Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for December 23, 2017

College Student Looks To Build Community Garden

A hand-drawn map shows a proposed design for a community garden in Rebecca Park in Clearfield Borough. The project is being proposed by Penn State student Rachel Duke as part of her capstone requirement. Duke is hoping to work with local businesses and the Clearfield Borough Council to make the project a reality. (Photo by Kimberly Finnigan)

CLEARFIELD – A local college student is looking to bring a little home-grown goodness to Clearfield Borough.

At Thursday’s Clearfield Borough Council meeting, Rachel Duke, the 2016 Clearfield County Fair Queen, Pennsylvania State Fair Queen Alternate and Pennsylvania’s Miss United States Agriculture, presented her proposal for a community garden to be located at Rebecca Park.

In addition to her many agricultural titles, Duke is also a junior at Penn State University and is majoring in agricultural science. Duke said as part of her education, she must design and present a capstone project.

Duke said she is working to build a community garden in Rebecca Park and came to the meeting to ask for the council’s permission to pursue the project.

Duke said she would like to build a 150-by-50 foot garden, which would be divided into 4-by-8 foot plots in raised beds.

She said the garden would also offer additional attractions, such as an insect hotel, rain barrel water collection, a sunflower house, a sundial and an herb garden to help educate residents about agriculture.

“Many people know very little about agriculture and where our food comes from,” Duke said. “There are people out there who really think chocolate milk comes from brown cows.”

Duke said she has been making arrangements with local businesses for materials. She said she was also hoping to utilize the borough’s compost site for soil and compost.

If all goes according to plan, Duke believes she can construct the garden for about $5,000, which she will raise. She said part of the project includes forming a board of directors to oversee the garden once it’s completed.

In addition to teaching others about agriculture, Duke said the garden can be used to provide fresh produce to the local food banks.

Council Member Robbie Tubbs said he had several students come before the council during career day to pitch a similar idea. He said he could put Duke in contact with the students who would be very excited to help with the project.

Borough Operations Manager Leslie Stott introduced Duke to Todd Banks of Stiffler, McGraw and Associates, and Todd Kling, the street department foreman. She said both would be very helpful.

Kling said he would like to personally thank Duke for taking on the project and for choosing Rebecca Park. He said he has invested a lot of time and effort into improving Rebecca Park and he would be willing to help Duke as much as he can.

The council voted unanimously to support Duke and her plans for the garden.

 

Article source: https://gantdaily.com/2017/12/23/college-student-looks-to-build-community-guarden/

Keep the Golden Gate Bridge close to your heart


Find luxury items at discounted prices at the RealReal’s holiday pop-up shop in San Francisco’s Union Square. (Susana Bates for Drew Altizer Photography)

Find luxury items at discounted prices at the RealReal’s holiday pop-up shop in San Francisco’s Union Square. (Susana Bates for Drew Altizer Photography)




Need a gift for someone who has left his heart in San Francisco? How about a nugget of the Golden Gate Bridge?

Rick Bulan has repurposed the bridge’s original pedestrian handrails installed in 1937 (and removed in 1993) into affordable and unique jewelry.

His company, Golden Gate Design and Furniture Co., has been fashioning pieces of the handrail into home furnishings and accessories for a number of years, but these clever pieces are much more portable and giveable.

The steel from the bridge has been repainted in the signature color, international orange, and encased in a filigree silver- or copper-plated heart.

Pendants, with chain or choker, cost $35 and earrings or cufflinks cost $49.

They can be purchased in San Francisco at Local Take at either 1371 Ninth Ave. (415-664-4422) or 3979 17th St. (415-556-5300), at San Francisco Mercantile at 1698 Haight St. (415-757-0677) or online at goldengatefurniture.com.

Getting RealReal

If you’re a fan of the RealReal, the popular online luxury consignment site, you can now shop in person at its pop-up shop in Union Square in San Francisco that opened just for the holidays and will close Jan. 31.

“It’s been jam-packed with shoppers,” says the RealReal spokesperson Natalie Shalk, “But, the stock is replenished daily.”

Here, you’ll find authenticated, preowned brands such as Chanel, Hermes, Tiffany, Cartier, Yves Saint Laurent and Prada and merchandise that ranges from men and women’s apparel, handbags, accessories, fine jewelry and watches to home furnishings, décor and fine art, all at pretty good prices.

If you want to consign luxury goods you own but aren’t using, bring them with you to the pop-up shop you can talk to a gemologist or other authentication specialists who will be on hand to answer questions.

Otherwise, you will still be able to book an appointment at the site’s San Francisco consignment office at 55 Francisco St. any time by phone or online.

The RealReal San Francisco Pop-Up shop is at 222 Stockton St. in San Francisco. It is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and noon to 6 p.m. Sundays. It will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Christmas Eve and closed Christmas and New Year’s days. Call 844-818-7325 or go to therealreal.com.

Furnishings for less

If you love Room Board merchandise, you’ll love shopping its clearance event online or at its San Francisco store starting Dec. 26.

Furniture and accessories will be discounted 20 to 50 percent. You can take a look at the clearance inventory at roomandboard.com/clearance.

If you’d rather wait for newly introduced furnishings and accessories, go to Room Board’s open house from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 20 and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 21. There will be refreshments and a raffle to win a $1,000 gift certificate.

Room Board is at 685 Seventh St. in San Francisco. Showroom hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays. Call 415-252-9280 or go to roomandboard.com.

Abode Marin sale

Look for another sale on Jan. 2 when Abode Marin, a full service interior design company and home furnishings showroom, reduces prices off floor sample pieces, gifts and accessories up to 50 percent for January. Custom orders will also be 20 percent off regular prices.

This is a great place for designing your own custom pillows by mixing and matching fabrics and coordinating pretty welting.

Abode Marin opened in 2016 and, according to owner Julia Robberts, specializes in good quality, transitional to contemporary upholstery and casework and emphasizes products that are made in America.

Coffee table books and decorative accessories such as bookends, candles, and diffusers are on sale through 5 p.m. Saturday.

Abode Marin, at 1177 Magnolia Ave. in Larkspur, is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Call 415-448-5536 or go to abodemarin.com.

Don’t-miss events

• Learn how to “Create a Colorful Indoor Planter” using orchids and bromeliads with the help of Sloat Garden Center designers and then take it home at 10 a.m. Jan. 14 at 401 Miller Ave. in Mill Valley (415-388-0365) or 1 p.m. Jan. 14 at 700 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. in Kentfield (415-454-0262). The workshop is $75 for members or $85; fee includes all materials. Go to sloatgardens.com.

• Get the best tips on pruning and planting roses from 9 to 10 a.m. Jan. 6 at Armstrong Garden Centers at 1430 S. Novato Blvd. in Novato. For details, call 415-878-0493 or go to armstronggarden.com. Admission is free.

PJ Bremier writes on home, garden, design and entertaining topics every Saturday and also on her blog at DesignSwirl.co. She may be contacted at P.O. Box 412, Kentfield 94914, or at pj@pjbremier.com.

Article source: http://www.marinij.com/article/NO/20171222/FEATURES/171229950

Belle Isle garden by renowned designer Piet Oudolf is a go

 

  • Garden designed by internationally known designer Piet Odolf approved for Belle Isle
  • He is said to be open to additional Detroit commissions, as well
  • Will be present at Detroit Film Theatre screening of film on his work

 

Internationally renowned designer Piet Oudolf has agreed to design a garden for Belle Isle and is open to additional commissions in Detroit.

The island garden will be planted on a 1.5-acre, grassy site near the Nancy Brown Peace Memorial Carillon and the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory, a site chosen by Oudolf himself during a visit to Detroit earlier this year.

The Dutch-born Oudolf is considered by many to be a modern-day Frederick Law Olmsted, the 19th-century designer credited with much of the original design for Belle Isle, as well as New York City’s Central Park. He worked on design of the High Line park in New York City — which transformed an old elevated rail line into a public space — and the Lurie Garden in Chicago.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources, which manages Belle Isle, approved the Detroit project early in December.

The Garden Club of Michigan, which led the effort to bring an Oudolf garden to Belle Isle, has raised $150,000 to cover his commission and travel expenses from his home in the Netherlands.

Additional fundraising for the $2.7 million project — which would include an endowment for maintenance and operation — will be led by Oudolf Garden Detroit. Among the group’s members are Maura Campbell, immediate past president of the Garden Club and fellow board member Jean Hudson, who’ve co-chaired the effort to bring Oudolf to Detroit, along with other members of the club and other local supporters.

The Belle Isle Conservancy has agreed to serve as fiduciary for the fundraising effort.

Article source: http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20171222/news/648441/belle-isle-garden-by-renowned-designer-piet-oudolf-is-a-go

Discussion of Belle Isle garden project follows film about master gardener Piet Oudolf



The Garden Club of Michigan and the Detroit Institute of Arts auxiliary Friends of Detroit Film Theatre will co-host a program at 7 p.m. Jan. 4, which includes the documentary Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf and a conversation with Oudolf and filmmaker Thomas Piper.

Oudolf was born in 1944 in Haarlem, Netherlands, and since 1982 has lived and worked in Hummelo, a tiny village in the east Netherlands, where he started a nursery with his wife, Anja, to grow perennials.

His garden has since become renowned for its radical approach and ideas about planting design.

Pipers Five Seasons immerses viewers in Oudolfs work and takes them inside his creative process, from his beautifully abstract sketches to his theories on beauty and the ecological implications of his gardens.

Intimate discussions with the artist were filmed through all fours seasons, in Oudolfs gardens at Hummelo and on visits to his signature public works in New York, Chicago and the Netherlands. It also follows Oudolf as he designs and installs a major new garden at Hauser Wirth Somerset, a gallery and arts center in Southwest England that he considers his most important work to date.

In his 35-year career, Oudolf has achieved international acclaim and was given the Netherlands Prince Bernhard Cultural Foundation Award in 2013.

Oudolf co-founded Future Plants, a company specializing in selecting, growing, breeding and protecting plants for landscaping and public areas. Among the many books he has co-written are Planting: A New Perspective (2013); Landscapes in Landscapes (2011); and Planting the Natural Garden (2003).

His projects include No. 5 Culture Chanel in Paris, the High Line in New York City, Lurie Garden in Chicagos Millennium Park, Serpentine Gallery in London, England, and Italys Venice Biennale.

At the invitation of the Garden Club of Michigan, Oudolf committed to designing a garden in Detroit and proposed a site on Belle Isle. Oudolf and Piper discuss the Belle Isle proposal with audience members.

Tickets to the film and talk are $10 and $8 for seniors and FDFT members at bit.ly/FiveSeasonsDFT.

Image: Piet Oudolf in one of his gardens.

Article source: http://www.dailytribune.com/lifestyle/20171222/discussion-of-belle-isle-garden-project-follows-film-about-master-gardener-piet-oudolf

Women at Work: Can you turn a ‘side hustle’ into a career? – Post

‘+

‘+__tnt.truncateStr(oAsset.title,85,’…’)+’

‘+

‘+

Article source: http://www.postbulletin.com/business/women-at-work-can-you-turn-a-side-hustle-into/article_2ee8c42b-d6c0-5ef0-a7fa-11e31492872c.html

Wildlife Department offers online guide for attracting birds

Bird feeding tips, birdhouse basics and landscaping ideas have been brought together in an online guide, with the goal of helping Oklahomans better enjoy their backyard birds.

The 18-page guide, available at wildlifedepartment.com, outlines bird feeder designs, seed choices, bird-friendly plants, nest box plans and suggestions for squirrel-proofing feeders.

“This guide was created to help the hundreds of thousands of Oklahomans who watch birds around their home attract even more birds to their backyards,” said Jena Donnell, information specialist with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

“We want to help a beginner choose a feeder, or give longtime bird watchers ideas for updating their backyard landscape.”

More tips for attracting birds and a variety of other wildlife can be found in Landscaping for Wildlife: A Guide to the Southern Great Plains, available for $10 in the Wildlife Department’s Outdoor Store, https://wildlifedepartment.com/outdoor-store.

Article source: http://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/news/business-farm/wildlife-department-offers-online-guide-for-attracting-birds/article_333dd464-ccad-5456-b66f-6f3c22004b8d.html

Environmental landscaping can result in both attractive properties and more profits

CLAY STEWART

By BECKY GILLETTE

As the name suggests, environmental landscaping is about the design of urban landscapes in a way that benefits the natural environment by saving energy, conserving water and providing food and habitat for wildlife.

Clay Stewart, CEO, Stewart Environmental Construction Inc, Tupelo, said initially both landscaping and environmental landscaping have many similarities in that you are using trees, shrubs and other types of plants that are beneficial to the environment.

“As a description, environmental landscaping would deal more with native plantings such as native wetland grasses and native trees and shrubs,” Stewart said. “Commercial landscaping would include more urban type plant material.”

Stewart works for a design that will add signature elements to differentiate businesses who want to impress clients and satisfy employees. That is accomplished by the use of special elements in the landscape such as natural garden areas, dry stream beds for aesthetic purposes, as well as function and outdoor living spaces with arbors, seating areas, fire pits, etc.

Stewart Environment Construction has been involved in large projects like the Column Barium Memorial Garden and the Vietnam Memorial Replica Wall, both in Tupelo. The company has also done work on a number of sports complexes.

“Special considerations in sports field construction would be the access of the sports complexes to the public and location for public use,” Stewart said. “The specific consideration for sports turf would be an existing soil profile for drainage purposes and specialty turf for durability such as hybrid Bermuda grass.”

There is a lot of interest in low maintenance landscaping for commercial projects. Two primarily elements are turf and tree plantings.

“In situations that require more than these two elements, the use of blanket ground covers would be utilized using high volumes of shrub material plants,” Stewart said. “In high visual or entryway areas, the use of annual color is utilized. To increase aesthetics, these areas would be able to be re-cultivated two times a year.”

Sadik Artunc, professor and head of the Department of Landscape Architecture, Mississippi State University, said doing the best thing for the environment can also considerably reduce maintenance costs for the owners. You can cut water bills considerably and also may benefit by having perennial plants instead of annuals, which have to be replaced every year.

Environmental landscaping starts with the choice of plants. Artunc said an example is using native and non-invasive plants that require little, if any, additional irrigation, as opposed non-native ornamental and invasive plant materials that can provide little food or habitat for wildlife.

“You won’t see it too much in Mississippi yet, but if you travel to areas like Washington D.C., you will see lots of tall grasses used as ornamental plantings,” said Artunc, a licensed architectural landscaper. “These are not grasses that have to be mown, and are used in landscaping quite a lot. In commercial landscapes, people are doing more and more grasses. Big eateries like McDonald’s and Chick-fil-A are trending towards more environmentally sensitive landscapes.”

Some of the techniques are not new. Those include planting large deciduous shade trees on the south side of a home or commercial building that provide shade to cut air conditioning bills in the summer. When the trees lose their leaves in the fall, that also helps with heating bills because the sun helps warm the buildings.

Environmental landscaping can also reduce labor costs. But there is no such thing as a maintenance-free landscape.

“You need to get plastic plants if you want that,” he said. “Every landscape requires maintenance. Local plant materials tend to require less maintenance, less water and less or no mowing. It cuts down some on maintenance.”

There is great concern about the decline of pollinators like honey bees, which have seen populations reduced by 90 percent in the U.S. since 1962, according to Greenpeace. About 30 percent of food crops are reliant on honey bees for cross pollination.

Plantings that provide food and habitat for honeybees and other pollinators are also becoming popular both because people like doing their part to help nature, and just because of the enjoyment of seeing bees, moths, butterflies and hummingbirds in the garden. And there is a boomerang effect:  a healthy bird and pollinator population helps with the survival rates of just about everything in the garden from flowers to trees, Artunc said.

“Also, if you select the correct material for pollinator gardens, you do not have to replace them,” Artunc said. “The idea is if everybody does their part, collectively we will be able to turn back that disaster of losing the pollinators. This whole thing goes back to the idea of sustainability. Think globally, act locally. We are acting at the local level and hopefully, if everyone joins in the effort, it will do some good.”

Rainwater runoff is a major component of environmental landscaping. Artunc said the idea is to use designs and materials that allow rainwater runoff from your roof and paving infiltrate as much as possible instead of being running off into a pipe and dumped into a river.

“Using impervious pavement allowing water to recharge groundwater is very important,” Artunc said. “You may need less water to irrigate if you are designing the rainwater runoff so it goes into the ground. If the rainwater leaves the site quickly, eventually somebody downstream gets flooded. Some of the more progressive municipalities have strict stormwater controls. You can’t increase water coming off land after development. In some areas of the country like Maryland, Ohio and Michigan, there are regulations on developments as small as a quarter of an acre.”

Rainwater runoff can also contain pollutants from asphalt pavement, vehicles and chemicals placed on yards.

“All that is collected and ends up in somebody’s backyard,” he said. “The next thing you know, somebody downstream drinks it. Every drop of water on our campus ends up in the Gulf of Mexico. It may take awhile, but it will get there. So, we all need to preserve the quality of our water.”

Some of the largest landscapes that benefit from environmental landscaping include golf courses. Artunc said in some dry areas of the country like Arizona and parts of California, the only true grass seen on most golf courses is the greens. The rest have local native plant materials from cacti to native grasses.

“Amazingly, golfers have come to prefer natural looking golf courses as opposed lush looking landscapes,” he said.

Article source: http://msbusiness.com/2017/12/environmental-landscaping-can-result-attractive-properties-profits/

Gardens moves to annex 500 homes west of Ibis; will residents say yes?

Residents of The Acreage, a sprawling community of 15,000 single-family homes with little commercial development, have considered becoming a city in the past. Joining with such a city does not appeal to The Preserve at Bay Hill Estates residents, Santorelli said, because home values in The Acreage are lower than in the Bay Hill communities. He’s worried that The Preserve at Bay Hill Estates, built by GL Homes in 2012, would bear the brunt of the cost of the new city.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/local/gardens-moves-annex-500-homes-west-ibis-will-residents-say-yes/Ae4wl8UwT719WcDSwHtPVL/

Discussion of Belle Isle garden project follows film about master gardener Piet Oudolf



The Garden Club of Michigan and the Detroit Institute of Arts auxiliary Friends of Detroit Film Theatre will co-host a program at 7 p.m. Jan. 4, which includes the documentary “Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf” and a conversation with Oudolf and filmmaker Thomas Piper.

Oudolf was born in 1944 in Haarlem, Netherlands, and since 1982 has lived and worked in Hummelo, a tiny village in the east Netherlands, where he started a nursery with his wife, Anja, to grow perennials.

His garden has since become renowned for its radical approach and ideas about planting design.

Piper’s “Five Seasons” immerses viewers in Oudolf’s work and takes them inside his creative process, from his beautifully abstract sketches to his theories on beauty and the ecological implications of his gardens.

Intimate discussions with the artist were filmed through all fours seasons, in Oudolf’s gardens at Hummelo and on visits to his signature public works in New York, Chicago and the Netherlands. It also follows Oudolf as he designs and installs a major new garden at Hauser Wirth Somerset, a gallery and arts center in Southwest England that he considers his most important work to date.

In his 35-year career, Oudolf has achieved international acclaim and was given the Netherlands’ Prince Bernhard Cultural Foundation Award in 2013.

Oudolf co-founded Future Plants, a company specializing in selecting, growing, breeding and protecting plants for landscaping and public areas. Among the many books he has co-written are “Planting: A New Perspective” (2013); “Landscapes in Landscapes” (2011); and “Planting the Natural Garden” (2003).

His projects include No. 5 Culture Chanel in Paris, the High Line in New York City, Lurie Garden in Chicago’s Millennium Park, Serpentine Gallery in London, England, and Italy’s Venice Biennale.

At the invitation of the Garden Club of Michigan, Oudolf committed to designing a garden in Detroit and proposed a site on Belle Isle. Oudolf and Piper discuss the Belle Isle proposal with audience members.

Tickets to the film and talk are $10 and $8 for seniors and FDFT members at bit.ly/FiveSeasonsDFT.

Image: Piet Oudolf in one of his gardens.

Article source: http://www.theoaklandpress.com/lifestyle/20171222/discussion-of-belle-isle-garden-project-follows-film-about-master-gardener-piet-oudolf

Gardening tips: A quick guide to caring for poinsettias

FESTIVE poinsettias can look spectacular at Christmas, but all too often they end up being put in the wrong place – and start wilting before the celebrations have even really started.

Kenneth Freeman, an expert on interior plant welfare and technical director at interior plants specialist Ambius (ambius.co.uk), offers the following tips to help keep your poinsettia perky through the festive season and beyond…

1. Unwrap them immediately

Poinsettias must be unwrapped from their sleeves as soon as you get them indoors.

2. Keep them warm

Poinsettias are indigenous to the warm climate of Mexico and don’t do well sitting in cold vehicles or buildings, or being watered with cold water. In fact, this can substantially reduce their lifespan. When positioning your poinsettia, don’t place them near cold draughts or near to outside doorways – they prefer warm and light conditions.

3. Don’t over-water

While they can consume a lot of water, poinsettias should never be allowed to stand in water. They only require a small amount once every few days.

4. Give them a pick-me-up

While wilted poinsettias may have their lifespan reduced, soaking the rootball with warm water will often cause severely wilted poinsettias to revive. Revival should occur within one hour, so don’t chuck out your plants until you have tried this.

5. Choose your poinsettias wisely

White or pink poinsettias will look better for longer display periods (over three weeks). Red ones tend to fade in colour if in low light, and after more than three weeks.

The poinsettia can provide a modest alternative to the Christmas tree, but if this doesn’t take your fancy either, then there are other alternatives to choose from. Both the Christmas cactus and hippeastrum, often erroneously called Amaryllis (a bulbous plant), can be found in most supermarkets and garden centres.

Article source: http://www.irishnews.com/lifestyle/2017/12/23/news/gardening-tips-a-quick-guide-to-caring-for-poinsettias-1213841/