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Archives for January 2, 2018

Should doctors prescribe gardening?

Gayle Souter-Brown is doing a PHD in the effects of gardening and mental health at AUT Northern campus.

The garden Gayle Souter-Brown has created is filled with colour and fragrance. Star jasmine and sweet peas clamber up teepees, callistemon and buttercup bush attract butterflies, there’s a daphne walk and a hebe-lined path leading to a secret seat surrounded by mānuka and olearia. Vegetables and berries grow in raised beds, wildflowers attract pollinators, decomposing logs flourish with fungi and there’s an orchard of fruit trees. 

But there is more to this garden than meets the eye. Planted in the grounds of Auckland University of Technology‘s Northcote campus, it’s also a living laboratory designed to appeal to all the senses.

Science has confirmed that spending time in nature is good for our health. Finnish researchers have found that just 20 minutes a day can lower blood pressure and increase feelings of vitality. Forest bathing is now a thing.

What Gayle wants to know is what kinds of natural surroundings are most beneficial to our wellbeing. 

The Family Recovery Garden on Christchurch’s Manchester Street, is a peaceful green space designed and maintained by residents of Odyssey House, which offers rehabilitation services for drugs and alcohol in Christchurch.

READ MORE:
* Meadows: the next big thing in sustainable gardening
* Top 5 places to see wildflowers in New Zealand
* A riverside retreat in Whanganui

 

On The Edge: The Centre For Mental Health garden at the UK's RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show 2017 represents the ...

On The Edge: The Centre For Mental Health garden at the UK’s RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show 2017 represents the journey through depression, and reflects designer Frederic Whyte’s own experience using gardens and plants to help deal with mental health issues.

So she’s designed a randomised controlled trial where one group spends half an hour a week in her sensory garden, and another group in a plaza-style space with paving and architectural trees planted in neat rows. Afterwards, Gail tests levels of the stress hormone cortisol and various other measures of wellbeing. 

And she’s made an interesting discovery. Those who enjoy the rich diversity of the sensory garden are faring significantly better than those assigned to the colder plaza-style experience. “The planting schemes that support wildlife support us too,” concludes Gayle, whose company Greenstone Design creates therapeutic gardens for people with depression, dementia and autism, both here and in Britain.

She was also involved in drawing up the UK’s first Health  Horticulture Charter in 2016, which aims to make plants and green spaces part of everyone’s life.

Such spaces can be low maintenance and even fairly minimalist. “The monastic cloister gardens were all green but the leaf forms were round,” Gayle points out. “We need to get away from spiky palms, grasses and flaxes, and balance that by putting in round-leafed coprosma and hebes. It’s about a sense of abundance and allowing nature to do its thing.”

The ideal sensory garden involves colour, texture and fragrance. It has something you can pick to eat or put in a jam jar. There are places to sit and things to do – even if it’s just sweeping up leaves or watching birds – because it’s not enough to simply be in nature, you have to pay attention to it.

In post-earthquake Christchurch, the temporary parks and gardens created on vacant lots by Greening the Rubble played a part in helping people recover from the destruction and loss they’d suffered. 

The sensory garden at AUT's Northcote campus.

The sensory garden at AUT’s Northcote campus.

Seven years on, the organisation is still going strong but it’s evolving. A recent project helped Odyssey House – an addiction recovery service – create a garden. The project began when they were looking for ways to reduce the stigma around talking about drug and alcohol problems. “Plus we wanted to develop some horticultural skills,” says operations manager Anna Christophorou. “So we wondered if there was a site in town we could take on to benefit the community.”

It turned out there was quite a big garden next to the Margaret Mahy playground that had been designed to reflect the traditions of the city’s ethnic communities. With Greening the Rubble’s guidance, the residents of Odyssey House set about turning it into a family recovery garden that is open to the public and available for other groups to use. Volunteers pitched in and there are now raised beds filled with flowers and veges, a dirt bike area planted with natives, a barbecue, lawn and gathering spots.

Every week, a group of Odyssey House residents spends a morning working in the garden. Often, members of the public will stop and ask them about their work and how it’s helping their recovery. A sense of purpose, the satisfaction of creating something for people to enjoy, time for reflection and peace are some of the benefits they’ve found gardening has brought.

The sensory garden also functions as a living laboratory.

The sensory garden also functions as a living laboratory.

Anna admits she wasn’t much of a gardener herself when the project began. “But we’re learning together. The outcomes have been pretty good. It’s been a real turning point for us.”

She is now hoping to train some of the Odyssey House staff in horticultural therapy, an aspect of healthcare used in some countries (but not New Zealand at the moment) to help everyone from stroke patients to anorexia sufferers. 

Horticultural therapist Kerryn Coombes-Valeontis was brought up in Christchurch but now lives in Sydney where she works with at-risk youth in a private clinic. She says the benefits are noticeable almost immediately when she’s working with a group growing veges and flowers. “Within five to 10 minutes, big sighs come out as they start to relax and expel air they’ve been holding onto. Breathing slows, blood pressure goes down and they come into the moment. That’s what nature does for us all and is why we all so desperately need it.”

Sweet peas from Odyssey House.

Sweet peas from Odyssey House.

Kerryn has conducted feedback studies and has anecdotal evidence to show that for people with mental health problems, working in the garden improves their sense of wellbeing as much as medication. 

That may be partly due to a soil microbe called Mycobacterium vaccae, which boosts levels of serotonin, the neurotransmitter activating the same nerves in the brain that are targeted by anti-depressants such as Prozac. 

Pottering round the garden has also been linked to longer life expectancy. A Swedish study of people over the age of 60 showed that daily activity such as cutting the lawn reduced the risk of heart attack or stroke by 27 per cent and death by any cause by 30 per cent over a 12-year period.

Beans from Odyssey House.

Beans from Odyssey House.

A bit of weeding and mulching might not seem like a proper workout but in fact prolonged gardening can burn more calories than a gym session. This is because we tend to spend at least two or three times longer working in the garden than we do in the gym and we’re exposed to more stimuli – the sights, sounds and decision-making distract us from the physical exertion. 

Active gardeners are also less likely than inactive couch potatoes to have type-2 diabetes, bowel cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis or stroke.

There are also particular health boosts from gardening if you’re older – improved hand dexterity, a smaller waist circumference, a reduced risk of dementia and better aerobic fitness. 

Since our aerobic capacity declines about 10 per cent per decade after we reach our 40s, and mobility and muscle strength lessen, gardening can literally be a life-saver.

There’s also a pay-off for getting kids involved with all that digging, raking, hoeing and weeding: it’s a way for those who aren’t sports-minded to get into being physically active and forms a foundation for a healthy lifestyle. (See Gardening: does it make kids smarter?)

The Ministry of Health recommends that adults have 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical exercise on most if not all days of the week, with some extra vigorous activity if possible.

But last year, Queensland researchers argued that we all need to be much more active than that to stave off the big killers (stroke, heart disease, diabetes, bowel and breast cancer). They recommended the equivalent of 15 to 20 hours of brisk walking a week and advised incorporating much more activity into daily life, naming gardening among the things we should be doing more of (they also mentioned doing housework as being helpful but we’ll gloss quickly over that!).

Around 50 per cent of the world’s population now lives in cities and the space available for private gardens is shrinking. But community gardens are thriving and they’ve been shown to be a great way for people to connect with each other and with nature.

Meanwhile, it’s emerging that what you do with the outdoor areas you do have may make a big difference. In the UK, one in four front gardens is paved over and the University of Sheffield is conducting research to find out if it’s better for mental and physical health to have those spaces filled with plants instead.

Gayle Souter-Brown says her trial at AUT is suggesting that not only are those characterless paved areas not beneficial, they can actually do measurable harm to our wellbeing. “Living with the sensory overload of digital technology all around us, some people are finding a need to cut back to the bare minimum,” she explains. “There’s nothing to say you can’t have a structural, architectural space. But it’s time to stop thinking of plants as the enemy because trees drop leaves!” 


 – NZ Gardener

Next Garden story:

Herbal knot garden: a step-by-step to growing your own

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Article source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/garden/100075709/should-doctors-prescribe-gardening

Herbal knot garden: a step-by-step to growing your own

How to make the perfect cup of herbal tea.

Low edges and clipped standards add structure to a herb garden, but the ultimate in botanical mastery is the herbal knot garden. Complete with interwoven hedges of box, lavender, hyssop or santolina, this formal garden, laid out to resemble a decorative knot, delivers year-round interest.

The first knot gardens were recorded in the early 1500s, when labourers were paid for “clypping of knottes”. But historically, the gardens had their roots in the Middle Ages, when lavender, rosemary and other fragrant herbs were planted as hedges within walled gardens.

In those days, freshly washed clothing was laid out over the hedges to dry, making them refreshingly fragrant.

The trend continued during the ensuing years, and during the Renaissance these hedges became increasingly intricate, and the knot garden was born.

Box hedges and herbs in a classic walled garden.

Box hedges and herbs in a classic walled garden.

READ MORE:
5 great herbs to grow in pots
5 herbs that will thrive in partial shade
* 10 healing herbs to grow in your garden

 

PLAN YOUR OWN HERBAL KNOT GARDEN
In its most basic form, a herbal knot garden design consists of a simple square within a square. 
* One square in the desired size is marked off.
* A second square is set on point (45-degree angle) within the first, with woven rows in the centre to create eight separate sections for planting: The clipped rows create “ribbons”; where the rows intersect, they create “knots”.
* There is no right or wrong size or shape for a herbal knot garden, but to stay true to the style, your garden should be symmetrical. Choose a square or rectangle design, as geometrical and symmetrical patterns suit this style. Look online for simple designs or create your own on paper. 

Gravel may be used in the spaces between plants if desired or you can plant the blank spaces with flowering herbs.

In The English Husbandman (1613), Gervase Markham recommended ground-up brick to obtain a red colour, powdered clay for a yellow hue, coal dust for black, chalk dust for white, and a mix of the latter two for blue. Chamomile was suggested for green, presumably, in this instance, as a carpeting herb. “As any of the colours shall decay, you shall diligently repaire them, and the luster will be most beautifull.”

For best viewing, position your garden so you can look down on it from above – from a balcony or upstairs room, for example.

Japanese box has been used for this knot garden.

Japanese box has been used for this knot garden.

BEST PLANTS FOR YOUR HERBAL KNOT GARDEN
Once the shape and size of your knot garden have been settled upon, choosing your plants is the next step. 

More elaborate and detailed designs are typically constructed with box (Buxus sempervirens), sometimes planted and grown in double rows, although this is not necessary. 

The reason for using box is two-fold:
* Box is a slow-growing shrub that holds its shape for years and will contain your herbs in beautiful style. The colourful leaves and blooms of various herbs are extraordinarily beautiful when viewed in contrast to the tiny, dark green leaves of box. And box emits a faint fragrance when the sun warms the oil in the leaves – an added bonus for the garden lingerer.
* Unlike some other woody herbs, box regrows from bare wood, so even if your hedges have been left to turn wild, they can be clipped back dramatically without detrimental effect.

Santolina chamaecyparissus, with its pretty silver foliage, can be used instead of or as well as box, providing a contrast in foliage colour. The interest in knot gardens often comes from the contrasting leaf colours – this way, when the herbs between the hedging have died down, there is still interest from the hedging.

Wall germander (Teucrium chamaedrys), with its dark green leaves, is another great alternative. Teucrium fruticans, which has silver leaves, can be used alongside it. Just bear in mind that santolinas and teucriums are fast-growing, and require more frequent clipping to keep them in shape.

Lavender and hyssop can be used to make more informal hedging, or they can be planted within a tighter-clipped hedge – or closed knot. Red- or purple-leafed berberis provides a striking contrast.

PLANTING UP YOUR HERBS
Plant herbs that have the same needs near each other to make maintenance easier. 

Before planting out your knot garden, make sure the ground is cleared of all weeds. 

Then dig over the soil and, if needed, incorporate grit or gravel to ensure excellent drainage. Woody plants are prone to rot in heavy clay soils; in sandy soils they need frequent watering, so remember to incorporate compost. 

Use sand or spray paint to mark out your design. Then dig a continuous trench, about 20cm x 20cm, following your marked pattern. 

Plant your chosen herbs for hedging: A buxus hedge, with its tight leaves and slower growth, is best planted close together, usually 20cm apart, or five to a metre. Faster-growing plants can be given a little more space. 

Firm the plants in well. The first trimming can begin as soon as all your plants are in the ground.

Often, the centre of the knot garden incorporates a single plant shaped into a standard as a focal point. A bay tree (Laurus nobilis) is an attractive choice for the centre, as is upright rosemary, both of which are easy to train into standards. Alternatively, a statue or obelisk can be used.

Thyme has an essential oil, thymol, an antiseptic that can help ward off colds and flu, and soothe sore throats. It's ...

German chamomile is well known for its healing properties. Its gentle nature makes it useful for treating a wide range ...

Peppermint has a wide variety of medicinal uses, but it's especially good for gut and bowel problems as it helps expel ...

Lemon balm has mild sedative and mood enhancing properties, and is a common home remedy to treat insomnia, stress, ...

Comfrey has been used for centuries to reduce swelling and bruising, and heal superficial wounds. Also known as ...

Calendula is known for its skin-healing properties. It is said to hasten cell growth, so it's seen as ideal for treating ...

Sage has antifungal and antibacterial properties that have contributed to its reputation as a healing herb. It is used ...

Mullein is said to be antibacterial, anodyne (relieves pain) and anti-inflammatory.  Mullein leaves can be used to treat ...

Yarrow has antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antispasmodic properties. It has traditionally been used to ...

Aloe vera is used in its raw form to treat burns, bites, blisters, cuts, ulcers, inflammation, rashes, eczema and ...

Thyme has an essential oil, thymol, an antiseptic that can help ward off colds and flu, and soothe sore throats. It’s also used in commercial mouthwashes. Try thyme for relieving colds, sore throats and coughs as well as to help clear mucus in the upper respiratory tract. It has also long been used to relieve tonsillitis and inflammation of the mouth. Combine it with sage to make a gargle at the first sign of a sore throat or to alleviate coughs. Use 3-12g of dried thyme each day; infuse in freshly boiled water and drink during the day, or use to gargle. In the garden, thyme likes a sunny spot in free-draining soil.

German chamomile is well known for its healing properties. Its gentle nature makes it useful for treating a wide range of childhood complaints, including restlessness, teething and colic. Adults, too, can enjoy a cup of chamomile tea to ease stress, anxiety and irritability. Chamomile has sedative properties, but it’s also antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic. It can be used in salves or compresses to soothe sores, rashes and other skin conditions, or in steam baths to calm nerves, clear congestion, alleviate bronchitis, sinusitis and hayfever. Just steep a handful of dried chamomile in a bowl with boiling water, put your head over the bowl and cover with a towel. In the garden, chamomile prefers an open, sunny area but will grow in part shade. Harvest flowers when just or very nearly opened. If left on the plant too long, they will taste bitter.

Peppermint has a wide variety of medicinal uses, but it’s especially good for gut and bowel problems as it helps expel gas and stop gas build-up. It’s also used to treat headaches, nausea, morning sickness, diarrhoea, and anxiety associated with depression. Make a herbal steam inhalation to help clear congestion and soothe sinus inflammation, or sup on peppermint tea for upset stomach, to aid digestion and ease anxiety. Carry sprigs of peppermint with you when travelling for sniffing, to prevent motion sickness. In the garden, peppermint is a hardy perennial that grows 30-60cm. It spreads by sending out runners, so keep it contained in large pots. Soil should be moist but free-draining. Excess moisture around the root zone can lead to fungal diseases.

Lemon balm has mild sedative and mood enhancing properties, and is a common home remedy to treat insomnia, stress, anxiety and depression. It is also traditionally used to ease nausea, settle an upset stomach and relieve gas. Its antiviral properties speed up the healing of cold sores. To make a relaxing tea, loosely pack a teapot with fresh leaves, add boiled water and steep for 10-15 minutes. Drink up to 3 cups a day. Or make a salve as per the instructions above. You can also make a poultice from the fresh leaves to soothe sores, minor cuts and insect bites. In the garden, lemon balm is
a perennial that grows 60-80cm, dying down in winter. Plant in moist, free-draining soil in sun or part shade.

Comfrey has been used for centuries to reduce swelling and bruising, and heal superficial wounds. Also known as knitbone, it was once thought to mend broken bones. It also has anti-inflammatory properties. To make a comfrey poultice for bruises and sprains, pick 6-7 leaves and roughly chop. Use a mortar and pestle to grind the leaves. Add enough boiling water to make a thick paste. Apply directly to the skin or spread the mixture between two layers of cotton or gauze in the size that you want your poultice to be. Apply to the skin. Wrap with cloth. Replace with a fresh poultice after a few hours. In the garden, comfrey will grow in sun or part shade, and any cut or damaged piece of root will regrow. Confine it to one area and dig in plenty of compost or aged manure.

Calendula is known for its skin-healing properties. It is said to hasten cell growth, so it’s seen as ideal for treating infections, abrasions, cuts, rashes, scalds and small wounds. Calendula is also anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and inhibits bleeding. Make a tea from the fresh or dried flowers, then soak a clean cloth in the infusion. Wring it out and place over rashes, scalds or wounds. Or make a salve. Fill a glass jar with calendula leaves (leave fresh leaves to wilt for 12 hours before using), screw on the lid and put the jar in a warm room out of sunlight for 4-6 weeks. Turn the jar upside down once a day. After 6 weeks, strain. Put 100ml calendula oil and 15g beeswax in the top of a double boiler, and heat gently until the beeswax has melted. Remove from the heat and add 10-20 drops of essential oil (chamomile essential oil is a powerful anti-inflammatory; lavender is antimicrobial and soothes the skin). Pour into small, clean pots. In the garden, calendula likes
a sunny spot in free-draining soil.

Sage has antifungal and antibacterial properties that have contributed to its reputation as a healing herb. It is used in tonics for sore throats, infected gums and mouth ulcers. To make a gargle, combine sage with a little cider vinegar, or honey and lemon, and steep in boiling water. Historically, sage has also been used as a tonic for the brain, and studies today show it may well be beneficial. British scientists found that sage improved the mood and memory of healthy adults, and adults with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s showed significant improvement in cognitive functions after using sage for four months. Sip on sage tea throughout the day to calm the nerves and stimulate the brain — ideal for those studying for exams. Sage tea is excellent for women suffering from night sweats and hot flushes too. Combine it with alfalfa (Medicago sativa) for a potent remedy. Studies have shown the two herbs are extremely effective together. In the garden, sage likes a sunny spot in free-draining soil. Water young plants frequently until established.

Mullein is said to be antibacterial, anodyne (relieves pain) and anti-inflammatory. Mullein leaves can be used to treat coughs. They contain mucilage, which acts as an expectorant and soothes irritated mucous membranes. Harvest leaves before the flower stems appear, bruise slightly and steep in boiled water for 10 minutes. You can also try a steam bath and inhale the steam to relieve congestion. In the garden, mullein is a biennial. It produces flowers in its second year.

Yarrow has antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antispasmodic properties. It has traditionally been used to staunch bleeding, reduce fevers (it opens your pores and induces perspiration) as well as ease tight muscles and spasms. To help stop bleeding, grab a handful of leaves, rub them to release their juice and pack onto minor cuts. Or make a tea from the fresh or dried plant, soak a clean cloth in the infusion, wring it out, and put over the wound. To stop a bleeding nose, insert a bruised leaf into the nostril. When ingested, yarrow is said to help alleviate indigestion as well as stimulate bile flow and liver function. Take it at the first sign of a cold. Yarrow has astringent properties, and may help dry up and expel mucus from the respiratory system, as well as reduce inflammation in the nose and throat. To keep yarrow on hand all year round, dry leaves and flowers, and grind to a powder. In the garden, yarrow loves a sunny spot in well-drained soil.

Aloe vera is used in its raw form to treat burns, bites, blisters, cuts, ulcers, inflammation, rashes, eczema and psoriasis. The gel within the plant contains bradykinase, salicylic acid and magnesium lactate, which help reduce inflammation, pain and itching. The gel is also said to speed up wound healing, promote cell and tissue regeneration. The easiest way to use it at home is to slice open a leaf and rub the gel onto minor burns, sunburn and cuts. However, when exposed to oxygen for prolonged periods, the gel oxidises (much like an apple browns when the flesh is exposed to air) and loses its potency. Use the gel within 2-4 hours after cutting. If you only require a small amount of gel, just cut off what you need. If you’ve cut a whole leaf from the plant but only use a small amount, snip off what you need from the leaf and wrap the rest in clingfilm and store in the refrigerator. When it comes to using it again, cut the used end back to the undamaged tissue, then cut off another piece to use. Harvest leaves from plant that are at least three years old as the active constituents are higher in mature plants. In the garden, grow aloe in sun and protect from frosts.

CARING FOR YOUR HERBAL KNOT GARDEN
A lot of growth will be taking place within a relatively small space, especially when using box, so plants will need a steady supply of water to establish themselves. (Read more about the best way to water your plants.)

Where two rows (or ribbons) meet, emphasise this crossover by clipping at two different heights so that it appears that one of the ribbons is passing beneath the other. Here’s how:
* Clip one of the rows slightly lower at the intersection (about 5cm lower), then clip the other with a gentle humpback curve so that it appears that it is sitting on top.
* Use electric clippers or hand shears to trim your hedging, placing an old sheet or tarpaulin down first to catch the clipped foliage – this makes them easier to remove afterwards. The compartments within the hedging can be planted with annual or perennial herbs. The choice is up to you, but planting perennial herbs will reduce the amount of work needed. 

Treat the herbs in a knot garden the same as if they were planted in any other type of garden – add the occasional side dressing of compost, water regularly and add a layer of organic mulch. Decorative mulch will undoubtedly add to the beauty of your knot garden.

If box blight presents a problem in humid areas (this fungal disease causes the interior of plants to brown off and die), cut out the affected parts and bin or burn them. Feed your hedges with a weak solution of seaweed tea a few times a year and your plants have every chance of growing back healthily.


 – NZ Gardener

Next Garden story:

Lavender farming in Carterton

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Article source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/garden/100086911/herbal-knot-garden-a-stepbystep-to-growing-your-own

Southern Exposure: The long road to cannabis in Cannon Beach

Five Zero Trees has dispensaries in Cannon Beach, Astoria and Portland.

Five Zero Trees

Five Zero Trees has dispensaries in Cannon Beach, Astoria and Portland.

The location of Five Zero Trees.

Brenna Visser/The Daily Astorian

The location of Five Zero Trees.

Employees Travis Flagel, Josh Jensen and manager Josh Cisco stand at the counter at Five Zero Trees.

Brenna Visser/The Daily Astorian

Employees Travis Flagel, Josh Jensen and manager Josh Cisco stand at the counter at Five Zero Trees.


Buy this photo

Exhale.

The wait is finally over.

More than three years since the passage of Oregon’s Measure 91 legalizing recreational cannabis, Cannon Beach saw its first retail dispensary open without fanfare in December.

In an elegant wood-frame building with matching interior decor, customers can pick up flowers, edibles, concentrates and pre-rolls. Described alternately as a “craft cannabis dispensary” and “your Pacific Northwest premium provider,” shoppers at Five Zero Trees are invited to choose between Blue Dream, Poochie Love, Magic Durban Poison or dozens more.

Oregrown, a little more than a block to the north, is likely to be the second to open its doors.

What took so long?

Measure 4-179

Despite several licensed cannabis dispensaries in Astoria and Seaside, one in Manzanita and one in Wheeler, Cannon Beach residents came late to the game.

When Oregon voters — including 63 percent of residents of Cannon Beach — approved the retail sale of recreational pot in 2014, they gave communities the ability to opt out.

A petition signed by 155 residents brought prohibition to the ballot in November 2016. The threat of denial was enough to stall would-be cannabis retailers, even as neighboring communities saw a surge in activity.

In the interim period before the vote, city councilors restricted marijuana sales to three separate commercial zones.

Under the ordinance, retailers could operate downtown from Ecola Creek south to Washington Street, midtown from Harrison Street south to Elliot Way and in Tolovana Park from Delta Street south to the Sandcastle condominiums. Cannon Beach voters also approved a 3 percent local tax on recreational marijuana sales to support public safety. Meanwhile, Measure 4-179 to ban marijuana sales in Cannon Beach failed in November 2016 by a 51 percent to 49 percent margin.

The narrow vote was enough to give entrepreneurs the green light.

Starts and stops

Sam Chapman of New Economy Consulting appeared before the City Council in 2016 announcing his intention to open a dispensary but never applied for a business license. Through his company, he continues to focus on advising entrepreneurs and investors, as well as consulting for political campaigns.

A planned dispensary at 3115 S. Hemlock St. abandoned its land-use application after a rejection by the Design Review Board in August.

Owner Daryl Bell, who owns dispensaries in Lincoln, Coos and Tillamook counties, went before the Design Review Board to seek approvals for his proposed Tolovana dispensary. Bell provided plans for exterior building and landscaping upgrades, but the board asked for a more detailed plan for the property.

Bell proposed exterior painting, window modifications and landscaping ideas, but the board wasn’t satisfied. Bell was granted a continuance and asked to return in October with revised plans.

When he failed to appear or submit revisions, his application was rejected.

Nancy Benson, operations manager of PPC Holdings, said in late December that changes requested just weren’t worth it and they did not intend to pursue the application.

Oregrown

Last summer, store owner Abbas Atwi sold the building at 215 South Hemlock ­— home to the Purple Moon Boutique for 14 years — to Justin Crawn, Aviv Hadar, Kevin Hogan and Hunter Neubauer of Oregrown Industries.

Described as “Oregon’s premier farm-to-table vertically integrated cannabis company,” the four men, each in their early 30s, founded their company in 2013 with the goal of setting the bar for the emerging recreational market in Oregon, according to Cascade Business News.

Oregrown’s flagship store in Bend opened as a medical dispensary about four years ago.

The owners said they wanted to expand their business to Cannon Beach because of its natural beauty, which meshes with the company’s Oregon outdoors lifestyle brand, they told the Cannon Beach Gazette in July.

Their No. 1 priority is to go through proper channels to make sure it will fit in with the aesthetic and the culture of the town.

Last summer, the Design Review Board approved Oregrown’s request to modify signage, door color and window display restrictions.

Oregrown has a marijuana retail license from the Oregon Liquor Control Commission for a dispensary in Bend but not in Cannon Beach.

Until they receive commission approval — a process described as backlogged for months — they await licensing as the city’s second retail cannabis dispensary.

Owners are hoping for spring.

“Oregrown is incredibly excited to bring our authentic lifestyle brand to Cannon Beach,” Oregrown’s Amanda Moore said.

“Many of us grew up learning how to surf on the Oregon Coast.”

Moore said Oregrown is hoping to have a soft opening in place by the beginning of April. “We really cannot wait to bring a taste of Oregrown to our home away from home.”

Future challenges?

Even with two shops planned and more likely, opponents of retail dispensaries in the downtown area say the pot shops are not compatible with the city’s goals.

Five Zero Trees summer opening into the former location of the home decor and design store Fruffels at 140 S. Hemlock St. was delayed after the Ecola Square Homeowners Association, spearheaded by David Frei, sought a denial of their business license, citing concerns about the application process and inconsistencies with the city’s comprehensive plan.

Frei argued approving Five Zero Trees at the Hemlock location would take away a mixed-use building with three apartments, “eliminating apartments in affordable housing-challenged Cannon Beach.”

Councilors voted 3-2 to maintain the ordinance, which prohibits marijuana stores in mixed-use buildings to adhere to the community’s desire to keep marijuana out of residential areas.

The building meets the city code for a marijuana store because the residents have since moved out and it is no longer mixed-use.

In a November memo to the mayor and councilors, city land use attorney Bill Kabeiseman wrote: “While some might find that marijuana facilities are fully consistent with having a strong ‘quality of life,’ the question of how to implement the vision statement is a policy question for which the City Council, informed by the voters, has the final authority.”

City ordinances do not violate provisions of the comprehensive plan — particularly the values of fostering community, small-town atmosphere and a sense of safety — “merely because they allow for marijuana facilities in the city.”

Although the city could choose to interpret the provisions as the opponents of the marijuana facility suggested, nothing in the comprehensive plan mandates such an approach and the city has not violated its comprehensive plan in allowing marijuana facilities in the downtown area, Kabeiseman wrote.

The topic will likely arise during the re-evaluation of the comprehensive plan as part of the city’s strategic planning.

“Cannabis is a substance that can transcend all genders, religion, lifestyle — it brings different values to different people,” Five Zero Trees co-owner Case Van Dorne said in June. “If we can provide this experience in a safe mechanism, that’s fulfilling.”

R.J. Marx is The Daily Astorian’s South County reporter and editor of the Seaside Signal and Cannon Beach Gazette.


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Article source: http://www.dailyastorian.com/columns/20180102/southern-exposure-the-long-road-to-cannabis-in-cannon-beach

Donate your Christmas trees for animal enrichment at The Wild Animal Park

Donate your Christmas trees for animal enrichment at The Wild Animal ParkCopyright 2018 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.





CHITTENANGO, N.Y. (WSYR-TV) – If you’re looking to put your Christmas tree to good use, The Wild Animal Park in Chittenango will take them for animal enrichment.

You can drop off the tree at their admissions building.

photoCopyright 2018 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

The trees will be used in exhibits like Jambo’s– the male leopard– for enrichment exercises. 

You can also  drop off your Christmas tree at OCRRA’s Amboy (6296 Airport Road Camillus) and Jamesville (4370 Route 91 Jamesville) sites after the New Year.

Just make sure that all the ornaments, tinsel, lights and other decorations are off the tree.

In the springtime, the trees will be ground into mulch that can be used in gardens for landscaping.

You can also check with your local highway department– some towns and villages offer tree pickups.

For more information, click here.

 

 

Article source: http://www.localsyr.com/news/local-news/donate-your-christmas-trees-for-animal-enrichment-at-the-wild-animal-park/894806962

The hottest gardening and landscaping trends set to sizzle in 2018

ARE you looking to update your backyard with cutting-edge ideas?

We spoke to the team from Tim Davies Landscaping to find out the hottest gardening and landscaping trends set to sizzle in 2018.

Top 3 trends for 2018

– Concrete

There are various finishes currently being used with concrete and while some clients see this as a cold product we love using it as each pour is unique.

It has an earthy tone and can be worked into many applications for floors, walls, bench tops and seats.

We are also seeing this material being used for pool copings and surrounds.

– Coastal planting

Given many Australians settle next to the coast, the planting style needs to work with the aspect. Low maintenance is a term we hear often when speaking with clients. I think the clever use of succulents mixed with native silver tones/mixed with large drifts of grasses work so well.

– Earthy floor surfaces

Earthy surfaces such as decomposed granite or gravel are making a trend back into the landscape as well as natural stones coming out of Europe.

Is there a trend from around the world you’d like to see boom here?

Palm Springs and a minimalist design. I think this style of sophisticated and sleek gardens appeals to our clients’ busy lifestyles and WA’s similar climate zone. Plus, it complements the current architectural trends.

What style are you happy to see go?

Clipped box hedges. Whilst there is always a place for formal design, we are seeing less of the clipped box hedges, particularly given the maintenance involved. Instead, the Buxus spheres are being used more regularly to provide structure and form within a planting composition. These types of plants are then contrasted with various foliages.

Article source: https://www.communitynews.com.au/eastern-reporter/lifestyle/the-hottest-gardening-and-landscaping-trends-set-to-sizzle-in-2018

2018 Garden Calendar Available – Dig It – Blogs – Journal Star

 

My 2018 Garden Calendar is now available. It provides garden tips, a calendar of events, and a picture each month spotlighting University of Illinois Extension volunteers and programs.

New this year are hyperlinks to information on various topics in the monthly tips. Just click on the underlined-blue links while viewing the electronic copy and it will take you to the connecting ILRiverHort blog, Pinterest pin, or YouTube video.

January displays Master Gardeners (MGs) from Fulton Mason Counties learning more about irises at MG Margaret Kelly’s iris garden. A tip and corresponding hyperlink explain how to plant an indoor edible garden.

February features the Peoria MGs providing gardening information at the Spring Home Show held at the Peoria Civic Center. Next year’s show is February 23-25. Learn how to test the viability of last year’s leftover seed in a Pinterest link.

April’s photo reveals Fulton County MGs hosing a miniature garden program. A linked chart shows planting times for garden vegetables. April is the time for frost tolerant plants, such as spinach, lettuce, and radishes.

June shows Tazewell County MGs having fun while they teach about gardening during their annual Plant Bingo Event. Next year’s event is June 7 at a new venue in E. Peoria. Instagram users can link to a video on proper mowing heights for healthier lawns.

July pictures Mason County Junior Master Gardeners harvesting potatoes grown in straw bales. All fair dates are listed, as well as a link on how to reduce mosquitos in your yard.

October illustrates Horticulture Educator Kari Houle teaching tree identification to this fall’s Master Gardener trainees. Our 2018 MG training will begin in April or May. Fall is the time to plant garlic.

November has a picture of Master Gardener trainees with Master Naturalists during one of their combined classes this fall. Master Naturalist training will be in June next year. Tips and links discuss spring flowering bulbs and tool care.

My entire garden calendar is available for as a free pdf-format download at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/fmpt. While there check out my ILRiverHort garden blog, links to my Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest pages, and our many other gardening sites.

Rhonda Ferree

Author: Rhonda Ferree

Rhonda Ferree is Extension Educator in Horticulture for the Fulton-Mason-Peoria-Tazewell Extension Unit. She has been with University of Illinois Extension for over 20 years where she has held several positions and received many awards. Ferree has a master’s degree and a bachelor’s degree in horticulture from the University of Illinois.




Article source: http://blogs.pjstar.com/gardening/2018/01/01/2018-garden-calendar-available/

2018 Garden Calendar Available

 

My 2018 Garden Calendar is now available. It provides garden tips, a calendar of events, and a picture each month spotlighting University of Illinois Extension volunteers and programs.

New this year are hyperlinks to information on various topics in the monthly tips. Just click on the underlined-blue links while viewing the electronic copy and it will take you to the connecting ILRiverHort blog, Pinterest pin, or YouTube video.

January displays Master Gardeners (MGs) from Fulton Mason Counties learning more about irises at MG Margaret Kelly’s iris garden. A tip and corresponding hyperlink explain how to plant an indoor edible garden.

February features the Peoria MGs providing gardening information at the Spring Home Show held at the Peoria Civic Center. Next year’s show is February 23-25. Learn how to test the viability of last year’s leftover seed in a Pinterest link.

April’s photo reveals Fulton County MGs hosing a miniature garden program. A linked chart shows planting times for garden vegetables. April is the time for frost tolerant plants, such as spinach, lettuce, and radishes.

June shows Tazewell County MGs having fun while they teach about gardening during their annual Plant Bingo Event. Next year’s event is June 7 at a new venue in E. Peoria. Instagram users can link to a video on proper mowing heights for healthier lawns.

July pictures Mason County Junior Master Gardeners harvesting potatoes grown in straw bales. All fair dates are listed, as well as a link on how to reduce mosquitos in your yard.

October illustrates Horticulture Educator Kari Houle teaching tree identification to this fall’s Master Gardener trainees. Our 2018 MG training will begin in April or May. Fall is the time to plant garlic.

November has a picture of Master Gardener trainees with Master Naturalists during one of their combined classes this fall. Master Naturalist training will be in June next year. Tips and links discuss spring flowering bulbs and tool care.

My entire garden calendar is available for as a free pdf-format download at http://web.extension.illinois.edu/fmpt. While there check out my ILRiverHort garden blog, links to my Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest pages, and our many other gardening sites.

Rhonda Ferree

Author: Rhonda Ferree

Rhonda Ferree is Extension Educator in Horticulture for the Fulton-Mason-Peoria-Tazewell Extension Unit. She has been with University of Illinois Extension for over 20 years where she has held several positions and received many awards. Ferree has a master’s degree and a bachelor’s degree in horticulture from the University of Illinois.




Article source: http://blogs.pjstar.com/gardening/2018/01/01/2018-garden-calendar-available/