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Archives for February 2, 2018

Garden designer from Stevington shortlisted for industry award

A garden designer from Stevington has been shortlisted for an industry award.

Susan Young Garden Design has been shortlisted for the Association of Professional Landscapers (APL) Awards 2018.

Susan Young design

Susan Young design

Susan, a Pre-Registered Society of Garden Designers member, won one of the Marshalls Regional Awards 2018 for hard landscaping design in the category of Best Use Of Ethically Sourced Fairstone, with her design of a spacious, terraced, low maintenance garden for a home in Cranfield.

Susan said: “The original garden was on a slope with much of it too uncomfortable to use, but with a fantastic panoramic view of Marston Thrift. The clients asked me to create more usable space around the house and the end result has practically doubled it. It has steps to a broad terrace, five raised beds, path and a new utility area. The finishing touches of a cedar greenhouse and a new shed for storage of garden tools will keep the owners ‘green fingers’ busy for many years to come.”

Landscapers David Stack and Mark Evans of Absolute Landscapes Ltd of Flitwick, who built Susan Young’s design, are pleased with the Marshalls Regional Award for the project and delighted that her hard landscaping design is also a finalist in the APL Awards.

The annual awards ceremony, sponsored by Bradstone, takes place on March 16 in London. Susan Young’s project, ‘Slope to Stage’, is in the running for the Hard Landscaping category.

Visit www.susanyoungdesign.co.uk and www.aplawards.co.uk

Article source: https://www.bedfordtoday.co.uk/news/garden-designer-from-stevington-shortlisted-for-industry-award-1-8360100

Sculptures in the garden go back to their roots

Keep abreast of significant corporate, financial and political developments around the world. Stay informed and spot emerging risks and opportunities with independent global reporting, expert commentary and analysis you can trust.

Article source: https://www.ft.com/content/8116b4d0-003f-11e8-9e12-af73e8db3c71

Japanese gardens: Unique source of inspiration – Victoria Advocate …

ROCKS USED IN LANDSCAPING

• Granite

• Marble

• Quartz

• Flagstone

• Limestone

• Gravel

• River rocks

• Crushed/decomposed stone

• Pea gravel/pebbles

JAPANESE GARDENS IN TEXAS

• Japanese Tea Garden – San Antonio Botanical Gardens (Built 1927)

• Zilker Botanical Garden – Austin Area Garden Center (Built 1968-1969)

• Fort Worth Botanic Garden (Built 1973)

• Japanese Garden in Hermann Park – Houston (Built 1991-1992)

• National Museum of the Pacific War – Admiral Nimitz Museum

• Japanese Garden of Peace – Fredericksburg (Built 2014)

TYPES OF JAPANESE GARDENS

• Courtyard

• Strolling

• Teahouse

• Dry

Step through the gate of a Japanese garden and experience a garden 2,000 years in the making. It is quiet here. A place of peace and tranquility. Stroll the garden paths and see living paintings where every carefully placed plant, tree and stone creates an image of nature perfected.

Each Japanese garden, like each Texas garden, reflects its unique creator – but why do these gardens look and feel so different? What can we learn from them that will enhance our own gardening experience?

Early American gardens – planted to enable survival

Americans began planting gardens around 1700 when they planted more than edibles to survive winter. Their design ideas were brought from Europe, where small, rectangular gardens just outside the home meant food, flavoring and medicine.

Over the years, our gardens expanded to include a rectangular front and back yard with rectangular beds of flowers or shrubs around foundations. Later, tract houses came complete with one tree on each side of the sidewalk – a rectangular slab that shot from the curb to the front door. The design had nothing to do with religion.

Japanese garden design – guided by divine spirits

Japanese garden design began in China around 170 BC. An emperor fenced off an especially beautiful area of his kingdom and brought into it unusual rocks and unique plants.

For the next two thousand years, oriental garden design was guided by the practice of several ancient religions. These taught the presence of divine spirits within mountains, rocks, trees and water; the importance of the garden as a miniature representation of the world; and the garden as an inspirational place for meditation.

Four types emerged in Japan

In Japan, four garden types emerged: courtyard gardens, strolling gardens, tea gardens and dry gardens. Each of these has interesting elements we can use in our own gardens.

Courtyard Garden

Originally a small garden between two houses, these are placed where they can be seen close-up from more than one vantage point. No matter where someone stands to view it, however, it is arranged so everything in the garden cannot be seen at once.

This is meant to slow the viewer, to make him or her take time to find and absorb all there is to see.

Strolling garden

A much larger version of the courtyard garden, a strolling garden has long walking paths throughout. Straight lines and right angles are avoided. Curving paths and stepping stones are used again to slow one’s journey, partially obscure parts of the garden and increase the enjoyment of each view.

This “hide-and-reveal” concept is the exact opposite of American home landscaping, where the view of the house and yard from the street creates “curb appeal.” Instant gratification: See it all. Done. Move on.

Tea house garden

While we don’t have tea houses in our backyards, many of us have outside areas for entertaining. Along the curving paths to the tea house, metal or stone lanterns were placed for lighting at dusk. Today, solar-powered and electric lighting fixtures can create a softly lit ambiance similar to these lanterns.

Dry garden

Created in Zen Buddhist monasteries as focal points for meditation, these gardens were enclosed by high walls. Large rocks representing specific entities stood in careful arrangements within the walls. The remaining spaces were filled with gravel, which monks raked into patterns representing the movement of water around the rock “islands.”

Rocks in landscaping

How many of us use rocks in our landscaping? Rocks add wonderful contrast in texture to gardens. From smooth granite and quartz to honeycombed limestone, Texas has a bountiful treasure of rocks for home landscapers.

In Japanese gardens, tall, vertical rocks were sometimes designated “guardians.” Large flat rocks were sometimes deemed “meditation” rocks. Exercise your imagination or a child’s by naming some of your rocks. Putting a weed barrier beneath the rocks and placing gravel around them would allow for some creatively raked patterns.

Water conservation – xeriscape

Dry gardens are being embraced by many gardeners concerned with water conservation.

The term “xeric” applies to plants, trees and turf that can survive on little water per year.

Placing these plants together in areas of the yard that otherwise would require daily or weekly watering is a positive step in helping conserve water in our state.

Visit Japanese gardens in Texas

Observing, learning and putting to use new gardening techniques is one hallmark of a great gardener. Consider visiting one or more of the authentic Japanese gardens located in the Botanical Gardens of San Antonio, Fort Worth and Austin. Smaller gardens can be found in Houston and Fredericksburg. For sheer beauty and timeless inspiration, they are worth the trip.

The Gardeners’ Dirt is written by members of the Victoria County Master Gardener Association, an educational outreach of Texas AM AgriLife Extension – Victoria County. Mail your questions in care of the Advocate, P.O. Box 1518, Victoria, TX 77901; or vcmga@vicad.com.

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Article source: https://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/2018/feb/01/japanese-gardens-unique-source-of-inspiration/

Slidell garden bathed in shade takes second place in NOLA.com garden contest

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In 2015, when David Munroe and Michael Hickerson purchased a circa-1912 Craftsman home in Olde Towne Slidell, the landscape consisted of “a single pink house, three oak trees and some mud,” Hickerson jokes. 

“It was a box with three sticks,” added Munroe. “The yard was a gooey, clay mud when it rained, and it was full of roots, vines and weeds.”

Today, it’s hard to decide which is more charming — the house or the yard. The couple has spent the past two years transforming the shady property into a picturesque study of textures and leaf shapes, all in varying hues of green (at least until the recent freezes, which turned much of the yard a forlorn brown. Most of the photos with this story were taken before the freezes.) 

Foxtail ferns, autumn ferns and gingers were planted in beds close to the house. Another bed created a border with Aztec grass and small azaleas. 

Their efforts won Munroe and Hickerson second place in the third annual Jazzin’ Up the Neighborhood Garden Contest. Sponsored by NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune, the LSU AgCenter and the Metro Area Horticulture Foundation, the contest, held last fall, was open to front yards throughout the New Orleans area. The judges were LSU AgCenter agents Joe Willis and Anna Timmerman; Metro Area Horticulture Foundation president Kevin Taylor of Southern Accent Landscaping Lawn Care Inc.; and Susan Langenhennig, NOLA.com home and garden editor. The five finalists’ gardens were visited in person by the judges.

As the second-place winners, Munroe and Hickerson received a $150 gift certificate to Banting’s Nursery Northshore; a signed copy of “The Louisiana Urban Gardener: A Beginner’s Guide to Growing Vegetables and Herbs” by Kathryn K. Fontenot; and a copy of “The Grumpy Gardener: An A to Z Guide from the Galaxy’s Most Irritable Green Thumb,” by Steve Bender. (Bender will bring his humor and gardening tips to the New Orleans Botanical Garden on Saturday, Feb. 3. For tickets, go to longuevue.com.)

When planning their garden, Munroe and Hickerson were inspired by visits to City Park. “We began to look more closely at what plant materials were being used, where they were being used and how,” Munroe said in his contest entry. “We explored the gardens of City Park. Then, back in Olde Towne, we drove the streets of our new neighborhood looking closely at what plants were growing and thriving.  We visited our local nurseries in Slidell and Lacombe for ideas. We even subscribed to Louisiana Gardner and a few other garden magazines to further encourage us.”

The couple’s research led them to plant gingers, ferns, hosta and grasses and then add in garden sculpture, including a Zen-style fountain surrounded by Macho ferns. A walkway with crushed stone and pavers adds geometric interest as it leads to the front porch.

Resurrection ferns line the oak tree branches, and “the fern idea flows down into the garden,” Willis said. “You took what you had and then worked with it.” 

“I really like how they incorporated different leaf textures and the way they achieved balance,” Taylor added. “It’s very peaceful. They used every inch of space for their landscape.”

Timmerman pointed out the various garden “rooms” created by a decorative gate and fence.

This was the couple’s first effort at landscaping. They previously lived in the Treme in a house with “a very small patio. It was low maintenance,” Hickerson said. 

The large, corner yard in Slidell gave them an open slate to try new ideas. “I’ve always lived in New Orleans where the neighbors were 3 feet away,” he said. “Coming here, I felt like Zsa Zsa Gabor on ‘Green Acres.’ Suddenly we had land.”

See more photos of this garden and the first-place garden contest winner’s yard
on Instagram @nolahomegarden.

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2018/02/slidell_garden_bathed_in_shade.html

Small, but with oh so much to offer

This ranch on Beverly Drive on 1.9 acres in Warwick offers three bedrooms, full basement and brick fireplace


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— As smaller houses become the modern trend, you will love the comfort and simplicity of this single floor residence situated on 1.9 acres in the Town of Warwick.

Take in the natural light, hardwood floors and inviting brick fireplace when you first enter this appealing ranch.

A large bay window brings in the view of mature evergreens as light reflects off the warm wood floors.

Take note of the spacious eat-in kitchen with plenty of prep space and natural light.

The kitchen opens to the deck and backyard allowing you to easily take your meal outside or entertain with ease as your guests flow freely through the space.

Three comfortable bedrooms including a master with private bath have hardwood floors and ample closet space.

The interior was just painted with a neutral palette so that you can easily make this home your own, bringing your personal touches. Perhaps a mid-century modern theme?

Organic fruit trees, evergreens and a fabulous yard for gardening, volley ball or integrate some of your landscaping ideas!

This home is a blank pallet that can easily be made your own.

A full basement and two-car garage complete the setting, allowing you more than enough room for storage.

This lovely home is located in a desirable neighborhood within minutes to Warwick’s historic village, cafes, restaurants, boutique shopping and library (named the Best Small Library in America 2016).

If you’re ready to make a change, contact Claudia Vaccaro at 845-986-7500 to set up an appointment to see this home in person.

Each week’s featured home is chosen from among the houses offered by The Warwick Advertiser’s advertisers. For more information, e-mail the director of sales, Frank Curcio, at sales@strausnews.com.


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‘We’ll always have Warwick’

Photographer Robert G. Breese shared this photo of a woman checking out the Love Locks on the Carriage Path Bridge on Saturday afternoon. Warwick Mayor Michael Newhart introduced…

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Eat some pancakes to help a family who lost everything in a fire

By Christine Urio
WARWICK — The Warwick Knights of Columbus are sponsoring a pancake breakfast fund raiser on Sunday, Feb. 11, with 100 percent of the money raised…

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John J. Donovan

John J. Donovan entered into eternal rest on Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018, surrounded by his loving family. He was 82.
John was predeceased by his parents Harry and Delia and…

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Article source: http://www.warwickadvertiser.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20180131/BUSINESS01/180139991/0/FUNANDGAMES90/Small-but-with-oh-so-much-to-offer

Ryser’s Landscape Supply owner chose patios over police work

CLOSE

Learn how to make your outdoor space more livable.

LITTLE SILVER – In 1993, Marty Ryser was deadlocked between becoming a police officer and pursuing his landscaping business full time.

Ryser knew he loved what he was doing with his lawn care business, but also saw himself being in the police force because of his family background and some of his schooling. He had two uncles and a cousin in the police force already.

“It was a great opportunity and a tough decision,” said Ryser. “I could have either become a cop, which is a great job and career, or just stick with the business and try to make something of it. It was a lot harder career path to take to stick to the business I was doing and making decisions all the time, but it was also a lot more rewarding.

“I started out in high school cutting grass and doing local tree services,” said Ryser. “Afterward graduating high school, I started attending Brookdale Community College and taking criminal justice classes there for some time. One day, I decided that my landscaping business was the direction that I wanted to go and so I chose to chase that dream full time.”

Watch the video at the top of this story for outdoor design ideas.

Ryser, owner of Ryser’s Landscape Supply in Little Silver, has deep roots in his field. Ryser’s father worked side jobs doing landscaping for neighbors and friends, and as a boy Ryser helped him, planting mulch and mowing lawns.

During his time with his father, Ryser learned the ins and outs of this trade and about the value of hard work.

“My father taught me how to take initiative and really go after what I wanted out of life,” said Ryser. “He was always positive and showed me how to move forward and better myself. One key thing that I picked up along the way from working with him was that it was easy to stay where you are at, but change is growth. The hard part is reinventing yourself and your business. If it wasn’t for him, I don’t know where I’d be.”

More: Side jobs you can start with no money

More: New APP columnist speaks for the ‘average guy’

Madison Wow House: Enjoy Spectacular Gardens, Landscaping

MADISON, CT — The latest Madison wow house is located at 374 Green Hill Road and the current asking price according to Realtor.com is $1.995 million. This house includes more than 7,000-square-feet of living space.

  • Address: 374 Green Hill Rd, Madison, Connecticut
  • Price: $1,995,000
  • Square Feet: 7345
  • Bedrooms: 4
  • Bathrooms: 5 Full and 2 Half Baths
  • Built: 1991
  • Features: Think Greenwich, Connecticut when trying to visualize this spectacular 4+ acre setting reminiscent of Victoria, British Columbia’s Butchart Gardens in the heart of Madison, CT that envelopes this extraordinary 7,345 square foot brick Modern English Country Home, complimented by a two story brick studio and heated four season tea house.
  • The Tea House sits amidst lush gardens and is surrounded by hundreds of linear feet of hand-laid stone walls and picturesque walkways reminiscent of paths throughout the Island of Capri. A finished walkout lower level provides additional living space including a 44×18 media room warmed by a beautiful wood burning Tulikivi.
  • Multiple decks and patios provide 180 degree views of the spectacular gardens, stone paths and award winning pedestrian timber bridge constructed of laminated curved timbers and spans a beautiful brook that crosses the property. A cedar and copper “weather station” stands ready at the far end of the property to provide refuge should the weather change while you are enjoying the amazing scenery. Inside intricate wood work, comprised primarily of maple floors with cherry inlays are found throughout both the main floors.
  • A first floor Master Bedroom offers two full baths with heated towel racks. This elegant home is the product of loving owners and master craftsmen who spent countless hours pouring over every detail imaginable. Two adjacent building lots with 250 feet of frontage on Copse Road are also available for sale.

This listing originally appeared on realtor.com. For more information and photos, click here.

div265 Legend Hill Rd/divdivMadison, Connecticut 06443/div

div15 Dudley Towne Rd/divdivKillingworth, Connecticut 06419/div

div909 Goose Ln/divdivGuilford, Connecticut 06437/div

div33 Park Ave/divdivMadison, Connecticut 06443/div

div150 Sconset Ln/divdivGuilford, Connecticut 06437/div

div31 Linden Ln/divdivMadison, Connecticut 06443/div

div8 Fox Run Ln/divdivKillingworth, Connecticut 06419/div

div88 Sconset Ln/divdivGuilford, Connecticut 06437/div

div40 Rock Point Ln/divdivGuilford, Connecticut 06437/div

div384 Mulberry Point Rd/divdivGuilford, Connecticut 06437/div

Article source: https://patch.com/connecticut/madison-ct/madison-wow-house-enjoy-spectacular-gardens-landscaping

In its 30th year, Seattle garden show aims for a younger crowd

JUDITH JONES sent me a picture when she and her son finally sorted out how to erect the extremely heavy, 30-foot-high, three-sided ladder structure they had just built.

“I’m headed into the greenhouses now since the sun just peeped over the mountains,” she wrote. “It only shines for two hours this time of the year.”

Jones spends each day in January working in one of five greenhouses on the Gold Bar property where she lives and works, running a mail-order fern business she has owned since the 1980s, Fancy Fronds Nursery. A one-woman show, she is an international expert on ferns and has more than 1,000 taxa of ferns in her collection.

Northwest Flower Garden Festival

What: The second-largest show of its kind in the country.

When: Feb. 7-11.

Where: Washington State Convention Center, downtown Seattle.

More information and tickets:gardenshow.com

She calls her 5-acre piece of land the “Fronderosa,” and it’s exactly the sort of home you’d envision for a woman who has dedicated her life to working with ferns. Damp, woodsy and wonderful — you half expect a woodland nymph to hop out from the undergrowth and join the daily routine.

For the past 30 years, Jones has used winter to prepare in some way for the Northwest Flower Garden Festival, and this winter is no different. Jones can stand at her kitchen window and look out at the small glass greenhouse (made from repurposed sliding-glass doors) that glows at night from the grow lights. Here, rows of forced plants sit next to small ferns, ajuga and eucharis that are among the 100 plants she will bring to the show. Outside the greenhouse, her yard is full of structures used in past exhibits — including a colorful 500-pound snail she calls Meryl and a Thai pavilion from her 2009 “King and I” installation.

This sort of visual cacophony of artistic expression is her thing. In 1995, she dressed as a dead spirit for the Victorian graveyard theme, complete with two large Griffin statues that now live on the porch of her cabin.

“It’s a good way for the public to understand that you are associated with the booth,” Jones says. “It also helps clear an aisle (which allows more people to pass), because you’re strange,” which, to Jones, is excellent.

 

Judges compared notes near the Molbaks garden in 1999. The garden won the best-of-show Founders Cup award. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)Judges compared notes near the Molbaks garden in 1999. The garden won the best-of-show Founders Cup award. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival. Fancy Fronds is one of the longest-running exhibitors at the show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival. Fancy Fronds is one of the longest-running exhibitors at the show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
John Stroup, with Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, applies the Japanese siding method shou sugi ban to reclaimed wood. This technique preserves wood by charring it with fire. This piece will be on display at the upcoming garden show at the Convention Center in downtown Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)John Stroup, with Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, applies the Japanese siding method shou sugi ban to reclaimed wood. This technique preserves wood by charring it with fire. This piece will be on display at the upcoming garden show at the Convention Center in downtown Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, takes care of this 300-year-old bonsai tree that he has been training for years. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, takes care of this 300-year-old bonsai tree that he has been training for years. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be displayed at this years garden show in Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be displayed at this years garden show in Seattle. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Chris Wester, from Redwood Builders Landscaping, puts together one of two tables that will be part of a display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Chris Wester, from Redwood Builders Landscaping, puts together one of two tables that will be part of a display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, of Redwood Builders Landscaping, has drawn up plans for his display at the garden show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, of Redwood Builders Landscaping, has drawn up plans for his display at the garden show. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a 300-year-old Mountain Hemlock bonsai that originated from Vancouver Island. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a 300-year-old Mountain Hemlock bonsai that originated from Vancouver Island. This old bonsai will be part of the Redwood Builders display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Mike Carpenter, with Alchemy Concrete Works, mixes a batch of concrete that will be used in various display pieces for the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Mike Carpenter, with Alchemy Concrete Works, mixes a batch of concrete that will be used in various display pieces for the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the 2018 Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Bonsai trees, like this one, will be part of the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Bonsai trees, like this one, will be part of the Redwood Builders Landscaping display at the upcoming Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Vanca Lumsden, who participates with Judith Jones (not pictured) in an annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival, looks over plants and ferns being grown at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Vanca Lumsden, who participates with Judith Jones (not pictured) in an annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival, looks over plants and ferns being grown at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Props from the 2002 Flower  Garden Festival watch over the plants in one of Judith Jones greenhouses at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Props from the 2002 Flower  Garden Festival watch over the plants in one of Judith Jones greenhouses at Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
This replica of a prehistoric flying reptile was featured in the Fancy Fronds Nursery exhibit at the 2002 garden show. The prop found its way back to Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, where it currently watches over plants in a greenhouse. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)This replica of a prehistoric flying reptile was featured in the Fancy Fronds Nursery exhibit at the 2002 garden show. The prop found its way back to Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, where it currently watches over plants in a greenhouse. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is known for her plants, including the variety of ferns she grows from all over the world, like this emCyrtomium/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is known for her plants, including the variety of ferns she grows from all over the world, like this emCyrtomium/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones is the owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. This plant is emBlechnum tabulare/em, from South Africa. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones is the owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar. This plant is emBlechnum tabulare/em, from South Africa. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, grows a variety of plants, including a wide range of ferns. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, grows a variety of plants, including a wide range of ferns. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is one of the longest-running exhibitors at Seattles Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is one of the longest-running exhibitors at Seattles Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is growing emHelleborus/em in her greenhouse to display at the Northwest Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, is growing emHelleborus/em in her greenhouse to display at the Northwest Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)
Suzanne Phillips helps water plants at the A Familys Little Farm in the City display at the 2010 Northwest Flower  Garden Show. At right are miniature goats that were part of the display. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)Suzanne Phillips helps water plants at the A Familys Little Farm in the City display at the 2010 Northwest Flower  Garden Show. At right are miniature goats that were part of the display. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)
Brooklyn Deatherage, intern project manager for the Washington Park Arboretums garden, laid sod interspersed with white scilla in preparation for the 2015 show. (Bettina Hansen/The Seattle Times)Brooklyn Deatherage, intern project manager for the Washington Park Arboretums garden, laid sod interspersed with white scilla in preparation for the 2015 show. (Bettina Hansen/The Seattle Times)
Koi from Japan costing $5,000 to $6,000 each were part of the Pan Intercorp of Kenmores exhibit at the 2004 show. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times)Koi from Japan costing $5,000 to $6,000 each were part of the Pan Intercorp of Kenmores exhibit at the 2004 show. (Alan Berner/The Seattle Times)
Vance Allen pondered his next choice of tropical plants to install in the Ravenna Gardens display that workers dubbed Zonal Denial, in honor of plants that grow in this zone but are very susceptible to temperatures below 30 degrees. Allen grew a 38-foot bamboo plant, which was part of the 2001 display. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)Vance Allen pondered his next choice of tropical plants to install in the Ravenna Gardens display that workers dubbed Zonal Denial, in honor of plants that grow in this zone but are very susceptible to temperatures below 30 degrees. Allen grew a 38-foot bamboo plant, which was part of the 2001 display. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)
Scott Hackney, one of the owners of Marenakos Rock Center in Issaquah (red hat, at right), directed his boom-truck operator as they set a rock at Rodgers Landscaping Inc.s exhibit in 2000. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)Scott Hackney, one of the owners of Marenakos Rock Center in Issaquah (red hat, at right), directed his boom-truck operator as they set a rock at Rodgers Landscaping Inc.s exhibit in 2000. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times)
Elva Dunlap, of La Conner, examined the Winged Weeder at the 1996 show. Lyle Hahn, whose family sold the unusually shaped garden tools at the show, said he expected to sell 1,500 that year. (Rod Mar/The Seattle Times)Elva Dunlap, of La Conner, examined the Winged Weeder at the 1996 show. Lyle Hahn, whose family sold the unusually shaped garden tools at the show, said he expected to sell 1,500 that year. (Rod Mar/The Seattle Times)
Standing outside in the rain, Robert Wilson looks through a window at an arrangement of tropical flowers awaiting judging at the 1999 show. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)Standing outside in the rain, Robert Wilson looks through a window at an arrangement of tropical flowers awaiting judging at the 1999 show. (Tom Reese/The Seattle Times)
Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Joe Gast stands for a picture with a giant rootball on display at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Joe Gast stands for a picture with a giant rootball on display at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)

THIS YEAR MARKS the 30th anniversary of Seattle’s garden show. The oversized displays, as usual, will be captivating, over-the-top whimsies of dream gardens, and the seminars will provide excellent information for gardeners. At its core, the event has always been a garden show for gardeners.

The first time I attended was well before I started exploring gardening professionally. I was in my early 20s and had an interest in growing something, but with a small deck and little firsthand experience, the size of the show was overwhelming. And those display gardens? I wasn’t inspired. I was intimidated.

So if you lack a green thumb, or don’t have any land (calling all apartment and condo dwellers!), it might seem easy to pass this show over. Really, what’s it in for you?

Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a emSelaginella/em. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, holds a Selaginella. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

As it turns out, this year, there’s quite a bit.

Where once the show was all about the display gardens (of course, they continue to be a major draw), the show staff has added elements meant to attract all sorts of gardeners, enthusiasts and wannabes.

“In recent years, we’ve placed greater emphasis on small-space and container gardening, growing edibles and the role of garden spaces in home entertainment,” says Jeff Swenson, festival manager.

It’s no secret that every business these days is hoping to entice millennials, and the Flower Garden Festival is no exception. Organizers are working to broaden its appeal by adding engaging elements, a larger marketplace and a local food court.

Says Gayle Payne, who designs the display garden for Flower Growers of Puget Sound: “The industry is having a hard time getting millennials into gardening. It’s something the industry is worried about: how to attract more people.”

 

THE GOOD NEWS is, there are newcomers to the show this year who have both the vision and the business savvy to think about what’s happening in the garden industry.

Heather Jellerson has built display gardens for other companies, but decided to give it a whirl with her own company, Millennium Landscape Construction, Inc., which she operates with her husband.

“In our (display) garden this year, we hope it will be much more approachable and something DIYers can actually do themselves,” she says. Tired of seeing grandiose ideas that didn’t seem practical, she wants people to leave the show feeling empowered.

Her overall design relies heavily on metalwork, one of the most commonly asked-about features among new garden clients (she swears it is not difficult or intimidating to work with), and low-maintenance plants for the trendy, time-strapped consumer.

With the show only a month away, she was still working on final plans for her garden exhibit.

“I’m probably the one who is least prepared for the whole show,” Jellerson says.

She says she plans to use COR-TEN, a weathering steel that patinas into a stable rustlike appearance, to build garden beds and fencing. It’s a relatively easy project for anyone with the know-how to drill into metal. She says there’s not a huge budget for building the exhibits, and, “That’s what most home gardens are working with, as well.”

And while plans and materials are coming together for the physical structure, the plants are sitting in wait. Focusing on plants that need only occasional attention throughout the year — ground covers to give a sense of lawn, grasses and evergreen shrubs that flower across seasons — is a way to showcase easy ideas that attendees can imitate at home. For now, these plants are lined up in the nursery, about 20 feet from Jellerson’s back door, where they’ve been stacking up for months.

Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Dahlia tubers were popular at the 2012 Northwest Flower Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)

Also new to the show this year is “Floral Wars.” With a format similar to the festival’s popular container-planting competition, local floral designers will use American-grown buds and put together large floral arrangements in real time while on stage. Not everyone is interested in fawning over catalogs to find a new favorite bulb, whereas any home can accommodate a vase full of blooms.

It’s a smart move for show organizers, as the local flower business is booming — a trend with no signs of slowing. Flower farms are the new “it” factor in agriculture, and designers using local flowers are in high demand.

“I think, as a whole, the concept of seasonality has really been embraced,” says competitor and floral designer Gina Thresher of From the Ground Up Floral in Kent. “We have the most amazing local product and great farmers that stay on trend.”

Thresher contributed to the American Institute of Floral Design booth last year and is a fan of the show. “I’ve attended for so many years — my mom and I have so much fun.”

Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)
Pamela Hughes takes photos while holding an ornamental rake made of fruitwood that she bought at the 2012 show. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)

SEMINARS ALWAYS have been a large part of the programming, though Janet Endsley, the seminar and judging manager who has been involved with the show for the past 18 years, has made big changes lately. When she started, speakers were mostly regional. It was rare to see someone outside the Pacific Northwest come in to talk. Today, though, “Publishers send authors to us, and people can see speakers they normally wouldn’t ever see during the course of the year,” she says.

It used to be that plantaholics filled the halls, eager to learn more about certain plants, or looking for design inspiration for their yards. Today, the quest for inspiration is coupled with the desire for information, and the programming reflects that by offering a more diversified range of seminar topics.

“People are highly interested in growing edibles — 10 years ago, there were very few edible (seminars), and now I have a significant block of those,” Endsley says. Do-It-Yourself-themed classes remain popular, and Endsley has worked to add topics for urbanites in small spaces — classes on growing air plants, or a focus on hydroponics that promises to teach how to grow edibles on countertops.

Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his familys company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)
Reid Kawamoto showed off this Lavaflow orchid at a garden show booth in 2011. his family’s company, based in Honolulu, still specializes in orchids from Hawaii. (John Lok/The Seattle Times)

Most of the younger gardeners I spoke with come to the show (with a parent, often) for the seminars, seeking information on how to get started, so Endsley is right on. Container gardening is a big draw, as is anything having to do with growing food at home.

“Heavy plant geeks can pick out what they’re interested in, and people in apartments can learn specifics for them, too,” Endsley says. “We’re looking back at the history of the show, and as the show evolves, we are trying to accommodate people’s lifestyles and give people useful information.”

 

EVEN WITH ALL the additions, it’s safe to say the main draw of the show is still the “garden creations” — a massive installment of more than 15 Puget Sound-area gardening and landscaping businesses.

Elandan Gardens of Bremerton is a fixture here — this will be its 29th year at the show. The company specializes in specimen material — trees of considerable size that are artistic in form.

“For the last 60 years, I’ve been training trees and turning them into spectacular pieces of art,” founder Dan Robinson says.

Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower  Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)
Dan and Diane Robinson sat in their completed garden at the second event, in 1990, when it was still called the Northwest Flower Garden Show (not Festival). (Jimi Lott/The Seattle Times)

This year, Elandan Gardens will showcase two special trees, both of which stand about 12 feet tall. One is a large and gnarly 125-year-old laceleaf maple that Robinson has been caringly pruning for 45 years. The other is a twin-trunked, 56-year-old Japanese black pine that was grown from seed by his hand. As Robinson walked his 7-acre property one recent afternoon, he excitedly reminded me that I needed to get to the show to see them — “It’s fantasmagoria!”

Anthony Fajarillo of Redwood Builders Landscaping will showcase a selection of small bonsai trees — one of which you can hold in the palm of your hand. It’s his attempt to create a relationship between attendees and nature.

“Trees represented in miniature form through bonsai can become our portable connection with nature, especially now with our fast-paced digital world,” Fajarillo says.

Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this years Flower  Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Tony Fajarillo, owner of Redwood Builders Landscaping in Maple Valley, cares for a Satsuki Azalea bonsai that will be on display at this year’s Flower Garden Festival. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

It’s a lofty message to convey through a garden display, but a timely one.

Fajarillo’s garden has a modern, Zen vibe to it and includes old hemlocks, conifers and moss, along with the bonsai trees. In the center, Fajarillo will place a floating deck set up to mimic a tea ceremony in progress.

 

A DECADE AGO, the displays imitated the seasonal influence of the time — winter. This steered booths and displays into a minimalist feel and kept the big, bold blooms to a minimum. For the past several years, though, “We’ve made an effort to bring in tens of thousands of flowers,” says Endsley. “People come to escape the dreariness of what’s outside — they want that fantasy; they want that now, and we’ve definitely brought that up.”

But not all gardeners are convinced the changes are for the better, and a question lingers: Can show programming satisfy the hard-core gardeners while simultaneously engaging garden newbies with a small space?

Michelle Meyer, owner of Gardening GaGa!, is on the fence after having attended religiously in years past.

“Quite honestly, last year I thought the exhibits and speakers were not very interesting to plant people,” Meyer says. She will, however, attend a daylong event on Friday specifically for garden professionals — the GardenPRO Conference, which was introduced this year.

Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower  Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Judith Jones, owner of Fancy Fronds Nursery in Gold Bar, left, and Vanca Lumsden stand under a display centerpiece being built for their annual display at the Flower Garden Festival at the Convention Center. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

For its big anniversary, the festival feels like a mixed bag — a bit of something for everyone. Time will tell whether this all-inclusive strategy works for or against planners, but with reasonable pricing for entry, I think it’s worth a visit. You can pick up interesting plants or garden art in the marketplace if you’re willing to shuffle past booths of unrelated paraphernalia like hair accessories or beef jerky.

The seminars offer solid information for beginners and midlevel gardeners. Same goes for the garden displays — for anyone with a blank slate who is looking for ideas, it still is a great place for inspiration or, at the very least, to satisfy a curiosity about how others build out their garden spaces.

And pending all else, you can swing by Fancy Fronds and meet the lively Judith Jones. That alone is worth the cost of a ticket.

Article source: https://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/for-the-30th-anniversary-of-the-northwest-flower-garden-festival-organizers-hope-to-lure-a-younger-crowd/

Garden Expo Offers Spring-like Respite in February

As winter settles over Wisconsin, the 25th annual Wisconsin Public Television Garden Expo brings a bit of spring-like warmth to the Exhibition Hall at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison Feb. 9-11. Event hours are:  12-8 pm, Feb. 9; 9 am – 6 pm, Feb. 10 and 10 am – 4 pm, Feb. 11.

Wisconsin Public Television (WPT) hosts the community educational event and fundraiser in partnership with UW-Extension Horticulture. All proceeds support WPT’s programming, educational initiatives and events. Advance tickets are available at wigardenexpo.com.

This year’s event features the newest innovations in gardening and landscaping with information and advice spread among lush green plants, colorful flowers, vibrant designs of spring and delicious bounties from home gardens and Wisconsin farms. Highlights from this year’s event include:  hundreds of exhibitor booths, free educational seminars and demonstrations, aquascaping competition, the 1,600-square-foot Wisconsin Nursery and Landscape Association (WNLA) Central Garden, and a “Resilience in Gardening” story slam.

Visitors are invited to explore the fourth annual Garden Expo Farmers Market in the Exhibition Hall Atrium, Feb. 11, 10 am – 4 pm. Products available at the Farmers Market include pickles and preserves, artisan cheeses, honey, olive oil, tea, chocolate, greens, coffee, and handcrafted salami and cured meats.

Single-day tickets cost $8 in advance and $10 at the door. Children 12 and under are admitted free. Two-day passes are available for $13 in advance and $15 at the door. Three-day passes are available for $16 in advance and $18 at the door. To purchase tickets, visit wigardenexpo.com.

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Article source: https://doorcountypulse.com/garden-expo-offers-spring-like-respite-february-2/

GET TIPS ON VEGETABLE GARDENING AT BOB LUTTS FULSHEAR/SIMONTON BRANCH LIBRARY

Ralph Fuller

Ralph Fuller



Posted: Thursday, February 1, 2018 8:41 am

GET TIPS ON VEGETABLE GARDENING AT BOB LUTTS FULSHEAR/SIMONTON BRANCH LIBRARY


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Seasoned gardeners, as well as beginning gardeners who might be considering starting a vegetable garden for the first time, are invited to attend a special program, “Getting Your Vegetable Garden Growing,” which will take place on Monday, Feb. 12, from 6-7:45 p.m., in the Meeting Room of Fort Bend County Libraries’ Bob Lutts Fulshear/Simonton Branch Library, located at 8100 FM 359 South in Fulshear.

Fort Bend County Master Gardener and Vegetable Specialist Ralph Fuller will provide an overview of spring vegetable gardening.

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    Article source: http://www.fbherald.com/community/get-tips-on-vegetable-gardening-at-bob-lutts-fulshear-simonton/article_5c2897bd-f3d7-5fb2-a585-a3fddb935851.html