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Archives for February 5, 2018

Playscapes, geometric pools and roof gardens: Award-winning gardens, in pictures

The Society of Garden Designers announced the winners of the SGD Awards 2017 at its sixth annual award ceremony in London yesterday evening.

Robert Myers MSGD was presented with the most prestigious award of the night, winning the Grand Award for The Magic Garden at Hampton Court Palace.

The garden, designed as an imaginative and playful new garden for families, is inspired by the rich history of the palace. It was described as ‘truly magical’ by the judging panel, who said it was ‘full of surprises and fun.’ The garden was also named best public or commercial outdoor space.

Matt Keightley MSGD won three awards including the distinguished Judges’ Award for his eastern-inspired Tyre Hill House Garden, and visionary Spanish designer Fernando Caruncho was presented with the Lifetime Achievement award. 

In total, 17 designers were presented with awards across 19 categories, including accolades for the best healing and learning garden, international garden and roof garden.

Society of Garden Designers (SGD) chair Sarah Morgan said: “The SGD Awards are all about celebrating the very best in landscape and garden design and recognising the incredible talent being brought to bear across the industry. It’s clear from tonight just how much fantastic work is being done within the sector.”

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardening-events/playscapes-geometric-pools-roof-gardens-society-garden-designers/

enoura observatory by hiroshi sugimoto / odawara art foundation for architecture and garden design

after more than a decade of planning, the enoura observatory by hiroshi sugimoto for the odawara art foundation opened in 2017. set into japan’s hakone mountains, the complex comprises a number of carefully positioned structures — including an art gallery, two stages, a tea house, several gates, and a reception building — that overlook sagami bay. to learn more about the project, and the vision of the artist and photographer, designboom visited the observatory to experience its immersive architectural experience firsthand.

sugimoto enoura
hiroshi sugimto on the tip of the summer solstice observation gallery
image © odawara art foundation
all images, if not otherwise specified, are © designboom

 

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

the summer solstice observatory gallery, which also culminates in a dramatic 12 meters cantilever overlooking the sea, doubling as a viewing platform

 

 

believing that the heavens could provide some insight into our future, sugimoto oriented the observatory around the annual movement of the sun: the winter solstice, when new life begins; the summer solstice, when the pendulum of the seasons swings back again; and the spring and autumn equinoxes, milestones at the midpoint between the two extremes. ‘I believe that if we turn once more to our ancient observation of the heavens, we will find glimmers that point the way to our future,’ sugimoto continues.

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

the summer solstice observatory gallery is covered in oya stone

 

 

‘the mission of the complex is to revive traditional building methods which are in danger of being lost, and to pass them on to future generations,’ says sugimoto, who is the founder of the odawara art foundation. each of the structures that make up the enoura observatory incorporates traditional japanese building styles and methods in order to provide an overview of japan’s architectural history. however, upon visiting the site it is clear that the complex is more than just a compilation of vernacular typologies and after experiencing these architectural wonders, that many more will be drawn to this remote part of japan.

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

inside the gallery visitors can enjoy photography work by hiroshi sugimoto

 

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

one hundred meters above sea level and hundred meters in length, the opposing wall is made of glass windows – 37 large panes, side by side with no support – for a completely column-free space

 

 

it is evident upon visiting, that each aspect of the observatory responds to the location of the rising sun throughout the calendar year. for example, on the morning of the winter solstice, the sun rises from sagami bay and sends light through a 70 meter-long tunnel — illuminating a large stone at its opposing end. in this way, the scheme observes the year’s shortest day and marks a significant turning point in the cycle of death and rebirth.

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

cantilever winter solstice light-worship tunnel, next to the optical glass stage

 

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

winter solstice light-worship tunnel

 

 

parallel to the tunnel, a stage paved with optical glass sits on a framework of hinoki cypress. on the morning of the winter solstice, the platform glows as it catches the light on its cut edges. directly adjacent to the stage, a full-size recreation of a ruined roman auditorium has been constructed. as we took a moment to reflect, sitting in the amphitheater, the glass stage appears to float perfectly on the surface of the sea.

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

winter solstice light-worship tunnel, next to the glass stage, built with a ‘kakezukuri’ framework of hinoki cypress, paved with optical glass

 

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

close-up on the ‘kakezukuri’ framework

 

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom
inside the tunnel, ‘tome-ishi’, this stone means ‘no entry’ / ‘no passing’

 

 

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom
kameishi‘ tortoise stone overlooking sagami bay

 

 

hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

‘as if guided by an unseen hand, I was drawn to this place of memories,’ says sugimoto

 

 

‘what should art today express?’ asks hiroshi sugimoto — a straightforward question that apparently cannot be answered in such a simple manner. instead, the artist sees the enoura observatory as a place for contemplation. ‘at the dawn of history, when the ancients first gained self-awareness, their first step was to search for and identify the place they occupied within the vastness of the starry firmament,’ says sugimoto. ‘this search for meaning and identity was also the primal force behind art.’ hiroshi sugimoto enoura observatory japan designboom

the stone stage

 

the origins of performing arts in japan go back to the ancient legend of ‘ama-no-iwato. according to this legend, the dawn goddess danced in order to lure forth the sun goddess, who was hiding in a cave. the design of the stone stage is based on the dimensions of a noh stage. at each of the stage’s four corners are large stones, originally destined for the walls of an edo castle. the axis of the stone bridgeway (seen behind) aligns with the axis of the sun as it rises from sagami bay at the spring and autumn equinoxes.

 

my conception was for the noh plays to start just before dawn as the murk of night is giving away to daylight and for the principal actors of the second part of the play to return to the underworld as the sun rises directly behind the stage‘, says hiroshi sugimoto to designboom.

 

 

 

see a video where hiroshi sugimoto explains the project (designboom’s previous coverage) here.

 

elsewhere, the meigetsu gate — originally constructed in the muromachi period style (1336 – 1573) — preserves the original materials and zen style found in structures of the period. other buildings include the uchōten (‘listen-to-the-rain’) teahouse… see more images in the gallery below.

 

 


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Article source: https://www.designboom.com/architecture/enoura-observatory-hiroshi-sugimoto-odawara-art-foundation-02-05-2018/

Japanese Tea Garden

A gorgeous garden oasis breathes new life into a shuttered quarry. Stone trails meander through the grounds, leading explorers over quaint stone bridges that criss-cross tranquil patches of blue-green water.

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In its past life, the Japanese Tea Garden was a rock quarry that had been given to the city of San Antonio. When city officials decided to transform it into a lily pond and garden in the early 20th century, they turned to a Japanese family with an intimate knowledge of the subject. As the family became the caretakers, they worked with the city to develop the old quarry into a picturesque paradise by adding wandering paths, stone bridges, and a large pagoda. They also served light lunches and tea.

Sadly, the family was relocated in the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack and the garden was rebranded as a Chinese tea garden. The family was among the many that were rounded up and placed in camps as backlash against Japanese-Americans ensued nationwide. Once the war was over, the name of the garden was changed back to the Japanese Tea Garden permanently.

San Antonio took complete control of the garden in the early 2000s after some years of neglect and vandalism. The city put over a million dollars worth of repairs and restorations into it. Today, the garden offers the city a glimpse of Asian architecture and garden design. Stone paths and bridges, koi ponds, a pagoda, and waterfalls all add to its beauty. Meander down to see the koi and turtles while butterflies and hummingbirds inspect the many flowers and plants nearby. Be sure to take photographs and explore the bamboo patch.

Article source: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/japanese-tea-garden-san-antonio

Climate-cognizant landscaping

rock path with flowersThe National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) recently announced its official list of the 2018 top landscape trends.

“The top 2018 landscape trends reflect an evolution of the outdoor living trend we’ve seen grow in popularity over the past few years,” says Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs, NALP. “Stimulated by a healthy economy, homeowners and property managers are innovating their landscapes in fun, new ways. Recognizing the tremendous value that beautiful and functional landscapes bring to homes and commercial properties, today’s landscapes are built to last, so they can be used and enjoyed through all the seasons, year after year.”

NALP says it develops its trends reports based on a survey of its members and by drawing from the expertise of landscape professionals representing various regions of the U.S. who are at the forefront of outdoor trends. The group adds that landscape trends are also influenced by broader lifestyle and design trends.

For 2018, NALP predicts that the following five trends will influence the green industry:

Climate-cognizant landscaping

NALP notes that with unpredictable weather patterns comes the need for landscape enhancements that can withstand extreme conditions and allow spaces to be enjoyed, whether it’s unseasonably warm or cold.

You never know when the unexpected will arrive, so more and more landscapes are now being planned with just that thought in mind. Many feature pergolas with retractable canopies that can offer shelter for outdoor areas in wind, snow and rain. Others may feature outdoor patio heaters for those chilly nights, and hardier hardscape materials are used to handle the drastically fluctuating temperatures.

Experimental landscape design

Nowadays, landscapes are creatively and thoughtfully built for living, playing and working, and they greatly contribute to bringing together function and form for a quality outdoor experience.

When it comes to residential landscapes, many feature designated areas for cooking, relaxing, dining and doing outdoor work. These are typically adorned with fully integrated outdoor lighting and audio/visual systems for a multisensory and multiuse experience, day or night.

Office landscapes also more frequently feature walking and bike paths, gardens or dining areas to enhance the experience of the employees. In both residential and commercial landscapes, NALP says the experience typically begins at the entrance with design elements, plantings and an eye-catching lawn making visitors feel welcome and awed.

Plants in playful colors and patterns

Since Pantone recently chose Ultra Violet as the 2018 Color of the Year, there’s no doubt that this pop of color will be incorporated into more landscapes, while still playing up the simple elegance of the greenery that was all the rage in 2017.

NALP believes that this color of the year will prove to be an influencer on the interior and exterior design, and landscape professionals are expected to integrate more violets, verbena, clematis, iris and other purple flowers into landscapes.

NALP says that “patterned” plants are also getting some time in the garden spotlight this year since these plants are unique and revered for their intricate details, such as brightly colored veins and striped leaves.

Emphasis on water management and conservation

Sustainability has proven to be a buzzword in the green industry over the past few years, and NALP says that for 2018, it’s proving to be more than just a trend.

The organization says that sustainability influences how landscapes are created and maintained now and in the years to come. Particularly, NALP says the integration of eco-friendly watering practices are expected to continue taking off this year, which includes the use of plants native to a region (which generally uses less water), smarter irrigation technology and xeriscaping (planning a landscape to use low-water-use plants).

Enhanced equipment and technology

When it comes to the latest yard tools on the market, NALP says the ideas of ease of use and storage, along with incorporating more eco-friendly innovations, are major focusses.

Many pieces of equipment such as lawn mowers, leaf blowers and the like feature low or no emissions, are battery-powered and are quieter. There are many garden tools that are also designed to stack or fold to fit in a shed or garage space.

Along with these ideas, NALP reports that professionals are also integrating more technology into landscape planning, such as 3D modeling, drones and mobile apps.

Article source: https://www.totallandscapecare.com/landscaping/nalp-2018-landscape-trends/

Big crowds expected at I-X Center for annual home and garden show – News


Auburn Career Center’s “Jazz” display in the Garden Showcase at the Great Big Home and Garden Show in The I-X Center.
Auburn Career Center’s “Jazz” display in the Garden Showcase at the Great Big Home and Garden Show in The I-X Center.
David S. Glasier — The News-Herald




Great Big Home + Garden Show

When: Feb. 2 through 11

Where: I-X Center, 1 I-X Center Drive, Cleveland

Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Feb. 3; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 4; 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Feb. 5-9; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Feb. 10; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Feb. 11

Tickets: $15 adult; $12 adult at www.greatbighomeandgardenshow.com or Discount Drug Mart; $11 senior (65-plus, Monthday-Thursday only); $5 children (6-12)

Website: www.greatbighomeandgardenshow.com

Facebook: Facebook.com/homeandgardenevents

Twitter: @GreatBigShow

From tiny houses to large-scale projects, this year’s Great Big Home and Garden Show is a feast for the eyes laid out in 600 exhibits.

The annual showcase runs through Feb. 11 at the I-X Center in Cleveland.

Joe Schill, owner of Green Impressions Landscaping of Sheffield Village, said having an exhibit space in this event’s popular Garden Showcase is an essential component of his landscaping company’s business plan.

“We’ve been here 15 years running,” Schill said as showgoers strolled through the company’s garden display on Feb. 2, opening day of the show. The display was inspired by Neil Diamond’s hit single, “America,” and was judged to be the best in show this year.

“We make a substantial investment to be in this show and hope we generate $200,000 to $300,000 of business from it,” Schill said.

Beyond the commercial aspect, Schill said he enjoys interacting with the tens of thousands of people who visit his company’s themed garden exhibits.

“It’s great to talk to people about their homes, gardens and plans for the summer,” Schill said.

Winning the best in show award was a thrill for Schill and company employees.

“You’re talking about 700 man hours invested over eight days. It was a team effort,” he said.

A steady stream of visitors worked their way through the Garden Showcase exhibit of Concord Township’s Maple Ridge Nursery and Garden Center. The exhibit was inspired by Stevie Wonder’s “The Secret Life of Plants.”

Doug Cormack, who designed the exhibit for his cousin, business owner Craig Cormack, said their crew spent nine days building the exhibit that has a winding path carrying visitors past a vintage tractor, garden work areas and water features.

Water features also are essential components of “Saturday in the Park,” the Garden Showcase exhibit designed and built by Falling Waters LLC of Avon. Co-owners Kevin Bublinec and Seth Nieding said the exhibit was inspired by the hit single of the same name by Chicago.

Bublinec said the show is a must-do for the company because it generates so much business. Last year, he said, the goal was to get 25 jobs from the show.

“We got 28,” he said, smiling.

Small Spaces CLE is a Westlake company that specializes in the design, construction and sales of so-called “tiny houses,” Company president Carl Baldesare has two models on display at the Great Big Home and Garden Show. Prices range from the around $60,000 to $120,000, he said.

The ultra-light model displayed at the show is 16 feet long, mounted on a trailer with wheels, weighs 7,500 pounds and has 128 feet of living space. Because it’s been a display unit for two years, the show price is $58,500.

Baldesare said he’s sold 10 units in three years and believes the market will get stronger as more baby boomers move into retirement and seek out options for second homes.

As always, the main display floor offers exhibits for a wide array of products geared to homes, gardens and do-it-yourself projects.

Great Big Home + Garden Show

When: Feb. 2 through 11

Where: I-X Center, 1 I-X Center Drive, Cleveland

Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Feb. 3; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 4; 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Feb. 5-9; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Feb. 10; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Feb. 11

Tickets: $15 adult; $12 adult at www.greatbighomeandgardenshow.com or Discount Drug Mart; $11 senior (65-plus, Monthday-Thursday only); $5 children (6-12)

Website: www.greatbighomeandgardenshow.com

Facebook: Facebook.com/homeandgardenevents

Twitter: @GreatBigShow

Don’t miss

Photos: 2018 Great Big Home + Garden Show

Video: The Great Big Home and Garden Show exhibition floor

Video: Spokeswoman Caitlin Dorney discusses this year’s show at The I-X Center

Article source: http://www.news-herald.com/general-news/20180202/big-crowds-expected-at-i-x-center-for-annual-home-and-garden-show

In its 30th year, Seattle garden show aims for a younger crowd | The …

JUDITH JONES sent me a picture when she and her son finally sorted out how to erect the extremely heavy, 30-foot-high, three-sided ladder structure they had just built.

“I’m headed into the greenhouses now since the sun just peeped over the mountains,” she wrote. “It only shines for two hours this time of the year.”

Jones spends each day in January working in one of five greenhouses on the Gold Bar property where she lives and works, running a mail-order fern business she has owned since the 1980s, Fancy Fronds Nursery. A one-woman show, she is an international expert on ferns and has more than 1,000 taxa of ferns in her collection.

Northwest Flower Garden Festival

What: The second-largest show of its kind in the country.

When: Feb. 7-11.

Where: Washington State Convention Center, downtown Seattle.

More information and tickets:gardenshow.com

She calls her 5-acre piece of land the “Fronderosa,” and it’s exactly the sort of home you’d envision for a woman who has dedicated her life to working with ferns. Damp, woodsy and wonderful — you half expect a woodland nymph to hop out from the undergrowth and join the daily routine.

For the past 30 years, Jones has used winter to prepare in some way for the Northwest Flower Garden Festival, and this winter is no different. Jones can stand at her kitchen window and look out at the small glass greenhouse (made from repurposed sliding-glass doors) that glows at night from the grow lights. Here, rows of forced plants sit next to small ferns, ajuga and eucharis that are among the 100 plants she will bring to the show. Outside the greenhouse, her yard is full of structures used in past exhibits — including a colorful 500-pound snail she calls Meryl and a Thai pavilion from her 2009 “King and I” installation.

This sort of visual cacophony of artistic expression is her thing. In 1995, she dressed as a dead spirit for the Victorian graveyard theme, complete with two large Griffin statues that now live on the porch of her cabin.

“It’s a good way for the public to understand that you are associated with the booth,” Jones says. “It also helps clear an aisle (which allows more people to pass), because you’re strange,” which, to Jones, is excellent.

 

Judges compared notes near the Molbaks garden in 1999. The garden won the best-of-show Founders Cup award. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)Judges compared notes near the Molbaks garden in 1999. The garden won the best-of-show Founders Cup award. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival. Fancy Fronds is one of the longest-running exhibitors at the show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival. Fancy Fronds is one of the longest-running exhibitors at the show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
John Stroup, with Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, applies the Japanese siding method shou sugi ban to reclaimed wood. This technique preserves wood by charring it with fire. This piece will be on display at the upcoming garden show at the Convention Center in downtown Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)John Stroup, with Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, applies the Japanese siding method shou sugi ban to reclaimed wood. This technique preserves wood by charring it with fire. This piece will be on display at the upcoming garden show at the Convention Center in downtown Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, takes care of this 300-year-old bonsai tree that he has been training for years. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, takes care of this 300-year-old bonsai tree that he has been training for years. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be displayed at this years garden show in Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be displayed at this years garden show in Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Chris Wester, from Redwood Builders Landscaping, puts together one of two tables that will be part of a display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Chris Wester, from Redwood Builders Landscaping, puts together one of two tables that will be part of a display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, of Redwood Builders Landscaping, has drawn up plans for his display at the garden show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, of Redwood Builders Landscaping, has drawn up plans for his display at the garden show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a 300-year-old Mountain Hemlock bonsai that originated from Vancouver Island. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a 300-year-old Mountain Hemlock bonsai that originated from Vancouver Island. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Mike Carpenter, with Alchemy Concrete Works, mixes a batch of concrete that will be used in various display pieces for the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Mike Carpenter, with Alchemy Concrete Works, mixes a batch of concrete that will be used in various display pieces for the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Bonsai trees, like this one, will be part of the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Bonsai trees, like this one, will be part of the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Vanca Lumsden, who participates with Judith Jones (not pictured) in an annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival, looks over plants and ferns being grown at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Vanca Lumsden, who participates with Judith Jones (not pictured) in an annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival, looks over plants and ferns being grown at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Props from the 2002 Flower  Garden Festival watch over the plants in one of Judith Jones greenhouses at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Props from the 2002 Flower  Garden Festival watch over the plants in one of Judith Jones greenhouses at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
This replica of a prehistoric flying reptile was featured in the Fancy Fronds Nursery exhibit at the 2002 garden show. The prop found its way back to Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, where it currently watches over plants in a greenhouse. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)This replica of a prehistoric flying reptile was featured in the Fancy Fronds Nursery exhibit at the 2002 garden show. The prop found its way back to Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, where it currently watches over plants in a greenhouse. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is known for her plants, including the variety of ferns she grows from all over the world, like this emCyrtomium/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is known for her plants, including the variety of ferns she grows from all over the world, like this emCyrtomium/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones is the owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. This plant is emBlechnum tabulare/em, from South Africa. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones is the owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. This plant is emBlechnum tabulare/em, from South Africa. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, grows a variety of plants, including a wide range of ferns. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, grows a variety of plants, including a wide range of ferns. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is one of the longest-running exhibitors at Seattles Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is one of the longest-running exhibitors at Seattles Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is growing emHelleborus/em in her greenhouse to display at the Northwest Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is growing emHelleborus/em in her greenhouse to display at the Northwest Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)
Suzanne Phillips helps water plants at the A Familys Little Farm in the City display at the 2010 Northwest Flower  Garden Show. At right are miniature goats that were part of the display. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)Suzanne Phillips helps water plants at the A Familys Little Farm in the City display at the 2010 Northwest Flower  Garden Show. At right are miniature goats that were part of the display. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)
Brooklyn Deatherage, intern project manager for the Washington Park Arboretums garden, laid sod interspersed with white scilla in preparation for the 2015 show. (Bettina Hansen/The Seattle Times)Brooklyn Deatherage, intern project manager for the Washington Park Arboretums garden, laid sod interspersed with white scilla in preparation for the 2015 show. (Bettina Hansen/The Seattle Times)
Koi from Japan costing $5,000 to $6,000 each were part of the Pan Intercorp of Kenmores exhibit at the 2004 show. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times)Koi from Japan costing $5,000 to $6,000 each were part of the Pan Intercorp of Kenmores exhibit at the 2004 show. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times)
Vance Allen pondered his next choice of tropical plants to install in the Ravenna Gardens display that workers dubbed Zonal Denial, in honor of plants that grow in this zone but are very susceptible to temperatures below 30 degrees. Allen grew a 38-foot bamboo plant, which was part of the 2001 display. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)Vance Allen pondered his next choice of tropical plants to install in the Ravenna Gardens display that workers dubbed Zonal Denial, in honor of plants that grow in this zone but are very susceptible to temperatures below 30 degrees. Allen grew a 38-foot bamboo plant, which was part of the 2001 display. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)
Scott Hackney, one of the owners of Marenakos Rock Center in Issaquah (red hat, at right), directed his boom-truck operator as they set a rock at Rodgers Landscaping Inc.s exhibit in 2000. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)Scott Hackney, one of the owners of Marenakos Rock Center in Issaquah (red hat, at right), directed his boom-truck operator as they set a rock at Rodgers Landscaping Inc.s exhibit in 2000. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)
Elva Dunlap, of La Conner, examined the Winged Weeder at the 1996 show. Lyle Hahn, whose family sold the unusually shaped garden tools at the show, said he expected to sell 1,500 that year. (Rod Mar/The Seattle Times)Elva Dunlap, of La Conner, examined the Winged Weeder at the 1996 show. Lyle Hahn, whose family sold the unusually shaped garden tools at the show, said he expected to sell 1,500 that year. (Rod Mar/The Seattle Times)
Standing outside in the rain, Robert Wilson looks through a window at an arrangement of tropical flowers awaiting judging at the 1999 show. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)Standing outside in the rain, Robert Wilson looks through a window at an arrangement of tropical flowers awaiting judging at the 1999 show. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)
Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Joe Gast stands for a picture with a giant rootball on display at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Joe Gast stands for a picture with a giant rootball on display at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)

THIS YEAR MARKS the 30th anniversary of Seattle’s garden show. The oversized displays, as usual, will be captivating, over-the-top whimsies of dream gardens, and the seminars will provide excellent information for gardeners. At its core, the event has always been a garden show for gardeners.

The first time I attended was well before I started exploring gardening professionally. I was in my early 20s and had an interest in growing something, but with a small deck and little firsthand experience, the size of the show was overwhelming. And those display gardens? I wasn’t inspired. I was intimidated.

So if you lack a green thumb, or don’t have any land (calling all apartment and condo dwellers!), it might seem easy to pass this show over. Really, what’s it in for you?

Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a Selaginella. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

As it turns out, this year, there’s quite a bit.

Where once the show was all about the display gardens (of course, they continue to be a major draw), the show staff has added elements meant to attract all sorts of gardeners, enthusiasts and wannabes.

“In recent years, we’ve placed greater emphasis on small-space and container gardening, growing edibles and the role of garden spaces in home entertainment,” says Jeff Swenson, festival manager.

It’s no secret that every business these days is hoping to entice millennials, and the Flower Garden Festival is no exception. Organizers are working to broaden its appeal by adding engaging elements, a larger marketplace and a local food court.

Says Gayle Payne, who designs the display garden for Flower Growers of Puget Sound: “The industry is having a hard time getting millennials into gardening. It’s something the industry is worried about: how to attract more people.”

 

THE GOOD NEWS is, there are newcomers to the show this year who have both the vision and the business savvy to think about what’s happening in the garden industry.

Heather Jellerson has built display gardens for other companies, but decided to give it a whirl with her own company, Millennium Landscape Construction, Inc., which she operates with her husband.

“In our (display) garden this year, we hope it will be much more approachable and something DIYers can actually do themselves,” she says. Tired of seeing grandiose ideas that didn’t seem practical, she wants people to leave the show feeling empowered.

Her overall design relies heavily on metalwork, one of the most commonly asked-about features among new garden clients (she swears it is not difficult or intimidating to work with), and low-maintenance plants for the trendy, time-strapped consumer.

With the show only a month away, she was still working on final plans for her garden exhibit.

“I’m probably the one who is least prepared for the whole show,” Jellerson says.

She says she plans to use COR-TEN, a weathering steel that patinas into a stable rustlike appearance, to build garden beds and fencing. It’s a relatively easy project for anyone with the know-how to drill into metal. She says there’s not a huge budget for building the exhibits, and, “That’s what most home gardens are working with, as well.”

And while plans and materials are coming together for the physical structure, the plants are sitting in wait. Focusing on plants that need only occasional attention throughout the year — ground covers to give a sense of lawn, grasses and evergreen shrubs that flower across seasons — is a way to showcase easy ideas that attendees can imitate at home. For now, these plants are lined up in the nursery, about 20 feet from Jellerson’s back door, where they’ve been stacking up for months.

Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)

Also new to the show this year is “Floral Wars.” With a format similar to the festival’s popular container-planting competition, local floral designers will use American-grown buds and put together large floral arrangements in real time while on stage. Not everyone is interested in fawning over catalogs to find a new favorite bulb, whereas any home can accommodate a vase full of blooms.

It’s a smart move for show organizers, as the local flower business is booming — a trend with no signs of slowing. Flower farms are the new “it” factor in agriculture, and designers using local flowers are in high demand.

“I think, as a whole, the concept of seasonality has really been embraced,” says competitor and floral designer Gina Thresher of From the Ground Up Floral in Kent. “We have the most amazing local product and great farmers that stay on trend.”

Thresher contributed to the American Institute of Floral Design booth last year and is a fan of the show. “I’ve attended for so many years — my mom and I have so much fun.”

Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)

SEMINARS ALWAYS have been a large part of the programming, though Janet Endsley, the seminar and judging manager who has been involved with the show for the past 18 years, has made big changes lately. When she started, speakers were mostly regional. It was rare to see someone outside the Pacific Northwest come in to talk. Today, though, “Publishers send authors to us, and people can see speakers they normally wouldn’t ever see during the course of the year,” she says.

It used to be that plantaholics filled the halls, eager to learn more about certain plants, or looking for design inspiration for their yards. Today, the quest for inspiration is coupled with the desire for information, and the programming reflects that by offering a more diversified range of seminar topics.

“People are highly interested in growing edibles — 10 years ago, there were very few edible (seminars), and now I have a significant block of those,” Endsley says. Do-It-Yourself-themed classes remain popular, and Endsley has worked to add topics for urbanites in small spaces — classes on growing air plants, or a focus on hydroponics that promises to teach how to grow edibles on countertops.

Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)
Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his family’s company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)

Most of the younger gardeners I spoke with come to the show (with a parent, often) for the seminars, seeking information on how to get started, so Endsley is right on. Container gardening is a big draw, as is anything having to do with growing food at home.

“Heavy plant geeks can pick out what they’re interested in, and people in apartments can learn specifics for them, too,” Endsley says. “We’re looking back at the history of the show, and as the show evolves, we are trying to accommodate people’s lifestyles and give people useful information.”

 

EVEN WITH ALL the additions, it’s safe to say the main draw of the show is still the “garden creations” — a massive installment of more than 15 Puget Sound-area gardening and landscaping businesses.

Elandan Gardens of Bremerton is a fixture here — this will be its 29th year at the show. The company specializes in specimen material — trees of considerable size that are artistic in form.

“For the last 60 years, I’ve been training trees and turning them into spectacular pieces of art,” founder Dan Robinson says.

Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)
Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)

This year, Elandan Gardens will showcase two special trees, both of which stand about 12 feet tall. One is a large and gnarly 125-year-old laceleaf maple that Robinson has been caringly pruning for 45 years. The other is a twin-trunked, 56-year-old Japanese black pine that was grown from seed by his hand. As Robinson walked his 7-acre property one recent afternoon, he excitedly reminded me that I needed to get to the show to see them — “It’s fantasmagoria!”

Anthony Fajarillo of Redwood Builders Landscaping will showcase a selection of small bonsai trees — one of which you can hold in the palm of your hand. It’s his attempt to create a relationship between attendees and nature.

“Trees represented in miniature form through bonsai can become our portable connection with nature, especially now with our fast-paced digital world,” Fajarillo says.

Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this year’s Flower Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

It’s a lofty message to convey through a garden display, but a timely one.

Fajarillo’s garden has a modern, Zen vibe to it and includes old hemlocks, conifers and moss, along with the bonsai trees. In the center, Fajarillo will place a floating deck set up to mimic a tea ceremony in progress.

 

A DECADE AGO, the displays imitated the seasonal influence of the time — winter. This steered booths and displays into a minimalist feel and kept the big, bold blooms to a minimum. For the past several years, though, “We’ve made an effort to bring in tens of thousands of flowers,” says Endsley. “People come to escape the dreariness of what’s outside — they want that fantasy; they want that now, and we’ve definitely brought that up.”

But not all gardeners are convinced the changes are for the better, and a question lingers: Can show programming satisfy the hard-core gardeners while simultaneously engaging garden newbies with a small space?

Michelle Meyer, owner of Gardening GaGa!, is on the fence after having attended religiously in years past.

“Quite honestly, last year I thought the exhibits and speakers were not very interesting to plant people,” Meyer says. She will, however, attend a daylong event on Friday specifically for garden professionals — the GardenPRO Conference, which was introduced this year.

Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

For its big anniversary, the festival feels like a mixed bag — a bit of something for everyone. Time will tell whether this all-inclusive strategy works for or against planners, but with reasonable pricing for entry, I think it’s worth a visit. You can pick up interesting plants or garden art in the marketplace if you’re willing to shuffle past booths of unrelated paraphernalia like hair accessories or beef jerky.

The seminars offer solid information for beginners and midlevel gardeners. Same goes for the garden displays — for anyone with a blank slate who is looking for ideas, it still is a great place for inspiration or, at the very least, to satisfy a curiosity about how others build out their garden spaces.

And pending all else, you can swing by Fancy Fronds and meet the lively Judith Jones. That alone is worth the cost of a ticket.

Article source: https://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/for-the-30th-anniversary-of-the-northwest-flower-garden-festival-organizers-hope-to-lure-a-younger-crowd/

With care, gardens can thrive in winter snow and cold

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Your yard and garden may be deeply asleep right now, but this is the perfect time to think of “winterscaping” your landscape.

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After all, the Iowa growing season may be just eight or nine months long, but you look out of your windows and at your yard 12 months of the year. Why not make your winter landscape just as attractive to look at in February as it is in July?

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A successful winter landscape is one that is pretty to look at even in the coldest month when nothing is actively growing. Think bare trees, evergreens, dormant perennials, berries and hardscape such as stonework or accents laid bare.

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The first step is to determine how you look at and use your landscape in the winter months. Which windows and doors do you look out? When you’re outside, what part of the landscape do you see? The area along the drive? Beside the garage? The path to the back door? And don’t forget what your neighbors see in the front yard, as well as guests walking to your front door.

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Then fill those spaces with hardscaping and planting that will look good throughout the year. Evergreens, of course, are a natural. They’re gorgeous all year long, but especially when dusted with snow. Paths, stonework and raised beds also should be designed to look good even in winter.

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Also keep in mind those shrubs and perennials that are attractive when dormant. Tall sedums dry to attractive brown and stand all winter long, providing winter interest. Red-twigged dogwood drops its leaves in fall to reveal beautiful bright red stems that pop against the snow. Let purple coneflower go to seed in late summer and the black ball-like seed heads will be pleasant to look at in cold weather (they also attract goldfinches).

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Hardscape and accents play a role, too. At my back door, instead of a slab of concrete, we laid a pretty brick round patio of aged brick, which looks attractive and welcoming no matter what the weather.

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Win flowers from our two sponsors: Flowerama and Pierson’s. It is free to enter.


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I leave my birdbath up in the backyard as a focal point as well as a wooden bench with matching chairs even when it’s impossible to use them. I enjoy looking at them as informal sculpture and accents in my backyard. The same holds true for a handful of small sculptures tucked in here and there in my flower beds.

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Blocking unattractive views also is important for the winter garden. In summer, that neighbor’s peeling garage or unkempt backyard may be partially hidden from view by greenery. In winter, however, the sight lines might be depressingly open. This can be solved with attractive fencing, strategic plantings of vines, as well as various shrubs and low, faster-growing trees.

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Of course, now is not the time to actually execute these plans — it’s merely the time of year to look at your landscape with a critical eye to plan for plantings and projects this spring and summer. That way, come next winter, you’ll have a landscape to look forward to, no matter what the weather.

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l Veronica Lorson Fowler is co-publisher of The Iowa Gardener website at www.theiowagardener.com.

Article source: http://www.thegazette.com/subject/life/home-and-garden/with-care-gardens-can-thrive-in-winter-snow-and-cold-20180204

Proctor’s Garden: Game day ideas for decor and food

It’s game day! While most of the attention will be directed to the tv screen, the second most popular area is usually the buffet table, so make sure it is fun and creative. As you are laying out the food, if you find that your table is a little boring, all you need are a few household items and about ½ hour and you can make your buffet fit into the football theme.

First, cover your table with butcher paper, or any type of rolled out paper. This will create a base on which you can label your food items. After your food is set out, use a black marker and write the food labels directly on the paper. Use a play-book style of writing with x’s, o’s, and arrows pointing to the food.

Next, make fun cutlery holders by wrapping mason jars in brown paper. A paper lunch sack cut to size will work great for this project. Once the jar is wrapped, create a football lacing pattern on the jar with paint, white tape, or even white contact paper. Fill the jars with spoons and forks and set them on the table.

You can also get creative with houseplants to fill in any empty areas. Use thin strips of white duct tape to create a football lacing pattern on a plain terracotta pot. If your terracotta pot is empty, just find a smaller pot that is already planted and sink it down into the decorated pot. Use the plant foliage or shredded brown paper to fill in any gaps between the two pots. If you have green pots, you can use white tape to create lines on the pot to mimic the lines on the playing field. The decorated pots create a fun and economical centerpiece for your buffet.

Finally, have fun with the food. Look for foods in your team’s colors. Yogurt parfaits and fruit trays are a colorful and healthy option. You can also dress up more traditional football foods, such as deviled eggs. Simply cut chives, or cilantro stems, in strips and lay them on top of the eggs in a football lace pattern.

Creating a fun and festive football atmosphere doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive. Just take inventory of what you already have at home and have fun repurposing items to fit your gameday theme.

Article source: http://www.9news.com/article/life/home-garden/proctors-tips/proctors-garden-game-day-ideas-for-decor-and-food/73-514332599

Conference to offer gardening tips

TWIN FALLS, Idaho (KMVT/KSVT) – A gardening conference is coming up this week in Twin Falls.

Bloom Horticulture specialist Tony McCammon hosts “Breaking Dormancy” which will cover topics including soils, edible landscaping design, fruit trees and more.

This caters to everyone at all levels whether you’re just starting out or have been gardening for years.

“The conference will kind of walk us through everything that has to do with gardening to waken up our minds to break the dormancy of our minds and get us ready to head out into the garden and get our hands dirty,” McCammon said.

The three day event will start this Thursday, Feb. 8 at the Fairfield Inn Suites.

To sign up, click here.

Article source: http://www.kmvt.com/content/news/Conference-to-offer-gardening-tips-472671963.html