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Archives for December 8, 2017

New ICA Miami opens a welcoming public space in the Design District

(Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Interior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

(Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Since its founding, Miami’s Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) has had a series of temporary homes, starting with a 1996 Charles Gwathmey-designed exhibition space and then a repurposed Art Deco office building in the city’s design district. But this week, the ICA, led by a new team helmed by Director Ellen Salpeter and Chief Curator Alex Gartenfeld, with help from some of Miami’s most important philanthropists and art collectors, finally has a permanent home.

The museum, which is free to the public, sits on a site in the city’s Design District donated by Miami developer Craig Robins.The commercial district is chock-a-block with private art museums, including the Rubell, Margulies, and De la Cruz collections, and the ICA is not far from Herzog and de Meuron’s 2013 Perez Art Museum. The new 37,000-square-foot ICA is designed by the Madrid-based firm, Aranguren + Gallegos Arquitectos, who are barely known in this country, but have a significant body of public and institutional work in Spain and curated the Spanish pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2002 .

This week, AN interviewed the Spanish architects about their practice and the new Miami museum. A significant number of their projects have thus far been renovations of ancient existing stone buildings in Spain. Their design insertions for the Museum of Fine Arts and Gardens in Caceres and the Colmenar Viejo exhibition space display an ability to create powerful and idiosyncratic details of metal, wood and stone that mark their work as highly personal–almost expressionistic–in approach, juxtaposing the old and the new with a sensitive conviction. They brought their ability to create handsome details to the ICA’s two facades, but this is not what makes this project stand out in an a shopping district of bravura luxury brand commercial facades.

(Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Rather, it is the ICA’s openness to the street and the community that makes it such an exemplary building. The architects had hoped to design the lobby of the building to be entirely open, without front and back glazing, so that the public could walk through and under the building and into the back garden all in the open air. The sides of this lobby would be glazed and provide the sealed entries into the exhibition spaces. But perhaps because they imagined Miami’s reputation for pleasant weather from their Madrid desks, they know little about the hurricane needs of any construction here and the humidity of south Florida. Instead, the entry lobby is glazed, front and back, but still flows, as the architects imagined, from the public sidewalk through the building to the back garden that was designed in collaboration with New York architect Jonathan Caplan.

The adjacent ground floor gallery also flows naturally through enormous glass walls, between inside and out, making the back garden space a continuation of the interior and a great new space in Miami, a city not known for popular public spaces, with the exception of the beach. Finally, Fernando Wong Outdoor Living Design, the landscape architects of the 15,000-square-foot Petra and Stephen Levin Sculpture Garden, worked with the architects to create a discreet series of outdoor rooms, each with its own (temporary) sculpture and defined by discrete native plantings. The landscape architects intended for the space, when seen from the museum’s second and third floors, to serve as a living canopy visually linking the museum to the unlimited sea of Miami trees.

The ICA is a triumph, inside and out, for the museum, its trustees, the designers, and, most importantly, the public.

Article source: https://archpaper.com/2017/12/new-ica-miami-aranguren-gallegos/

New ICA Miami opens a welcoming public space in the Design District

(Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

Interior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art Miami)

(Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Since its founding, Miami’s Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) has had a series of temporary homes, starting with a 1996 Charles Gwathmey-designed exhibition space and then a repurposed Art Deco office building in the city’s design district. But this week, the ICA, led by a new team helmed by Director Ellen Salpeter and Chief Curator Alex Gartenfeld, with help from some of Miami’s most important philanthropists and art collectors, finally has a permanent home.

The museum, which is free to the public, sits on a site in the city’s Design District donated by Miami developer Craig Robins.The commercial district is chock-a-block with private art museums, including the Rubell, Margulies, and De la Cruz collections, and the ICA is not far from Herzog and de Meuron’s 2013 Perez Art Museum. The new 37,000-square-foot ICA is designed by the Madrid-based firm, Aranguren + Gallegos Arquitectos, who are barely known in this country, but have a significant body of public and institutional work in Spain and curated the Spanish pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale in 2002 .

This week, AN interviewed the Spanish architects about their practice and the new Miami museum. A significant number of their projects have thus far been renovations of ancient existing stone buildings in Spain. Their design insertions for the Museum of Fine Arts and Gardens in Caceres and the Colmenar Viejo exhibition space display an ability to create powerful and idiosyncratic details of metal, wood and stone that mark their work as highly personal–almost expressionistic–in approach, juxtaposing the old and the new with a sensitive conviction. They brought their ability to create handsome details to the ICA’s two facades, but this is not what makes this project stand out in an a shopping district of bravura luxury brand commercial facades.

(Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Exterior of the ICA Miami (Iwan Baan/Courtesy Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami)

Rather, it is the ICA’s openness to the street and the community that makes it such an exemplary building. The architects had hoped to design the lobby of the building to be entirely open, without front and back glazing, so that the public could walk through and under the building and into the back garden all in the open air. The sides of this lobby would be glazed and provide the sealed entries into the exhibition spaces. But perhaps because they imagined Miami’s reputation for pleasant weather from their Madrid desks, they know little about the hurricane needs of any construction here and the humidity of south Florida. Instead, the entry lobby is glazed, front and back, but still flows, as the architects imagined, from the public sidewalk through the building to the back garden that was designed in collaboration with New York architect Jonathan Caplan.

The adjacent ground floor gallery also flows naturally through enormous glass walls, between inside and out, making the back garden space a continuation of the interior and a great new space in Miami, a city not known for popular public spaces, with the exception of the beach. Finally, Fernando Wong Outdoor Living Design, the landscape architects of the 15,000-square-foot Petra and Stephen Levin Sculpture Garden, worked with the architects to create a discreet series of outdoor rooms, each with its own (temporary) sculpture and defined by discrete native plantings. The landscape architects intended for the space, when seen from the museum’s second and third floors, to serve as a living canopy visually linking the museum to the unlimited sea of Miami trees.

The ICA is a triumph, inside and out, for the museum, its trustees, the designers, and, most importantly, the public.

Article source: https://archpaper.com/2017/12/new-ica-miami-aranguren-gallegos/

At Design Miami, Objects Offer Unlikely Havens from an Imperfect …

At Cristina Grajales Gallery, which has been at Design Miami since year one, twin brothers Doug and Mike Starn have given their Big Bambu project a new shape. It’s a suite of what I’ll call ‘locations for sitting’, since the pieces’ shapes defy the typical categories of chair, couch, or chaise. Constructed from bamboo and knotted rock climbing cord, the pieces are airy, yet their size gives them imposing power. One piece, a sort of wing chair on steroids, is seven and a half feet tall; sitting on it feels like being ensconced on a throne, and for a moment I felt powerful too. The collection, which sells for between $40,000 and $90,000, brings the same sort of controlled chaos to the domestic sphere as the brothers did to their installation on the roof of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2010.

Across the tent, R Company’s presentation favored chaos over control, with a riot of colors, shapes, and textures that bring to mind the psychedelic fancies of Dr. Seuss. I cautiously entered the booth via a peculiar portal: an arched wooden door designed by The Haas Brothers. On the outside, mustachioed walruses in bas-relief; on the inside, octopuses. Although the immediate effect is extremely silly (the animals wear befuddled expressions and have pendulous breasts or conspicuous penises), the virtuosity of the woodcarving and the sheer weight of the door makes crossing its threshold feel strangely profound.

Article source: https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-design-miami-objects-offer-havens-imperfect

The Gardens in Tulare, your local holiday oasis – Visalia Times

When people hear the word garden they might imagine an area where flowers, vegetables, herbs and plants grow.

The Gardens in Tulare is so much more than that.

It’s a gift shop, an outdoor wedding venue, a nursery, a classroom, landscape design services and a serene oasis.

It is filled with hundreds of fresh plants, a waterfall, a grassy lawn and lights strung over mature trees that create an ambiance unlike anything else in Tulare.

You would never know this magical place was hidden between industrial shops and residential areas unless you walked through its charming white barn doors. 

“It was as if I were swept away to Laguna Beach or Beverly Hills,” Laurie Bush Jones wote in a Facebook comment. “Classy and creative.”

The idea to have this garden of serenity started more than 20 years ago by Fred and Pam Brown.  Fred and Pam are also the owners of California Turf Equipment Supply, Inc. in Tulare and have been in the gardening industry for nearly 40 years.

They’ve always had a passion for gardens, nurseries and landscape, said their daughter- in- law Devon Brown who manages The Gardens.

Devon married the Brown’s son, Joel. Both, Joel and Devon went to school for landscape architecture and several years ago, started working with Fred and Pam to design The Gardens.

They would gather inspiration from visiting gardens and nurseries while on vacations, Brown said.

“It’s been a dream in the making for 20 years, and the past seven or eight years it’s been putting pen to paper, and then we opened our doors about four years ago,” Brown said.

The Brown family took what was basically a storage yard and a dumping ground into something beautiful the people in the community can escape too. 

“When people come here they have a sense of peace and relaxation and they come to get inspired,” Brown said.”I don’t think we’ve gone to too many nurseries in the United States that really tries to incorporate the design with the planting portion to create an atmosphere that is a serene atmosphere.”

They also take pride in sourcing unique plants and collectibles.

“We spend a lot of time creating potted arrangements, things that are gifty and make peoples homes and gifts a little more special,” Brown said.

Christmas at the Gardens

If you haven’t found your Christmas tree or want to add another to your home, the gardens have unique varieties you might not find at other lots.

The Gardens also hosts hands-on workshops and community events with shopping specials and treats from local eateries.

December’s events are focused on holiday decor.

The shop will a have succulent wreath making class this month. And, Thursday night, families can escape to the gardens to pick out Christmas trees or fresh wreaths and enjoy food from a local food truck. The event starts at 5 p.m.

Details:

Address: 950 N. “J” St. Tulare, 93274

Phone: 688-2084

Website: http://www.thegardensshop.com

 

Article source: http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/story/news/2017/12/07/gardens-tulare-your-local-holiday-oasis/898164001/

At Design Miami, Objects Offer Unlikely Havens from an Imperfect World

At Cristina Grajales Gallery, which has been at Design Miami since year one, twin brothers Doug and Mike Starn have given their Big Bambu project a new shape. It’s a suite of what I’ll call ‘locations for sitting’, since the pieces’ shapes defy the typical categories of chair, couch, or chaise. Constructed from bamboo and knotted rock climbing cord, the pieces are airy, yet their size gives them imposing power. One piece, a sort of wing chair on steroids, is seven and a half feet tall; sitting on it feels like being ensconced on a throne, and for a moment I felt powerful too. The collection, which sells for between $40,000 and $90,000, brings the same sort of controlled chaos to the domestic sphere as the brothers did to their installation on the roof of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2010.

Across the tent, R Company’s presentation favored chaos over control, with a riot of colors, shapes, and textures that bring to mind the psychedelic fancies of Dr. Seuss. I cautiously entered the booth via a peculiar portal: an arched wooden door designed by The Haas Brothers. On the outside, mustachioed walruses in bas-relief; on the inside, octopuses. Although the immediate effect is extremely silly (the animals wear befuddled expressions and have pendulous breasts or conspicuous penises), the virtuosity of the woodcarving and the sheer weight of the door makes crossing its threshold feel strangely profound.

Article source: https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-design-miami-objects-offer-havens-imperfect

Do you enjoy garden books like I do?

Do you keep a garden journal? Do you have your landscape, vegetable garden, flower beds and such so organized that they are lined out in a notebook precisely, exactly the way you see them in your landscape, or are they in your mind?

It’s fun to browse the internet or look through garden magazines and picture books of flower and plant ideas. And let’s not forget the seed catalogs, daylily, bulbs or dahlia catalogs or simply walking through your favorite nursery. It’s all about planning, plotting, playing in the dirt. Oh … sorry, I mean soil.

Take a walk in your landscape. What do you need? How will this daisy or that veggie grow, how much sun, how deep the soil to plant a seed, how much soil amendment, what is the best form of irrigation?

Of course, as you should know, you can go out to the AgriLife Extension Offices (State Highway 75 North and Tam Road) and peruse the gardens there. Ask questions on any gardening subject when the Master Gardeners are there working the demonstration gardens on Thursday mornings. Furthermore, county extension agent Reggie Lepley is usually there all week so call him and ask your questions. He’ll get you an answer.

And there is a lot to know about the tried and true LEAF-PRO methods to help your garden and landscape be successful. The demo gardens at AgriLife cover much of it. But there are brochures that give you the scoop on LEAF-PRO! And there are brochures on citrus, butterflies and roses.

The first expected freeze date for Walker County should be occurring in the next few weeks, and that means a bit less time being outside for most gardeners. So what does a gardener do when they are indoors? Besides watching HGTV or a Hallmark movie, there are garden books. Here are several from Texas AM Press, using parts of their synopsis’s explaining these books.

One of my personal favorites is Doug Welsh’s “Texas Almanac to Gardening”: “Doug Welsh’s Texas Garden Almanac is a giant monthly calendar for the entire state — a practical, information-packed, month-by-month guide for gardeners and “yardeners.” This book provides everything you need to know about flowers and garden design; trees, shrubs, and vines; lawns; vegetable, herb, and fruit gardening; and also soil, mulch, water, pests, and plant care to create beautiful, productive, healthy gardens — and have fun doing it!”

“In Butterfly Gardening for Texas,” author and expert Geyata Ajilvsgi shares a wealth of practical information about all kinds of butterflies and the many flowers and other plants they utilize in their miraculous life cycle: from hidden egg to munching caterpillar to cryptic chrysalis to nectar-sipping, winged adult.”

“Growing Grapes in Texas, From the Commercial Vineyard to the Backyard Vine” is a “complete and approachable manual on grape growing in Texas. The author, Jim Kamas, asks the essential question all potential growers need to answer: Why do you want to plant a vineyard? Outlining the challenges and risks to all who think viticulture is a weekend hobby, Kamas then identifies the state’s current grape growing regions and covers everything the commercial or home producer needs to know in order to have a successful vineyard.”

“Heirloom Gardening in the South,” by William C. Welch and Greg Grant, “is a comprehensive resource that also offers a captivating, personal encounter with two dedicated and passionate gardeners whose love of heritage gardening infuses the work from beginning to end. Anyone who wants to know how to find and grow time-honored and pass-along plants or wants to create and nurture a traditional garden is sure to find this a must-have addition to their home gardening library.”

“Onions, Leeks, and Garlic, A Handbook for Gardeners” by Marian Coonse answers “questions she frequently answered one at a time as they came from the customers of the herb farm she and her husband owned. As familiar a kitchen staple as onions, leeks, and garlic are, many gardeners have scores of questions about growing them. How do the species differ? How and when should you plant and harvest them? How hardy are different varieties and how do they adapt to different climates? What insects and diseases attack them, and how can you combat them?”

“Perennial Garden Color” by William C. Welch, “Gardeners in Texas and the South, is a new book to our shop. “Gardeners in Texas and the South face their own special problems with climate and growing seasons, and they need a guide written specifically for the region in order to have the greatest chance of success.” Perennial Garden Edition “directly fills this need, and for years gardeners have relied on this book to aid their efforts to beautify their outdoor spaces. Now in a new Texas AM Press edition, this time-tested classic, dubbed a ‘masterpiece’ by Neil Sperry, is available again.”

The popular Texas Parks Wildlife book, “Texas Wildscapes,” has a “fully searchable DVD containing all the plant and animal information you need to customize your backyard habitat. Whether you have an apartment balcony or a multi-acre ranch, the “Texas Wildscapes” program provides the tools you need to make a home for all the animals that will thrive in the native habitat you create. In “Texas Wildscapes,” Kelly Conrad Bender identifies the kinds of animals you can expect when you give them their three basic needs: food, water, and shelter. She then provides guidelines for designing and planting your yard or garden to best provide these requirements for the many birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates the environment will attract.”

Article source: http://www.itemonline.com/news/do-you-enjoy-garden-books-like-i-do/article_9348fd0c-da06-11e7-b284-bbd80b2c8b9f.html

New ‘Garden Renovation’ book answers the call for landscapes that need help (photos)

Bobbie Schwartz
CLEVELAND, Ohio – Does your garden look dull to you but you don’t know how to make it more appealing?

Shaker Heights Landscape Designer Bobbie Schwartz is familiar with that dilemma.

For 40 years, Schwartz, whose company is Bobbie’s Green Thumb, has guided homeowners down the path that leads to the garden that makes them happy and content, with steps that include understanding soil, selecting plant materials, and long-term maintenance to keep the garden beautiful year after year. Along with that, she has judged landscape design contests, mentored new designers and twice served as president of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers.

Now, Schwartz is reaching out to a much broader audience with her new book, “Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams” (Timber Press, $24.95).

“The number one question when renovating a garden is ‘Where do I start?”‘ she says. “I know that can be a daunting question for a lot of people.”

The 260-page soft-cover book, filled with 275 photos that are lovely to look at and are fodder for ideas, is divided into six sections. The first one urges readers to initially concentrate on the reasons why they want to renovate, what they hope to achieve, and, of course, how much can they spend.

Have you have lived in a home for a few years with a landscape that is merely acceptable, but now you want to be surrounded by beauty? Did you just buy a home that you’re happy with, but not so much with the previous owner’s landscaping?

Are you happy with some parts of the garden and want to keep those parts, or do you want to scrap the whole thing and start over? Once you’ve realized why you’re ready to make a change, take some time before you attack.

“You will probably be eager to start making changes straight away, but it is actually very helpful to spend the first year – whether the first year in your home, or the first year after deciding to make a change – observing your landscape,” Schwartz writes. “Take extensive notes on how the hardscaping works for you, whether paths are lacking where you need them, which plants you have and how they change during the seasons, and also whether there are periods when nothing is happening.”

Mulch to keep weeds down while you wait and add compost or other organics to improve the soil so that it will be rich when you are ready to plant. If you need a flower fix while you’re waiting, pop some plants into window boxes, hanging baskets, containers – or all of the above.

Speaking of soil. The importance of healthy soil is extensively covered in section two, along with light conditions, dealing with wind, and fending off deer and other wild animals.

“Most people live in homes where the soil hasn’t had anything added to it since they bought the house,” says Schwartz. “In Cuyahoga County we have basically heavy clay soil, which means it doesn’t drain very well. More plants die because the roots are too wet during the winter than because of drought in the summer.”

In other words, soil amendment – leaf humus, compost, composted manure – is a must. And it’s better to do it in the fall so that the soil is nice and rich when it’s time for spring planting.

The third section delves into hardscaping – patios, driveways, sidewalks and paths – and seamlessly melding these elements into the garden rather than treating them as an afterthought.

The fourth section is all about assessing and choosing new plants. That’s a personal choice, of course, but accompanying pictures of trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals and grasses, and ways of combing them, offer ideas. The fifth section is on putting your plan into action, and how to choose a landscape designer if you realize that in putting your plan into action, you are getting in way over your head.

The last section has a few of everybody’s favorite, before and after pictures. See how a sparse, uninspiring shady back yard design was transformed into an inviting space with a two-level stone patio surrounded by a host of plants.

There’s an example of a homeowner who, because of her physical disabilities, wanted her front lawn completely removed and replaced with a xeriscape garden that needs little water and minimal maintenance. The result: a sea of low-growing plants and wispy grasses growing alongside a diagonal walk that replaces the linear walk.

Asked why she wrote the book, Schwartz responded, “Timber Press asked me to. It calls on everything I have learned in more than 40 years of gardening and landscape designing.”

Schwartz writes a blog that can be accessed by going to her website, bgthumb.com.

Article source: http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/12/garden_renovation_by_bobbie_sc.html

Landscaping Camp: Giving the Gift of a Green Thumb

Jeff McManus
Jeff McManus, Director of Landscape Services at the University of Mississippi. (Photo courtesy Jeff McManus)

If someone you know wants to exercise their green thumb this spring, an Early Bird Special gift certificate for next May’s Landscaping Camp in Oxford will make a great Christmas gift.

The Oxford-Lafayette County Chamber of Commerce and the Economic Development Foundation will produce the event, to be held May 25-27. It will feature Jeff McManus, the director of landscape services at the University of Mississippi.

The Early Bird Special sells for $300 and runs through March 30, after which the cost rises to $375. A gift certificate for the event can be mailed in a shiny gold envelope or placed in a gift box for local residents.

The Inn at Ole Miss will serve as the event’s host hotel, and reservations can be made for a discounted rate at 888-486-7666.

McManus is shown here leading a tour during last year’s Landscaping Camp in Oxford.

“We’re excited to say that this unique event was a huge success in its first year, attracting interest from all across the United States,” said Rosie Vasallo, Director of Retirement Attraction for the Chamber. “In fact, we’ve already started hearing people asking if we would be hosting it again.”

Additional reading: The honors keep piling up for Jeff McManus.

The answer to that question is a resounding yes. Campers will enjoy a personal tour with McManus, whose expertise in landscaping has earned Ole Miss recognition for having “The Most Beautiful Campus” in the country by national publications like Newsweek and, more recently, USA Today.

During the 2 ½ day camp, participants will receive a copy of McManus’ book, “Pruning Like a Pro,” at the opening dinner and book signing. They will immerse themselves in a tour of the Ole Miss campus and learn best practices from industry leaders in educational seminars.

The lineup of speakers will include Donna Yowell, Executive Director of the Mississippi Urban Council; Nellie Neal, host of the radio show “Garden Mama”; and Ed Croom, a retired Ole Miss botanist and author of “The Land of Rowan Oak: An Exploration of Faulkner’s Natural World.”

Landscaping Camp
Mary Haskell addresses a group of Landscaping Camp participants during last year’s event.

Participants will also board Oxford’s famous Doubledecker bus to visit the beautifully landscaped home of Dickie and Diane Scruggs, which is maintained by McManus, as well as the grounds of Rowan Oak with Croom and the city of Oxford itself.

Forty-five participants signed up for last year’s camp, Vassallo noted, and they came from across Mississippi as well as Tennessee, Georgia and Maryland.

After the event, Vassallo said, participants “will be excited to put their new ideas to work, taking their homes to a new level of beauty. Research shows that beauty created through landscaping is one of the top three factors in creating community attachment or loyalty to your particular town, city or neighborhood.”

Sponsors for the Landscaping Camp include the City of Oxford, Ole Miss, MaxxSouth Broadband, Rebel Realty and Property Management LLC, the Inn at Ole Miss, Mississippi Magazine and HottyToddy.com.


Special to HottyToddy.com.


Article source: http://hottytoddy.com/2017/12/07/landscaping-camp-giving-gift-green-thumb/

Recognizing Eureka’s ‘Garden Jewels’


2356 Frank St.

2356 Frank St.












This month’s “Garden Jewel” certificates are being presented to homes in the Myrtle Avenue area of Eureka.

In the 1900s, this part of town was called “Eden,” as in the Garden of Eden mentioned in the Bible. The land was covered with rhododendrons and tall evergreen trees. Several of these homes are now occupied by second and third generations of the original families, while other residences have been built in the last 10 years, nearly 100 years later.

The owners of these front gardens have been invited to attend the Jan. 19 meeting of the Eureka Sequoia Garden Club, to be held at the Humboldt County Agriculture Center at 5630 South Broadway. For more information, call 707-442-1387.

This month’s “Garden Jewels” are:

• 3719 Pennsylvania Ave.: White picket fences surround the front yard at the cottage home owned for the last 30 years by Lee and Joyce Coffman. She was raised in the home. A jasmine vine covers the arbor and front gate, which leads on a concrete path to the front porch adorned by stained glass windows. Variegated hebe with purple flowers and grey Santolina are under the maple tree. Rhododendrons, Meyer lemons, lilac trees and variegated weigela balance the landscape design. The foundation plants near the house include orange roses, breath of heaven, hydrangeas, sword ferns, geraniums and Mexican daisies.

• 3700 Pennsylvania Ave.: A wonderful park bench under a Victorian streetlight adorns the property. The early Craftsman home, owned by Walt and Toni Kabula, was built in the 1950s when she was a child. Colorful rhododendrons, camellias, hydrangeas, calla lilies, yellow yarrow, ferns and California poppies are under the Pieris Japonica tree. Cherry trees are featured on the corner lot and are accompanied by holly trees and mature rhododendrons surrounded by a green lawn. A jade specimen is happy on the front porch and welcomes visitors.

• 3745 Pennsylvania Ave.: Anita and Chuck Pavlich created the landscape design around the 1950s ranch style house. Jamie Pavlich grew up in the residence and her son now lives there and is attending Humboldt State University. Her dad was in the nursery business for years and later was a landscape specialist for the State of California. Currently Luscious Landscaping is doing an amazing job restoring the garden. Red and gray brick pillars mark the circular driveway in front of the home with accent lights. Roses, evergreens and chrysanthemums add more color along with the curly redwood stakes as an architectural feature. The tradition palm tree from that era is on the west side of the home, with rhododendrons, camellia, red trig maples, heather and a birdbath. The Pieris Japonica shrubs and outdoor lighting are featured with the bird nest pine and maroon Japanese maple trees. Other mature maple trees complete the landscape design.

• 2316 Frank St.: The landscape design on this property owned by Earl and Sheila Schmeidt includes a bank of river rock planted with red trig maple trees, against a redwood fence with a decorative lattice across the top. Mounds of summer flowers add color, and huge rocks are featured by the split-rail fence. Japanese maples, heavenly bamboo, purple leaved shrubs and cascading maple trees are arranged in a geometric style. The foundation planting includes Pieris Japonica shrubs and ornamental grasses.

• 2364 Frank St.: This three-story modern home owned by Duane and Amy Christian was landscaped by Tim Rice. It has matching corners of mature collections of succulents, circled by locally collected rocks. A dry pond uses black rocks to create the effect of water and the design of the river gravel gives the impression of the dry creek bed flowing to the sidewalk. A pair of matching orange roses frame the wine barrel near the residence with primroses spilling out to the garden and beautiful green lawn.

• 2356 Frank St.: Shirley Tuel loves to celebrate the holiday by decorating her landscape design in the front of the house. The picture with this article features Thanksgiving, and you can drive by today to see the Christmas season with red ribbons. Rhododendrons, holly and heather shrubs bloom seasonally while the white lattice fence accents the planted area of manzanita and the wishing well. A privet hedge and outdoor lights show off her planter boxes filled with greenery and cloth bows. The green and yellow spotted aralia is always dramatic.

Article source: http://www.times-standard.com/article/NJ/20171206/FEATURES/171209896

New York Long Island Tree Service Brings a Redefined Experience to Garden, Flowers and Trees Unlike Any Other …

New York Long Island Tree Service Brings a Redefined Experience to Garden, Flowers and Trees Unlike Any Other Company

New York, NY, December 07, 2017 — “We are professionals that are specialised in landscaping. Our team has the experience and knowledge and are always willing to offer you reliable services. Our services are pocket friendly and at very affordable prices to help you maintain and enhance the value of your property,” said a New York Long Island Tree service representative.

New York Long Island Tree service has been in the industry for over 20 years and has worked with people throughout Long Island, NY serving both Nassau and Suffolk Counties. They recently created a new division that specializes in landscaping; working in residential properties to enhance the beauty of one’s home, improving gardens, and specializing in flowers, plants, etc.

They are a full tree service company providing services ranging from tree trimming, pruning and removal services. Stump grinding, property clean-ups and storm damage clean-ups are also included in their service list. They are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week to help clients with all their emergency tree service needs.

They also provide services to commercial properties; some of their landscaping services includes analysis from tree experts, residential lawn tree care, emergency tree removal service, lawn restoration, landscape services, land clearing, garden designs, transplanting, and tree relocation, among others. These are only a few of the landscaping services New York Long Island Tree service offers.

At the Tree Service New York and Landscaping Division, their primary aim is to keep their customers satisfied with their landscaping services. These experts are experienced and ready to work in any residential or commercial property. They are willing to give their client’s lawn the desired and needed care and maintenance, which includes helping their clients with any landscaping design they wish to have done.

“There are many things that can lead to needing tree removal services. When there are strong storms in an area, there may be a need for tree cleanup. Your full range New York Tree service company is readily available when you need tree removal in New York. Our expert team is ready to provide a fast response to your emergency tree situation,” said Michael, New York Long Island Tree service representative.

Their professionals work in any area of Long Island, NY and serve any area of Suffolk and Nassau County. They help people with their landscaping design, creating new ideas for their gardens and lawns and any other project that the owner wishes to have done on their residential or commercial property. They also give solutions to how to trim a diseased tree.

For more detailed information about tree removal in Long Island, please visit www.findlocaltreeservice.com

Media Contact: Michael
Phone: 516-4767249

Article source: https://nbherard.com/business/new-york-long-island-tree-service-brings-a-redefined-experience-to-garden-flowers-and-trees-unlike-any-other-company/32780