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Archives for December 19, 2017

Belmont Among Historic Sites Added to the Virginia Landmarks Register

12/19/2017 Release from the Department of Historic Resources:

RICHMOND – The commonwealth’s 20th-century history in the areas of suburban planning and growth, African American history and civil rights, and in public education, among other themes, are highlighted in eleven historic sites added to the Virginia Landmarks Register (VLR) by the Department of Historic Resources (DHR) last week.

Community planning and development through the early 20th century underlie the new VLR listings of the Highland Springs Historic District in Henrico County and the North Belmont Neighborhood Historic District in Charlottesville.

Highland Springs arose as an electric streetcar suburb beginning in 1890 and featured a simple grid plan with small lots of one- and one-and-a-half story residences for white working class families. A variety of modest vernacular and definable residential architectural styles, dating from the 1890s to the 1960s, can be seen in the district. The mid-20th century saw the period of greatest growth in Highland Springs, which derives its name from its elevated site and abundant springs scattered throughout the area, a few of which serve as the focal points of small community parks.

In Charlottesville, the North Belmont Neighborhood Historic District covers about 75 acres located in the southeastern part of the city. The Belmont Land Company and the Charlottesville Land Corporation developed the neighborhood beginning in 1891. The district’s period of significance stretches from around 1820, when Belmont Mansion was constructed, to 1960, when a new bridge opened in the district and significantly altered connections between the largely residential area and the business section of the district.

Post World War II growth and development supported construction of the Lee Medical Building in Richmond along the city’s celebrated Monument Avenue. Facing the Robert E. Lee Monument, the six-story Colonial Revival building is the most prominent design of prolific local architect W. Harrison Pringle and the best-known project of local builder and developer Franklin A. Trice.

Late 19th and early 20th century African American history underscore new listings in Stafford County and Alexandria.

Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church and its cemetery were founded in 1870 in Stafford County by formerly enslaved African Americans under the auspices of a benevolent organization working with the Freedmen’s Bureau. An 1870 church building was replaced by a new church constructed on the site in 1951. The later church is where the Stafford County branch of the NAACP was formed, and where in 1960 meetings convened with Civil Rights lawyers seeking to integrate Stafford County’s public schools, the first such meetings in the Fredericksburg area.

Founded around 1897 in the City of Alexandria as an unconstructed burial ground, Oakland Baptist Church Cemetery is important to the history of the “The Fort” community, a village formed by African Americans on the site of the dismantled Civil War-era Fort Ward. Today’s cemetery consists of burials marked by commemorative markers as well as many unmarked graves identified by archaeologists. Oakland Baptist Church continues to own the cemetery, the only surviving privately owned African American cemetery in Alexandria.

Segregated public school education in 1930s Great Depression-era Virginia is embodied in Fairfax County’s Original Mount Vernon High School. Built during the segregation era, the high school opened only to white students when completed in 1939, with construction funded by the Public Works Administration (PWA). Designed in a Colonial Revival Institutional style, the school desegregated in 1965.

In Amherst County, regional religious history during the early 20th century is revealed in the VLR listings of the El Bethel Methodist Church and Emmanuel Baptist Church.

Erected around 1930 on a natural rise, El Bethel Methodist Church is the second church built on the property and was constructed with materials recycled from the earlier circa-1857 church it replaced. One of two remaining public buildings of the once thriving Allwood community, the church combines Classical Revival and Late Gothic Revival stylistic elements, and is one of two existing Great Depression-era churches in the county. Regular services at the church ended 1989, and the El Bethel Community Association now uses the building for community events today. Enhancing the site’s importance is the Allwood Cemetery, historically associated with, and located behind the church. The cemetery contains more than 300 graves and is the only active public burial ground in the area.

Emmanuel Baptist Church was constructed around 1907 on the outskirts of the former milling community of Sandidges. The Late Gothic Revival-style building features a three-story bell tower and is an important example of early 20th century ecclesiastical architecture in Amherst County, where few early 20th century church buildings have survived or remain largely unaltered and historically intact.

Other sites approved for listing in the Virginia Landmarks Register last week during the quarterly meeting of DHR’s State Review Board and Virginia Board of Historic Resources include:

  • Kenwyn (presently known as Wynandra), built in 1929 in Richmond, is an exceptional early 20th century Georgian Revival-style house designed by well-known architect Carl Max Lindner Sr., and enhanced with garden designs by landscape architect Charles Freeman Gillette.
  • The Little River UDC Jefferson Davis Highway Marker is located five miles north of Ashland in Hanover County along U.S. Route 1. Composed of gray granite and just over four-feet in height and 29-inches wide, the Little River marker was dedicated in 1936 and is one of sixteen erected in Virginia along the Jefferson Davis Highway between 1927 and 1946 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC).
  • Established around 1817 for James Gilliam, Jr. (1776-1841), the 109 acre Gilliam-Irving Farm is one of the earliest existing examples of an evolved middle-class farmstead in Appomattox County. In addition to the main house, the property contains 14 standing secondary buildings and two known cemeteries, all of which contribute to the property’s historical importance.

In addition to those new VLR sites, the DHR boards approved boundary increases for three previously listed sites including two historic districts.

  • A boundary increase for the Harrisonburg Downtown Historic District expands it to include five historic buildings associated with the foundry complex known as P. Bradley Sons. Established as P. Bradley Co. in 1856 and relocated in 1867 to the current site, during its years of operation the foundry concentrated mostly on casting high-quality plows of its own pattern and executing other general foundry work. During its peak, the foundry’s reach extended throughout Virginia and into Maryland and Pennsylvania. The foundry ceased casting in 1961.
  • The Downtown Hopewell Historic District boundary increase extends the district to incorporate several buildings that underscore the rise of automobile ownership in the post-World War II era. The expanded district now includes two service stations, an auto parts store, and an automotive dealership designed in the Art Moderne style. The expansion also features a two story former jail constructed in 1928 in a style known as Stripped Classicism.
  • Previously listed in 1981, the nomination for Richmond’s St. Luke Building has been updated and its boundary designation enlarged to include a two-unit row house that was historically and functionally associated with the Order of St. Luke and its headquarters in the St. Luke Building at 900 St. James Street.

The Virginia Department of Historic Resources will forward the documentation for these eleven newly-listed VLR sites and boundary increases to the National Park Service for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.

Complete nomination forms and photographs for each of these sites can be accessed on the DHR website at http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/boardPage.html.

Listing a property in the state or national registers is honorary and sets no restrictions on what a property owner may do with his or her property. The designation is, first and foremost, an invitation to learn about and experience authentic and significant places in Virginia’s history.

Designating a property to the state or national registers—either individually or as a contributing building in a historic district—provides an owner the opportunity to pursue historic rehabilitation tax credit improvements to the building. Tax credit projects must comply with the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. The tax credit program is voluntary and not a requirement when owners work on their listed properties.

Virginia is a national leader among states in listing historic sites and districts in the National Register of Historic Places. The state is also a national leader for the number of federal tax credit rehabilitation projects proposed and completed each year.

Together the register and tax credit rehabilitation programs play significant roles in promoting Virginia’s heritage and the preservation of the Commonwealth’s historic places and in spurring economic revitalization and tourism in many towns and communities.

Expanded Summaries of Sites:
The Highland Springs Historic District, in eastern Henrico County, arose as an electric streetcar suburb that began in 1890 when Edmund S. Read, of Massachusetts, purchased land to create a community of modest, affordable houses near Richmond. Highland Springs featured a simple grid plan with very small lots of one- and one-and-a-half story residences for white working class families, which distinguished it from Richmond’s other contemporary street car suburbs intended for more upscale residents. An exception to the district’s array of modest dwellings are houses on larger lots close to Read’s residence or on lots adjacent to Nine Mile Road, residences that display sophisticated architectural styles such as Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, and Craftsman. Non-residential buildings in the district include institutional and commercial structures, churches, schools, an Art Deco theater, a Masonic Hall, and a post office, all of which continue to serve the Highland Springs community. The mid-20th century saw the period of greatest growth in the district, as reflected in the large numbers of existing dwellings from that era built in Minimal Traditional or Ranch styles. A variety of other modest vernacular and definable architectural styles, dating from the 1890s to the 1960s, can also be seen in the district. The community’s name derives from its elevated site and several abundant springs scattered throughout the area, a few of which serve as the focal point of small parks in Highland Springs.

Important for its association with late-19th century suburban development adjacent to Charlottesville, the North Belmont Neighborhood Historic District covers about 75 acres located in the southeastern part of the city. The Belmont Land Company and the Charlottesville Land Corporation developed the neighborhood beginning in 1891 and through the early 20th century. Most of the district’s houses and buildings date from the 1890s through the 1940s, representing the area of initial development, with the exception of some buildings dating to the mid-20th century. The southern part of the district is also composed mostly of mid- and late-20th century resources, with a few late-19th century buildings. The district’s period of significance stretches from around 1820, when Belmont Mansion was constructed, to 1960, when a new bridge opened in the district and significantly altered connections between the largely residential area and the business section of the district. Containing 392 contributing resources, the district retains its character-defining architecture and exhibits and overall appearance of historical integrity.

Kenwyn (presently known as Wynandra), built in 1929 in Richmond, is an exceptional early 20th century Georgian Revival-style house designed by architect Carl Max Lindner Sr., and enhanced with garden designs by landscape architect Charles Freeman Gillette. Both men, well-known designers in the Richmond area, were at the height of their careers when they designed Kenwyn for Edward Victor Williams and his wife, Kate. Prominent in Richmond’s social and civic affairs, Williams was the successful manager of the Allen Ginter branch of the Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company (later, American Tobacco Company). Kenwyn, one of the first houses built in Westhampton’s Paxton neighborhood, sat just beyond the city limits at the time of its completion in the Henrico County countryside. The area grew more attractive as a place for country homes after the creation of T.C. William’s Windsor Farms, where Gillette completed several design projects, including for T.C. William’s Agecroft Hall and the adjacent Virginia House. Lindner, who also designed apartment houses and churches, was a sought-after designer for residences in Richmond’s fashionable neighborhoods, typically executing his designs in a variety of revival styles. One of Lindner’s finest architectural compositions, Kenwyn is an impressively large and detailed example of the Georgian Revival style surrounded by Gillette’s landscaping.

The Lee Medical Building, which faces the Robert E. Lee Monument on Richmond’s celebrated Monument Avenue, is the most prominent design of prolific local architect W. Harrison Pringle and the best-known project of local builder and developer Franklin A. Trice. Lee Medical Building was completed in 1952 after a sustained battle between the building’s owner and developer who fought for its construction and neighboring homeowners who bitterly contested its development. The six-story Colonial Revival building was speculatively developed with the hope of providing offices, laboratories, and outpatient medical facilities for doctors and dentists in the well-established Monument Avenue residential neighborhood. An understated earlier example of the same building type in Richmond is the 1920s Medical Arts Building at N. 2nd and Franklin streets in downtown Richmond. What distinguishes the Lee Medical Building is its commanding orientation toward the Lee monument and multiple design elements that complement the Lee circle and Monument Avenue.

The Little River UDC Jefferson Davis Highway Marker is located five miles north of Ashland in Hanover County along U.S. Route 1. Composed of gray granite and just over four-feet in height and 29 inches wide, the Little River marker was dedicated in 1936 and is one of sixteen erected in Virginia along the Jefferson Davis Highway between 1927 and 1946 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) to commemorate Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederate States of America. A nationwide memorial project of the UDC, the Jefferson Davis Highway began in 1913 and continued until 1947 when the highway’s terminal marker was placed in Arlington. Stretching to San Diego, California, the Davis highway was a southern counterpoint to the nation-spanning Lincoln Highway. The Little River marker is situated near to where the left wing of Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s army rested on May 23-26, 1864 while Lee’s forces faced Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant on the north side of North Anna River.

Bethlehem Primitive Baptist Church and its cemetery were founded in 1870 in Stafford County by formerly enslaved African Americans under the auspices of a benevolent organization working with the Freedmen’s Bureau. The church and cemetery are significant to the history and growth of the black community in the White Oak area after the Civil War and through the eras of Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and Civil Rights. The cemetery marked a turning point for African Americans who could now bury community members in a sanctioned burial ground during funerals officiated by a black pastor, instead of a white one, as law required prior to the Civil War. The site of the 1870 church building, subsequently demolished after construction of a new church in 1951, has the potential to yield archaeology important to understanding the area’s black community during Reconstruction and beyond. The 1951 church is also important for its association with the Civil Rights movement. The Stafford County branch of the NAACP was formed there, and in 1960 meetings convened there with Civil Rights lawyers seeking to integrate Stafford County’s public schools, the first such meetings in the Fredericksburg area. Unsuccessful integration attempts led by student members of the Bethlehem congregation resulted in a U.S. court ruling that desegregated schools in the Fredericksburg area.

Founded around 1897 as an unconstructed burial ground in the City of Alexandria, Oakland Baptist Church Cemetery is important to the history of the “The Fort” community, a village formed by African Americans on the site of the dismantled Civil War-era Fort Ward. Today’s cemetery consists of burials marked by commemorative markers—about 50 in all—as well as many unmarked graves that have been identified by archaeologists. The cemetery represents a history, not unlike African American history across the nation, where African Americans organized daily activities, economic resources, and methods for preserving life and burying their family members with constraints, limited resources, and segregated conditions. Oakland Baptist Church continues to own the cemetery, which is the only surviving privately owned African American cemetery in Alexandria.

Completed in 1939, Fairfax County’s Original Mount Vernon High School was constructed under the federally funded Public Works Administration (PWA). To accommodate the need to update public school facilities, as well as spur the economy, the PWA was initiated by President Franklin Roosevelt to fulfill the goals of the “New Deal” program. Built during the era of Jim Crow segregation, the school was open only to white students. The school building is a good example of the then-popular Colonial Revival Institutional design, one of the design options listed under the PWA program. Early additions to the building such as a gymnasium/cafeteria, which echo the Colonial Revival design, were planned and funded under PWA funding. The school’s ever-growing student body reflected the growth of the metropolitan area after World War II, and by 1960 it accommodated approximately 1,300 students. Former Governor Charles “Chuck” Robb is one of the notable graduates from Mount Vernon High School. The school desegregated in 1965.

Erected around 1930 on a natural rise, El Bethel Methodist Church in Amherst County is the second church built on the property and was constructed with materials recycled from the earlier circa-1857 church it replaced. One of two remaining public buildings of the once thriving Allwood community, the church is also one of two existing Great Depression-era churches in the county. Combining Classical Revival and Late Gothic Revival stylistic elements, the building’s only alteration since 1930 was a redesign of the pulpit during the 1960s. Significant features today include the property’s site design, the building’s temple form with portico, and, on the interior, its barrel-vaulted ceiling and collection of stained-glass windows. The church was used for regular church services until 1989, when its congregation merged with the Mount Pleasant Church and abandoned El Bethel. In 1999, the Pedlar Ruritan Club adopted the building as a community improvement project, and repaired and restored it. The same year, the Methodist Church deeded the property to the El Bethel Community Association, which uses the building for community and special events. Enhancing the sites historical significance is the Allwood Cemetery, historically associated with, and located behind the church. Containing more than 300 graves, many those of former church members, it is the only active public burial ground in the area. In continuous use since 1899, the cemetery contributes to the El Bethel Methodist Church property’s overall historical significance.

Established around 1817 for James Gilliam, Jr. (1776-1841), the 109 acre Gilliam-Irving Farm is one of the earliest existing examples of an evolved middle-class farmstead in Appomattox County. The frame house features restrained but elegant interior finishes and a massive chimney of dressed sandstone. In addition to the main house, the property contains fourteen standing secondary buildings and two known cemeteries, all of which contribute to the property’s historical importance. The Gilliam-Irving Farm has a period of significance ranging from about 1817 to 1940, extending from initial construction and ending with the period in which the last major alterations were made to the house. The property is locally important for its distinctive architecture and original fabric, including fine stonework, unusual stair balusters, and a mid-19th century air-dried tobacco curing house with unusual construction features.

Emmanuel Baptist Church was constructed around 1907 in central Amherst County on the outskirts of the former milling community of Sandidges. The Late Gothic Revival-style building features a three-story bell tower and is an important example of early 20th century ecclesiastical architecture in Amherst County, where few early 20th century church buildings have survived or remain largely unaltered and historically intact. Of the four documented existing churches in the county built between 1901 and 1940, Emmanuel is the only church featuring canted walls and multiple-part, lancet-arched stained glass windows, and is one of just two designed with auditorium seating. The present church building is the product of three building phases: The original building including a rear ell was constructed around 1907; a one-story rear addition was erected in 1969; and a breezeway and two-story rear addition that were completed in 1996. These later additions to the rear of the church do not greatly affect the original building’s integrity of design or feeling.

Boundary Increases:
Previously listed in 1981, the state and national register nomination for Richmond’s St. Luke Building has been updated and the boundary designation for the property enlarged to include 902-904 St. James Street, a two-unit row house that was historically and functionally associated with the Order of St. Luke and its headquarters in the St. Luke Building at 900 St. James Street. The St. Luke Building once served as the national headquarters of the Independent Order of St. Luke, a mutual aid society founded in 1869. The Order’s mission to foster African-American economic independence was largely realized through enterprises housed in the St. Luke Building, including the St. Luke Penny Savings Bank, printing facilities for the St. Luke Herald, and offices for the Order.

A boundary increase for the previously-listed Downtown Hopewell Historic District extends the district to incorporate several buildings associated with transportation, commerce, and local government. Underscoring the use and ownership of cars in the post-World War II era, the expanded district now includes two service stations, an auto parts store, and an automotive dealership designed in the Art Moderne style. The expansion also features a two story former jail constructed in 1928 in a style known as Stripped Classicism.

A boundary increase to the previously-listed Harrisonburg Downtown Historic District expands it to include five historic buildings associated with the foundry complex known as P. Bradley Sons, and among the oldest surviving examples of this type of industry in Harrisonburg. Established as P. Bradley Co. in 1856 and relocated in 1867 to the current site, the property is illustrative of the changing industrial process that occurred there from the late-19th century through the early 1960s, and collectively the buildings retain much of their historic fabric. During its years of operation, the foundry concentrated mostly on casting high-quality plows of its own pattern and executing other general foundry work, with its reach extending throughout Virginia and into Maryland and Pennsylvania. The foundry ceased casting in 1961 and by 1994 the remaining operational Bradley foundry buildings were sold.

Article source: http://www.nbc29.com/story/37099596/belmont-among-historic-sites-added-to-the-virginia-landmarks-register

This year’s Garden Club of Indian River County ornament is tribute to local dig site

Editorial: New factory helps Beach to diversify local economy – Virginian

GOV. TERRY McAuliffe and Virginia Beach Mayor Will Sessoms were all smiles in announcing that Global Technical Systems, an engineering firm providing an array of items for national defense and homeland security, plans to build a new factory on land adjacent to Birdsneck Road.

It’s easy to see why.

The advanced manufacturing facility will employ about 1,100 people, touting an average salary of about $74,000. The company intends to locate its 540,000-square-foot plant on part of the former Owl’s Creek Golf Center, which is no longer operating.

According to Pilot reporting, GTS expects to invest $54.7 million to build the new structure and pay about $282,000 annually in real estate taxes to the city. The land will be transferred to the Virginia Beach Development Authority and sold to the company for $1.2 million.

Warren Harris, director of economic development for Virginia Beach, says that the deal checks off a number of other boxes critical to the continued growth of the city and the region.

GTS is a local company which began in Virginia Beach, so its decision to build an advanced manufacturing center here means keeping a successful corporate citizen at home. The city won out over communities in Oklahoma and Mississippi which were also vying for this plant.

This will represent a pivot of sorts for the company. While it is now devoted to serving public needs, such as the Pentagon and government agencies, GTS will use this facility to manufacture batteries that can store and produce energy, according to Terry Spitzer, who owns the company with his wife Yusun.

In reporting on the announcement, Pilot reporter Stacy Parker wrote that GTS scientists have developed a flywheel rotor system that is capable of storing large amounts of kinetic energy for 50 to 100 years. It’s an exciting development for green energy technology.

Emerging fields such as this are precisely where Virginia Beach should be focused as it looks to diversity the local and regional economy, especially considering the existential threat this area faces from climate change and sea-level rise.

Cultivating companies that are testing new ideas in renewable fuels and energy storage makes sense, as it means the region is working to find climate solutions in technology.

The location of the new plant, on a former golf course, could also be an omen of things to come. Fewer Americans are playing golf nowadays, meaning courses are going out of business and leaving communities to deal with the abandoned properties.

In this case, nearby residents expressed disappointment that the city didn’t adequately inform them about the possibility that Owl’s Creek could become a manufacturing site. City officials accepted that blame, and said they will use it as a learning opportunity.

However, GTS says its plant will be quiet and clean, preserving open space and using landscaping to protect residents from any noise as three shifts of workers come and go. That was enough for the Seatack Community Civic League to lend the project its support in November.

They also were swayed by the promise of jobs — good positions that pay decent wages. GTS officials have plans to develop a workforce development initiative to prepare employees for careers in advanced manufacturing.

That job also will fall to local schools and Tidewater Community College, which already does well to develop skilled workers for this market. In truth, our education system needs to make strides quickly to prepare students for these 21st century jobs and to compete in an increasingly global workforce.

Critics will argue that the price tag is too high. GTS could collect about $10 million in state and local incentives and grants if it follows through on its promises, which in some minds amounts to corporate welfare.

But this is precisely the type of company Virginia Beach needs — a homegrown business looking to bring high-paying jobs to the local economy — and it should have all of the region smiling along with the governor and mayor.

Article source: http://pilotonline.com/opinion/editorial/editorial-new-factory-helps-beach-to-diversify-local-economy/article_58a0ca8c-c9e9-5589-a1ea-9fd60930fed4.html

Fireside Chat Time

Just because it’s cold outside doesn’t mean we need to spend all of our time indoors. Creating an outdoor living space can add a whole new dimension to the winter months. Whether it’s accessorizing patio furniture with wintry hues, or creating an entire outdoor living area, we have some ideas for you.

Loraine and Marc Smith built an outdoor living space ten years ago that started with necessary landscaping to address drainage and became a much bigger idea. Guidance from professionals Greg Masters, brick and stone mason, and Graham Kimak, landscape designer, was instrumental in the process.

“Their vision helped create ours,” Loraine said.

With an outdoor kitchen, bar, sofa and dining furniture, they have options for every gathering from an intimate oyster roast to a dinner for the entire Lacrosse team. “We used to hang a sheet for movie night when the boys were little.” They have since added an outdoor television and enjoy watching weekend football.

Have A Seat

Comfort is key so finding furniture that is comfortable is a good place to start. Donnie Owens at Firehouse Casual Living Store suggests sitting in the chairs. “Find the looks you like and then sit in them, some will feel better to you than others,” he said. After you have visited the store Firehouse offers complimentary design service. You choose the styles of furniture that you prefer and a designer will come to your house for measurements and suggestions on specific pieces, layout, and fabrics to coordinate with your home’s existing style.

Firehouse offers furniture in every style from modern to traditional. With a focus on high quality materials such as woods:Teak and Ipe (pronounced ee-pay), cast aluminum, and synthetic wicker, warranties are as solid as the furniture.

Outdoor fireplace

Adding heat to an outdoor area is the most crucial step in making in a year round spot. Options range from adding an outdoor fireplace, fire pits or heat lamps.

When choosing or building an outdoor fireplace the biggest decision is whether to use wood or gas to burn. While wood is cozy, the smoke and cleanup required often make gas an easy choice.

Fire Pit

It is hard to beat the flexibility and placement of a fire pit. With varying sizes and aesthetics, a fire pit can become the centerpiece of outdoor living. When choosing, gas is most often recommended to seating areas. Smoke from burning wood can give fabrics a heavy smell. Owens recommends adding a small, inexpensive wood-burning pit for and roasting hotdogs and marshmallows. Bio Ethanol, while a more expensive fuel is cleanest burning, thus a favorite with environmentally concerned customers. With gas models, Fyre glass is available in every color imaginable and adds a polished beauty to the fire.

Heat Lamps

Standing lamps are a mobile and less expensive way to add heat to your patio or deck. With models range from smaller residential glass and aluminum to commercial grade, many customers opt for the commercial grade stainless steel models for their home. The commercial stainless steel models heat about ten to twelve feet.

Dining Al Fresco

One impressive option for staying warm and creating knock out ambiance is a dining set with a fire pit in the center. Choices range from a more casual “chat group” four chairs with a fire pit with have added space to set plates and glasses on the outside, or a full dining tables with a beautiful fire pit in the center and seating for ten.

Meet Me In The Kitchen.

Grill options range from high end built in to stand alone and some choose to add a small refrigerator or high end cooler to make entertaining seamless. Serving food outdoors on plain acrylic is a thing of the past. Unique, heirloom design dishes and serving pieces can make an outdoor Christmas dinner feel just as elegant as in the dining room. The Italian line, Guzzini, featured at Firehouse, has pieces in every style traditional to minimal, but each piece looks like a work of art. You may find yourself using your outdoor ware indoors.

Turn Cold to Cozy

Pillows, cushions and a perfect blanket can also create comfort the cooler temperatures. Sunbrella offers an unbeatable selection of fabrics and warranty. Whether you want to create cushions or just add some wintry accent pillows, Sunbrella cannot be beat for outdoor use. Elaine Smith, featured at Firehouse, offers beautiful statement throw pillows for any decor. With unique patterns, you can create a seasonal masterpiece by adding a few accent pillows. Now grab your favorite blanket and head outdoors.

One thing is sure, Loraine and Marc Smith will be spending time this winter in their outdoor living room. “It is the best thing we ever did to this house. It increased the value of our home, but more importantly, it is our go to spot,” Loraine said.

Article source: http://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/life/style/talk-greenville/2017/12/15/fireside-chat-time/108627182/

SiteOne Landscape Supply Signs Definitive Agreement to Acquire Pete Rose, Inc.

SiteOne® Landscape Supply, Inc. (NYSE:SITE), the largest and only
national wholesale distributor of landscape supplies in the United
States, announced today it has entered into a definitive agreement to
acquire Pete Rose, Inc. Started in 1975, Pete Rose has one location in
the Richmond, VA market, and is a leader in the distribution of natural
stone and hardscape material. The deal is scheduled to close in January
2018, subject to the satisfaction of customary closing conditions.

“Pete Rose is a terrific fit with SiteOne as they expand our natural
stone and hardscape presence in the Richmond, VA market. The addition of
Pete Rose complements our existing branches that offer the full range of
nursery, hardscape, agronomic, irrigation and outdoor lighting products.
We have now completed nine acquisitions in 2017, and we continue to
expand the number of markets where we provide a full range of
landscaping products and services,� said Doug Black, Chairman and CEO of
SiteOne Landscape Supply.

“Pete Rose has a rich history and talented team that shares SiteOne’s
passion and desire to provide excellent quality, service and value to
their customers. We welcome them all to the SiteOne family,� said Black.
“We are committed to delivering the best experience to our customers,
and the combination of Pete Rose and SiteOne is yet another step forward
in our mission to become the best full-line distributor in the Green
Industry.�

About SiteOne Landscape Supply:

SiteOne Landscape Supply (NYSE: SITE), is the largest and only national
wholesale distributor of landscape supplies in the United States and has
a growing presence in Canada. Its customers are primarily residential
and commercial landscape professionals who specialize in the design,
installation and maintenance of lawns, gardens, golf courses and other
outdoor spaces. https://www.siteone.com/

Article source: http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/siteone-landscape-supply-signs-definitive-agreement-to-acquire-pete-rose-inc-1011625554

Heritage Sandy Springs honors volunteers

Heritage Sandy Springs members, volunteers and staff gathered Dec. 6 for the annual meeting and volunteer recognition, where the 2017 award recipients were announced. These volunteers were honored for their dedication to the community and their outstanding volunteer contributions to Heritage.

“We are so very proud of all that our Heritage Sandy Springs volunteers have done over the past three decades – as board members, committee chairs, community volunteers and friends of Heritage Sandy Springs – to get us where we are today,” Executive Director Carol Thompson said in a news release. “Volunteers have put in countless hours over many years to help create a gathering place for our community where we can come together to celebrate our culture, to learn about our history, to connect with nature, to enjoy music with family and friends, or just to sit on a bench and eat a sandwich. You have done amazing work for this community, and we salute you!”

The 2017 volunteer awards and recipients were:

o Youth Volunteer of the Year Award: Ainslee Coombs. The recipient of this honor is recognized for outstanding contributions to the community through volunteer work with events or programs such as the Sandy Springs Festival, Heritage’s concerts, museum programming, membership events, etc.

Group Volunteer Award: North Springs Charter High School’s Thespian Honor Troupe No. 4389. This accolade recognizes excellence in dedication to volunteering by a group of individuals volunteering on behalf of a community group, organization or business.

o James Kambourian Landscape Award: Jim Brannon. It honors an individual or organization for outstanding contributions to the Heritage Green gardens, park landscaping and nature-based programs.

o Historic Achievement Award: Leslie Walden. This honor recognizes outstanding volunteer work that uses Heritage’s historic collections to help the community better understand and appreciate local heritage through: cataloging collections, archives, and library resources; collections conservation; exhibition development and support and / or original research.

o Community Partner Award: The Reporter Newspapers. Established in 2005, this award honors business sponsors for their exemplary support of the organization through sponsorship, provision of volunteers, equipment and/or expertise for programs or physical improvements to the site.

o Sandy Springs Festival Volunteer Award: Drew Mancini and Brent Schwieger. This accolade honors extraordinary service to the community through volunteer commitment to the festival.

o Volunteer of the Year Award: Erica Bibbey. The recipient is selected based on extraordinary services during the current year.

o President’s Award: Bob and Susan Beard. This honor is given at the discretion of the president of the board of trustees for outstanding contributions to Heritage.

o Garnett Cobb Outstanding Volunteer Award: Danny Martin. A recipient is selected from among all volunteers who have exhibited extraordinary service over the years, not limited to the current year of service.

Heritage relies heavily on volunteer support in order to present recreational, historical, and educational programs. The entire staff and board of trustees are greatly appreciative of the community’s support in 2017 and beyond.

For more information about getting involved, visit www.heritagesandysprings.org.

Article source: http://www.mdjonline.com/neighbor_newspapers/northside_sandy_springs/community/heritage-sandy-springs-honors-volunteers/article_29f0f8fa-e410-11e7-80ef-bf5123493a99.html

Clemson students partner with GHS to revamp healing garden

CLEMSON — Seven Clemson University students put their heads — and talents — together this semester to brighten the hospital experience for Greenville Health System patients, particularly those in the children’s hospital.

Students with designs

An interdisciplinary group of Clemson University agricultural education, architecture and horticulture majors recently completed a redesign of the Greenville Health System Healing Garden. Pictured from left: Duncan Cashmer, Blakely Johnson, Matt West and Richard Johnson.
Image Credit: Clemson University Relations

As part of their Sustainable Landscape Garden Design laboratory class, an interdisciplinary group of agricultural education, architecture and horticulture majors completed a redesign of the GHS Healing Garden on Grove Road in Greenville.

The project isn’t just a classroom exercise. Thanks to funding from Clemson Miracle, the university’s largest student-run nonprofit organization which benefits GHS Children’s Hospital, it will become a reality known as the Clemson Miracle Healing Garden.

The redesign stemmed from two GHS staffers coming to the conclusion the hospital’s healing garden was not welcoming enough for children — some of whom rely on the space as their only outdoor environment.

“It’s a nice little private place to go, but it needed some more things to attract children,” said Sarah Pierce, a child life specialist at GHS for more than 25 years. “But since the children’s hospital is within the adult hospital, we wanted to make sure that it would be pleasing to staff and adult patients that wanted to go out there, as well.”

A family connection led Pierce and pediatric nurse practitioner Carmen Quintero to Clemson horticulture professor Ellen Vincent, who worked with South Carolina Botanical Garden landscape architect Shannon Barrett to design the project. Barrett teaches the studio component of the horticulture 309 class, while Vincent supports the lab with lecture materials.

“Healing gardens and gardens in health care are a very big topic in design right now because we understand that a lot of healing has to happen outside the four medical walls of the hospital building,” Barrett said. “So trying to use landscape to enhance that is really important. And given the size of the garden — about 3,500 square feet — it was a really great beginning space for students to look at and be able to manage.”

Castles with design

Ray Castles, a junior in horticulture from Columbia, said he enjoyed the chance to “actually come up with a new idea and draw up plans and then present them.”

Hospital stakeholders challenged students to make the space more inviting and user-friendly and requested such elements as a defined entrance; spaces for animal statuary, water features and other kid-friendly artwork; pathways to accommodate wheelchairs and rolling IV poles; swings or gliders; structures, such as small bridges, arbors and archways; and interesting areas, such as butterfly gardens.

Vincent, who specializes in landscapes and health, said after weeks of preliminary planning, the students were divided into three groups to develop comprehensive site plans for the healing garden.

“The teams were formed to be interdisciplinary so that each team is learning from another because this is a sustainable design class, so that ability to listen to other points of view is very important in this type of a class,” Vincent said.

The students made their first visit to the garden in August, and each team developed a plan that recommended appropriate plant selections, updated site furnishings and hardscape adjustments to improve circulation and seating areas.

“They also went back and took soil tests, and that’s where we saw that the soil had a high pH,” Vincent said. “The existing azaleas weren’t healthy, and that explained that to us. All of that informed their design and they selected plants that could survive in the garden.”

One of the students, Stephen Parris, a senior horticulture major from Landrum, said he has long held an interest in using landscape design to create healing spaces for health care systems.

Parris with design

Stephen Parris, a senior horticulture major from Landrum, said the redesign project “was an enlightening experience to work in a team consisting of individuals with different knowledge sets and learning how to complement each other to accomplish our goals.”

“Having the opportunity to design a healing garden for a local hospital was a great opportunity,” Parris said. “It was an enlightening experience to work in a team consisting of individuals with different knowledge sets and learning how to complement each other to accomplish our goals.”

Duncan Cashmer, a senior in horticulture from Portland, Oregon, also pointed to the variety of skill sets team members from different majors brought to the project.

“I learned about specific plants that grow well in this climate when there is a very alkaline soil,” he said. “A lot of people plant plants here that only like acidic soil, and this garden presented a challenge because of that.”

While the horticulture majors brought their knowledge of plants to the project, the third member of their team, Blakely Johnson, a junior in agricultural education from Denmark, South Carolina, said the focus on children made it dear to her heart.

“This project really meant a lot to me,” she said, “and I really took it and ran with it because it’s not just something that I enjoyed, but it’s something that’s going to make a difference at the children’s hospital. This garden will give them a place to go, it will be fun for them and it will help their healing process.”

For Matt West, a senior horticulture major from Greenville, the project was an opportunity to gain experience with sustainability.

“I’m considering going into some sort of design, so I saw it as a really good opportunity for practice,” he said, “and to see something that is more real world and applied makes it even better in terms of using it for a portfolio or something like that.”

Seiderman with design

Ashley Seiderman, a junior in architecture from Charleston, said she is excited “to see what the healing garden actually looks like when the renovation is complete.”

West was teamed with Richard Johnson, a senior in architecture from Clemson, who said he took the class because he plans to minor in sustainability.

“I also thought it would look really nice in a portfolio and give me another opportunity to get some designs out there and challenge myself,” he said. “Being in the class and collaborating with an interdisciplinary group, we were able to get a bunch of diverse viewpoints and apply those different viewpoints to make a more efficient design overall.”

Ray Castles, a junior in horticulture from Columbia, has experience in the landscaping field, having worked and been around his brother’s Charleston-based company and his uncle’s Columbia-based company.

“I have always been around it, and working in the field since middle school, but this time it was different,” he said. “We had to actually come up with a new idea and draw up plans and then present them. I really thought this was a very creative project and I enjoyed putting it together.”

Castles worked with Ashley Seiderman, a junior in architecture from Charleston, who said the project was her first time working on landscapes and called it “an amazing experience.”

“Everyone in the class had great design ideas and the final proposals we gave to the hospital were all beautiful,” she said. “I can’t wait to see what the healing garden actually looks like when the renovation is complete. The thought that something I helped create is going to be used to brighten a patient’s day is extremely rewarding.”

For funding, Pierce and Quintero turned to Clemson Miracle, which raises money for the GHS Children’s Hospital through an annual dance marathon. Each year, its executive board selects projects to fund.

West with design

Matt West, a senior in horticulture from Greenville, noted the “applied” nature of the class project, which made it “even better in terms of using it for a portfolio.”

“They brought it to their board and it was accepted for us to receive partial money,” Pierce said. “In return, they are going to give enough money for us to name it the Clemson Miracle Healing Garden.”

Clemson Miracle internal events director Ashley McMullen, a junior parks, recreation and tourism management major, said the board was excited to support the upgrades to the healing garden.

“We saw the importance that incorporating the outdoors and having a place that families and kids can go while they’re in the hospital for an extended time, where they can get outside, we thought that was something that was really important,” McMullen said. “We talk about filling the ‘dream gap.’ People pay for their treatments and things like that, but what Dance Marathon is really here to do is make sure that these kids can be normal kids in the hospital and have those experiences.”

Clemson will present the students’ concept designs to GHS, which will bring in a landscape design consultant to vet the designs and guide the transition from the students’ three concepts into a singular design that will actually be installed.

“It was an awesome collaboration and it just worked out beautifully between us and Clemson,” said Quintero, a 23-year veteran at GHS. “It just feels like it was meant to be.”

END

Article source: http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/clemson-students-partner-with-ghs-to-revamp-healing-garden/

Garden News: Get It Growing calendar makes sure you get timing right

I have yet to meet a gardener who wants a messy, ugly garden. Most gardeners would like to have a beautiful landscape.

Readers of this column and other gardening guides know many of the different tools, techniques and methods used to obtain a lush landscape. While “how to garden” is extremely important, it’s really all about timing.

Plant or prune something at the wrong time and let’s just say, your results can be less than optimum.

Planting times and maintenance schedules are crucial to the development and management of insects and other pests. For example, I received an email this week from someone wanting to know why his bell pepper leaves are beginning to curl. After examining the pictures, I determined the plant had cold damage as well as mites. The plant could be sprayed with a miticide, but a better approach would be to understand the ideal time for bell peppers, and December is outside of that range. It would prove more beneficial to pull out the peppers and replace them with winter vegetables at this time.

There are many planting and pruning dates that gardeners need to be aware of. Because of this, the LSU AgCenter has developed the Get It Growing Calendar. Elma Sue McCallum of LSU AgCenter Communications, who serves as the calendar’s coordinator, tells me many Louisiana gardeners eagerly anticipate the calendar’s new edition each year. It’s been published since 2005.

The just-published 2018 Get It Growing Lawn and Garden Calendar provides both knowledge and inspiration for gardening with tips for experienced and novice gardeners along with stunning photos of plants, flowers and gardens from photographers across the state.

In addition to monthly gardening tips, the calendar features a how-to section on building raised beds for vegetable gardening with advice from LSU AgCenter horticulturist Dan Gill, a widely respected regional gardening expert.

The calendar also includes helpful information for projects, like when to plant tulips and tomatoes, and when to look for Louisiana Super Plants, such as the Little Gem Southern magnolia and the Limelight hydrangeas.

The full-color, 32-page, 9-inch-by-13.25-inch calendar also includes an illustrated step-by-step guide to solarizing garden beds to reduce fungi, nematodes and weed problems. And, the calendar provides a list of AgCenter lawn and garden publications along with information on the LSU AgCenter Master Gardener program and the AgCenter Plant Disease Diagnostic Clinic and Soil Testing and Plant Analysis labs.

The Get It Growing calendar costs $11.95 and is available online lsuagcenter.com/getitgrowingcalendar or by calling (225) 578-2263. It also can be found at bookstores, garden centers and gift shops across Louisiana.

Got a question?

Email gardennews@agcenter.lsu.edu.

Article source: http://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/entertainment_life/home_garden/article_c760c0de-de93-11e7-81cb-1391e6469b28.html

This week’s gardening tips: plant hardy trees in December and …

Plant hardy trees now: December and January are ideal months for planting hardy fruit trees, bushes and vines, such as apples, pears, plums, peaches, grapes, blueberries, persimmons and others. 

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2017/12/this_weeks_gardening_tips_plan_9.html