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Archives for October 2, 2017

On Gardening: Get inspired for next year’s garden



We are now one week into the fall season of the year (the autumnal equinox occurred last Friday. Now is the time to plant in preparation for the new season. In the spring, many gardeners become inspired as garden centers display flowers that have been nitrogen-dosed into bloom, but the fall is best for installing new herbaceous perennials, and woody shrubs and trees. This time is good for such tasks because the plants will have time to establish their roots during the winter months and prepare to burst into bud and bloom in the spring. As this underground growth happens, our seasonal rains (hopefully) will provide needed moisture.

Planting and transplanting involves the pursuit of landscape design visions, which makes the late spring/early fall also a fine season for touring gardens for new ideas.

The Garden Conservatory, a non-profit organization, conducts a national program of one-day garden tours, known as the Open Days program. The tours are organized in local clusters of three-to-five outstanding private gardens. The Conservatory publishes an annual catalog of Open Days events, which are scheduled from April through October.

Last weekend, I visited one of the Open Days clusters in San Jose, and volunteered as the greeter at one of the gardens. There were three gardens on tour: a garden designer’s “intensely private sanctuary” with extensive stone and cast embellishments; a design gem, once featured in Sunset magazine and recently recovered from five feet of flood waters; and an artist’s nicely designed and well-managed collection of palms, cycads, bromeliads, ferns and succulents.

I won’t attempt to describe these gardens in more detail. The direct experience is always best. These three gardens are not larger than standard city lots, and they each presented details that most gardeners could adapt for their own landscapes. They also have interesting and well-grown plants, one of which I could not identify.

The designer was not present when I visited. The flower resembles that of the Firecracker Plant (Cuphea ignea), but the leaves are quite different. I’m searching for its name.

Several design details caught my attention. I particularly liked the use of small black river stones (Mexican pebbles), which are available in several sizes. These can be used loose as a stone mulch, placed in sand or concrete as decorative pavement, or in other ways as imagination might lead.

Another design detail of interest was the use of small Christmas light strings, woven into hanging metal pieces, e.g., chandelier, empty birdcage, etc. and serving a decorative lighting under a patio roof. Not everyone has a similar situation, but the effect would be attractive in the evening.

Thirdly, I was impressed by the use of very large carved stone, natural stone, and cast concrete pieces in a relatively small landscaped environment. Placing massive blocks requires bold commitment as well as physical effort, but such pieces express permanence with great clarity. Even a single specimen could be a strong addition to a garden, and a vote against more tentative actions.

Visit the Garden Conservatory’s Open Days website www.gardenconservancy.org/open-days for more information.

If you are ready to add plants to your garden, a good opportunity is the 5th Annual Native Plant Sale of the Watsonville Wetlands Watch. The sale will be 8:30–1:00 on Saturday, October 7th, at the organization’s resource center at the Pajaro Valley High School campus in Watsonville. The sale supports the group’s education and restoration programs in the Pajaro Valley. For info, visit www.watsonvillewetlandswatch.org.

Tom Karwin is past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, president of the Monterey Bay Area Cactus Succulent Society, and a Lifetime UC Master Gardener (Certified 1999–2009). Visit ongardening.com for links to information on this subject, and send comments or questions to gardening@karwin.com.

Article source: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/article/NE/20170928/FEATURES/170929652

European garden in the heart of Auckland

When your home is also your business premises, things have to look spot on pretty much all the time. When the garden is also part of that business, there’s even more pressure. Not that you would notice any signs of anxiety if you dropped in to visit Meredith Lee at her big white Grey Lynn villa in central Auckland. 

Meredith decided 13 years ago to find a live work site for her business European Antiques, somewhere she could display the beautiful furniture and decorative pieces she regularly sources from France, Belgium, Sweden and other European countries. The villa’s well-proportioned rooms turned out to be perfect for the job but the garden… not so much. Its subtropical style just didn’t work as a background for the classic French zinc planters, stone finials and graceful wrought iron furniture she imports. 

“I decided it needed to be more European to complement  the rest of the house,” she explains. “It had to be a working garden to display my outdoor pieces. Both the house and the garden are retail spaces. I knew when I started this business that I didn’t want a classic retail shop because you can’t get the same relationship with the furniture and other pieces as you do in a home environment.” 

Meredith on her front veranda with white clematis planted in pots either side of the door.

Meredith on her front veranda with white clematis planted in pots either side of the door.

READ MORE:
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Meredith commissioned Sayburn Miller of Verde Garden Design to come up with the initial design for the garden and has continued to develop it over the years. Her design concept is simple: green, white and scented with European styling. The luxuriant subtropical planting has been replaced by a more restrained palette of clipped bay trees, gardenia, star jasmine, Magnolia grandiflora ‘Little Gem’, eugenia and port wine magnolia (Michelia figo). 

“I am definitely a green kind of girl; I love gardens that are mainly green. I also like a neutral palette; it’s very French,” says Meredith. “I find it so restful and the colour complements the stone, zinc and terracotta so beautifully.”

To add seasonal colour, she grows different flowering plants in pots and troughs. In the winter months, white cyclamen are in bloom while in summer it’s her favourite flowering plants, blue and white hydrangeas. A range of different sized evergreen topiary adds further interest. “I like to think of gardens as outdoor rooms which I furnish with key pieces working with different textures, layering, colouring and seasonal drama,” she says. 

The green foliage of buxus, hydrangea and hosta beautifully complements their zinc planters.

White cyclamen fill an antique stone trough in another small courtyard behind the house.

Meredith takes her Swedish day bed out into the side garden on a sunny day.

An early 20th century zinc peacock.

Dried flowers.

Reconstituted stone lions.

Meredith adores the delicate foliage of pratia.

The French favoured zinc, here used for a hip bath, because it was easy to work.

Pleached bay and ficus trees bring the structured formality of European gardens to this Grey Lynn courtyard.

Meredith on her front veranda with white clematis planted in pots either side of the door.

The green foliage of buxus, hydrangea and hosta beautifully complements their zinc planters.

White cyclamen fill an antique stone trough in another small courtyard behind the house.

Meredith takes her Swedish day bed out into the side garden
on a sunny day.

An early 20th century zinc peacock.

Dried flowers.

Reconstituted stone lions.

Meredith adores the delicate foliage of pratia.

The French favoured zinc, here used for a hip bath, because it was easy to work.

Pleached bay and ficus trees bring the structured formality of European gardens to this Grey Lynn courtyard.

Meredith on her front veranda with white clematis planted in pots either side of the door.

You enter the garden via French doors from the living area, stepping down to a serene courtyard terrace – Meredith’s favourite spot for relaxing and entertaining. 

It’s the epitome of French elegance with its pale gravel floor, green foliage and the straight grey trunks of pleached bay trees. “Although they are definitely slow growing, I wanted to use bay trees because they introduce a strongly structural element into the garden with their straight grey trunks,” she explains. “I planted English ivy under the bay trees to introduce another layer of green. It had become so shaded there as the hedge has grown that this seemed like a good solution. Nothing much will grow there and the soil is very compacted. Luckily, they are thriving… and it cleverly hides leaf drop and restricts weed growth.”

Different tables and chair settings from her collection are used to form the centrepiece of the courtyard. Until recently it was an elegant cream circa 1940s wrought iron outdoor table setting but now it’s a more modern wooden table and chairs from ECC. “I wanted to introduce a bit of a contemporary element into the garden with this setting. I’ve also added some wonderful antique French lantern posts to this area and I’m looking to introduce a lighting scheme soon to highlight the trunks of the bay trees for night time drama.”

Pleached bay and ficus trees bring the structured formality of European gardens to this Grey Lynn courtyard.

Pleached bay and ficus trees bring the structured formality of European gardens to this Grey Lynn courtyard.

A second set of stairs takes you down to another paved courtyard, this one displaying a plethora of finials, plinths, terracotta pots, zinc weather vanes and metal watering cans as well as steel tables, stone benches and a fabulous wrought iron bench seat. 

Everywhere you look in the garden, beautiful objects are artfully placed. Most of the pieces are antiques from France and England, and each has its own story. She points out a lovely French limestone angel that has just arrived in her most recent shipment. It had somehow ended up in Denmark where Meredith found it. 

She knows which pieces will appeal to different clients and will contact them if she finds the perfect urn or statue. “I am working on a country garden for a client at the moment with a strong English style so that is good fun. I have bought some of the new shipment with this garden in mind. Sadly, I do find that a garden seems to be at the end of a client’s makeover and so the budget is more restricted. That is why fewer, stronger monumental pieces are proving more popular. Also, pieces like benches that are functional as well as being striking.”

An early 20th century zinc peacock.

An early 20th century zinc peacock.

Meredith maintains the garden herself “with the help of a wonderful gardener, Geoff. He has been visiting me twice a year for about the past 10 years to clip the hedges and do overall maintenance such as feeding and so forth. How he trims the long hedges by eye I do not know but I am grateful that he can.”

She comes from a family of gardeners and regularly visits her parents’ large English style garden. “I was very proud of my mother being featured in the NZ Herald one day as they covered her success in growing paeonies in Auckland, almost an impossible thing to do. Suffice to say we had many bulb fridges in the garage.”

And although she has seen many beautiful gardens here and in Europe, when you ask Meredith which garden designer she admires most, her response is immediate. “My mother’s, pure and simple. She is my absolute inspiration with her incredible plant knowledge, design skills and her daring colour combinations. She lives to garden and is in it each and every day.” 

The French favoured zinc, here used for a hip bath, because it was easy to work.

The French favoured zinc, here used for a hip bath, because it was easy to work.

 


 – NZ Gardener

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8 colourful shrubs for your spring garden

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Article source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/garden/97351904/european-garden-in-the-heart-of-auckland

Little Rock Sculpture Garden Expansion Opens






LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — After nearly a year of construction the Vogel Schwartz Sculpture Garden expansion in downtown Little Rock is open. 

It was originally dedicated in 2009 at Riverfront Park, and this expansion adds about a dozen new sculptures. 

The design for the garden and the landscaping have all been done by the Little Rock Parks and Recreation Department.

“I don’t think there is anybody in the United States that has ever had the design or done what we done with this sort of material to make a garden like this, said Dean Kumpuris, Little Rock City Director.

There are currently a total of 66 pieces of art by 48 different artists. 

Article source: http://www.arkansasmatters.com/news/local-news/little-rock-sculpture-garden-expansion-opens/822549684

Refurbished 1970s sculpture comes to Leesville Art Park

After standing in front of the Vernon Parish School Board Office, and then the Special Education Center for many years, a large-scale welded steel sculpture has been revitalized and moved a third time.

Vernon Parish Artist Larry Leach designed this collaborative work while serving as Artist-in-Residence for Vernon Parish Schools.

In the fall of 1976, Leach knew that he would be leaving after the school year to join the Louisiana State University of Alexandria (LSUA) faculty. School Superintendent Creighton Owen asked then Director of Vernon Parish Special Services Dr. Billie McRae to try to do something special with the students and Leach before his departure.

McRae and Leach came up with the idea for the sculpture which eventually became known as “Billie,” named after and dedicated in memory of  McRae.

Owen loved the sculpture idea, so McRae applied for, and received, a National Education Association (NEA) grant, and the project was underway.  

Sculpture Professor Rivers Murphy of NSU made suggestions to the original scale model. From there, the model was taken to all the parish schools, providing many students the opportunity to design, with cardboard, their own ideas and input.

During the process, students were exposed to the works of other well-known sculptors who worked with welded steel, such as Alexander Calder, David Smith, and Barnett Newman.

Jeff Laughlin taught welding at the Vernon Parish Career Center, and with his students from various schools throughout the parish, constructed this work based on the final design.  

The finished work was initially displayed in front of the school board office for years, then moved across the street in front of the Special Education Center.

In 2016, the Art 4 The Park Committee of GALLERY ONE EIIIEVEN proposed to the school board to allow them to remove, refurbish and install the sculpture where it is today.

Superintendent of Schools James Williams and Special Education Director Charlotte McHenry Cooper enthusiastically agreed to provide the sculpture for this project.

The installation and landscaping of “Billie” was made possible through the support of the Vernon Parish Tourism Commission and a generous donation by McRae’s children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. 

GALLERY ONE EIIIEVEN Coordinator Tony McDonald said “Billie” has become the anchor piece in the Leesville Art Park. “It is so dramatic that we have incorporated it into the park logo.”

The sculpture’s namesake, McRae, was an educator, world traveler, and strong supporter of the Arts in Vernon Parish. McRae was instrumental in not only the funding and production of this sculpture project, she also secured a grant to fund the mural montage of the history of Vernon Parish that hangs in the Historic Vernon Parish Courthouse. McRae was a strong and influential figure in the development of the Arts in Vernon Parish.

Four plaque pedestals are being built to accompany the four current sculptures in the park, said McDonald. “These will identify the sculpture, the sponsors, and will have an educational panel on each piece so the park can be used as an Art Education Lab.”

Art 4 the Park also just received a $4800 grant from the state to help purchase three interactive musical sculptures for the Melody Garden within the park.

Formal re-dedication of “Billie” the sculpture will take place in late November.

Article source: http://www.postsouth.com/news/20170930/refurbished-1970s-sculpture-comes-to-leesville-art-park

Ogden mini-building boom underway in Naperville; ‘rebranding’ suggested

Ogden Avenue, already seeing signs of rebirth thanks to plans for several new businesses, may be getting an added boost from a public-private partnership being discussed to “rebrand” the corridor.

An open house, sponsored by the city of Naperville, the Naperville Development Partnership and the Naperville Area Chamber of Commerce, is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 10 to get input on Ogden streetscape improvements that could include new lighting, signage, flowers and other landscaping.

“Ogden has always been a very vibrant corridor. It’s just looking a little tired,” said Christine Jeffries, president of the Naperville Development Partnership.

The open house comes five months after Naperville City Councilman Kevin Coyne and Mayor Steve Chirico broached the idea of creating a special service area along East Ogden Avenue through which commercial property owners would pay for esthetic improvements via a special tax assessment.

LAWN AND GARDEN: Dealing with property’s wet areas creates new landscaping opportunities

Most people have that spot, or spots, on their property that just refuse to grow anything or make you suffer trying.

Let’s take a look at some of those hard-to-grow spots and give you some ideas on what will grow there.

One typical problem area is spots that are wet. There are two kinds of wet areas — the continually wet and the once-in-a-while wet.

 A continually wet area means the water table is quite high. Most people at this point would throw up their hands in despair, but a small group of visionaries would see a bog garden complete with a moss-trimmed flagstone path terminating into a small rustic bridge with cattails framing its entrance.

The flagstone path continues a short distance; to their right, next to the pond, a rock and old stump garden of astilbe; to your left cardinal flowers and mounds of bee balm creating a red and green backdrop for pink cranes bill near their feet.

From this comfy spot, the whole of the bog is laid out before them. They notice that smaller plants like primrose and summer snowflake are planted close, growing in and among a few more rocks and stumps. At the waters edge, two or three clumps of marsh marigolds surround a small stand cowslips.

Across the small bog, the bigger, leafier stuff grows — ligularia with its yellow flowers, daylilies, a little bog rosemary for an evergreen effect, all set in front of a backdrop of possum haw viburnum or willow.

“Filling in” or “draining off” the property isn’t the only option. Plant choices are plentiful, in fact moist to wet loving plants number well over one hundred.

If the area has standing water only after a hard rain, you are probably dealing with a bad percolation problem, still the above-mentioned plants will work fine. Keep in mind, you will have to sprinkle this planted area when the dry weather set in.

If you don’t like the idea of making either one of these wet situations work, draining it off can be done, provided you have a place you can drain it too. To do this you will need a transit, and possibly a permit to drain off a wetlands area.

A transit aids in finding elevation. One person looks through a scope that is mounted on a tri-pod, which is set up securely over a spot that will have an unobstructed view of the entire area you wish to survey. Another person holds a long measuring stick, which looks like an eight-foot yardstick.

By using the transit, the “lowest” part of your wet area can be determined.

You can make a transit by using a flat top table, a two or four foot level, and an eight-foot stick. Place the table where you will have an unobstructed view of the entire area you wish to survey. Level the table so no matter where the two or four foot level is on the table the bubble is showing level.

With the lowest spot determined, take your stick and find a lower spot to drain to.

To drain the area, you will be using 4-inch plastic non-perforated drain tile; 4 inches will have to be subtracted from your 10 inch. This leaves you with 6 inches of actual fall to work with.

With this actual rate of fall established, you now have to figure out how fast your drain tile can drop when laid between the “wet” area, and the “to be drained to” area. To do this you divide the length you need your drain tile to travel by five, then divide the number of inches you have in fall by the answer you just received.

With the area drained, just treat it like any other garden you have, giving it the water and food it needs.

Wet is work but the results can be more beautiful than any other spot in your yard.

Article source: http://www.mlive.com/advancenewspapers/opinion/index.ssf/2017/09/lawn_and_garden_dealing_with_y.html

These 7 fire-retardant plants may help save your home


Consider all the potential solutions to help save your home during a wildfire and landscaping seems an obvious choice.

But are the drought-tolerant solutions that many of us have already implemented – turf removal among them – enough to fend off fire?

“Many native plants take longer to burn than some of the invasive weeds such as pennisetum and pampas grass,” Aoyagi says.

Other non-native invasive plants such as the wild mustard that took over Los Angeles hiking trails last spring, actually help to promote fire. “It’s like kindling,” Aoyagi adds. “What we need are authentic landscapes — landscapes that are natural to this place — that will make us more resilient [to fire, slides, floods] and give us a look that is ours alone.”

To combat invasive plants that may blow in from your neighbor’s yard, Aoyagi recommends using smart irrigation rather than overhead spraying (this leads to germination), heavy mulching and ground covers.

Aoyagi views the recent La Tuna fire, which destroyed five homes and scorched more than 7,000 acres, as an opportunity to talk about how our landscape affects natural disasters.

The key, she says, is to be authentic and to think about what comes after the wildfires.

“If a sumac burns, its roots are still intact,” explains Aoyagi. “When it rains, which we know it will soon, those living roots will retain slopes. In contrast, pennisetum has shallow roots that won’t provide much protection. Natives, like sumac, will also recover faster. Basically, natives protect us through the ups and downs of our climate. They are adapted to 100-year droughts, floods, as opposed to the plants we’ve been using.”

Here, Aoyagi describes seven of her favorite fire-resistant natives that are particularly useful in supporting L.A.’s fire resilience.

A pair of El Segundo blue butterflies mate on a flowering seacliff buckwheat plant at Miramar Park in Torrance.
A pair of El Segundo blue butterflies mate on a flowering seacliff buckwheat plant at Miramar Park in Torrance. Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

There are so many buckwheats, all with a distinctive beauty. The common ground is remarkable, pom-pom-like blooms.

Detail of flowering lemonade berry at Mike Evans/Tree of Life Nursery in San Juan Capistrano.
Detail of flowering lemonade berry at Mike Evans/Tree of Life Nursery in San Juan Capistrano. Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Also an edible, lemonade berry makes a great hedge substitute. You can make a nice, tart tea from its berries.

An oak tree in the Witches Wood, in the foreground, at Paramount Ranch.
An oak tree in the Witches Wood, in the foreground, at Paramount Ranch. Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Oaks are one of California’s truly iconic trees. In addition to aiding fire resilience, their expansive canopies can cool our communities. Placed correctly, they can also lower air conditioning costs by about 50%.

Fred Oehler Stanford Manzanita at Rancho Santa Ana Botanical Garden in Claremont.
Fred Oehler Stanford Manzanita at Rancho Santa Ana Botanical Garden in Claremont. Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

Even when its evergreen foliage is burned away, manzanita’s resilient trunks and branches have an architectural beauty that is hard to match. As if that weren’t enough, it is edible.

Detail of wooly blue curls at Mike Evans/Tree of Life Nursery in San Juan Capistrano.
Detail of wooly blue curls at Mike Evans/Tree of Life Nursery in San Juan Capistrano. Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Woolly blue curls is a highly fragrant, 3- to 4-foot evergreen shrub with violet flowers in fuzzy spikes. Again, so beautiful.

Catalina cherry: Resists fire and feeds wildlife and humans.
Catalina cherry: Resists fire and feeds wildlife and humans. FormLA Landscaping

Wildlife love the berries, and so do we.

Our Lord's Candle yucca bloom above the 210 freeway in Tujunga in 1998.
“Our Lord’s Candle” yucca bloom above the 210 freeway in Tujunga in 1998. Richard Derk / Los Angeles Times

Our Lord’s Candle is already beginning to sprout in the area burned in the La Tuna fire. The yucca has an almost iridescent quality when in bloom. Virtually every bit of it is edible at some point during the year. It is a great aesthetic exchange for those who like the look of pampas grass.

Los Angeles City firefighter Robert Hawkins hoses down a home to protect it from the La Tuna fire in Sunland.
Los Angeles City firefighter Robert Hawkins hoses down a home to protect it from the La Tuna fire in Sunland. Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Here are some smart examples of putting native, fire-retardant plants to good use:

Authentic Foothill Gardens, Sierra Madre City Hall: Installed two years ago, the foliage in the fire garden adjacent to the fire station will look like it will in a residential garden, as it is on a smart irrigation system. The foliage is varied in color, lush and leafy, and performs year round. SierraMadreGardens.com.

Sunland/Tujunga Welcome Garden: A community project led by Roger Klemm removed highly invasive grasses that had been proactively planted at the intersection of the 210 and Foothill Blvd. The garden now showcases the best of the more than 300 heat-and-drought resilient species native to the area, including those from Coastal Sage Scrub, Chaparral, and Oak Woodland communities. Sunland Welcome Nature Garden

Rosemont Preserve: Mostly preserved and unaltered space, however, Arroyos and Foothills Conservancy swapped invasive plants for fire-resistant and slope retaining natives last year in an effort to protect nearby homes from fire and slides. Now they are prepared. arroyosfoothills.org/rosemont

Source: FormLA Landscaping

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lisa.boone@latimes.com

Twitter: @lisaboone19

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ALSO:

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Did succulents save her home?

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/home/la-hm-firescaping-20170930-htmlstory.html

What to do in the October garden – Yakima Herald

A honey bee rests on a Golden Plate yarrow for a lunch break at the Yakima Area Arboretum in Yakima, Wash. Friday, June 24, 2016. (MASON TRINCA/Yakima Herald-Republic)

Article source: http://www.yakimaherald.com/lifestyle/home_and_garden/what-to-do-in-the-october-garden/article_461eaaa2-a4cf-11e7-9d18-e3e8e2dc3149.html

A Landscape at Peace With Man and Nature

“I like the play of light you get,” Mr. Beitel said, and as he pointed we saw his client come into focus as well. Standing in the doorway of the house and wearing a rain slicker, he beckoned us in.

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With the torrents slowing to a drizzle, we made a run for it. Indoors, the house revealed itself to be much bigger than expected, with cedar-paneled, open-plan living and dining areas that gave way to a long wall of floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the Peconic Bay. The distant land masses of Robins and Shelter Islands looked deceptively close, a swim away.

The view lured us outdoors, onto an unobtrusive terrace that gave way to a self-effacing deck surrounding a swimming pool. At this stealth house, nothing disturbed the landscape.

Photo

While construction of the main house was underway, the clients and their children stayed in the guest barn, where low retaining walls of fieldstone from Upstate New York separate a mostly unmown field from a gravel dining courtyard.

Credit
Eric Striffler for The New York Times

We wandered out to the bluff to look at the bay and to pay homage to a wind-battered native black cherry tree. Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc on the fragile bluff in 2012. But you would never know it five years later. Mr. Beitel replanted it; today, the steep, sandy slope is covered with bayberry, beach plum, volunteer locust and wild verbascum. “A rugged coastal, sandy landscape where the plants are really survivors is the most beautiful landscape there is,” Mr. Beitel said. “You learn that, growing up on Long Island.”

A garden like this has a positive impact on the environment: The coastal plants are a buffer against erosion and runoff; the hardy perennial grasses require very little water (“and no pesticides,” Mr. Beitel said) and the native flowering plants attract pollinators.

Deer are welcome in the garden, along with the bossy wild turkeys. Deer don’t like to eat plants like Pennisetum, Muhlenbergia, or Stipa tenuissima so there is no need to keep them away from anything but the family’s edible garden, where the fence that stands guard is made of rough, hand-hewed locust poles. (“I wanted to do it in the rustic way I remember my grandfather doing it,” Mr. Beitel said.)

Photo

A crushed gravel ribbon driveway follows the contours of the land.

Credit
Eric Striffler for The New York Times

The rain stopped as we walked toward the guest barn, where the family slept for months while their new house was under construction. We stopped to admire a proud old dogwood tree, whose progress Mr. Beitel monitors throughout the seasons, sending his clients photos in spring. (“I don’t want them to miss it in flower,” he says.)

Mr. Beitel knows, day to day, everything that happens in this garden. He drops by often, and sometimes the visits are for himself as much as for the garden: “If I’m really stressed out, I’ll stop by. It’s calming.”

“It’s beautiful,” I agreed.

And then the sun came out.

Michelle Slatalla, editor in chief of Gardenista.com, is the author of “Gardenista: The Definitive Guide to Stylish Outdoor Spaces.”


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Article source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/30/arts/landscaping-garden-homes.html

Sharum’s Garden Center Tips: Open House Fall Festival

Sharum’s Garden Center is back and they have the perfect way to kick off this fall weather at both of their Fort Smith and Springdale locations with a Open House Fall Festival Event.

Frank Sharum shares with us the perfect fall plant, their mums, which come in a large variety of colors and sizes. They currently have over 7,000 mums to choose from.

Don’t forget about their pumpkin patch which included 15 different varieties.

As always they will have complimentary hot dogs, popcorn, and drinks to enjoy while you shop for your favorite fall plants, trees, and pumpkins during their Open House event.

Segment Sponsored By: Sharum’s Garden Center

Article source: http://5newsonline.com/2017/09/30/sharums-garden-center-tips-open-house-fall-festival/