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Archives for November 4, 2017

4 Projects Win AIA Innovation Awards for Groundbreaking Design


4 Projects Win AIA Innovation Awards for Groundbreaking Design, Bah Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image  Sebastin Wilson Len
Bahá’í Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image © Sebastián Wilson León

The American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) Technology in Architectural Practice (TAP) Knowledge Community has announced the winners of their 2017 Innovation Awards, honoring “new practices and technologies that will further enable project delivery and enhance data-centric methodologies in the management of buildings for their entire lifecycle, from design, to construction and through operations.”

Continue reading for this year’s winners.

 Awards are given annually within five categories:

  • Stellar Design
  • Project Delivery Construction Administration Excellence
  • Project Lifecycle Performance (none selected this year)
  • Practice-based or Academic Research, Curriculum or Applied Technology Development
  • Exemplary use in a Small Firm (none selected this year)

Stellar Design

Bahá’í Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects


Bah Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects
Bahá’í Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects

Set within the Andean foothills, just beyond the metropolis of Santiago, Chile, the Bahá’í Temple of South America is a domed, luminous structure that echoes the rolling topography of the mountains. Its nine monumental glass veils frame an open and accessible worship space where up to 600 visitors can be accommodated. Looking up to the central oculus at the apex of the dome, visitors experience a mesmerizing transfer of light from the exterior of cast glass to an interior of translucent Portuguese marble. At sunset, the light captured within the dome shifts from white to silver to ochre and purple.


Bah Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects


Bah Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image Courtesy of Hariri Pontarini Architects


Bah Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image  Guy Wenborne


Bah Temple of South America; Santiago, Chile / Hariri Pontarini Architects. Image  Guy Wenborne






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The Yard at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; Chicago / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in collaboration with Theater Consultant CharcoalBlue

Construction completed by Bulley Andrews


The Yard at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; Chicago / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in collaboration with CharcoalBlue. Image  Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture
The Yard at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; Chicago / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in collaboration with CharcoalBlue. Image © Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture

Opened in September 2017, The Yard is a next-generation performance venue that reflects Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s multi-faceted artistic vision. Consisting of approximately 35,000 square feet, the project introduces a new flexible theater that can be configured into a variety of shapes and sizes with audience capacities ranging from 150 to 850. A new two-story entrance lobby connects to the existing theater and features a custom electrochromic façade that mitigates glare and heat gain by gradually tinting as sunlight passes across the southern face.


The Yard at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; Chicago / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in collaboration with CharcoalBlue. Image  Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture


The Yard at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; Chicago / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in collaboration with CharcoalBlue. Image  Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture


The Yard at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; Chicago / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in collaboration with CharcoalBlue. Image  Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture


The Yard at Chicago Shakespeare Theater; Chicago / Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in collaboration with CharcoalBlue. Image  Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture






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Project Delivery Construction Administration Excellence

Garden Village; Berkeley, California / Nautilus Group Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects 


Garden Village; Berkeley, California / Nautilus Group  Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects. Image Courtesy of Natoma Architects
Garden Village; Berkeley, California / Nautilus Group Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects. Image Courtesy of Natoma Architects

Built entirely using modular building technology, Garden Village is an engineering and construction marvel. This cutting edge and intricate development was accomplished using only two module types: Type A, a living/dining/kitchen module, and Type B, two bedrooms/bathroom module. These are joined in two combinations to create an entire project of only two unit types, four bedroom units and two bedroom units. The two modules are developed and perfected like in the automobile industry, where every detail, drawer, handle and finish is refined in full size mockups – something seldom possible in architecture.  The result: high quality and 20% cost savings.


Garden Village; Berkeley, California / Nautilus Group  Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects. Image Courtesy of Natoma Architects


Garden Village; Berkeley, California / Nautilus Group  Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects. Image Courtesy of Natoma Architects


Garden Village; Berkeley, California / Nautilus Group  Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects. Image Courtesy of Natoma Architects


Garden Village; Berkeley, California / Nautilus Group  Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects. Image Courtesy of Natoma Architects






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Practice-based or Academic Research, Curriculum or Applied Technology Development

Reality Capture Workshop; Detroit / University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture


Reality Capture Workshop; Detroit / University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture . Image  Prof. Wladyslaw Fuchs, Ph. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture, Volterra-Detroit Foundation
Reality Capture Workshop; Detroit / University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture . Image © Prof. Wladyslaw Fuchs, Ph. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture, Volterra-Detroit Foundation

Reality Capture Workshop is a long-term project to produce a complete digital documentation of a historical city of Volterra, Italy and a methodology for the information dissemination. The project utilizes the 3D laser scanning and photogrammetry to record precise spatial data which will be used for research, presentation and preservation of the city history. Since its start in October 2016 the workshop already supplied data which became a foundation of a very significant research in the area of archeology and architectural history. It became an interdisciplinary research tool, connecting the academia, historical preservation administration, professionals and corporate partners.


Reality Capture Workshop; Detroit / University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture . Image  Prof. Wladyslaw Fuchs, Ph. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture, Volterra-Detroit Foundation


Reality Capture Workshop; Detroit / University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture . Image  Prof. Wladyslaw Fuchs, Ph. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture, Volterra-Detroit Foundation


Reality Capture Workshop; Detroit / University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture . Image  Prof. Wladyslaw Fuchs, Ph. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture, Volterra-Detroit Foundation


Reality Capture Workshop; Detroit / University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture . Image  Prof. Wladyslaw Fuchs, Ph. D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture, Volterra-Detroit Foundation






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The jury for the AIA Innovation Awards included: Matt Krissel, AIA (Chair), Kieran Timberlake; Tyler Goss, Turner Construction; Paola Moya, Assoc. AIA, Marshall Moya Design; Jeffrey Pastva, AIA, Davis Architects and Brian Skripac, Assoc. AIA, CannonDesign.

Learn more about the awards, here.

News and project descriptions via AIA

Article source: https://www.archdaily.com/882917/4-projects-win-aia-innovation-awards-for-groundbreaking-design

Good to Grow: Favorite fall-blooming perennials – Charleston Gazette

My cousin, Ruth, wondered why I wanted to visit the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C., in the middle of September.

“There won’t be anything in bloom,” she said, as she dutifully drove us there.

I laughed.

“Of course, there will be tons in bloom. You will be amazed,” I said.

And she was delighted by the profusion of flowers she’d never seen before. While naming each flower for my cousin, I added a few plants to my must-try list.

What was in bloom that was new to me? A duo of yellow-flowering beauties, rudbeckias (Little Henrys) and coreopsis (full moons).

The rudbeckia, better known as black-eyed Susan, was unlike any I’ve seen. It had curiously quilled petals around the traditional brown cone, the flowers borne on 3-foot-tall stems. It’s a selection of the native sweet coneflower.

The coreopsis was covered in soft, yellow flowers with lots of buds still to open. The full moon is supposed to have excellent disease resistance, and it flowers over a long season on 2-foot-tall plants.

Both the black-eyed Susan and coreopsis are full-sun, low-water-use plants, once established. That means water them well for the first year, then sparingly, if at all, after that.

A third yellow-flowering plant, chrysanthemums, called Sheffield yellows, was not in bloom, and I was disappointed, but not surprised. I have grown its sister plant, hillside Sheffield pinks, in my garden for many years, and it never starts blooming before the first of October.

Then, it produces an abundance of apricot daisies with yellow centers until frost, scenting the garden with a soft, sweet fragrance.

I would love to have a yellow version of this hardy mum, which is deer and rabbit resistant. These are also full-sun, low-water-use plants, once established.

Those of us who love wildflowers know the late-summer-, early fall-blooming Joe Pye weeds and ironweeds that spangle our hillsides and meadows. There are cultivated shorter versions of both of these wildflowers that are well worth some space in our gardens.

The eupatorium baby Joe, is, as its name indicates, a dwarf Joe Pye weed, growing to 3 to 4 feet tall, versus 6 to 8 feet for its parent. We’ve used it successfully in a garden that doesn’t drain well, and it returns reliably, though the garden is in a wind tunnel in the West Virginia mountains. The deer have not eaten this plant, which is another plus.

Nor have they eaten the vernonia iron butterfly, a 3-foot-tall version of the elegant, deep-purple ironweed. This, too, grows well in the same difficult mountain garden, coming back reliably, to our delight. Both plants are versatile and will also do well in a dry, sunny space.

We carry the blues and purples into the October garden with monkshood and asters aconitum {span}carmichaelii{/span} arendsii and tataricus jindai. The aconitum has deep, blue-violet, hooded flowers (hence its common name of monkshood) that are large and spectacular at the end of the garden season.

A low-water plant for sun or partial sun, it emerges early in spring with thick, glossy, attractive foliage. It reaches 3 to 4 feet tall in autumn and puts on a great flower show for weeks.

So does the tall, sky-blue jindai, a plant that will naturalize a large garden area. You can contain it in a smaller garden by dividing it every three years and sharing it with friends.

One more October bloomer that does well in a sun or partial-shade garden is commonly called boneset or snakeroot. Eupatorium chocolate sports clusters of white flowers atop chocolate leaves with deep-purple stems. It will grow in moist or dry soils that are well-drained and will reach 3 feet tall. Deer resistance adds another reason to grow this beauty.

As my cousin found out, there’s no reason to have a flower-free autumn garden when you can enjoy blossoms, along with our pollinator friends, until the first hard freeze.

Article source: https://www.wvgazettemail.com/life/gardening/good-to-grow-favorite-fall-blooming-perennials/article_8c7615b0-9526-5ca1-adab-ce464a6c5c67.html

Fireplaces in the garden: a design guide by Bunny Guinness

Enjoying winter jollities such as Hallowe’en and Guy Fawkes Night while basking in the glowing warmth of naked flames is a perfect way to enjoy the garden late in the season. And sitting outside in summer, soaking up the fabulous evening air with a GT, is the best way to end the day. By investing in an outdoor fire you can make your garden even more enjoyable. 

The idea of the garden as an “outdoor room” took off in the Seventies. However, our unpredictable weather means you need cover and heat to make your outdoor room usable year-round. It is such a luxury to have that extra space, not just on high days and holidays, but for everyday living too. 

Now you can have a fireplace, fire table, fire pit or fire bowl and they can be fuelled with gas (mains gas or propane), wood or maybe bioethanol. However you design it, you can guarantee that a fire will always be a convivial draw. 

Where and…

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/problem-solving/fireplaces-garden-design-guide-bunny-guinness/

Community center director retires, leaving behind a richer community

She may be leaving, but Diana Rich isn’t going anywhere. Rich, the executive director of the Sebastopol Community Cultural Center is set to walk away from the organization she’s helmed for the past seven years on Dec. 1.



Diana Gardner Rich

The center’s board of directors announced Rich’s departure on Oct. 23 in a news media release.

“The time is right,” Rich said. “The team we have in place is talented and stable.”

While she’s been mulling the decision to leave for about a year, Rich said she knew the community center was in good hands and in a good place for her to step down. Her point of clarity came after she returned from a two-week vacation. Upon her arrival, the Tubbs and Nuns fires erupted in the east part of the county. By the time she got to the community center, her team was already there, ready to get to work to help the center morph into a much needed evacuation center.

“Let’s face it,” Rich said. “I left for two weeks and the team ran the center just fine.”

Rich was hired by the center’s board in 2010, replacing Rob Carey who held the position for a little over a year before retiring. Chosen among a pool of 70 candidates, David Turchin, the board’s former president called her “the cream of the crop. She had everything we were looking for — tremendous contacts and connections in Sebastopol, she had done lots of fundraising and she also started the Folk Art for Schools Calendar Project.”

Gabrielle Disario, president of the center’s board, credited Rich with bringing many types of musical events to the center, expanding special interest classes and supervising multiple building renovations. During her tenure, new floors were installed in the main hall, the kitchen and restrooms were remodeled and new landscaping was developed outside the building.

It’s work that Rich is humble about, but also takes pride in accomplishing.

“It’s really been the effort of the community,” she said, adding that renovations would not have been possible without funding from community organizations like the Rotary clubs, business associations and the city council.

Disario said  Rich’s leadership led to a better center in a better community.

 “During her tenure, SCCC grew into a fiscally stable and reassured resource for all members of the west county community,” Disario said. “Diana’s commitment and energy combined with her organizational and problem solving skills helped the center thrive.”

She also brought many new events to the center, including the talent show and Tour D’Organics. Rich said  the board of directors brought original ideas to the table and empowered her to execute them.

Rich plans on staying in Sebastopol . Originally from the Sacramento area where she was a corporate law attorney, she feels Sebastopol is home.

She called west county a “great place to live and work. We’re such an interesting collection of people, and it’s a perfect place for a community center because all of us who live here value art, music, entertainment and enrichment.”

Rich grew up in Ibiza, Spain and Venice, CA, surrounded by intellectuals, writers and other creative-minded friends of her “rather bohemian” parents, making Sebastopol and west county a perfect match for her.

The board has not yet named a replacement but Rich said the efforts are underway.

Article source: http://www.sonomawest.com/sonoma_west_times_and_news/news/community-center-director-retires-leaving-behind-a-richer-community/article_60de6334-be72-11e7-a0f2-afecae050a4a.html

Successful home show brought ideas, products and customers … – Daytona Beach News

DAYTONA BEACH — For Gary Swanson, the Daytona Beach News-Journal’s annual Fall Home Show is a good place to get ideas to make improvements to his residence.

The New Smyrna Beach resident and his wife stopped at the Daytona Beach Ocean Center on Sunday, last of the three-day event, looking at products that would make his place look nice.

“We were just looking for ideas for some new doors,” Swanson said. “We got a couple leads and it’s fun to look around and see what’s here.”

The 57th annual Fall Home Show started on Friday bringing hundreds of business under one roof at the Ocean Center where thousands of visitors had the opportunity to see what’s available from their local businesses, said event organizer Jamie Brown.  

From learning what wares to use to cook an egg without oil to car dealers, door distributors, cabinet makers, food retailers, hospitals and many other businesses were at the Ocean Center with booths grabbing people’s attention as they walked by.

For 20 years Elan Schlachet of Planet Granite has been making granite countertops as well as work on floors and cabinets. He has been participating in the home show for eight years where he has had a lot of face to face contact with people ready to buy his products.

“This is our best source of advertising,” Schlachet said. “These home shows give us business all year long so it’s very advantageous for us to keep coming.”

Summer Saxon of Beck’s Nursery Landscaping Pavers said the home how is good for business but it also gives them a chance to provide information and help people.

“The fact that it’s (home show) a local function it helps us get out to the community,” Saxon said. “While we are here, it’s amazing how many people come up with questions about the plants they already have installed they are having problems with.”

The Listed Sisters, Lex and Alana LeBlanc of HGTV fame were also present captivating their audience their presentations about home remodeling.

“It’s (home show) been a pretty high speed and adventurous for us,” said Orange City businessman Brandon Bing of All American Solar. “We’ve definitely had a large good response a lot of people have been coming looking at our displays and equipment.”

 

Article source: http://www.news-journalonline.com/news/20171015/successful-home-show-brought-ideas-products-and-customers

2018 Home Resource Guide: Landscaping

Photo courtesy stephen breaux

Austin offers a long list of landscape professionals who are experienced dealing with the city’s 300 days of sun each year.


Articulated Design Landscape Architecture
Articulation means “clarity or distinction to elements of form and space, organized into a coherent or meaningful whole.” This design-build firm, a Best of Houzz service winner from 2014 to 2016, works from concept through construction to produce custom courtyards, pools, outdoor kitchens and more. The designers’ expertise includes ecology, horticulture and art. 1200 East 12th St., (512) 402-2341, adlastudio.com

Austin Outdoor Design
Austin Outdoor Design is a full-service modern landscape design-build firm that aims to blur the line between interior and exterior spaces. The firm incorporates several elements in its designs: light, water, stone, plants, life and fire. Led by principal Jose Roberto Corea, Austin Outdoor Design celebrated 10 years’ worth of projects in 2017. 1412 Collier St., Studio C, (512) 368-2001, austinoutdoordesign.com

B. Jane Gardens
By taking difficult sites and turning them into unique outdoor living spaces for their clients, the creative problem solvers at B. Jane Gardens have endeared themselves to Austinites for 15 years. A perennial Best of Houzz design winner, B. Jane Gardens offers landscape design, installation and maintenance—one-stop shopping to cut down on headaches. (512) 296-2211, bjanegardens.com

Breaux Design Group
Stephen Breaux and company focus on creating ecologically attuned, modern landscapes using locally sourced materials. Native plant and drought-tolerant gardens give clients the low-maintenance beauty they seek. And did we mention Breaux also designs pools and outdoor kitchens and living areas? He provides design, installation and maintenance services all around Central Texas. (512) 418-6164, breauxdesign.com

Countryside Nursery and Landscape
Since 1998 this independent garden center has designed and maintained beautiful outdoor spaces for Central Texas businesses and homes. From yards and hardscapes to stonework and pools, a team with 60 years’ combined landscape expertise finds organic, water-efficient solutions. Acres of natives, a teaching garden and a uniquely Austin gift shop helped Countryside make Garden Center magazine’s “Top 100” list. 13292 Pond Springs Road, (512) 249-0100, countrysideaustin.com

David Wilson Garden Design
Austinites who need their gardens designed, installed and furnished should remember David Wilson Garden Design. Wilson and business partner Marco Rini have created some of the most exquisite gardens in Austin since 1987, proving that all things of quality have staying power. Their motto, “We can nurture the life in your plants, and the plants in your life,” speaks to their thoughtful approach. (512) 459-7909, dwgd.com

D-CRAIN
What do you get when you combine architecture, ecology and philosophy? You get the modern outdoor living designs of D-CRAIN. Owner and designer Dylan Crain Robertson has been creating simple yet eye-catching projects in the Austin area since 1994. From indoor to outdoor structures and gardens, there’s almost nothing this group doesn’t do. 1621 Willow St., (512) 480-8008, d-crain.com

Design Ecology
The depth of experience of Design Ecology’s team members means you can throw an intricate landscape problem at them and they’ll rise to the occasion. With a specialty in stunning swimming pools and water features, Design Ecology creates contemporary outdoor living spaces for clients. Plus, efficient and careful planning reduces waste and helps keep the budget down, and all Austinites can get behind that. 3714 Manchaca Road, (512) 326-2193, designecologyaustin.com

Furrow Studio
This partnership between Nikos Papadopoulos, the founder and former principal of NPD Landscape Architecture, and Ron Lutsko Jr., the founder of Lutsko Associates in San Francisco, specializes in landscape architecture, urban design and site planning. The studio’s work marries contemporary design with ecological expertise and tends to be high-end residential, both urban and rural. (512) 584-8893, furrowstudio.com

J. Peterson Garden Design
Trained as a master gardener, Jenny Peterson specializes in thoughtful outdoor spaces that emphasize the healing and restorative nature of gardens and plants. Her portfolio includes yoga gardens, outdoor retreats, meditation spaces, aromatherapy gardens and herb gardens. And her work has been featured in Fine Gardening and Cottages Bungalows magazines. (512) 922-3359, jpetersongardendesign.com

Jeff Neal Design
Jeff Neal Design combines elegant features with a fresh, contemporary approach. This design-build firm, founded in 2010, has quickly gained a reputation for its custom terracing, swimming pools, water features, fireplaces and steelwork. Once they design and install your outdoor retreat, they also take pride in maintaining it. 605-A W. 37th St., (512) 844-3578, jeffnealdesign.com

Kevin Wood Landscapes
Beautiful landscapes with Texas flair are what Kevin Wood Landscapes is all about. Employing extensive knowledge of native plants and xeriscaping, this team also provides clients with a full menu of structures including water features, pools, outdoor kitchens, fire pits and landscape lighting. And they’ve been doing it for more than 25 years. 2210 Gardenia Dr., (512) 250-9004, kevinwoodlandscapes.com

LandWest Design Group
For more than a decade, LandWest has specialized in thoughtful, innovative home landscapes for a city of outdoor people. Rick Scheen, graduate of LSU’s prestigious landscape architecture school, oversees every project and imbues it with creative vision. Services include design, construction and maintenance of pools, fire pits, water features, and yard and garden settings. 8100 Thomas Springs Road, (512) 263-3464, landwestdg.com

Mark Word Design
From historic garden revivals to fresh and modern garden design, Mark Word and his team produce inventive landscapes that are sensitive to context and region. Translation: These designs aren’t cookie-cutter. This darling of Texas and national garden and lifestyle publications designs commercial and residential landscapes all around Central Texas. 2201 N. Lamar Blvd., (512) 440-0013, markworddesign.com

Native Edge Landscape
A rising star on the landscape scene, Native Edge offers design, installation and maintenance as an integrated service, which eliminates that need for multiple providers who may have competing priorities. Founder and lead designer Rodney Stoutenger has more than a decade of experience and industry knowledge. One of the company’s projects was featured on the DIY Network show Yard Crashers. 1426 W. Howard Lane, (512) 351-4000, nativeedgelandscape.com

Open Envelope Studio
You can tell by its name that this company likes to do things a little differently. The boutique design-build firm has created a reputation for its modern landscapes, custom steelwork and unique furnishings for residential and commercial projects—all with a funky, slightly offbeat vibe. If that doesn’t say “Austin,” nothing does. 4807 Santa Anna St., (512) 293-6972, oes.design.com

Seedlings Gardening
Since 2009, native Austinite Liz Baloutine and her small staff of professionals have helped homeowners and restaurants achieve eco-friendly landscapes. From inspiration to installation, they’ll advise on drought-resistant plants, green up a courtyard, maintain a garden or turn a yard into outdoor living space. Projects range from a chef’s garden at Jeffrey’s to a midcentury family patio in Circle C. (512) 298-9396, seedlingsgardening.com

Sod Solutions 
Since 1994 this producer has developed innovative turfgrass, sold to licensed suppliers for landscape professionals to use in yards, golf courses and sports fields. These low-maintenance varieties, including Bermuda and St. Augustine cultivars, are chosen for quality, economy and ease of transplantation from farms to landscapes. The company provides technical and marketing support for all products. sodsolutions.com

SOMOS Design Landscaping
Do you want a sustainable, low-maintenance modern garden with artistic flair? SOMOS has you covered. Carlos Martinez and wife Rebecca Cely combine their backgrounds in the fine arts with their love of the outdoors to give clients unique spaces that include bocce ball courts, edible front yards, fountains and green roofs—anything but stuffy, and perfect for Austin. 828B Airport Blvd., (512) 732 2995, somoslandscapes.com

Studio Balcones    
A boutique landscape architecture firm that opened in 2009, Studio Balcones strives to design landscapes that inspire and create connections between people, nature and urban life. Led by co-founders Ilse Frank and Jennifer Orr, the team has more than 20 years’ experience in the residential, commercial and public sectors. Multiple projects have appeared on the AIA Austin Homes Tour and in national magazines. 702 San Antonio St., (512) 383-8815, studiobalcones.com

Tait Moring Associates
Born, raised and educated in Texas, Tait Moring is appreciative of our region’s native plants and rocks. Bringing his love of all things Texan to the design process, Moring and his team design, build and maintain inspiring gardens all over Central Texas. From rugged ranch landscapes to elegant estates, a Tait Moring Associates project has that regional swagger that Texans love. 6707 Bee Cave Road, (512) 327-6616, taitmoring.com

Thompson + Hanson
Since 1981 this design-build landscape architecture firm has been creating some of the finest residential gardens in Texas. Stylistically diverse, with site-appropriate plantings and proportion, many also include elements like terraces, pavilions and pools. The firm does everything from design and installation to maintenance and has divisions in both Austin and Houston. 1508 W. 34th St., (512) 327-7424, thompsonhanson.com

Westshop Design
Specializing in residential and small-scale commercial landscapes, Westshop approaches outdoor spaces as aesthetic, technical and environmental challenges, solving function and maintenance issues while using materials and plants to visually tie a property together. Alisa West, who holds a landscape architecture master’s degree from UT, founded the firm in 2013 and has collaborated with architects Matt Garcia and Michael Hsu. (512) 815-0733, westshopdesign.com

Article source: http://www.austinmonthly.com/AHM/November-2017/2018-Home-Resource-Guide-Landscaping/

New medicinal garden

By: Alexis Mitchell
Email – mitchella2@findlay.edu
Twitter – @alexismitch1

Deborah Berlekamp, assistant professor of pharmacy, recently took a trip to Japan with the University and saw something that she thought UF was missing; a medicinal garden.
“I thought, why don’t we have one?” said Berlekamp.
What people might not know is that a lot of schools in the country have medicinal and herb gardens. Ohio Northern is an example. They have campus-wide meetings where students actively participate in the research of the herbs in their gardens. This also inspired Berlekamp to start a garden here in Findlay.
The garden will be located by the Buford center close to where the Japanese garden currently is. The greenhouse that does the landscaping for the University of Findlay, Stratton Greenhouse, will also be contributing the herbs for the garden.
So far there are 25-30 plants picked out to go in the garden. Berlekamp says that picking the plants was definitely a process. She had to look at their maintenance, how much sunlight they need, and just how to take care of them in general.
There will also be benches, arches, a shade tree, signs describing the plants, and a walk way.
Not only will the new medicinal garden be a good place for students to go unwind, but it was designed for research purposes as well. Berlekamp says that pharmaceutical medicine derived from natural things and nature, so she hopes that pharmacy students will be able to see that in the garden.
However, she still invites students, and faculty from all majors to come and enjoy the garden or do research.
“I want it to be a beautiful, peaceful place,” Berlekamp said.
The garden will be started this semester, but the plants will not be planted until the spring. Berlekamp is currently looking for volunteers to help start working on the garden.
If you are interested, contact her at berlekamp@findlay.edu. In the near future Berlekamp will be starting her own herb club as well.

Article source: https://pulse.findlay.edu/2017/around-campus/new-medicinal-garden/

Memories of eastern gardens – The Herald

‘What joy it was for one of us to discover the tender green breaking through the mould, and run to grandpapa to announce that we really believed Marcus Aurelius was coming up, or the Queen of the Amazons was above ground!’

—Ellen Randolph Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson’s granddaughter,describing fanciful daffodils and tulips emerging at Monticello

H aving toured western gardens this summer, I thought it apt to compare them with eastern U.S. gardens. Eastern and western gardens are often far apart—not only geographically, but also culturally and botanically.

Euro-centric garden styles prevail in eastern cities, along with use of plants originally imported from the Continent, contributing to a kind of effusiveness. Western gardens are sparser and more rugged, integrating rocks and gravel with drought-tolerant plants. A hip curator with Denver Botanic Gardens forewarned touring garden professionals this summer that they might find mulleins, thistles and 5,000 species of xeric plants in his personal garden “kinda wild.”

Yet, homeowners, east and west, who’ve bought into America’s love affair with meticulous lawns, often find English-style cottagey gardens kinda messy. Attuned gardeners, including myself, often consider gardens using native plants somewhat unkempt. Is not there a happy medium among use of natives, cultivated plants and some lawn?

In eastern cities such as Philadelphia and Baltimore, European garden traditions flourish, with heavy use of boxwoods, hollies and cutting-edge temperate-zone plants. American colonists developed pragmatic kitchen gardens and farm-style plots at Williamsburg, Philadelphia, Monticello and other locales, and learned to use exciting New World plants. Yet, trendsetters such as Thomas Jefferson, author of our independence and a supreme horticulturist, tended toward classical designs and plants from around the world.

One of my most insightful tours was of John Bartram’s Garden, along the Schuylkill’s banks in west Philadelphia. “The king’s botanist” and early nurseryman supplied trees and plants to Independence Hall, Mount Vernon and Monticello, as well as Europeans thirsty for American plants. After taking the trolley from Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station, I beheld giant 200-year-old specimens of white fringetree and Carolina allspice, two favorite landscaping plants, and witnessed smallish descendants of the Franklin tree, a native tree Bartram and son discovered in Georgia, named after Benjamin Franklin.

The Philadelphia area’s teeming public gardens, endowed by wealthy entrepreneurs and alumni, showcase American triumphs in garden design at Longwood Gardens, Winterthur, Chanticleer, Philadelphia’s own public gardens, and the campuses of Swarthmore College and the University of Pennsylvania. Indeed, “the City of Brotherly Love” cradles gardening.

I was introduced to Philly’s prowess the summer of 2006 when Designscape hosted a dozen of us on a weekend fling to Longwood and Winterthur in neighboring Delaware. Never before had I beheld such gardens. Longwood founder Pierre du Pont’s color-coordinated entry gardens were overwhelming, and that centennial year we experienced Longwood’s trademark “garden theater,” choreographing fountains, fireworks and music. Never before had the “1812 Overture” been so glorious! Those productions returned this summer, I understand, after two years of re-calibrating Longwood’s fountains and reconstructing the Main Fountain Garden.

I returned to Longwood two years later, in 2008, upon receiving a merit award from the Perennial Plant Association for a Bloomington shade garden. PPA held its annual symposium in Philadelphia, and I was among several guests of honor at an awards dinner in Longwood’s conservatory where water was drained from a reflecting pool to accommodate tables and chairs.

That train trek years ago from Indianapolis was a career highlight. Besides Bartram’s Garden, I toured Chanticleer’s “pleasure gardens,” and Swarthmore’s captivating Scott Arboretum. For a landscape designer, Chanticleer is spellbinding, where plants are used ever so creatively. I enjoyed a “ruins garden” around an abandoned homestead, and, like all those other grande-dame gardens, their glorious container plantings.

The drought-tolerant ruins garden at Chanticleer compared favorably with mound and crevice gardens I saw out West. Rocks are a Western mainstay, and in Denver are an integral part of landscaping. The Denver Water Department gets the credit for introducing xeriscaping in the late 1970s. Derived from the Greek xeros, meaning “dry,” that city’s utility unit coined a term for water-wise gardening, now commonly used.

During layovers in Washington, D.C., Union Station’s proximity to the National Arborteum has made it very accessible during eastern flings. I’ve enjoyed the arborteum’s regional gardens, fascinating plant displays, and, in the conservatory, exciting exhibits on horticultural phenomena.

While such fantastic gardens delight my eyes, historic gardens, such as Bartram’s Garden, Monticello and Williamsburg sing to my soul. I delight finding commonality with horticultural heroes, whose accounts tell me that each day in the garden is a new challenge and discovery. That mission drives me onward.

Largely self-taught, but learning a little more each day, landscape designer Bob Baird can be reached at bbaird@alumni.iu.edu.

Article source: https://www.heraldtimesonline.com/life/at_home/memories-of-eastern-gardens/article_bdc4cf74-8e4c-5caa-80cf-9c2d83131dbc.html