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UNC Health Care sees room for a compact medical campus on the edge of Chapel Hill

UNC Health Care is planning a “clean, sophisticated and striking commercial development” to replace its longtime Eastowne office complex off U.S. 15-501.

A concept plan for roughly 11 acres, located inside the Eastowne Drive loop near Pinegate Apartments, was submitted in late December. It seeks to demolish five of six buildings constructed in the 1970s and 1980s before U.S. 15-501 became a commercial and residential corridor.

The existing complex was built around an existing two-acre pond and is surrounded by apartments, medical clinics and offices. UNC Health Care would add two six-story, 150,000-square-foot office buildings and a 5.5-story parking deck with 1,100 spaces.

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The goal is to reduce the office park’s footprint, creating a walkable, compact development with more open space and landscaping buffers, the plan states.

“The initial project will consolidate a significant amount of services that are scattered throughout the healthcare system in Chapel Hill while simultaneously upgrading the buildings and improving patient access,” system officials wrote in the proposal.

The town’s Community Design Commission will review the plan Tuesday, Jan. 23, followed by a Town Council review on Wednesday, Jan. 31. Both meetings are designed to offer feedback that UNC Health Care can use to revise the plan before submitting an official application.

Long-term plans

One building and the parking deck can be built under a previously approved master plan with only a zoning compliance permit from town staff. UNC officials want to start building those pieces this summer, and if all goes as planned, open the first building by 2020.

The second office building would require the council to approve a special-use permit.

Health System Properties LLC owns five lots – roughly 29 acres – inside the Eastowne loop and another 20 acres at the southwestern corner of U.S. 15-501 and Interstate 40. County records show it paid just over $344,610 in property taxes on all six parcels last year.

While steep slopes and wetlands would limit construction on the 20-acre parcel, UNC Health Care officials have a long-term vision for the Eastowne properties that could be rolled into a new master site plan. However, the focus at this time is on delivering the first medical office building, said Simon George I, vice president for UNC Health Care System real estate development.

“We have some high-level concept ideas, but do not yet have a formal plan,” George said. “We anticipate beginning formal work on the master site plan later this year.”

Growing corridor

The U.S. 15-501 corridor between Chapel Hill and Durham already is undergoing significant change, and the Eastowne redevelopment would be the first of multiple, large projects anticipated along the Orange-Durham county line.

Future U.S. 15-501 corridor development could include new retail, offices and apartments at the proposed Gateway station near I-40 on the Durham-Orange light-rail transit line, and new buildings for the former Blue Cross campus, now owned by the State Employees Credit Union. The iconic Blue Cross building was constructed opposite the Eastowne campus in 1973.

Chapel Hill officials have talked with regional partners and the N.C. Department of Transportation for some time about increasing traffic in the already congested highway corridor. The regional Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization will study the highway – from Ephesus Church Road in Chapel Hill to University Drive in Durham – starting in mid-February, Town Manager Roger Stancil said.

The study could be completed by mid-2019 and “take a much more comprehensive look at the corridor and consider road infrastructure, multimodal connections, land uses, future light rail alignment and station areas, and environmental constraints,” Stancil said in an email to council members.

What’s next

The Community Design Commission and Chapel Hill Town Council will offer UNC Health Care feedback on its concept plan for redeveloping the Eastowne Office Park.

The CDC meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 23, in the Town Hall council chamber, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. The council meets in the chamber at 7 p.m. Jan. 31.

Article source: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local/counties/orange-county/article195773294.html

Rainima’s dream to establish a sustainable business

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Young Entrepreneurship Scheme (YES) recipient Atunaisa Rainima (centre) with his family. From left: Aunt Taraivini Taleimaibua, dad Atunaisa Rainima, cousin Sokoveti Hea and mum Sokoveti Rainima after the launch earlier this month. Picture: JOVESA NAISUA

ATUNAISA Rainima, 23, endeavours to establish his own sustainable business, a dream he wishes to pursue in the near future.

Not a common trait for a person his age, but the Tailevu lad plans to set up a lawn maintenance and landscaping business that will also convert garden refuse into cooking gas (biomethane gas).

An AutoCAD student at the Fiji National University (FNU) National Training and Productivity Centre (NTPC), Mr Rainima also hopes to provide job opportunities to youths in his community and the greater Tailevu area as his business expands.

His business dreams are now closer to reality as he was among the five aspiring entrepreneurs who had their grant applications pre-approved under Government’s Young Entrepreneurship Scheme (YES) launched earlier this month.

The idea behind his business concept was inspired by his grandfather, who had cut grass as a source of income.

His creativity and ingenuity behind his environmental friendly business plan was worthy enough to convince the YES initiative selection committee.

After Mr Rainima fully completes the mentorship program under the YES initiative, he, including other recipients, will be eligible to receive a grant of up to $20,000 to pursue their business ideas.

“My goal is to set up a lawn maintenance and landscaping business with an objective to firstly provide the most affordable, sustainable, efficient grass cutting and landscaping in my community,” Mr Rainima said.

Mr Rainima’s project is divided in three phases, the first to cut the grass, followed by collection of grass and to produce biogas.

“I always see that most of the youths in the village are unemployed, so this business can employ them so they can earn a decent living for themselves,” he said.

His proud mother, Sokoveti Rainima, said her son had already developed an affinity for business, by establishing a small store some years back.

As she recalls, Mrs Rainima said her son had also aspired to become a “millionaire” someday.

“Some of his words to me I will never forget are ‘Mum, one day I will become a millionaire’,” Mrs Rainima said.

“He earlier established a small store at our residence in Cautata Bau, Tailevu, three years back but he had applied for this Government scheme,” Mrs Rainima said.

“My son is very obedient at home and is the eldest of my children. He was supposed to continue his education but he wants to also continue his business. His aunty, Taraivina Taleimaibua, assisted him in applying for the YES initiative. I didn’t even support this move but his aunty had assisted him in doing it because he wanted to establish a lawn and landscaping business.

“I would like to thank God that one day we were called and we were shocked to be told that his application was successful.”

Mrs Rainima also believes that her son’s faith in God and the values instilled in him would take him far in life.

“He is a God-fearing person as he attended a youth camp/conference recently, and he was believing that after the conference, doors would open for his business plans,” she said.

“That is why I thank God that he is also the lone iTaukei applicant chosen, so we give Him back the glory, the honour and praise to be his alone.

“We teach him never to forget the source of his blessings, God, so he always ensures that he gives his tithe with his salary or any monetary blessings he receives.”

Mr Rainima, the eldest of three children, earlier received his education at the Montfort Technical Institute in Savusavu, Vanua Levu.

Now he hopes to finish tertiary education and commence his business this year.



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Article source: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=431667

Stunning stone landscaping ideas to be inspired by

Getting your garden right can seem like a Herculean task, especially if you’re not a natural landscaper, but there is a great way to tackle the problem, while still embracing a contemporary and stylish aesthetic. Ask any professional gardener and they’ll tell you that an outdoor space that is finished with a host of beautiful stone will not only create a dramatic and enviable finished product, but also allow for easy maintenance as well. We know that you might need a little visual inspiration for designing a perfect stone garden, so how about we show you some of our favourite looks, right now?

Article source: https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/photos/stunning-stone-landscaping-ideas-inspired-180000312/

Landscape & Garden Fair Seeks Nature-Themed Vendors

Master Gardener, Carol Morris, prepares the hydroponic systems for the Landscape Garden Fair

Lake County’s 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, a free botanical-themed festival, is seeking nature-oriented vendors.
Interested participants specializing in landscaping, gardening, irrigation, horticulture, fertilizer and more are invited to sign up for the two-day event, to be held Saturday, March 24 and Sunday, March 25 at the Lake County Extension Center’s Discovery Gardens, located at 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares.
Sponsored by Lake County, The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County and the Lake County Master Gardeners, the festival will provide visitors an opportunity to browse and purchase goods from vendors selling landscaping materials, ornamental plants, orchids, fruit trees and more.
To reserve space at the fair, rental fees must be received no later than Friday, Feb. 16. Available space ranges in price from $75 – $150 depending on size, and $25 for non-profit agencies. To secure a space, vendors may register online at https://2018lgfvendorregistration.eventbrite.com or make a check payable to “University of Florida” and either hand deliver or mail it to: Lake County Extension, Attn: Juwanda Rowell – Landscape Garden Fair, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares, FL 32778.
The annual Landscape Garden Fair attracts thousands of guests to hear expert speakers present on a variety of topics, including butterfly gardening, unusual edibles, shade gardening and hydroponics. Additional family-friendly activities include the Children’s Passport, with stops at multiple gardens, the Maze Scavenger Hunt and special butterfly release.
For more information about the 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2.

Olympics Latest News

Article source: http://www.clermontnewsleader.com/landscape-garden-fair-seeks-nature-themed-vendors/

Landscape & Garden Fair Seeks Nature-Themed Vendors

Master Gardener, Carol Morris, prepares the hydroponic systems for the Landscape Garden Fair

Lake County’s 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, a free botanical-themed festival, is seeking nature-oriented vendors.
Interested participants specializing in landscaping, gardening, irrigation, horticulture, fertilizer and more are invited to sign up for the two-day event, to be held Saturday, March 24 and Sunday, March 25 at the Lake County Extension Center’s Discovery Gardens, located at 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares.
Sponsored by Lake County, The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County and the Lake County Master Gardeners, the festival will provide visitors an opportunity to browse and purchase goods from vendors selling landscaping materials, ornamental plants, orchids, fruit trees and more.
To reserve space at the fair, rental fees must be received no later than Friday, Feb. 16. Available space ranges in price from $75 – $150 depending on size, and $25 for non-profit agencies. To secure a space, vendors may register online at https://2018lgfvendorregistration.eventbrite.com or make a check payable to “University of Florida” and either hand deliver or mail it to: Lake County Extension, Attn: Juwanda Rowell – Landscape Garden Fair, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares, FL 32778.
The annual Landscape Garden Fair attracts thousands of guests to hear expert speakers present on a variety of topics, including butterfly gardening, unusual edibles, shade gardening and hydroponics. Additional family-friendly activities include the Children’s Passport, with stops at multiple gardens, the Maze Scavenger Hunt and special butterfly release.
For more information about the 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2.

Olympics Latest News

Article source: http://www.trianglenewsleader.com/landscape-garden-fair-seeks-nature-themed-vendors/

Landscape and Garden Fair seeks nature-themed vendors

TAVARES — Lake County’s 7th Annual Landscape and Garden Fair, a free botanical-themed festival, is seeking nature-oriented vendors.

Landscaping, gardening, irrigation, horticulture and fertilizer specialists are invited to sign up for the two-day event, which will be March 24-25 at the Lake County Extension Center’s Discovery Gardens, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares.

To reserve space, rental fees must be received no later than Feb. 16. Available spaces range in price from $75 to $150 and $25 for non-profit agencies. To secure a space, vendors should register at https://2018lgfvendorregistration.eventbrite.com or make a check payable to the University of Florida. The checks can be hand delivered to the Extension office or mailed to: Lake County Extension, Attn: Juwanda Rowell — Landscape and Garden Fair, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares, FL 32778.

Sponsored by Lake County, the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County and the Lake County Master Gardeners, the festival will provide visitors an opportunity to browse and purchase goods from vendors selling landscaping materials, ornamental plants, orchids, fruit trees and more.

The annual Landscape and Garden Fair attracts thousands of guests to hear expert speakers present on a variety of topics, including butterfly gardening, unusual edibles, shade gardening and hydroponics. Additional family-friendly activities include: the Children’s Passport, with stops at multiple gardens, a maze scavenger hunt and special butterfly release.

For information, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2.

 

Article source: http://www.dailycommercial.com/news/20180121/landscape-and-garden-fair-seeks-nature-themed-vendors

Declutter your garden with a good pruning before spring

Amidst this cold, wet and grey weather, some plants are starving for some attention.

Winter can be a prime time for pruning and Master Gardener Brian Minter has tips to help you cut through some of the damage the season may have caused.  

The window of time between mid-January to the end of February when growth starts on local trees offers the opportunity to get rid of the weak, dead and diseased branches.

Minter says this offers more air to flow through the tree, making it more resilient against damage.

“Also in terms of fruit production, more sunlight comes in so the tree actually is sturdier, better growth, cleaner without a lot of algae, lichen and so on,” he told B.C. Almanac guest host Lien Yeung.

‘Let the buds pop’

For the flowering trees and bushes — magnolias, flowering cherries, Japanese azaleas and rhododendrons — he recommends waiting to prune to enjoy the bright blossoms.

Evergreens can use a good cleaning this time of year to prevent big branches from snapping in the case of late season heavy snow.

“With the exception of spruce and pine … the pine trees produce candles, let those candles evolve in the spring, and the spruce. Let the buds pop and then you can prune,” he said.

Having the right tools is a must when diving into a good clean up, and he recommends getting a strong pair of loppers for the bigger branches to avoid breaking sheers.

“When you’ve done pruning in your yard, it’s like great house cleaning, the place just looks so much better but the trees will be stronger.”

Listen to B.C. Almanac every Thursday for more gardening tips and tricks from Master Gardener Brian Minter.

With files from B.C. Almanac

Article source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/declutter-your-garden-with-a-good-pruning-before-spring-1.4493958

GREEN THUMBS UP: Winter survival tips for gardeners

Outside my snow-plastered windows, winter storm Grayson is lashing the South Shore with gale-force winds and horizontal blasts of snow, creating nearly a perpetual white-out while coastal residents cope with devastating flooding and power outages. Frigid weather resumes as the nor’easter moves out, likely breaking records for our area, with temperatures dipping below zero as another arctic blast moves in over this weekend.

Fortunately, the new fallen snow should offer some protection for our precious plants although Mother Nature’s insulation blanket may have arrived a little too late to protect marginally-hardy plants and shallow-rooted shrubs. Memories of a winter several years ago still persist for many gardeners, when the deep freeze and desiccating winds caused innumerable species of plants to succumb including roses, butterfly bushes, and many broad-leafed evergreens, especially rhododendrons.

When “the weather outside is frightful”, I reluctantly accept Mother Nature’s gift of forced relaxation and settle into a comfortable chair to peruse gardening magazines, books, and catalogs. The winter months are the ideal time to plan new gardens, edit existing landscapes, research new plants, and order from those tantalizing catalogs.

Once the ground thaws and the soil can be tilled, spring fever often leads to impulse buying, resulting in gardens that become merely a collection of plants rather than cohesive designs. To avoid this haphazard approach, consider selecting a specific garden theme and research plant material before the growing season gets underway, narrowing potential plant acquisitions.

Broad categories of garden themes might include a perennial, wildflower, edible, or wildlife garden. Specialized gardens often evolve from these general classifications such as a perennial garden that features a particular plant family or color scheme, a culinary herb garden, or a wildlife garden for birds, butterflies, bees, or hummingbirds.

To ensure success, select a garden theme suitable for your personal site based on the availability of light, soil composition, drainage, and exposure to wind. The availability of light is perhaps the most critical aspect in choosing and developing a garden theme. A sunny location, with 6 to 8 hours of sunlight, will enable you to grow the greatest diversity of flowering plants. Theme gardens that excel in sunny locales include perennial and edible gardens, wildflower meadows, butterfly gardens, and collections of specialty plants including dwarf conifers, roses, iris, or daylilies. Shady sites are ideal for contemplative gardens, woodland wildflowers, and collections of hostas. Other themes, including gardens that focus on perennials, fragrance, wildlife, or hummingbirds, can often be adapted to multiple exposures. The planting of native species is a growing trend.

In recent years, the wonderful world of plant material has exploded with thousands of new cultivars introduced every season thanks to hybridization and international transport of plants from one continent to another. While many local nurseries now feature many of these cutting edge trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals, and exotic varieties of tropical plants, gardening catalogs, magazines, and the internet offer passionate gardeners the greatest opportunity to view and research new plants during the dormant winter months. Notes and photos I have taken during the past growing season while on garden tours or visiting botanical gardens serve as reminders of new varieties to research and add to my wish list. Although I order multiple packets of seeds to start my annuals and vegetables, I use most catalogs as reference material, compiling a lengthy wish list of new cultivars, knowing that even scarce, unusual plants are often available from local sources.

In the weeks to come, passionate gardeners longing for springtime should be able to pursue a wealth of horticultural opportunities. January is an ideal time to begin searching gardening magazines, the web, and local newspapers for listings of gardening lectures, educational courses, flower shows, and symposiums. Our local garden clubs, plant societies, organizations such as Grow Native Massachusetts, and botanical gardens, including the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, Tower Hill Botanic Garden, Garden in the Woods, and the Arnold Arboretum, offer a wonderful opportunity to escape the winter blues with lectures, workshops, field trips, plant sales, and special events throughout the year to enlighten and educate every level of gardening enthusiast. My calendar for the next few months is chock full of possibilities just waiting to transport me through the winter months and on to the first glimpses of springtime in my own garden.

January is a month for gardeners to dream!

 

Suzanne Mahler is an avid gardener, photographer and lecturer. She is a member of a local garden club, past president of the New England Daylily Society, an overseer for the Massachusetts Horticultural Society and is employed at a garden center.

Article source: http://plymouth.wickedlocal.com/news/20180120/green-thumbs-up-winter-survival-tips-for-gardeners

Put a little ‘spring’ in your step this January with an outdoor greenhouse – The Courier

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Students at Manual High School paint trash bins to help people donate gently used clothes.
Astrid Hacker/Louisville Courier Journal

When the snow is flying and the ground is rock hard, it’s easy to think spring is a lifetime away. Looking out my office window, it seems entirely implausible that those frozen, shivering beech tree buds, shrouded in the grays and browns of winter, will ever yield lush and delicate green leaves.

This is when a greenhouse is better than a whole muck bucket full of antidepressants.

I’m often asked when, as a gardener, I consider spring to start; not the date of the vernal equinox or the rising of Persephone from the underworld, but when a gardener feels like its spring. My answer has always been, “when I sow the first seed in the greenhouse.”

Think about it — why does spring lift our spirits? Sure, the snows melt and the weather warms. That helps a whole lot. But it’s more about looking out the window and seeing signs of “life” — the sight of swelling buds, emerging bulbs and the scents of the season. It is a high-impact sensory attitude adjustment event.

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Walk into a greenhouse in the depths of winter and the first thing you notice is the smell. Call it Mother Earth, call it Gaia’s perfume, call it anything you want. But I would expect that on walking into a warm and damp winter greenhouse there is a measurable drop in one’s blood pressure, a reduction in free-floating anxiety and a general sigh of seasonal relief. If that’s not a sign of true spring I don’t know what is.

Greenhouses come in a wide range of styles and sizes. Any number of hobbyist greenhouses can be purchased from mail order companies and erected in the backyard. They are generally small and intended more as season extenders than true year-round growing facilities. Heating these structures through the last three weeks would cost you the equivalent of your family’s total vacation and Christmas Club investments for the year. They are meant to allow you to start your tender seeds in early March rather than early January.

The next step up involves a little more ambitious (and more costly!) investment to provide year-round growing space that will not put you in the poor house — or at least not right away. But whether the season extender or the year-round starter house, they are generally free standing. Plunking a greenhouse onto the south side of your home might sound like a good idea but it’s not as great a marriage as you might think.

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The constant humidity and free-standing water of a greenhouse don’t mix very well with the modern concept of a residential space. And you can just imagine trying to keep such a house cool in the summer when the sun is streaming through the south-facing glass and cooking the whole house. Better have an up-sized AC unit!

Yew Dell’s greenhouse is a commercial structure that nobody but the craziest of us would consider building at home. Measuring in at a modest 1,850 square feet, it is built of extruded aluminum, single pane glass and concrete block. It is heated and powered by a solar/geothermal system that ends up requiring about 10 percent of the typical energy cost for a traditionally designed greenhouse.

Last Monday, a group of adult and kid volunteers spent the morning in Yew Dell’s greenhouse dividing aloe plants, potting up tropical cacti and generally soaking in all the greenhouse could deliver. We’ll have Monday volunteers all winter long doing more of the same. They all come to be supportive but leave each volunteer session with a little more spring in their step than when they arrived.

For the winter-weary gardener who wants to kick it up to the next level, take a drive about five hours west on Interstate 64 for a visit to the Missouri Botanical Garden. The MOBOT Climatron occupies 24,000 square feet and is the first conservatory in the United States built as a geodesic dome. Inside, year round you’ll find spectacular collections of tropical palms, orchids and a whole lot of things that look like overgrown houseplants. Honestly, you don’t even have to like plants to be overwhelmed by the place.

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But be it a hobby greenhouse, a potting up party at Yew Dell or a MOBOT excursion, all it takes is one step through the door for that winter attitude to start changing.

Yew Dell Botanical Gardens, 6220 Old Lagrange Road, http://www.yewdellgardens.org/

Great Gardening – Central Texas: Tips to prevent parched plants in winter

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Article source: http://www.tdtnews.com/life/article_5f5ec702-fd32-11e7-8d79-a7b6ebe37d36.html