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Archives for January 12, 2018

A Dallas Design Couple Just Opened These Airbnbs and They’re Adorable

Maybe it’s weird to write about Dallas Airbnbs at D Magazine. If you’re reading this, it’s safe to assume you live in locally. So, unless you have in-laws coming to town or are planning some serious renovations at home, you’re probably not looking to book a room just minutes from your main address.

But maybe you should! There are crazy cool tree houses after all. Or hygge-approved havens to cozy up in. And as of this month, Dallas’ Airbnb scene has also been gifted with The Grande Series, a pair of super stylish studios in the heart of Bishop Arts designed by owners of {neighborhood}, Erin and John Paul Hossley.

The duo purchased a 1930s building and took it down the studs, replacing the doors, windows, floors, tiles, and restructuring the entire building in just under a year. “The only thing we kept were some of old exterior bricks and the some of the floor joists,” says John Paul.

The end result is a rentable extension of their store’s modern, artful aesthetic, with just a touch of Wes Anderson-like whimsy.

Head to our slideshow to get into the cuteness.

 

Article source: https://www.dmagazine.com/home-garden/2018/01/best-dallas-airbnbs-bishop-arts/

7 museums, national parks, and more that are free on Monday

On Monday, many events will take place around the city to honor Martin Luther King Jr. Ahead, discover free activities you can do with your family on the holiday.

Contribute to a unique mural at the Museum of Fine Arts
Take the family to craft flowers for a unity garden, design family trees, and add color to a one-of-a-kind mural created by teens from Artists for Humanity. It’s all happening at the Museum of Fine Arts’s annual free Martin Luther King Jr. Day Open House, which will also include live performances, scavenger hunts, and gallery tours during which guests will learn about artists of color. Mayor Marty Walsh will speak at 1 p.m. to commemorate King’s life. (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; free; all ages)

Discover a national park
The National Park Service will offer $0 admission to its parks nationwide on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the first of four fee-free days in 2018. (The others are April 21, Sept. 22, and Nov. 11.) There are more than 400 national parks, many of which are free to enter all the time, but some normally charge a fee, according to the National Park Service. In Massachusetts, two national parks charge fees: Adams National Historic Park in Quincy and Cape Cod National Seashore in Wellfleet. The historic homes at Adams National Historic Park are closed until April 19, but you can still explore the grounds between sunrise and sunset. Starting at the Cape Cod National Seashore’s Salt Pond Visitor Center, you can hike trails, tour a museum with exhibits about Wampanoag culture, and watch short films about Cape Cod’s maritime history and how the Cape was formed by ice, wind, and waves. (9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Cape Cod National Seashore’s Salt Pond Visitor Center, Eastham; free; all ages)

Attend a concert at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
Explore the changing roles of music in the African-American community during a free concert by George Russell Jr. Company at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. Berklee College of Music professor George Russell Jr. and his ensemble play everything from Thomas Dorsey spirituals of the 1930s to the 1960s hit “Oh Happy Day” by the Edwin Hawkins Singers. Reservations are required. (10:30 to 11:30 a.m.; John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston; free; all ages)

You can chat with a zookeeper about lions during an admission-free day at the Franklin Park Zoo on Monday. —David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe

Chat with a zookeeper
On Monday, admission is free to both the Stone Zoo in Stoneham and the Franklin Park Zoo in Boston, where you can write a message of hope and peace on a mural within the Tropical Forest Pavilion. The Franklin Park Zoo will host zookeeper chats about birds, lions, gorillas, sloths, flamingos, and red pandas. The Stone Zoo will host zookeeper chats about cougars, sloths, and black bears. (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Stone Zoo, Stoneham, and Franklin Park Zoo, Boston; free; all ages)

Watch live performances at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
The Gardner Museum is waiving admission for its Day of Service festivities, at which Martin Luther King Jr. speeches will be projected onto the historic building. Danza Organica, the Gregory Groover Jr. Jazz Trio, and Jeff. W. Jones will all perform, the latter using music and imagery to depict four generations of African-American cultural history in Boston. Visitors will also have the opportunity to make care packages for survivors of domestic violence. Due to capacity regulations, the museum will admit guests every 30 minutes beginning at 11 a.m. (11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston; free; all ages)

Hear a stirring orchestra at Boston University
Listen to young musicians perform classical music, spirituals, and freedom songs when the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra performs a free concert at Boston University’s Metcalf Hall. Community leaders will also speak the words of King. It’s all part of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service and Celebration Tribute Concert, a collaboration between the Museum of African American History and the Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture. Seating is first-come, first-served. (10:30 a.m. to noon; Boston University’s Metcalf Hall, Boston; free; all ages)

Help neighbors in need in Cambridge
Sen. Elizabeth Warren will kick off the 8th Annual MLK Day of Service in Cambridge with a welcome address at 2 p.m. at Cambridge City Hall. Volunteers can then join several hands-on service projects between 2 and 5 p.m. at the following Central Square locations: the YWCA, the Senior Center, The Possible Project, St. Peter’s Church, and Cambridge City Hall. You can make fleece blankets for the homeless, Valentine’s Day cards for the elderly, activity kits for kids in ER waiting areas, and sort food donations for pantries. More than 80 different Cambridge service organizations will benefit from the citywide event. Volunteers are asked to register for the activities and arrive with items to donate, such as winter clothing, nonperishable foods, and children’s books. (2 to 5 p.m.; Central Square, Cambridge; free; all ages)

Article source: https://www.boston.com/culture/events/2018/01/12/7-museums-national-parks-and-more-that-are-free-on-monday

9 Reasons This New Garden On Belle Isle Could Be The Bee’s Knees

Plans are in motion to install a new 1.5 acre garden that will be located in front of the Nancy Brown Peace Carillon between the bandshell and the Whitcomb Conservatory gardens.

The garden will be one of collaboration between Oudolf, Belle Isle Conservancy, and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. The project focused group called the Oudolf Garden Detroit will be raising $2.7 million for construction and to provide a fund for ongoing maintenance.

The Oudolf garden is still in its planning stages as installation is planned to begin in 2019.

After talking with Oudolf at a media roundtable last week, I have been thinking about all of the possibilities and how this could be great for Detroit.

9. Oudolf has over 40 years of experience designing gardens

Recently Architectural Digest said he’s among the most “influential men and women working in interior design and architecture, who are changing the world, one room, one building and one garden at a time.”

8. The garden will be a wonderful place for pollinators like butterflies, bees and birds

Hauser Wirth Sculpture Park in Bruton, Sommerset

His gardens are wild without actually being wild. He uses a mix of native and non-native plants in his gardens.

7. Detroiters will have one more thing to compare us to Chicago and NYC

Lurie Garden in Millennium Park

Chicago might have the Lurie Garden in Millennium Park and New York City has the High Line but we will soon have our own Oudolf garden.

6. Piet Oudolf is known for using plants that are interesting all four seasons in his gardens

Piet Oudolf at Millennium Park in Chicago

 

So even when it is freezing outside the garden will still be interesting to look at.

5. This garden will strengthen the connection to other greenways in the city

The High Line in New York City

We’ve already got an amazing Riverwalk but imagine the connection that we could have between Belle Isle and the Riverwalk or even the Dequindre Cut.

4. The location for the garden will give an underutilized part of the park a new life

I can already imagine a sitting in the garden on a warm summer day and listening to live music playing from the band shell.

3. This could just be the first park by Oudolf in the city

Oudolf during media round table

 

He played coy at the round table, but there was some talk of other projects in the future.

2. This garden could generate more interest in financial support for Belle Isle 

Current state of the proposed garden site

This garden will put Detroit on the map as an international destination because Piet Oudolf is an internationally renowned garden designer.

1. We deserve it

Seriously. Belle Isle is a great space that has the potential to be a world-class draw. And beyond that, all of us who live within driving distance should be excited to come to the island. We as a region should push for the best.

Article source: http://www.dailydetroit.com/2018/01/11/9-reasons-new-garden-belle-isle-bees-knees/

County seeks hosts for Natural Garden Tour

The Clark County Green Neighbors program is seeking hosts for its 2018 Natural Garden Tour on Sunday, July 15. 

To participate, residents should practice environmentally friendly gardening techniques and be willing to offer public tours of their yards and gardens. 

The annual event is a fun way residents can show off their gardens and the Earth-conscious methods they use to make them blossom, a release from Clark County stated last week. The event gives people a chance to learn gardening techniques, get inspiration for home landscaping, and exchange ideas with others. 

“I’ve learned that creativity and sustainability are not mutually exclusive when it comes to gardening,”Clark County Public Health Sustainability Program Coordinator Sally Fisher said. “Each year, I’m surprised by the variety and beauty of the Natural Garden Tour hosts’ landscaping and the ways people help one another learn about sustainable gardening practices.” 

Those interested have until Feb. 15 to register, according to the Clark County Green Neighbors program website. The Natural Garden Tour is sponsored by the program. To register to be a Natural Garden Tour host, contact Jill Krumlauf at Public Health at 360-397-2121 ext. 7342 or jill.krumlauf@clark.wa.gov. 

To receive the latest Clark County eco-friendly information, sign up for the Green Neighbors newsletter at clark

greenneighbors.org/happen

ings/newsletter. 

— Clark County

Communications

Article source: http://www.thereflector.com/home_scene/article_c694902c-f590-11e7-aab6-ebe476b56349.html

Finding the next generation of the green industry – Lawn & Landscape

When the Illinois Landscape Contractor’s Association organized focus groups to gather perceptions of the green industry, the feedback was less than stellar.

“It’s all hard work.”

“They’re out there in the elements.”

“The only person who makes money is the owner.”

“It’s all Hispanic workers.”

The ILCA hosted one focus group with members of the general population, one with parents of students and one with high school students.

About 10 to 14 people attended each focus group, where they met with a moderator to share their thoughts on the landscaping industry, watch a video about landscaping jobs and respond to follow-up questions on their perceptions of the industry after watching the video. Members of the ILCA monitored the groups from behind a two-way mirror.

High school students are a more open-minded age group, willing to learn about different landscape industry career opportunities.

“It was tough to listen to, but at least it was ungarnished and unbiased,” says Scott Grams, executive director of ILCA.

But there was a silver lining. The responses from the high school students were more positive than the general population and the parents. Some perspectives from high school students included seeing the industry as something “stable” and “in-demand,” as well as something that helps the environment and an industry with plenty of opportunities.

At the beginning of the focus group with high school students, four out of the 10 students said they would consider a career in the green industry. At the end, eight out of the 10 students said they would consider a career in the green industry.

To Grams, this portion of the study provided good news for landscapers. It revealed that high school students are much more open-minded when it comes to learning about career opportunities. If a landscaper’s main goal is to recruit people, then high school students are a good demographic to target – not elementary school students whose opinions are shaped by that of their parents nor college students who sometimes have already made up their minds on a career path.

“Almost every student said, ‘My parents would be disappointed.’ That was the jumping off point – we have a huge problem.” Cassie Larson, executive director, Minnesota Nursery Landscape Association

“You would be wasting a lot of time and resources trying to start (recruiting) students when they’re in the fourth grade,” Grams says. “You would be better off starting when they are in high school.”

Since completing the study, ILCA and its Future Landscape Industry Professionals (FLIP) committee has been planning to reach out more to high school students to expose students to green industry careers. This includes attending high school career nights and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) events. FLIP also plans to lead a career day for green industry students who attend the 2018 iLandscapes show Jan. 31 – Feb. 2 in Illinois.

“As we build off this study and give these resources to FLIP, we’re focused on finding ways to get these careers in front of high school kids, which is a laser-focused audience,” Grams says.

ILCA isn’t the only group to conclude high school students might be a viable solution to the labor shortage problem. Other industry associations and contractors connected with Lawn Landscape to share how they have been working to change misconceptions about the industry and target high school students as next-generation employees.

Students compete at the National Collegiate Landscape Competition last year. This year, high school students are invited to the event, which you can learn more about in the sidebar below.
Educate educators.

Nearly a decade before ILCA’s focus groups, the Minnesota Nursery Landscape Association (MNLA) performed a similar study. Cassie Larson, executive director of MNLA, says the most interesting finding in the study came after students in the focus group were asked what their parents’ response would be if they told them they wanted to be a landscaper or a grower.

“Every student said, ‘my parents would be disappointed,’” Larson says. “That was the jumping off point – we have a huge problem.”

One of the ways MNLA tackled this problem was by teaming with agricultural educators at the high school level. The association purchased a horticulture curriculum from the Pennsylvania Landscape Nursery Association in 2010. MNLA then reviewed the curriculum to make it region-relevant. By 2015, MNLA released the curriculum to be used in the state’s ag schools, vocational schools and public schools. The association connected with the Minnesota Department of Education to approve the curriculum in order to meet state education standards.

Today, MNLA offers educational materials to students of all ages. For the younger kids, the lessons teach students how to plant seeds or it prompts them to use Legos to build what might be perceived as a patio. For the high schoolers, the lessons educate them on careers offered in the landscaping industry as well as plant sciences and math skills.

The Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) has also been focused on connecting with high schools. Becky Garber, director of communications at ALCC, says the association has had much success in partnering with high school educators and students the last few years. She attributes this success to the association’s long-time partnership with the Colorado Community College System, which has helped connect the association with high school teachers.

“For the last two years, our partnership with the Colorado Community College System has allowed us to actively give (high school) teachers training in hands-on skills so they know how to teach their students basic skills such as planting, installing pavers, irrigation system installation and maintenance and how to use the greenhouse to teach plant science,” Garber says.

ALCC first partnered with the Colorado Community College System about 12 years ago to try to build connections with high school educators, and Garber says opportunities to connect with educators ramped up about two years ago as more high school educators gained interest in teaching technical education to high school students. “That’s when the stars really aligned for us,” she says. “Most of the Colorado Community College System’s effort is to help high school teachers develop programs that sooner or later will lead students to post-secondary education. In order to get them on that path, high school is the strategic point to recruit.”

Attend events.

In addition to connecting with high school students through vocational programs, associations and contractors might want to consider getting involved in events such as school career nights, STEM nights at schools or FFA competitions.

Patrick Lynch, senior designer at Peabody Landscape in Columbus, Ohio, and his twin brother Mike Lynch, account representative at Environmental Management in Columbus, both saw benefits in getting involved with FFA’s nursery and landscape-based Career Development Events, which is a testing program for high school students considering a career in landscaping.

A few years ago, though, Patrick and Mike had the idea to develop a more interactive landscaping competition for students.

“A teacher told me his students could never pass the test to attend CDE,” Patrick says. “So, I said, ‘What if we create an event where all high schools throughout Ohio, no matter what, can come? We could have test problems and industry representatives. Would you come?’ And he said, ‘In a heartbeat, my students would love it.’”

With that, the Lynch brothers pitched their idea for a more inclusive student landscaping competition to the Ohio Nursery Landscape Association. ONLA loved the idea – the state association formed a committee for the event and recruited help from contractors across the state. By 2016, the association hosted its first event, which it dubbed the Ohio High School Landscape Olympics.

The Ohio Nursery Landscape Association hosted its second Ohio High School Landscape Olympics in 2017, where 250 students participated.

Part of the Lynch brothers’ idea for OHLO was to involve many regional landscape contractors and industry companies in the event. While ONLA would handle event logistics – such as finding a host school, providing food and recruiting vocational schools and students to attend – the contractors and companies would create and manage their own competitions. Each company is responsible for their own test problem, so they develop a hands-on test for students and pay for everything needed with the test.

“The neat thing about it is each test problem we have is ran, operated and facilitated by an industry company,” Patrick says. “So, the ONLA doesn’t have to mess with the test problems. They just take care of overall event management, while us companies put together test problems for students.”

Partnerships can help with these test problems, too. Patrick says Peabody Landscape teamed with Willoway Nursery to manage the plant installation test at OHLO 2017. In addition, he says some landscaping companies and local colleges donated money to provide ONLA with funds for food, tents and tables to use.

At OHLO, students compete in a variety of events like truck and trailer operation, skid-steer operation, sales presentation, irrigation, landscape maintenance and plant installation to name a few.

OHLO was such a hit among teachers and students in 2016 that ONLA decided to bring it back again in November 2017. This past fall, 250 students from 20 schools participated.

“On the professional level, we need people in the industry. The industry has been good to me, so I want students to know this is a viable career path for them.” Mike Lynch, account representative, Environmental Management

“As a first impression, I really like this event,” says Aaron Blaney, a junior at Auburn Career Center in Painesville, Ohio, who participated in OHLO in 2017. “It got me out into the elements and prepared to get into the business and work for people. I learned techniques here that I might not learn anywhere else.”

ONLA plans to host OHLO again in 2018. Mike envisions the event growing to include new competitions in 2018 such as turfgrass management and arboriculture. Although helping to manage an event such as OHLO can add to busy contractors’ work schedules and it sometimes means partnering with competitors, Mike says it’s more than worth it to be involved in these types of events.

“We want to give back to the industry and encourage these (students),” he says. “Is there cost involved? Yes. Is it worth it? Absolutely. I’m out a couple of days of sales and some of my staff is here, but it’s all worth it. On the professional level, we need people in the industry. The industry has been good to me, so I want students to know this is a viable career path for them. When it comes to improving the future of our industry and giving students an opportunity to showcase their skills, we all need to be a team.”

ONLA plans to host OHLO again in 2018, with hopes of adding new competitions to the event in arboriculture and turfgrass management.
Offer scholarships and real-world experience.

When connections with high school students are established, associations and contractors can also try to promote industry scholarships or internships to further engage these students. James Martin Associates, based in Vernon Hills, Illinois, has offered internships for just over 30 years and sponsored scholarships for about 18 years. President Jim Martin says both the internships and scholarships raise awareness about landscaping job opportunities.

“I think by being active in the (scholarships), most candidates consider us an opportunity for work,” Martin says. “That’s a significant differentiator for how they see and perceive us.”

In addition, Martin says he requires his interns to put together a PowerPoint presentation at the end of their internship to share about their experience, and he asks them to share that presentation with their classmates when they return to school. “That has also helped us to feed, sponsor and promote the internship program,” he says.

Students Max Zugan (left) and Aaron Blaney participated in the 2017 Ohio High School Landscape Olympics. Patrick Lynch (center) helped pitch the idea for the event.

Also, adding real-world expertise about landscaping in the educational setting can also raise awareness to students about the industry. The Pennsylvania Landscape Nursery Association hopes to incorporate mentorships in schools with horticulture programs to bring professionals with landscaping expertise to the classroom.

Cathy Corrigan, president of PLNA, says many high school horticulture programs have science teachers or general vocational teachers lead the horticulture program at a school, yet these instructors sometimes lack hands-on knowledge about landscaping.

As a solution, PLNA launched a high school mentoring task force to discuss how it could develop a mentorship program for high schools or vocational schools with horticulture programs.

The association wants to encourage a contractor to serve as a mentor in each horticulture program in the state to work alongside the teacher in the classroom. The instructor would provide the book knowledge, while the mentor would provide industry experiences and in-field knowledge.

“By having mentors from the industry come into the school, we can make sure students are learning what they need in order to be successful,” Corrigan says.

The association aims to integrate this program into Pennsylvania schools in the 2018-19 academic school year. Corrigan notes there will be some obstacles in incorporating industry professionals in the classroom, as each mentor must be approved by the Department of Education. To date, Corrigan says about 15 contractors have expressed interest in partnering with horticulture programs in the state to serve as mentors.

“Bringing outside people into the schools to have one-on-one time with students requires many clearances,” she says. “It comes down to what each school’s administration allows, and every school is going to be different. But that’s why we are willing to have different packages for this. We want to be able to get someone in front of the kids, even if it’s just a professional talking to (horticulture students) four times a year. Then, at least someone’s coming in the door to show students more practical experiences.”

Article source: http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/high-school-hopes.aspx

Finding the next generation of the green industry

When the Illinois Landscape Contractor’s Association organized focus groups to gather perceptions of the green industry, the feedback was less than stellar.

“It’s all hard work.”

“They’re out there in the elements.”

“The only person who makes money is the owner.”

“It’s all Hispanic workers.”

The ILCA hosted one focus group with members of the general population, one with parents of students and one with high school students.

About 10 to 14 people attended each focus group, where they met with a moderator to share their thoughts on the landscaping industry, watch a video about landscaping jobs and respond to follow-up questions on their perceptions of the industry after watching the video. Members of the ILCA monitored the groups from behind a two-way mirror.

High school students are a more open-minded age group, willing to learn about different landscape industry career opportunities.

“It was tough to listen to, but at least it was ungarnished and unbiased,” says Scott Grams, executive director of ILCA.

But there was a silver lining. The responses from the high school students were more positive than the general population and the parents. Some perspectives from high school students included seeing the industry as something “stable” and “in-demand,” as well as something that helps the environment and an industry with plenty of opportunities.

At the beginning of the focus group with high school students, four out of the 10 students said they would consider a career in the green industry. At the end, eight out of the 10 students said they would consider a career in the green industry.

To Grams, this portion of the study provided good news for landscapers. It revealed that high school students are much more open-minded when it comes to learning about career opportunities. If a landscaper’s main goal is to recruit people, then high school students are a good demographic to target – not elementary school students whose opinions are shaped by that of their parents nor college students who sometimes have already made up their minds on a career path.

“Almost every student said, ‘My parents would be disappointed.’ That was the jumping off point – we have a huge problem.” Cassie Larson, executive director, Minnesota Nursery Landscape Association

“You would be wasting a lot of time and resources trying to start (recruiting) students when they’re in the fourth grade,” Grams says. “You would be better off starting when they are in high school.”

Since completing the study, ILCA and its Future Landscape Industry Professionals (FLIP) committee has been planning to reach out more to high school students to expose students to green industry careers. This includes attending high school career nights and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) events. FLIP also plans to lead a career day for green industry students who attend the 2018 iLandscapes show Jan. 31 – Feb. 2 in Illinois.

“As we build off this study and give these resources to FLIP, we’re focused on finding ways to get these careers in front of high school kids, which is a laser-focused audience,” Grams says.

ILCA isn’t the only group to conclude high school students might be a viable solution to the labor shortage problem. Other industry associations and contractors connected with Lawn Landscape to share how they have been working to change misconceptions about the industry and target high school students as next-generation employees.

Students compete at the National Collegiate Landscape Competition last year. This year, high school students are invited to the event, which you can learn more about in the sidebar below.
Educate educators.

Nearly a decade before ILCA’s focus groups, the Minnesota Nursery Landscape Association (MNLA) performed a similar study. Cassie Larson, executive director of MNLA, says the most interesting finding in the study came after students in the focus group were asked what their parents’ response would be if they told them they wanted to be a landscaper or a grower.

“Every student said, ‘my parents would be disappointed,’” Larson says. “That was the jumping off point – we have a huge problem.”

One of the ways MNLA tackled this problem was by teaming with agricultural educators at the high school level. The association purchased a horticulture curriculum from the Pennsylvania Landscape Nursery Association in 2010. MNLA then reviewed the curriculum to make it region-relevant. By 2015, MNLA released the curriculum to be used in the state’s ag schools, vocational schools and public schools. The association connected with the Minnesota Department of Education to approve the curriculum in order to meet state education standards.

Today, MNLA offers educational materials to students of all ages. For the younger kids, the lessons teach students how to plant seeds or it prompts them to use Legos to build what might be perceived as a patio. For the high schoolers, the lessons educate them on careers offered in the landscaping industry as well as plant sciences and math skills.

The Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado (ALCC) has also been focused on connecting with high schools. Becky Garber, director of communications at ALCC, says the association has had much success in partnering with high school educators and students the last few years. She attributes this success to the association’s long-time partnership with the Colorado Community College System, which has helped connect the association with high school teachers.

“For the last two years, our partnership with the Colorado Community College System has allowed us to actively give (high school) teachers training in hands-on skills so they know how to teach their students basic skills such as planting, installing pavers, irrigation system installation and maintenance and how to use the greenhouse to teach plant science,” Garber says.

ALCC first partnered with the Colorado Community College System about 12 years ago to try to build connections with high school educators, and Garber says opportunities to connect with educators ramped up about two years ago as more high school educators gained interest in teaching technical education to high school students. “That’s when the stars really aligned for us,” she says. “Most of the Colorado Community College System’s effort is to help high school teachers develop programs that sooner or later will lead students to post-secondary education. In order to get them on that path, high school is the strategic point to recruit.”

Attend events.

In addition to connecting with high school students through vocational programs, associations and contractors might want to consider getting involved in events such as school career nights, STEM nights at schools or FFA competitions.

Patrick Lynch, senior designer at Peabody Landscape in Columbus, Ohio, and his twin brother Mike Lynch, account representative at Environmental Management in Columbus, both saw benefits in getting involved with FFA’s nursery and landscape-based Career Development Events, which is a testing program for high school students considering a career in landscaping.

A few years ago, though, Patrick and Mike had the idea to develop a more interactive landscaping competition for students.

“A teacher told me his students could never pass the test to attend CDE,” Patrick says. “So, I said, ‘What if we create an event where all high schools throughout Ohio, no matter what, can come? We could have test problems and industry representatives. Would you come?’ And he said, ‘In a heartbeat, my students would love it.’”

With that, the Lynch brothers pitched their idea for a more inclusive student landscaping competition to the Ohio Nursery Landscape Association. ONLA loved the idea – the state association formed a committee for the event and recruited help from contractors across the state. By 2016, the association hosted its first event, which it dubbed the Ohio High School Landscape Olympics.

The Ohio Nursery Landscape Association hosted its second Ohio High School Landscape Olympics in 2017, where 250 students participated.

Part of the Lynch brothers’ idea for OHLO was to involve many regional landscape contractors and industry companies in the event. While ONLA would handle event logistics – such as finding a host school, providing food and recruiting vocational schools and students to attend – the contractors and companies would create and manage their own competitions. Each company is responsible for their own test problem, so they develop a hands-on test for students and pay for everything needed with the test.

“The neat thing about it is each test problem we have is ran, operated and facilitated by an industry company,” Patrick says. “So, the ONLA doesn’t have to mess with the test problems. They just take care of overall event management, while us companies put together test problems for students.”

Partnerships can help with these test problems, too. Patrick says Peabody Landscape teamed with Willoway Nursery to manage the plant installation test at OHLO 2017. In addition, he says some landscaping companies and local colleges donated money to provide ONLA with funds for food, tents and tables to use.

At OHLO, students compete in a variety of events like truck and trailer operation, skid-steer operation, sales presentation, irrigation, landscape maintenance and plant installation to name a few.

OHLO was such a hit among teachers and students in 2016 that ONLA decided to bring it back again in November 2017. This past fall, 250 students from 20 schools participated.

“On the professional level, we need people in the industry. The industry has been good to me, so I want students to know this is a viable career path for them.” Mike Lynch, account representative, Environmental Management

“As a first impression, I really like this event,” says Aaron Blaney, a junior at Auburn Career Center in Painesville, Ohio, who participated in OHLO in 2017. “It got me out into the elements and prepared to get into the business and work for people. I learned techniques here that I might not learn anywhere else.”

ONLA plans to host OHLO again in 2018. Mike envisions the event growing to include new competitions in 2018 such as turfgrass management and arboriculture. Although helping to manage an event such as OHLO can add to busy contractors’ work schedules and it sometimes means partnering with competitors, Mike says it’s more than worth it to be involved in these types of events.

“We want to give back to the industry and encourage these (students),” he says. “Is there cost involved? Yes. Is it worth it? Absolutely. I’m out a couple of days of sales and some of my staff is here, but it’s all worth it. On the professional level, we need people in the industry. The industry has been good to me, so I want students to know this is a viable career path for them. When it comes to improving the future of our industry and giving students an opportunity to showcase their skills, we all need to be a team.”

ONLA plans to host OHLO again in 2018, with hopes of adding new competitions to the event in arboriculture and turfgrass management.
Offer scholarships and real-world experience.

When connections with high school students are established, associations and contractors can also try to promote industry scholarships or internships to further engage these students. James Martin Associates, based in Vernon Hills, Illinois, has offered internships for just over 30 years and sponsored scholarships for about 18 years. President Jim Martin says both the internships and scholarships raise awareness about landscaping job opportunities.

“I think by being active in the (scholarships), most candidates consider us an opportunity for work,” Martin says. “That’s a significant differentiator for how they see and perceive us.”

In addition, Martin says he requires his interns to put together a PowerPoint presentation at the end of their internship to share about their experience, and he asks them to share that presentation with their classmates when they return to school. “That has also helped us to feed, sponsor and promote the internship program,” he says.

Students Max Zugan (left) and Aaron Blaney participated in the 2017 Ohio High School Landscape Olympics. Patrick Lynch (center) helped pitch the idea for the event.

Also, adding real-world expertise about landscaping in the educational setting can also raise awareness to students about the industry. The Pennsylvania Landscape Nursery Association hopes to incorporate mentorships in schools with horticulture programs to bring professionals with landscaping expertise to the classroom.

Cathy Corrigan, president of PLNA, says many high school horticulture programs have science teachers or general vocational teachers lead the horticulture program at a school, yet these instructors sometimes lack hands-on knowledge about landscaping.

As a solution, PLNA launched a high school mentoring task force to discuss how it could develop a mentorship program for high schools or vocational schools with horticulture programs.

The association wants to encourage a contractor to serve as a mentor in each horticulture program in the state to work alongside the teacher in the classroom. The instructor would provide the book knowledge, while the mentor would provide industry experiences and in-field knowledge.

“By having mentors from the industry come into the school, we can make sure students are learning what they need in order to be successful,” Corrigan says.

The association aims to integrate this program into Pennsylvania schools in the 2018-19 academic school year. Corrigan notes there will be some obstacles in incorporating industry professionals in the classroom, as each mentor must be approved by the Department of Education. To date, Corrigan says about 15 contractors have expressed interest in partnering with horticulture programs in the state to serve as mentors.

“Bringing outside people into the schools to have one-on-one time with students requires many clearances,” she says. “It comes down to what each school’s administration allows, and every school is going to be different. But that’s why we are willing to have different packages for this. We want to be able to get someone in front of the kids, even if it’s just a professional talking to (horticulture students) four times a year. Then, at least someone’s coming in the door to show students more practical experiences.”

Article source: http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/article/high-school-hopes/

On the wild side; Local chapter mixes it up with speakers, field trips

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Article source: http://www.thedailytimes.com/community/on-the-wild-side-local-chapter-mixes-it-up-with/article_77f0c9b2-8e20-5d4c-b553-59334a46e5e8.html

Landscaping Mates to Launch Online Garden Care Services

landscaping victoria

Landscaping Mates, a new entrant in gardening service from Melbourne is all set to launch an online portal where people can book appointments for gardeners. According to a company source, this decision was taken to help the internet savvy generation. This move can greatly benefit people who are hard pressed for time as they can now login and schedule appointments during any time of the day. Previously it was only possible to get appointments over phone between 8AM to 5PM from Monday to Friday.

The source says that “From newly built houses to the existing gardens, we can take care of all your gardening needs to make sure it fits within your budget and you get gardens of your dreams!” The company ensures that gardening services are undertaken by professionals who have more than 15 years in the field.

Over the past couple of months, Landscapingmates.com.au has emerged as the most preferred garden landscaping service provider in Melbourne. This is because they have a good team of experienced professionals who can help people to formulate a plan for their garden based on factors like space, cost maintenance etc. It is important to choose plants based on the time one is willing to spend on the maintenance of the garden. Plants which require less maintenance time are the ideal choice if one does not have time to look after the garden. Even these plants can help keep the garden beautiful.

A neglected front garden does not look inviting and mellows down the mood of the visitor. But a beautiful garden is a visual treat and can cheer up a person. It is wise to hire a professional gardener from agencies like the Landscapingmates to maintain the garden. A gardener can also offer valuable tips which may come handy when one is looking forward to have a gorgeous and well maintained garden according to the source.

Apart from front yard gardening services, the team at the landscapingmates.com.au also provide services such as backyard landscaping, pool landscaping, pool building, deck building etc. A team of professional landscape architects are also available at the Landscapingmates. The source said that these architects are well versed in the planning and design of gardens across Melbourne.

Landscapingmates offers a host of services and are one of the best in Melbourne. While speaking about the team in the gardening agency, Nirmal Panda from Landscapingmates said that “Our team of professional horticulturalist has a lifelong passion for plants and garden design. We have been in the business for 26 years and have wealth of experience!”

About Landscaping Mates

At Landscaping Mates, we believe that honest highest quality of workmanship is a path to deliver excellent customer experience. All our projects, regardless of size/price are finished to meet and exceed the landscaping industry standards. We take pride in building beautiful landscapes gardens, our customers regard us as professional landscape gardeners in Melbourne.

Article source: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3620098

Dyck Arboretum Hosts Native Plant Landscaping Symposium and school

HESSTON — In preparation for spring, the Dyck Arboretum of the Plains in Hesston will offer many different opportunities to learn about landscaping and gardening with native plants, including a Native Plant Landscaping Symposium on Feb. 24 and multiple “Native Plant School” evening classes on a variety of topics from January through April.

These educational opportunities will help meet the increased demand for information about using drought-tolerant, pollinator-friendly prairie species in the home landscape.

At the Native Plant Landscaping Symposium, attendees will hear the vignettes of ten master native plant gardeners, experience a virtual tour of their landscapes in photos, and have a time for dialogue with each gardener.

From wild and ecological in nature to more horticultural and manicured, our speakers will present a broad range of design styles in gardening with native plants. With hundreds of years of collective gardening experience in the room, it will be an enriching and inspiring day to think about ways to create, shift, or enhance a native garden/landscape.

Each speaker will address some of the following questions: Why garden with native plants? What design aesthetic are they trying to achieve? What wildlife does the garden attract? What planting and maintenance routines work best? Do they prefer a manicured or wild approach? What is the inspiration that keeps them going?

The day will begin with registration and a continental breakfast at 8 a.m., followed by introductions at 8:30 a.m., and will end at approximately 3:15 p.m. The cost of registration is $40 for Dyck Arboretum members and $50 for non-members for those who register by Feb. 2 and includes a full day of presentations, breakfast, and lunch.

After Feb. 2, registration will increase to $50 for members and $60 for non-members. Participants should RSVP for the symposium by Feb. 21 to be included in the meal count.

For the first year, the Dyck Arboretum is also offering classes on a variety of topics concerning native plants, including “How to Establish a Buffalograss Lawn” on Jan. 25, “Birdscaping” on March 15, “Native Plant Essentials” on March 29, and “Rain Gardens 101” on April 5. Each class will run from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Cost is $10 per person, or $8 per Arboretum member.

In addition, Arboretum Executive Director Scott Vogt and staff will offer landscape design seminars for “Sunny Native Landscapes” on Feb. 8 and for “Shady Native Landscapes” on Feb. 15, each from 6:30 to 9 p.m. These classes are limited to 10 participants each and cost $20 per person or $15 per Arboretum member.

Participants in these design classes will each receive a coupon for the 2018 FloraKansas Spring Plant Sale.

Go to www.dyckarboretum.org and click on “Events” for more information about each event or class.

To register for the Native Plant Landscaping Symposium or Native Plant School, contact the Dyck Arboretum at 620-327-8127 or arboretum@hesston.edu.

Article source: http://www.mcphersonsentinel.com/news/20180111/dyck-arboretum-hosts-native-plant-landscaping-symposium-and-school

A garden season begins with a seed

The gardening world has awoken. For a few weeks from late fall until the end of the year, it does go quiet, but now with seed catalogues on the move and seminars planned, there’s much to keep eager gardeners busy. Even though it may feel like spring is long way off, they’re ordering seed, shopping for grow lights, and drawing up plans for backyard makeovers.

I’d say there’s as much excitement brewing in the middle of January as there is in the middle of summer. Gardens are doing their own thing by then without much help from the gardener. At that stage we have the great satisfaction of seeing the garden flourish, yet sadly there are occasional concerns, even worries. We worry about the weather, rogue rabbits (any rabbits), blight on tomatoes, rampant weeds, and ever-increasing water bills. Right now, those concerns are forgotten because our heads are currently full of dreams, ideas and lots of enthusiasm, all supplemented by the need to forget it’s a record-setting winter for cold — the other day I heard a fire hydrant whistling for a dog.

This is also the time of year to get together with fellow enthusiasts and forget about the weather for a while. As for dreams, Jan. 21 is the date for Galt Horticultural Society’s annual Dream Garden Conference and it usually sells out. For last-minute tickets, contact Lynne Goulet-Smith at 519-841-3325 or lynne@galthort. If you miss it, Drumbo Agricultural Society’s “Come Bloom with Us” takes place on Sunday, Feb. 4; information at www.drumbofair.com.

Meanwhile, if growing seedlings under lights indoors is a new venture for you, here are a few tips.

For seedlings, all you really need for an economical setup is a basic twin tube T8 fluorescent shop light and a timer. There’s no need for special grow lights for seedlings. The pricier options like T5 high output fluorescents are more suited to growing exotic plants or food crops.

LED are more common now and are also fine for seedlings. They’re available in the form of a shop light and they use much less hydro, although they’re usually more expensive to buy. Whatever the type of light source you choose it will need to be suspended about 150 mm above seedlings and timed to be on for 14 hours a day.

It’s still far too early to start most seeds, even if you’re raring to go. Start too early and you’ll run out of space with all the problems of overcrowding. It does depend, however, on what you choose to grow as the germination time for distinct species varies considerably. The seeds of some plants need special treatment — a spell in a freezer (stratification), soaking, or scarification — the scratching or scraping done to weaken a tough seed husk.

Some seeds can take weeks or months before germination takes place and others won’t sprout at all unless they’ve passed through the digestive system of wandering Yak in Outer Mongolia, so to avoid disappointment, determine the individual needs of each well before planting. Fortunately, basic information is usually on the seed packet. If the seeds are from a non-commercial source or a seed swap, more research may be required.

For rare, exotic or unusual seeds, an excellent online resource is Cyndi’s Catalogue of Garden Catalogues at www.gardenlist.com.

As we shiver our way through winter, there are more gardening events upcoming — seminars, conferences, shows, including Garden Kitchener’s Seedy Saturday at Kitchener Public Library on Feb. 24 and Stratford Garden Festival, March 1 to 4. More are posted on the Facebook page of Grand Gardeners. If that isn’t enough to keep you busy in the “off” season, check out your local garden club. There’s one in every community. Find yours at www.gardenontario.org.

Article source: https://www.thespec.com/living-story/8043858-a-garden-season-begins-with-a-seed/