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Archives for January 22, 2018

City evaluating three potential replacement sites for Sheboygan Avenue Community Garden

Whenever Abigail Becker posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

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Article source: http://host.madison.com/ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/city-evaluating-three-potential-replacement-sites-for-sheboygan-avenue-community/article_ee3baf6f-dcb7-5c7a-a52c-dd60b78208b8.html

Laurelwood Garden Club wants scholarship winner to be a star – or study them


FITCHBURG — When the Laurelwood Garden Club raises money for scholarship funding, they do with a spot of tea, clotted cream and at least one galactic-themed table setting inspired by a love of Star Trek.

“For me, it’s a chance to experience one another, to be around one another, in a way you only ever see in TV,” said Margaret Hanley, 69, of Leominster.

Hanley designed one of 12 table settings around which over 100 woman — and one man — sat and sipped tea during the eighth annual Scholarship Tea at the Ronald M. Ansin Gallery in the Fitchburg Art Museum on Saturday afternoon.

Sitting before home-made scones and a side of strawberry butter, Hanley said she hand-embroidered a table cloth with sequins and white thread to resemble constellations in the sky.

While Hanley explained her love of all things out-of-this world inspired her setting, the reason she and her colleagues at the Laurelwood Garden Club were there was to indeed fundraise so a young person will be able to study the earth.

Each year, the club offers a $1,000 scholarship to a senior pursuing a career in botany, environmental issues, floral design, horticulture, or landscape design.

While its organizers will be the first to say the event is foremost a fundraiser, several attendees, including Hanley, said the tea felt like a blast from the past.

First time tea-goer Lynn Houston, 72, of Ashby, said she was struck by the care and execution that went into each of the 12 “tablescapes” with themes like “Beam Me Up Scotty,” “Tea with Gypsies,” and “June’s Garden.

“I was in awe at the whole thing,” said Houston with a smile. “It was a total O-M-G moment.

Co-chairs Tisha Schiavitti and Sarah Grant said they enjoyed the opportunity to gather with a group of ladies amid the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

Also enjoying the company of a good, if not a great, friend, were Jean Belliveau and Mary Curran, who said they have been best friends for 68 years.

Belliveau said she as two days away from her 90th birthday.

She designed her table around the theme, “Celebrate Life,” accordingly.

Asked how they prefer to celebrate life, the women looked at one another, smiled, then Belliveau pointed toward a bottle on the table.

“Well, we’re going to have a bit of Prosecco,” she said.

Article source: http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/news/ci_31610584/spot-tea-shot-at-an-education

Over the Garden Gate: Houseplants complement home decor

We decorate our indoor space with colorful pillows, a piece of art, a strategically placed stack of books or cherished knickknack. Use houseplants the same way to enhance your living space and give a finishing touch.

Like many gardeners, I ignore the inside of my home and mundane cleaning chores through the spring, summer and fall in favor of spending time outside tending my garden. With Christmas over and faced with the last of winter, I’m remembering my promise to myself to spruce up the inside of my home.

While cleaning, I noticed those artificial greens I’ve used for years looking dated and dusty. They need to go. But then what? My tables, counters and corners look bare, cold and depressing while my houseplants are happily crowded in front of a few windows where I get my best light. Who’s in charge here, me or the plants?

Then I read an article in Pennsylvania Gardener (Nov./Dec. 2015), “Respect Your Houseplants” by Kylee Baumie. It piqued my decorating passion. I discovered that she also co-authored a book with garden designer Jenny Peterson – “Indoor Plant Décor: The Design Stylebook for Houseplants.” The following thoughts and opinions are inspired by her article.

Maybe you, like I, purchase bouquets of fresh flowers while grocery shopping. Most people, especially gardeners, are attracted to living things. But the rising cost of fresh-cut flowers has caused me to think twice about that purchase especially since the only flowers that last are the carnations, even though I change the water and trim the stems every other day. What a waste. Compare the price and life expectancy of a bouquet of fresh flowers to a potted houseplant. The potted plant wins even when placed in a less-than-perfect position in the home environment.

Remember those annual bedding plants that you couldn’t wait to buy to beautify the outside of your home? Quite an investment when you knew the ultimate outcome: death by frost. Why not think of potted houseplants in the same disposable way for your home’s interior? Even if you are a killer on houseplants (we’ve all killed our share), with a little remedial care review, you can be successful and these plants will last just as long as annuals, some even for years. In return you will feel the satisfaction of caring for a growing plant indoors while watching the snow fall outdoors. And by adding live plants you add life and beauty to your inside space.

A review of the basic rules to success with houseplants begins with a hole in the bottom of the pot. Cachepots are great options. They add to or complement the décor of your home plus, by choosing carefully, the cachepot will complement the plant color, texture and shape. The cachepot will hide an ugly nursery pot and make it harder to over-water because you can drain off the excess water at the sink. Over-watering is the biggest killer of houseplants. Test the soil with your finger. If damp or wet, postpone watering for another few days or a week. Houseplants only need to be watered every one to two weeks during the winter. Most houseplants will recover being over dry, but will succumb to being over wet.

Light requirements are a bit trickier but there are plenty of plants that will tolerate lower light. Every plant doesn’t need to be on the windowsill. Many will tolerate being a distance away in a bright room. Consider opening curtains during the day or using a lighter weight curtain fabric. Rotating plants from high light placement to lower light placement is another tool to increase success. Fertilizer is not recommended until spring. When you notice a growth spurt, fertilize your houseplants following label directions for the dilution rate and research the specific plant needs for fertilizer.

We decorate our indoor space with colorful pillows, a piece of art, a strategically placed stack of books or cherished knickknack. Use houseplants the same way to enhance your living space and give a finishing touch. Green is a color that complements all decors and styles. Choose plants for their texture, color, shape and height. Adding plants throughout the room will change the mood in a subtle and enjoyable way.

Houseplants are not only aesthetic but improve our mental outlook and the quality of the air we breathe. It’s well documented that plants have a healthy impact on our environment both inside and out by converting carbon dioxide to oxygen. NASA conducted a study in 1989 to evaluate if plants could be used to improve air quality of enclosed spaces and found that some plants are especially good at it, for example Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum spp.), snake plant (Sanservieria spp.), and English Ivy (Hedera helix).

Here are a few easy plants to try integrating into your home décor and style: pothos (Epipremnum aureum); rubber tree (Fiscus elastica); Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema spp.); spider plants (Chlorophytum comosum); dieffenbachia; philodendron; ZZ plant (Zamioculcas Zamiifolia); aloe; jade plant (Crassula ovata).

I’ve tried all of them with some success and some failure, and I don’t miss the artificial, plastic plants at all.

Laura Murphy is a Master Gardener with Penn State Extension – Beaver County.

 

Article source: http://www.ellwoodcityledger.com/entertainmentlife/20180122/over-garden-gate-houseplants-complement-home-decor/1

UNC Health Care sees room for a compact medical campus on the edge of Chapel Hill

UNC Health Care is planning a “clean, sophisticated and striking commercial development” to replace its longtime Eastowne office complex off U.S. 15-501.

A concept plan for roughly 11 acres, located inside the Eastowne Drive loop near Pinegate Apartments, was submitted in late December. It seeks to demolish five of six buildings constructed in the 1970s and 1980s before U.S. 15-501 became a commercial and residential corridor.

The existing complex was built around an existing two-acre pond and is surrounded by apartments, medical clinics and offices. UNC Health Care would add two six-story, 150,000-square-foot office buildings and a 5.5-story parking deck with 1,100 spaces.

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The goal is to reduce the office park’s footprint, creating a walkable, compact development with more open space and landscaping buffers, the plan states.

“The initial project will consolidate a significant amount of services that are scattered throughout the healthcare system in Chapel Hill while simultaneously upgrading the buildings and improving patient access,” system officials wrote in the proposal.

The town’s Community Design Commission will review the plan Tuesday, Jan. 23, followed by a Town Council review on Wednesday, Jan. 31. Both meetings are designed to offer feedback that UNC Health Care can use to revise the plan before submitting an official application.

Long-term plans

One building and the parking deck can be built under a previously approved master plan with only a zoning compliance permit from town staff. UNC officials want to start building those pieces this summer, and if all goes as planned, open the first building by 2020.

The second office building would require the council to approve a special-use permit.

Health System Properties LLC owns five lots – roughly 29 acres – inside the Eastowne loop and another 20 acres at the southwestern corner of U.S. 15-501 and Interstate 40. County records show it paid just over $344,610 in property taxes on all six parcels last year.

While steep slopes and wetlands would limit construction on the 20-acre parcel, UNC Health Care officials have a long-term vision for the Eastowne properties that could be rolled into a new master site plan. However, the focus at this time is on delivering the first medical office building, said Simon George I, vice president for UNC Health Care System real estate development.

“We have some high-level concept ideas, but do not yet have a formal plan,” George said. “We anticipate beginning formal work on the master site plan later this year.”

Growing corridor

The U.S. 15-501 corridor between Chapel Hill and Durham already is undergoing significant change, and the Eastowne redevelopment would be the first of multiple, large projects anticipated along the Orange-Durham county line.

Future U.S. 15-501 corridor development could include new retail, offices and apartments at the proposed Gateway station near I-40 on the Durham-Orange light-rail transit line, and new buildings for the former Blue Cross campus, now owned by the State Employees Credit Union. The iconic Blue Cross building was constructed opposite the Eastowne campus in 1973.

Chapel Hill officials have talked with regional partners and the N.C. Department of Transportation for some time about increasing traffic in the already congested highway corridor. The regional Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization will study the highway – from Ephesus Church Road in Chapel Hill to University Drive in Durham – starting in mid-February, Town Manager Roger Stancil said.

The study could be completed by mid-2019 and “take a much more comprehensive look at the corridor and consider road infrastructure, multimodal connections, land uses, future light rail alignment and station areas, and environmental constraints,” Stancil said in an email to council members.

What’s next

The Community Design Commission and Chapel Hill Town Council will offer UNC Health Care feedback on its concept plan for redeveloping the Eastowne Office Park.

The CDC meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 23, in the Town Hall council chamber, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. The council meets in the chamber at 7 p.m. Jan. 31.

Article source: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/local/counties/orange-county/article195773294.html

Rainima’s dream to establish a sustainable business

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Young Entrepreneurship Scheme (YES) recipient Atunaisa Rainima (centre) with his family. From left: Aunt Taraivini Taleimaibua, dad Atunaisa Rainima, cousin Sokoveti Hea and mum Sokoveti Rainima after the launch earlier this month. Picture: JOVESA NAISUA

ATUNAISA Rainima, 23, endeavours to establish his own sustainable business, a dream he wishes to pursue in the near future.

Not a common trait for a person his age, but the Tailevu lad plans to set up a lawn maintenance and landscaping business that will also convert garden refuse into cooking gas (biomethane gas).

An AutoCAD student at the Fiji National University (FNU) National Training and Productivity Centre (NTPC), Mr Rainima also hopes to provide job opportunities to youths in his community and the greater Tailevu area as his business expands.

His business dreams are now closer to reality as he was among the five aspiring entrepreneurs who had their grant applications pre-approved under Government’s Young Entrepreneurship Scheme (YES) launched earlier this month.

The idea behind his business concept was inspired by his grandfather, who had cut grass as a source of income.

His creativity and ingenuity behind his environmental friendly business plan was worthy enough to convince the YES initiative selection committee.

After Mr Rainima fully completes the mentorship program under the YES initiative, he, including other recipients, will be eligible to receive a grant of up to $20,000 to pursue their business ideas.

“My goal is to set up a lawn maintenance and landscaping business with an objective to firstly provide the most affordable, sustainable, efficient grass cutting and landscaping in my community,” Mr Rainima said.

Mr Rainima’s project is divided in three phases, the first to cut the grass, followed by collection of grass and to produce biogas.

“I always see that most of the youths in the village are unemployed, so this business can employ them so they can earn a decent living for themselves,” he said.

His proud mother, Sokoveti Rainima, said her son had already developed an affinity for business, by establishing a small store some years back.

As she recalls, Mrs Rainima said her son had also aspired to become a “millionaire” someday.

“Some of his words to me I will never forget are ‘Mum, one day I will become a millionaire’,” Mrs Rainima said.

“He earlier established a small store at our residence in Cautata Bau, Tailevu, three years back but he had applied for this Government scheme,” Mrs Rainima said.

“My son is very obedient at home and is the eldest of my children. He was supposed to continue his education but he wants to also continue his business. His aunty, Taraivina Taleimaibua, assisted him in applying for the YES initiative. I didn’t even support this move but his aunty had assisted him in doing it because he wanted to establish a lawn and landscaping business.

“I would like to thank God that one day we were called and we were shocked to be told that his application was successful.”

Mrs Rainima also believes that her son’s faith in God and the values instilled in him would take him far in life.

“He is a God-fearing person as he attended a youth camp/conference recently, and he was believing that after the conference, doors would open for his business plans,” she said.

“That is why I thank God that he is also the lone iTaukei applicant chosen, so we give Him back the glory, the honour and praise to be his alone.

“We teach him never to forget the source of his blessings, God, so he always ensures that he gives his tithe with his salary or any monetary blessings he receives.”

Mr Rainima, the eldest of three children, earlier received his education at the Montfort Technical Institute in Savusavu, Vanua Levu.

Now he hopes to finish tertiary education and commence his business this year.



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Article source: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=431667

Stunning stone landscaping ideas to be inspired by

Getting your garden right can seem like a Herculean task, especially if you’re not a natural landscaper, but there is a great way to tackle the problem, while still embracing a contemporary and stylish aesthetic. Ask any professional gardener and they’ll tell you that an outdoor space that is finished with a host of beautiful stone will not only create a dramatic and enviable finished product, but also allow for easy maintenance as well. We know that you might need a little visual inspiration for designing a perfect stone garden, so how about we show you some of our favourite looks, right now?

Article source: https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/photos/stunning-stone-landscaping-ideas-inspired-180000312/

Landscape & Garden Fair Seeks Nature-Themed Vendors

Master Gardener, Carol Morris, prepares the hydroponic systems for the Landscape Garden Fair

Lake County’s 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, a free botanical-themed festival, is seeking nature-oriented vendors.
Interested participants specializing in landscaping, gardening, irrigation, horticulture, fertilizer and more are invited to sign up for the two-day event, to be held Saturday, March 24 and Sunday, March 25 at the Lake County Extension Center’s Discovery Gardens, located at 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares.
Sponsored by Lake County, The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County and the Lake County Master Gardeners, the festival will provide visitors an opportunity to browse and purchase goods from vendors selling landscaping materials, ornamental plants, orchids, fruit trees and more.
To reserve space at the fair, rental fees must be received no later than Friday, Feb. 16. Available space ranges in price from $75 – $150 depending on size, and $25 for non-profit agencies. To secure a space, vendors may register online at https://2018lgfvendorregistration.eventbrite.com or make a check payable to “University of Florida” and either hand deliver or mail it to: Lake County Extension, Attn: Juwanda Rowell – Landscape Garden Fair, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares, FL 32778.
The annual Landscape Garden Fair attracts thousands of guests to hear expert speakers present on a variety of topics, including butterfly gardening, unusual edibles, shade gardening and hydroponics. Additional family-friendly activities include the Children’s Passport, with stops at multiple gardens, the Maze Scavenger Hunt and special butterfly release.
For more information about the 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2.

Olympics Latest News

Article source: http://www.clermontnewsleader.com/landscape-garden-fair-seeks-nature-themed-vendors/

Landscape & Garden Fair Seeks Nature-Themed Vendors

Master Gardener, Carol Morris, prepares the hydroponic systems for the Landscape Garden Fair

Lake County’s 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, a free botanical-themed festival, is seeking nature-oriented vendors.
Interested participants specializing in landscaping, gardening, irrigation, horticulture, fertilizer and more are invited to sign up for the two-day event, to be held Saturday, March 24 and Sunday, March 25 at the Lake County Extension Center’s Discovery Gardens, located at 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares.
Sponsored by Lake County, The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County and the Lake County Master Gardeners, the festival will provide visitors an opportunity to browse and purchase goods from vendors selling landscaping materials, ornamental plants, orchids, fruit trees and more.
To reserve space at the fair, rental fees must be received no later than Friday, Feb. 16. Available space ranges in price from $75 – $150 depending on size, and $25 for non-profit agencies. To secure a space, vendors may register online at https://2018lgfvendorregistration.eventbrite.com or make a check payable to “University of Florida” and either hand deliver or mail it to: Lake County Extension, Attn: Juwanda Rowell – Landscape Garden Fair, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares, FL 32778.
The annual Landscape Garden Fair attracts thousands of guests to hear expert speakers present on a variety of topics, including butterfly gardening, unusual edibles, shade gardening and hydroponics. Additional family-friendly activities include the Children’s Passport, with stops at multiple gardens, the Maze Scavenger Hunt and special butterfly release.
For more information about the 7th Annual Landscape Garden Fair, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2.

Olympics Latest News

Article source: http://www.trianglenewsleader.com/landscape-garden-fair-seeks-nature-themed-vendors/

Landscape and Garden Fair seeks nature-themed vendors

TAVARES — Lake County’s 7th Annual Landscape and Garden Fair, a free botanical-themed festival, is seeking nature-oriented vendors.

Landscaping, gardening, irrigation, horticulture and fertilizer specialists are invited to sign up for the two-day event, which will be March 24-25 at the Lake County Extension Center’s Discovery Gardens, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares.

To reserve space, rental fees must be received no later than Feb. 16. Available spaces range in price from $75 to $150 and $25 for non-profit agencies. To secure a space, vendors should register at https://2018lgfvendorregistration.eventbrite.com or make a check payable to the University of Florida. The checks can be hand delivered to the Extension office or mailed to: Lake County Extension, Attn: Juwanda Rowell — Landscape and Garden Fair, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares, FL 32778.

Sponsored by Lake County, the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Extension in Lake County and the Lake County Master Gardeners, the festival will provide visitors an opportunity to browse and purchase goods from vendors selling landscaping materials, ornamental plants, orchids, fruit trees and more.

The annual Landscape and Garden Fair attracts thousands of guests to hear expert speakers present on a variety of topics, including butterfly gardening, unusual edibles, shade gardening and hydroponics. Additional family-friendly activities include: the Children’s Passport, with stops at multiple gardens, a maze scavenger hunt and special butterfly release.

For information, call 352-343-4101 ext. 2.

 

Article source: http://www.dailycommercial.com/news/20180121/landscape-and-garden-fair-seeks-nature-themed-vendors

Declutter your garden with a good pruning before spring

Amidst this cold, wet and grey weather, some plants are starving for some attention.

Winter can be a prime time for pruning and Master Gardener Brian Minter has tips to help you cut through some of the damage the season may have caused.  

The window of time between mid-January to the end of February when growth starts on local trees offers the opportunity to get rid of the weak, dead and diseased branches.

Minter says this offers more air to flow through the tree, making it more resilient against damage.

“Also in terms of fruit production, more sunlight comes in so the tree actually is sturdier, better growth, cleaner without a lot of algae, lichen and so on,” he told B.C. Almanac guest host Lien Yeung.

‘Let the buds pop’

For the flowering trees and bushes — magnolias, flowering cherries, Japanese azaleas and rhododendrons — he recommends waiting to prune to enjoy the bright blossoms.

Evergreens can use a good cleaning this time of year to prevent big branches from snapping in the case of late season heavy snow.

“With the exception of spruce and pine … the pine trees produce candles, let those candles evolve in the spring, and the spruce. Let the buds pop and then you can prune,” he said.

Having the right tools is a must when diving into a good clean up, and he recommends getting a strong pair of loppers for the bigger branches to avoid breaking sheers.

“When you’ve done pruning in your yard, it’s like great house cleaning, the place just looks so much better but the trees will be stronger.”

Listen to B.C. Almanac every Thursday for more gardening tips and tricks from Master Gardener Brian Minter.

With files from B.C. Almanac

Article source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/declutter-your-garden-with-a-good-pruning-before-spring-1.4493958