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Archives for November 17, 2017

Try these 6 tips for fabulous holiday decor

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Transforming your home into holiday central can seem like an overwhelming task when you consider the expanse of décor trends out thereon Instagram. You start thinking about floral arrangements, tablescapes, mantels, wreaths and pretty soon there is too much to do and not enough time to do it.

To help you ease into holiday prep, we spoke to Molly Wood of Molly Wood Garden Design in Costa Mesa for advice on how to add festive style to your home without the stress.

“At the end of the day, if someone stands back and loves what they’ve created, that’s all that matters. The number one rule is that decorating is supposed to be fun,” said Wood.

These six tips from a local expert will get you started and help you find the joy in your party planning.

1. Simplify the space

“I would first do a general de-cluttering of your house because you’re going to be bringing more items into the space,” said Wood.  By clearing some of your everyday décor, you can create a blank backdrop that will highlight your holiday goods.

2. Choose 3-4 places to focus your décor

“Create more impact by choosing focal points like the entry table, kitchen island or mantel,” said Wood. Make the task of decorating more manageable by selecting a few areas that will set the mood without overwhelming your existing interior design.

3. Include elements of nature

“One of my must-haves is fresh greens. I always like to bring some sort of natural element into the story,” said Wood. Some of her go-tos include magnolia leaves, eucalyptus, dark greens, succulents, air plants and dried star pods because they have a long shelf-life and still look good when dried.

4. Say ‘yes’ to candles

“I like to bring out the Beeswax candles because it is a time for decadence. They smell good and burn clean,” said Wood. She also suggests displaying candles of varying heights and shapes— Think tall taper candles next to wide pillar candles.

5. Play up one color

“When you focus on one color it really becomes impactful. The hardest thing to do in all of design is editing, so maybe choose either red or green,” said Wood. The primary color can be balanced with a secondary color like gold, silver or black to make the traditional color pop.

6. Make the most out of your centerpiece

“It’s nice to have a few things that hold the table when nothing is there,” said Wood. She suggests a multilayered centerpiece with sections you can move off the table once the surface is set for a meal.

Article source: http://www.ocregister.com/2017/11/15/try-these-6-tips-for-fabulous-holiday-decor/

Chelsea townhouse with modern Danish design asks a cool $11M

This Chelsea townhouse at 449 West 24th Street has some bragging rights both inside and out. Exterior-wise, the 21-foot-wide home is surrounded by greenery and outdoor space on a block of other historic townhouses. Inside, over 4,073 square feet, mid-century and Danish interior design has added a unique and modern touch. Big walls of glass, finally, connect the indoor and outdoor elements. If you’re digging the connection, the property has just hit the market for a cool $11 million.

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The home is configured with a guest suite on the garden floor, and owner’s triplex above. The parlor floor is easily the main attraction, with a sunken living room that overlooks the lush rear garden through dramatic floor-to-ceiling windows.

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Up a few stairs from the living room is a dining area and large, customized kitchen. White slatted floor-to-ceiling doors were added, likely concealing an insane amount of storage. Sliding doors partition off an office space.

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The next floor up holds a spacious master bedroom suite, complete with built-in storage, a fireplace, and a dedicated terrace overlooking the rear garden.

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The top floor houses two more bedrooms, a large bathroom and flexible media or office space. Skylights abound, an important detail to this light-filled interior. And who wouldn’t enjoy a fire under skylights on the top floor of this home?

449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

Here’s a look inside the garden-level apartment, with a bedroom, kitchen and large den with a decorative fireplace. The living space opens to the front and back gardens.

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449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core, 449 west 24th street, chelsea, chelsea townhouse, core,

Outside, the townhouse is surrounded by greenery. It’s got a front garden, rare to Manhattan townhouses, which adds additional privacy from the street. Outside, two terraces extend off the exterior. And the West Chelsea location puts you within walking distance to the High Line, Chelsea Piers and Hudson River waterfront.

[Listing: 449 West 24th Street by Kelly Elivo and Ever Elivo of CORE Real Estate]

RELATED:

Photos courtesy of CORE

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Article source: https://www.6sqft.com/chelsea-townhouse-with-modern-danish-design-asks-a-cool-11m/

Natto Franco is the woman-helmed brand disrupting the streetwear game

For her latest creations that she specifically calls “drops”—explaining that she simply doesn’t create collections anymore—she draws inspiration from traditional sports uniforms in Japanese schools. “The two next drops include colors I’ve never done before. It’s mainly T-shirts made of stretched velvet. They are meant to resemble the T-shirts that young students wear in a P.E. class in Japan. It’s super cute,” she says.

 

HOMETOWN

Paris, France

GREEN THUMB BEGINNINGS

SEBAYASHI: Not a lot of people know this but I originally wanted to be a garden designer. I still talk about it. I love flowers and gardens. I always thought when I have a big house and lots of space, I could design my own garden with a river close by. And then one day my mom came up to me and said, “If you’re going to try to be a garden designer, you’re going to end up as a cashier at a garden store.” [laughs] That was the moment for me. I thought, if I’m going to design and it’s not plants, it’s going to be clothes. But it was really my father who got me interested in fashion. He used to work in advertising but he was always aware of what he was wearing. He bought and still buys stuff that may not be expensive but it’s the best thing you can find. He introduced me to thrift stores early on when vintage wasn’t a big thing in Paris. Around that time was also when he introduced me to the comfy, cozy, and cool Japanese menswear.

SILKSCREEN OBSESSIONS

SEBAYASHI: There’s this Japanese illustrator called Daisuke Ichiba. I’m basically obsessed with silkscreen artists. There’s a word for it in Japanese. It’s called “otaku.” It’s used for people who are obsessed with anime or rap. Everyone in Japan is “otaku” of something. These artists [that inspire me] are “otaku” of drawings and silkscreens. I’m also a very obsessive person. I like to explore everything about a subject. It could be a song, an artist, a place, or a thing. I still have these items of clothes with classic cuts from when I was a teenager. I looked back to when I was growing up and I realized what was going on aesthetically with the clothes. I’m very sensitive to when I was a teenager. It inspires me a lot as do books and collaging.

HUMOROUS AESTHETIC

SEBAYASHI: It’s a unisex brand, so I don’t say only girls or guys can wear a certain piece. My creative process also comes from the collages and color palettes I create. I think about what certain colors will look like when blended together. I don’t think about if girls will wear a print featuring another girl showing her boobs. Humor and how cool something looks is first for me. I also think streetwear is still a bit empty on the French scene. So for me there’s lots of room. People really think I do something unique here. But internationally, it’s important to not look at what everyone else is doing and just be true to yourself. That’s how you can have a unique identity.

Article source: https://www.interviewmagazine.com/fashion/natto-franco-woman-helmed-brand-disrupting-streetwear-game

Lansing-area artists use bridges as their canvas

When a bridge on campus needed repairing, MSU had two options: fix the bridge, or fix the bridge with some flair.

MSU chose the latter. The Public Art on Campus Committee, responsible for the placement and maintenance of artwork at MSU, held a contest where students could submit ideas for artistic railings for the bridge. Interior design senior Gavin Kata heard about the contest and submitted a series of sketches, an ode to the Red Cedar through changing seasons.

“I received an email about it from my advising office,” Kata said. “I kind of knew of the area and I felt like I had a good connection to that area, and so I came up with this idea of having the four seasons as being the bridge panels there.” 

Kata’s series of panels was chosen for production, winning him $2,500 to help offset tuition costs. The bridge was fitted with an adapted version of Kata’s original design, focusing on his autumn sketches. Fitting into the “Water Moves MSU” theme of the year, Kata’s ideas were incorporated into the bridge’s design, to be seen by anyone who crossed the Red Cedar near the Main Library and Spartan Stadium.

“It’s a great honor to have that displayed in such a prominent area on campus,” Kata said. “I was kind of blown away by the scale of it when I first saw it, it was just amazing.” 

The contest was “a win, win, win proposition” — a necessary infrastructure project that could involve students and add a touch of creativity, Infrastructure Planning and Facilities Campus Planner Stephen Troost said.

Troost is a member of the Public Art on Campus Committee. According to him, one of the criteria the committee uses in determining what will be displayed is that artwork should be integrated into the architectural and green space planning for the campus. Troost believes it is important to keep art’s functionality in mind on projects like these, as people do pay attention to the artistic elements in infrastructure.

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“Whether it is ‘in your face’ or something much more subjective, our lives are positively impacted by the arts at many different levels,” Troost said in an email. “From state transportation departments, to the design of transportation facilities … to pop-up exhibitions, the incorporation of art is beneficial if not expected.”

The idea that art can liven up residents’ daily routines is one that seems to be taking hold in the region. Kata’s artwork over the Red Cedar is not the only, or even the first, bridge makeover in the Lansing area this year.

Over the summer, the Under the Bridge project transformed the US-127 overpass at Michigan Avenue into a mural-slash-light show, in hopes of attracting more MSU students over Lansing city lines. The overpass serves as a sort of unofficial border between the two cities, a border that before the project was described as “sterile, ugly and non-bikeable.”

Lansing artist Brian Whitfield, a four-time ArtPrize participant, was commissioned to paint the murals, which depict settings relating to both Lansing and East Lansing. He described the pre-renovation underpass as a “barrier” to students crossing into Lansing, something he wanted to see changed. Having had past experience painting murals, Whitfield responded to the city’s call for artists with a mix of excitement and ambition.

“I live right near the area, so (the bridge) is kind of right in my backyard,” Whitfield said. “I just thought it was an exciting challenge. I’ve done murals before, so it’s just that kind of fit right within what I do. I was a little nervous, but I wanted to try to step up to that challenge.” 

Whitfield, a graphic designer with the Michigan Department of Transportation, said part of the inspiration for joining the project was in his personal appreciation for aesthetically pleasing infrastructure. He agrees art can play a major role in improving quality of life in an area, an idea he’s seen MDOT take note of throughout his career.

“When I’m traveling down the highway, landscaping always strikes me; if it’s nicely landscaped, I’m always affected,” Whitfield said. “It makes my drive much nicer, I feel much better. … It’s always nice to have a nice design, a pleasing experience interacting with the area.” 

Under the Bridge was successful in shifting public opinion on the Michigan Avenue corridor, Whitfield said. This is something that he believes not only boosts Lansing’s economic potential, but residents’ everyday lives.

“Talking to the people on this project, they feel better walking and biking and jogging and commuting through the area,” Whitfield said. “They like walking under the bridge now instead of having to avoid it; it was kind of dull and dingy. It had a definite impact on the way that people feel about the community.” 

Article source: http://statenews.com/article/2017/11/infrastructure-as-art

Business Loop Community Improvement District’s vision includes pedestrians and bikers

Whenever Yehyun Kim posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: https://www.columbiamissourian.com/news/local/business-loop-community-improvement-district-s-vision-includes-pedestrians-and/article_b953c32e-cb38-11e7-b461-eb5bbc25a088.html

Vermillion Residents Get A Look At The Wheel Deal

VERMILLION — Vermillion residents were introduced to a future infrastructure addition to the city with the unveiling of a bicycle master plan during a public meeting Wednesday night.

The meeting, held at the Vermillion Public Library, brought in the design team from RDG Planning and Design, an architecture and landscaping firm from the Omaha and Lincoln area that was selected to plan the new bicycle route. RDG will also be working with Toole Design Group to design the plan.

The purpose of this first meeting was to initiate the plan to stakeholders and conduct surveys in order to make an appropriate bike route specific to the city of Vermillion. Various posters were placed around the room for people to provide input on the streets they currently use while cycling, images asking to rank a situation by comfort level and potential routes to be included in the plan.

“It’s an introduction,” said Marty Shukert from RDG Planning and Design. “It’s a way of getting some initial input or thoughts about, maybe areas we have to look at, streets that people use, general comments.”

Plans from other cities, including one from Brookings, were shown for people to provide input on whether idea may fit into Vermillion’s own needs.

Shukert and the team from RDG have had a chance to tour Vermillion by bike and by car to get a chance to make some first impressions.

“Our first impression is that it is a really beautiful town that has many assets, looks good, has a great distribution of destinations and a good foundation of trail development and street network that is going to make this a really good investigation and plan,” Shukert said.

He also noticed that the street network with secondary streets that provide effective routes to a destination and the generally flat landscape make it easy to pedal.

“There are excellent possibilities for the community to make bicycling more a part of the transportation way of life within the city,” Shukert said.

The objectives for the plan come in the three parts: bicycle transportation can help with a healthier and happier lifestyle, encourage more people to use bicycles as a way to reach a destination and to develop a system that can be implemented quickly enough to make a difference.

The main objective is that bicycles can be used as a means of transportation and not just for recreational purposes. Something that makes this unique is that it would be South Dakota’s first stand-alone bicycle master plan.

“We want to develop a system of bicycles and bicycle networking program that expands the routine use of bikes for transportation in Vermillion and the surrounding areas,” Shukert said.

This meeting was the first step in the planning process to get an idea of the current use of bicycles in Vermillion, how they can be improved and listening to stakeholders ideas or concerns about a bike path. The next steps would be looking at existing conditions, an implementation plan, public events and the approval process.

Those who were unable to attend the meeting, but wish to be surveyed can visit the website bikevermillion.com.

Article source: http://www.yankton.net/article_bc5a68a8-ca83-11e7-86d4-7f9ff54bdc39.html

Boise giving away free compost to residents

The City of Boise is rewarding those who choose to  participation in the compost program.  The city is giving anyone who participates in the program finished compost free of charge.  The compost is for residential use only; no commercial use is permitted. Here are the details.

Date:

Saturday, November 18th, 9a.m. – 1p.m., or until compost is gone

Locations:

Idaho Transportation Department, 3311 W. State Street (Pickup truck friendly)

Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road  (Pickup truck friendly)

Whitney Elementary School, 1609 S. Owyhee Street

Boise Urban Garden School, 2955 N. Five Mile Road

How to Participate:

You need to bring a City of Boise utility bill or provide the name and address of the account holder to staff at the event.

Bring your own tools to load your own compost.

The City of Boise recommends using the compost as an addition to soil and application for lawn improvement, mulch around trees and plants at your home for landscaping and as a soil amendment for vegetable gardens.

Can’t make it to the event? That’s okay.  Ongoing collection will be available for Boise compost customers beginning Monday, Nov 20, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. at the following locations:

Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Rd.

Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road

Article source: http://www.kivitv.com/news/boise-giving-away-free-compost-to-residents

The top gardening trends of 2017 set to sizzle into the new year

WE’VE unearthed some of the top gardening trends of 2017, set to sizzle well into 2018.

Danny from Xteria Landscapes shares his favourites, ideal for those moving into a new home and exploring their options, or others considering a complete or partial garden makeover.

Natural materials

Natural materials such as boulders, rocks, railway ties and sleepers enable homeowners to give their garden a more natural, organic look and that’s a trendy effect that can be furthered with rustic outdoor furniture, including swings, small coffee tables and chairs. If you’re after a more rural or old-fashioned feel, try incorporating natural elements into the garden design.

A mix of old and new

If you don’t want your garden to look too rustic or old-fashioned, a mash-up of old and new could deliver a superb effect. This trend isn’t limited to outdoor spaces and gardens as it’s been popular in residential interiors for some time now and is increasingly prevalent in homes across the world. This could be as simple as a traditional heritage-style garden featuring modern, streamlined furniture or it could entail incorporating modern and traditional ornamental elements throughout the garden and landscaping design.

Bright and bold flowers

Whether you choose to plant them among your garden or make homes for them in ornamental pots on your patio, the colour that they add to landscaped areas is nothing shy of amazing. Some of the most popular of the gloriously bright and bold flowers suitable for landscape designs in Perth include tulips, pansies, daffodils, pink azaleas and snapdragons.

Edible gardening

While having a vegetable and herb garden separate from the non-edible plants in the garden is, and will always be, a popular trend, it’s now common to see vegetables and herbs planted throughout the entire area. Of course, they need to be planted in areas that makes them accessible without having to step over (or on) other plants. As some herbs and vegetables are so attractive, it makes sense to incorporate edibles among your garden.

Article source: https://communitynews.com.au/eastern-reporter/lifestyle/the-top-gardening-trends-of-2017-set-to-sizzle-into-the-new-year

Must owners without gardens chip in for association landscaping costs?

Q: Our senior living neighborhood association is proposing a $12.50 per month assessment increase to buy and install mulch for each household. These are single-family homes with different-sized mulch beds. Currently each house buys their own mulch. A few households opted to install rocks instead. Can our association charge everyone the $12.50 per month and send a year-end refund to the households that have rocks instead of mulch?

A: The answer depends on both your state law as well as your legal documents. In general, every homeowner must pay his or her percentage share of the common expenses. I often hear owners say, “I live on the first floor; why should I pay for elevator maintenance?” or “I don’t use the tennis court; why should I pay for its maintenance?”

Part of the answer is that when you live in a community association, the word “community” is important. You will get some benefits others will not and vice versa, but you still have to participate just like every other owner.

Having said that, many state community association laws permit individual association bylaws to allow for the assessment of common expenses only against the units that are impacted. If there is such language in your bylaws, then the board — instead of having to refund money at the end of each year — could merely assess those homeowners who will benefit from the mulch.

Winter gardening tips from Master Gardeners – Springfield News

Q. I brought in my geraniums before the freeze. Can you give some tips to keep them until next spring?  – W.T., Springfield

Answer by Master Gardener Mark Bernskoetter

Prune the geranium back by one-third and water the pot thoroughly. Place the pot in a west or south facing window in your home and you may get some great blooms on them.

If the plants get leggy (long, weak stems), that is because they are not getting enough light. Set up some grow lighting for them or perhaps prune them back again by about one-third.

Treat them like any other houseplant, watering as the soil dries out, and fertilizing very lightly and infrequently. Houseplants do not need as much water and fertilizer in the winter months because they are not as active making food.

Geraniums can also be stored bareroot. Dig the plant up now, and remove the soil from the roots (just knock the soil off). Hang the plans upside down somewhere the temperature remains around 50 degrees. The plant will gradually lose all of its leaves.

Once a month, soak the roots in water for an hour to prevent them from completely drying out, then hang the plant upside down again. In the spring, replant and watch them spring back to life.

 

 Q. I have two tropical ferns that I brought into the house, now they are losing their needles. – R.T., Nixa

Answer by Master Gardener Mark Bernskoetter

You will lose many of the needles from the fern. As long as you are maintaining some green in the plant, it is shedding down to the number of leaves that can process the diminishing amounts of sunlight we get during the wintertime.

Be sure you have them in a west or south-facing window. Water them only as the soil dries out.

If you choose to store them in a garage, remember that freezing temperatures will likely kill the stored plants. However, temperatures in the 60s will cause them to try to grow, and if they do not have adequate sunlight, they will die.

Set the pots back out next April, after danger of frost is past, and they should be ready to grow.

 

Q: Can I eat hickory nuts? – D.B., Republic

There are eight species of hickory trees in Missouri. Two of those produce a higher percentage of edible meat: shagbark and shellbark.

The shagbark hickory is identifiable by the “shaggy” bark that peels off in large pieces. The bark of the shellbark tree also comes off the tree in large pieces but it is not as pronounced.

Remove the outer husk and wash the nuts. Allow them to sit out in the sun a few days to dry. A hard hit from a hammer can crack the shell but leave the nut intact.

The pieces of nutmeat will be small and it’s easiest to remove them with a nut pick.

One pound of unshelled nuts will give you about one and a quarter cups of nutmeat. To roast the nuts, spread the shelled pieces in a shallow pan and bake at 350 degrees for 5 to 12 minutes, stirring occasionally until they turn golden brown.

 

Readers can pose questions or get more information by calling 417-874-2963 and talking to one of the trained volunteers staffing the Mas­ter Gardener Hotline at the University of Missouri Exten­sion Center in Greene County located inside the Botanical Center, 2400 S. Scenic Ave., Springfield, MO 65807.

Article source: http://www.news-leader.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/11/16/winter-gardening-tips-master-gardeners/848927001/