

According to NASA, upward of 20 percent of Earth’s carbon dioxide (CO2) could remain in the atmosphere for thousands of years, and rising concentrations are already causing the planet to heat up. By just planting a single tree, you can help, given that plants neutralize excess CO2. A single mature tree can absorb carbon dioxide at a rate of 48 pounds per year, while releasing oxygen back into the air. Planting a tree creates beauty, fights global warming and is good for our health, too. (Want to know more? Read “The 3 Plants Every Home Should Have for Clean Air.”)

Trees can also help keep cities cooler by releasing water vapor into the air and breaking up urban hot spots. Shade from trees slows water evaporation, and surprisingly, most new trees only need 15 gallons of water per week, according to Ciarlo. Surround your home with trees and enjoy the numerous benefits while also doing your part to help our beautiful planet. Mother Earth will surely thank you.

I hope this inspires you this Earth Day to take even just one of the above action steps. Last time I checked, there is no planet B.

Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock

Read More:
What I Learned My First Year of Container Gardening
Gardening Tips: Garden Like a Ninja
Why Rainwater Collection Works and How to Do It Correctly

  • About
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Lisa Beres

Lisa Beres

Lisa Beres is a healthy home expert, Baubiologist, published author, professional speaker and Telly award-winning media personality who teaches busy people how to eliminate toxins from their home with simple, step-by-step solutions to improve their health. With her husband, Ron, she is the co-founder of The Healthy Home Dream Team and the 30-day online program Change Your Home. Change Your Health. She is the author of the children’s book My Body My House and co-author of Just Green It!: Simple Swaps to Save Your Health and the Planet, Learn to Create a Healthy Home! Green Nest Creating Healthy Homes and The 9 to 5 Greened: 10 Steps to a Healthy Office. Lisa’s TV appearances include “The Rachael Ray Show,” “Nightly News with Brian Williams,” “TODAY,” “The Doctors,” “Fox Friends,” “Chelsea Lately” and “The Suzanne Somers Show.”

Lisa Beres

Article source: http://earth911.com/home-garden/water-conscious-garden-tips/

Perfect Maine Garden: The English Country Garden Meets …

Sunday, May 28, 2017 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Location: Blue Hill Public Library, 5 Parker Point Rd, Blue Hill, Maine

For more information: 207-374-5515; bhpl.net

Brooklin landscape Designer, Julie Wang, will do a presentation at the Blue Hill Public Library on Monday May 8th at 7:00 PM, about creating the perfect Maine garden by combining elements of English country gardens and Japanese landscape design.

An adjunct professor of writing at New York University, Julie Wang founded and ran her own public relations agency, Wang Associates Health Communications, in New York for 20 years. Subsequently, she designed gardens on the Blue Hill Peninsula in Maine, where she also ran a garden store and tea garden, Blue Poppy Garden. Wang currently divides her time between coastal Maine and Benin, West Africa.

This program is free, and open to everyone. For more information call the library at 374-5515.

This post was contributed by a community member. Submit your news →

Article source: https://bangordailynews.com/community/perfect-maine-garden-the-english-country-garden-meets-japanese-landscape-design/

Lexington Garden Club to host landscape designer

The Lexington Field Garden Club will host Warren Leach of Tranquil Lake Nurseries at 7 p.m. April 24 at Keilty Hall at St. Brigid Church, 2001 Massachusetts Ave., Lexington.

Leach will describe woody and herbaceous plants with good garden foliage color, architectural structure, multi-season interest, and shape and texture characteristics that can be used in different ways to compliment flowers, provide structure and offer seasonal succession in the mixed border.

For more than 25 years, Leach has been creating landscapes throughout New England as well as making display gardens at Tranquil Lake Nursery. He is co-owner of this specialty nursery that is a prominent grower of daylilies, irises and perennials and woody plants.

Leach is also an award-winning landscape designer, twice receiving the National Landscape Association Regional Certificate of Merit for Residential Landscape Design. Images of his garden design at Brigham Hill Farm in North Grafton are archived at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. In 2009, the Rhode Island Nursery and Landscape Association presented him the first place award for Residential Design and Installation for his ornamental vegetable garden at Brigham Hill Farm. The Massachusetts Horticultural Society honored Leach in 2010 with a gold medal for his horticultural expertise, landscape design as well as years of forcing plants and creating exceptional displays in the New England Spring Flower Show.

Article source: http://lexington.wickedlocal.com/news/20170417/stronglexington-garden-club-to-host-landscape-designerstrong

Jazz Age design shown in textiles, furniture and more

This undated photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s.” (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP)

Article source: http://siouxcityjournal.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/jazz-age-design-shown-in-textiles-furniture-and-more/article_350d8c35-7725-58ab-8bf9-6953333a3cc3.html

Virtual technology can make landscaping easier

Just as virtual technology has become a common tool for anyone planning to repaint or redecorate a home, a growing array of apps can make landscaping easier, too.

But know when to use them, and when it would be easier to pull out an old-fashioned pencil and a sheet of graph paper – or seek a professional.

“We’ve seen an increase in virtual interior design services within the last two years, so it’s only natural that this functionality would make its way to the exterior of the home as well,” said Stephanie Sisco, Real Simple magazine’s home editor.

A few of the more popular DIY gardening apps include Garden Designer, Design your New Surroundings, Garden Plan Pro and Perennial Match.

“We’ve seen several hundred thousand downloads,” says Patrick Pozzuto, founder of the iScape app aimed at both professional and home landscapers. Based in Mount Pleasant, S.C., Pozzuto worked as a contractor before launching his app.

“Arranging plants using a touch screen is way easier than using your lower back to do it,” he says.

“But while the pros have been using apps for a long time now, home gardeners encounter some hiccups sometimes,” he admits. “They don’t necessarily know what plant goes with what, and what areas it’ll grow in. And some people don’t have an artistic mind, and get into trouble.”

Dave Whitinger, executive director of the National Gardening Association, based in Jacksonville, Texas, warns that while some tech-savvy gardeners quickly get the hang of landscaping apps, the learning curve is steep, and they may be impractical for most home gardeners. The association, founded in 1971, helps put out the “Gardening for Dummies” book series and hosts the website garden.org.

“The reality is that while the virtual tools are great for a minority of gardeners, many more people find them far too confusing, and they get really frustrated,” he says.

Many home gardeners, he says, would be better off using a pencil and graph paper, with each square representing 6 inches, or whatever scale is appropriate for the particular garden.

Yet even for amateurs, he notes, the information on some online sites can mean the difference between failure and success with gardening and landscaping projects. Garden.org, for example, features a database for the entire country, searchable by zip code, to tell home gardeners what the frost dates are for their area, when to plant which vegetables and flowers, and what kinds of plants will encourage, say, certain varieties of butterflies or bees.

“Knowledge like that is crucial to whether a person’s gardening project succeeds,” he says. “Lettuce and spinach and tomatoes all have different dates when they should be planted for best results, and planting dates vary depending on where you live. Just because you see the plants for sale in the nursery doesn’t mean it’s the right time to plant.”

And even if you haven’t figured out all the features of the gardening apps, they can be a good way to show professional landscapers what you have in mind, Pozzuto says,

Richard Heller of Greener By Design, a firm in the New York area that uses 3-D software to help with both landscape design and communication with clients, says the software makes a huge difference.

“Three-D software is still not very common, and it gives us an amazing competitive edge. It allows people to see what’s not planted, so they start expanding on projects they have in mind,” he says.

“The software is accessible to anyone, but there’s a steep learning curve involved. And you need a high-end gaming computer to use it.”

Heller says home gardeners might want to check his company’s website EZgardendesign.com which, for a small fee, allows you to create a landscaping “design book.” It’s a good starting point, but most home gardeners would still want to work with a professional who knows plants well, he says.

And there’s always graph paper and a pencil if the learning curve proves too steep.

Article source: http://onlineathens.com/features/2017-04-22/virtual-technology-can-make-landscaping-easier

Perfect Maine Garden: The English Country Garden Meets Japanese Landscape Design

Sunday, May 28, 2017 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Location: Blue Hill Public Library, 5 Parker Point Rd, Blue Hill, Maine

For more information: 207-374-5515; bhpl.net

Brooklin landscape Designer, Julie Wang, will do a presentation at the Blue Hill Public Library on Monday May 8th at 7:00 PM, about creating the perfect Maine garden by combining elements of English country gardens and Japanese landscape design.

An adjunct professor of writing at New York University, Julie Wang founded and ran her own public relations agency, Wang Associates Health Communications, in New York for 20 years. Subsequently, she designed gardens on the Blue Hill Peninsula in Maine, where she also ran a garden store and tea garden, Blue Poppy Garden. Wang currently divides her time between coastal Maine and Benin, West Africa.

This program is free, and open to everyone. For more information call the library at 374-5515.

This post was contributed by a community member. Submit your news →

Article source: http://bangordailynews.com/community/perfect-maine-garden-the-english-country-garden-meets-japanese-landscape-design/

Virtual technology can make landscaping easier

Just as virtual technology has become a common tool for anyone planning to repaint or redecorate a home, a growing array of apps can make landscaping easier too.

But know when to use them, and when it would be easier to pull out an old-fashioned pencil and a sheet of graph paper — or to seek out a professional.

“We’ve seen an increase in virtual interior design services within the last two years, so it’s only natural that this functionality would make its way to the exterior of the home as well,” said Stephanie Sisco, Real Simple magazine’s home editor.

A few of the more popular DIY gardening apps include Garden Designer ($9.99, from Artifact Interactive), Design your New Surroundings ($9.99, from Home Revivals), Garden Plan Pro ($9.99, from Growing Interactive), and Perennial Match ($4.99, from Harmony systems, Inc.).

“We have seen several hundred thousand downloads,” says Patrick Pozzuto, founder of the iScape app ($9.99, from Home Revivals LLC), aimed at both professional and home landscapers. Based in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, Pozzuto worked as a contractor before launching his app.

“Arranging plants using a touch screen is way easier than using your lower back to do it,” he says.

“But while the pros have been using apps for a long time now, home gardeners do encounter some hiccups sometimes,” he admits. “They don’t necessarily know what plant goes with what, and what areas it’ll grow in. And some people don’t have an artistic mind, and get into trouble.”

Dave Whitinger, executive director of the National Gardening Association, based in Jacksonville, Texas, warns that while some tech-savvy gardeners quickly get the hang of landscaping apps, the learning curve is steep, and they may be impractical for most home gardeners. The association, founded in 1971, helps put out the “Gardening for Dummies” book series (published by For Dummies) and hosts the website garden.org.

“The reality is that while the virtual tools are great for a minority of gardeners, many more people find them far too confusing, and they get really frustrated,” he says.

Many home gardeners, he says, would be better off using a pencil and graph paper, with each square representing 6 inches, or whatever scale is appropriate for the particular garden.

Article source: http://goldenisles.news/ap/lifestyles/virtual-technology-can-make-landscaping-easier/article_d28b045b-bafb-5779-aedf-f5f128928cc5.html