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Architects design Hanging Gardens of Birmingham

According to ancient texts the Hanging Gardens of Babylon boasted elaborate terraces, magnificent water features and floating plants. 

It looks like Birmingham could have its own mythical-like garden tower if new designs drawn up by a British architect firm materialise. 

The Garden Hill designs are composed of two 25-storey wooden residential towers. Architects say it offers residents an ‘oasis-like residence’ to get away from the concrete jungle.

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The Garden Hill designs in Digbeth in Birmingham are composed of two 25-storey high wooden residential towers and architects say it offers residents an 'oasis-like residence'

The Garden Hill designs in Digbeth in Birmingham are composed of two 25-storey high wooden residential towers and architects say it offers residents an ‘oasis-like residence’

GARDEN HILL DESIGNS

The flats would also have unusual shared facilities including recording studios and spaces to rent for start-ups.

The total floor space would be 414,410 sq ft (38,500 sq m).

Designs also include between 120 to 200 car parking spaces as well as retail space on street level.

The towers would be very environmentally-friendly and both electricity and water would be supplied by solar panels.

Architects would also use passive ventilation and high quality insulation to reduce energy waste.  

London-based firm Architects of Invention drew up the designs for Digbeth in Birmingham which would house 500 residences and would be made entirely of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT). 

The green designs include shared and private garden terraces at every level with a spacious roof garden to top it all off. 

The flats would also have unusual shared facilities including recording studios and spaces to rent for start-ups.

‘The shape of the building means that light is maximised – for the residents and for their neighbours’, lead architect Niko Japaridze told MailOnline.

‘It also means that the garden plants will thrive – so Garden Hill can be green year-round’, he said. 

The total floor space would be 414,410 sq ft (38,500 sq m). 

Designs also include between 120 to 200 car parking spaces as well as retail space on street level, according to New Atlas

The towers would be very environmentally-friendly and both electricity and water would be supplied by solar panels.

Architects would also use passive ventilation and high quality insulation to reduce energy waste.

London-based firm Architects of Invention drew up the designs which would house 500 residences and would be made entirely of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)

London-based firm Architects of Invention drew up the designs which would house 500 residences and would be made entirely of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)

Most of the terraces are exposed to sunlight throughout the day - morning sun for the southern tower and evening sun for the northern tower 

Most of the terraces are exposed to sunlight throughout the day – morning sun for the southern tower and evening sun for the northern tower 

‘Garden Hill acts like a wonder – a tall monument of green leafiness, rising from the city’s fabric’, said Mr Japaridze.

‘It is a significantly more environmentally friendly building material than steel or concrete, the most thermo-efficient also, and involves a very quick construction period’, he said. 

Sixty per cent of flats would be one bedroom units which would be between 40m² and 50m² (131 ft² to 164ft²) and 40 per cent would be two-bedroom flats between 63m² and 75m² (207ft² to 246ft²).

The towers would be very environmentally-friendly and both electricity and water would be supplied by solar panels. Architects would also use passive ventilation and high quality insulation to reduce energy waste

The towers would be very environmentally-friendly and both electricity and water would be supplied by solar panels. Architects would also use passive ventilation and high quality insulation to reduce energy waste

Although there are no immediate plans to build the design the proposed budget is £70 million (roughly US$90 million). 

The architects are backed by backed by a Chinese private equity fund called PGC -Capital. 

The firm already backed The Jewel Court, 77 one and two bedroom luxury apartment which are already on site in Birmingham. 

‘The dramatic 25-storey staggered towers, hung with gardens on every level, give all occupants and visitors access to private and shared terraces and a spacious rooftop garden’, the designers said in a release. 

Designs also include between 120 to 200 car parking spaces as well as retail space on street level

The total floor space would be 414,410 sq ft (38,500 sq m)

The flats would also have unusual shared facilities including recording studios and spaces to rent for start-ups. The architects are backed by backed by a Chinese private equity fund called PGC -Capital

Architects of Invention is a London-based practice with offices in Moscow, Tbilisi and Vilnius but has not yet had any of its designs built in the UK

Architects of Invention is a London-based practice with offices in Moscow, Tbilisi and Vilnius but has not yet had any of its designs built in the UK

‘The design concept is inspired by The Hanging Gardens of Babylon: an oasis-like residence for Birmingham’s growing, multicultural population’.  

Architects of Invention is a London-based practice with offices in Moscow, Tbilisi and Vilnius but has not yet had any of its designs built in the UK.

The practice is currently having pre-application discussions with Birmingham city council.

THE HANGING GARDENS OF BABYLON: MYTH AND MYSTERY

For centuries, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were thought to have been built in the ancient Iraqi city of Babylon, because of the name.

This location led people to believe it was built by the Emperor Nebuchadnezzar who lived around 600 BC.

Since this time, archaeologists and historians have scoured the location of the ancient city but have been unable to find any physical evidence they existed – leading some to believe the gardens are a myth.

It is one of the Seven Ancient Wonders of the World and was called the Hanging Gardens because they were supposedly built high above the ground on split-level stone terraces.

Some texts referred to the plants in the gardens as ‘floating’ but they were believed, instead, to have hung from these different terraces, giving them the appearance of being suspended in mid-air.

A Greek historian named Diordorus Siculus described the gardens as being 400ft wide by 400ft long, with walls as high as 80ft.

Due to this height, water was said to have been transported from a lake at the bottom using a similar principle as Archimedes’ screw – a pump that scoops up water in a spiral tube and carries it to the top.

It was said to have been invented by Archimedes in the 3rd Century BC yet if a similar system was used in the gardens, this would predate it by around 350 years.

Given the size, historians have estimated the gardens would have used 8,200 gallons of water a day to water the plants.

Some historians and archaeologists believe that the gardens were destroyed by war and erosion, while others believe an earthquake destroyed them.

The roof gardens boast 360 degree views. The design concept is inspired by The Hanging Gardens of Babylon which were thought to have been built in the ancient Iraqi city of Babylon

The roof gardens boast 360 degree views. The design concept is inspired by The Hanging Gardens of Babylon which were thought to have been built in the ancient Iraqi city of Babylon

Although there are no immediate plans to build the design the proposed budget is £70 million (roughly US$90 million). The practice is currently having pre-application discussions with Birmingham city council

Although there are no immediate plans to build the design the proposed budget is £70 million (roughly US$90 million). The practice is currently having pre-application discussions with Birmingham city council

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Article source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4425220/Architects-design-Hanging-Gardens-Birmingham.html