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Archives for August 2017

Demolition scheduled, but still no plans for cineplex

SALEM — Construction fencing has now gone up around the future home of CW Theaters on Highland Avenue, but there are still no concrete plans before the city for the entertainment complex.

A demolition permit was issued by the building inspector’s office on Aug. 11 to raze three existing buildings on the site, according to Tom St. Pierre, the city’s chief building inspector.

“They’re going to clean up the site,” St. Pierre said. “It’s just cleanup and demo of the buildings out there.”

The site has played a central role in a tumultuous conversation about traffic, development and various other issues for the area for 2 1/2 years now. The basic cineplex proposal was initially unveiled in January 2015, but it hasn’t made much progress since then. 

The proposal calls for a 10-screen theater complex with bowling, an arcade, sit-down restaurant and more. Since it was announced, the project has drawn fierce opposition from neighbors and mixed reactions from others in the city.

But development plans haven’t formally come forward for the project — even as of this week, according to Tom Daniel, the city’s planning director. An official with CW Theaters didn’t return a call requesting comment for this story. 

Amid the lack of progress on plans, the future of the site as an entertainment complex also appears to be in some doubt.

The property appears on several real estate websites as having been listed for sale for more than a year, with some sites updating their listings even in the past month. The full property, which runs from 355 to 373 Highland Ave. and covers 5.14 acres, has a price tag of $2,899,999 on it. While some sites list the property for sale, other say it’s off the market.

The installation of the fencing was to address three structures on the site that homeless residents have reportedly been using for shelter since the site was vacated, according to St. Pierre. The property was once home to Highland Gardens — a landscaping mom-and-pop business — and a couple of apartments out back.

“They shift around, shift around from one place to another,” St. Pierre said, referring to the homeless. “You shut down one place, and they go somewhere else.”

The fencing also secures the site from illegal dumping, he explained.

“You don’t want people dumping when the dumpsters get there,” he said.

Contact Salem reporter Dustin Luca at 978-338-2523 or DLuca@salemnews.com. Follow him on Facebook at facebook.com/dustinluca or on Twitter @DustinLucaSN.

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Article source: http://www.salemnews.com/news/local_news/demolition-scheduled-but-still-no-plans-for-cineplex/article_c51d26a5-1128-54a1-82e7-f795e6277863.html

Waltham youth program installs native-plant gardens

High school and college youth participating in the debut year of the Waltham Youth Environmental Entrepreneurship Program installed 12 native-plant gardens in the greater Waltham area this summer. The students planted 420 flowers, ferns, grasses and shrubs to transform 5,000 square feet of unproductive land into ecosystems gardens and meadows. These meadows offer food, shelter and a place to raise young for pollinators, insects and other wildlife.

In 12 paid spring sessions, youth learned about ecosystems gardening, native plants and how to run a specialty landscaping service business. This summer, youth applied their knowledge to creating eco-friendly gardens for residential and city properties in Waltham, Belmont and Woburn. The Foundation for MetroWest, Watertown Savings Bank and RTN Federal Credit Union sponsored student stipends, curriculum materials and the purchase of native plants from the Garden in the Woods in Framingham. Waltham Summer Youth Works 2017 hired students to work two Waltham-operated sites, Stonehurst and the Parkland at Met State on Trapelo Road. The New England Grassroots Foundation supported a portion of the salaries of several high school and college students.

YEEP is the newest project of Waltham-based Meadowscaping for Biodiversity, an environmental education organization that provides outdoor, project-based learning for youth, ages 7-18, in the Boston area. Bringing its custom-designed curriculum to summer camps and out-of-school-time programs, MS4B staff teach youth about the essential elements of ecosystems gardens — soil, water, native plants, pollinators, insects, birds, stewardship, etc. — while the students create meadows that increase biodiversity and wildlife habitat, and thus support life on Earth. The YEEP program empowers youth to do something positive for the environment and for themselves because the students earn money while learning.

YEEP launched in March 2017 as a dual-track program to teach high school youth how to build ecosystems gardens and a specialty landscaping business where they sell and install native plants for business and residential customers.

Article source: http://waltham.wickedlocal.com/news/20170830/waltham-youth-program-installs-native-plant-gardens

DC community calendar, Aug. 31-Sept. 6, 2017

Garden tour: “Fun With Trees” Certified arborist Alexandra Torres leads a walk through the U.S. Botanical Gardens outdoor garden and discusses tree selection for the home and arborist gardening tips. Take sunscreen and water, and wear protective clothing. The tour will be canceled in the event of rain, extreme heat or a Code Red weather alert. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Tour meets by the entrance on the terrace. U.S. Botanical Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. usbg.gov/programs. Free with online registration.

Woodrow Wilson Plaza summer concerts Blues singer Shirleta Settles performs. Thursday, noon-1 p.m. Concerts daily weekdays. Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. itcdc.com. Free.

Native Landscape Tour A horticulturist leads a tour of the National Museum of the American Indian Native Landscape gardens. Thursdays at 1 p.m. Through Sept. 28, weather permitting, except federal holidays. Meet near the flagpole outside the South Entrance. National Museum of the American Indian, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-1000. nmai.si.edu. Free.

Kids’ chess club For children of all ages who want to learn to play, improve their chess moves or play in tournaments. Thursdays, 5 p.m. Through Dec. 28. Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. chevychaselibrary@dc.gov. Free.

Child safety seat inspections DC Safe Kids in partnership with Children’s Health Project of DC offers weekly car seat inspections. Fridays 10:30-3:30 p.m. THEARC, 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE. 202-476-3618. thearcdc.org. Free.

Garden tour: “Highlights from the Conservatory Collection” A one-hour guided tour through jungle, desert and tropical foliage. Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays at 10:30 a.m.; Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays at noon; Wednesdays and Thursdays at 2 p.m.; and Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays at 3 p.m. except Sept. 3 and 4. Through Sept. 29. U.S. Botanical Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. usbg.gov. Free.

NPS walk: “Secrets of the Washington Monument Grounds” A park ranger traces the Potomac River’s original shoreline with stories from more than two centuries of change. 10 a.m.-noon. Begins at the Paddle Boat Parking Lot (near the refreshment stand) on Maine Avenue. SW. 202-359.2662. nps.gov/planyourvisit. Free.

Capital Harvest on the Plaza A farmers market features fresh fruits, vegetables and artisanal novelties. Recipes and tips for maintaining a healthy and socially responsible life are available at the information booth. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. most Fridays through Nov. 10. Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 13th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. 703-237-9777. capitalharvestdc.com.

Union Market Drive-In movies “Days of Thunder” (1990), featuring Tom Cruise as a hot-shot stock car driver, is the finale of the summer movie series. Lot opens at 6 p.m. and closes promptly at 7:20 p.m. Film begins at 8 p.m. Union Market, 1309 Fifth St. NE. 877-775-3462. unionmarketdc.com/events/union-market-drive-in. Free for walk-ups; $10 parking fee for cars.

Labor Day Weekend Music Festival The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities presents three consecutive nights of local music with three different performers each night. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 7 p.m. Historic Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U St. NW. dcarts.dc.gov. Free.

Adult Zumba The Washington Ballet leads a dance workout class featuring radio pop and Latin rhythms. Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. THEARC, 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE. 202-889-5901. thearcdc.org. $12; residents of 20020 or 20032, $6.

2017 Library of Congress National Book Festival A day of presentations, panels, poetry and family-friendly activities for book lovers. More than 100 celebrated authors on 10 different stages, including David McCullough, Dav Pilkey, Kate DiCamillo, Roxane Gay and Alice McDermott. 8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Walter E. Washington Convention Center, 801 Mount Vernon Pl. NW. 202-707-5000. loc.gov/bookfest. Free.

Celebration of Textiles A day-long community festival explores textiles with demonstrations of weaving, embroidery, spinning, quilting and lacemaking. Other activities include live music and dance, storytellers and hands-on workshops. Saturday-Sunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. The Textile Museum, George Washington University Museum, 701 21st St. NW. 202-994-5200. museum.gwu.edu/celebrate-textiles. Free.

National Park Service ranger talk: “The National Guard in World War II” Learn about the contributions and sacrifices of the Guardsmen who, at the beginning of World War II, made up two-thirds of the U.S. Army. 11-11:30 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. Meet at World War II Memorial contact station, 1964 Independence Ave. SW. 202-359-1533. nps.gov/planyourvisit. Free.

“Professore Giuseppe, Master Concatenator!” An aural tour of the National Building Museum for all ages, with percussionist and museum creative-in-residence Steve Bloom. Compare the sounds and vibrations of the different spaces through synchronized group drumming and vocals while moving through the museum’s historic architecture with Professore Giuseppe (Bloom). 11 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1 p.m. and 1:40 p.m. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. nbm.org. Free.

Yoga at the library Classes for beginner adults and teens taught by Yoga Activist. No experience necessary; take a mat or borrow one from the library. Saturdays 11 a.m. Through Sept. 30. Petworth Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. 202-243-1188. petworthlibrary@dc.gov. Free.

“Pieges (Personal Column)” Maurice Chevalier, Marie Dea and Erich Von Stroheim star in director Robert Siodmak’s 1939 French proto-film noir. A taxi dancer goes undercover to investigate the disappearances of several women who answered a personal ad. In French with subtitles. 1:30 p.m. National Gallery of Art East Building, 150 Fourth St. NW. 202-842-6905. nga.gov. Free.

NPS ranger walk: “Presidents and American Indians” A 1.5-mile walk looks at the historical interactions of U.S. presidents and Native Americans. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Begins at Washington Monument (base). 202-438-9603. nps.gov/planyourvisit. Free.

Freshfarm Capitol Riverfront farmers market Locally sourced fruits and vegetables, meat, cheese, bread, beer and coffee, every Sunday in the fall. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Canal Park, southern block, 200 M St. SE. 202-362-8889. capitolriverfront.org.

Palisades farmers market Local produce year-round, with music by Sherier Mountain. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 48th Place and MacArthur Blvd. NW. palisadesfarmersmarket.com.

National Museum of Women in the Arts community day. The museum offers free admission to the special exhibitions “Revival” and “Fanny Sanin” and the museum’s collection. First Sundays, noon-5 p.m. National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. 202-783-5000. nmwa.org. Free.

Carifesta A day-long festival of Caribbean music, arts and culture highlights 28 nations with live reggae and soca music, food courts and a beer garden. Noon-8 p.m. Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. eventnation.co/event/carifestanation2017. Free.

Blue Monday at Westminster D.C. As part of the weekly blues series, guitarist Dave Chappell and his band perform with guest singer-keyboardist Johnny Neel. 6-9 p.m. Dinner from 5:30-8 p.m. Westminster Church, 400 I St. SW. 202-484-7700. westminsterdc.org. $5.

National Symphony Orchestra A concert of patriotic songs and American Songbook standards. (In case of inclement weather, the concert will be in the Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater.) Gates open at 3 p.m., open rehearsal 3:30 p.m., concert 8 p.m. U.S. Capitol West Lawn (access at Third Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW or Third Street and Maryland Avenue SW) 202-416-8114. kennedy-center.org. Free.

ImagiNATIONS Activity Center Kid-friendly activities related to Native American history and culture include an interactive skateboarding video game, a quiz show and a stilt house adorned with photos by indigenous youth from the Amazon. Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m. -5 p.m. National Museum of the American Indian, third floor, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-1000. nmai.si.edu. Free.

Little Builders Storytime Ages 2-6. An interactive read-aloud of “Riki’s Birdhouse,” by Monica Wellington, followed by a related activity. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. weta.org. Free with admission: $16 adult, $13 student, seniors and ages 3-17 with I.D., $5: Blue Star ages 3 and up with I.D. (limit 6 per family). Register for the event by phone or online.

Tuesday classical music concerts Organist Martin Schmeding performs. 12:10-1 p.m. Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20. epiphanydc.org. $10.

National Park Service ranger talk: “Little Rock Girl 1957” A discussion of the photograph that changed the fight for integration in profound and unexpected ways. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial plaza, Independence Avenue and West Basin Drive SW. 10-10:45 a.m. and 2-2:45 p.m. 202-740-3441. nps.gov/planyourvisit. Free.

Tour: “The Art and History of the U.S. Botanic Garden” A walking tour explores how historical currents, architecture, sculpture, and landscape architecture came together to create the garden. Meet at the entrance to the Conservatory on the Terrace. Repeats Sept. 13 and 20; will be canceled on rainy days. 2-3 p.m. U.S. Botanical Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. usbg.gov. Free.

Book talk: “Writer, Sailor, Soldier, Spy: Ernest Hemingway’s Secret Adventures, 1935-1961” CIA historian and author Nicholas Reynolds discusses his book on Hemingway’s mid-20th-century spycraft. The talk will be followed by a book signing. Noon-2 p.m. William G. McGowan Theater, National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 866-272-6272. archives.gov. Free.

Lunder Conservation Center tour Learn how Smithsonian American Art Museum conservators use science, art history and skilled hands to preserve objects from the collections in the Lunder Conservation Center. Wednesdays at 3 p.m. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center, third floor, Eighth and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. si.edu/museums/american-art-museum. Free.

“Conversation Pieces” Senior curator Joanna Marsh uses a work from the American Art Museum to inspire an art discussion. First Wednesdays at 6 p.m. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Eighth and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. si.edu/museums/american-art-museum. Free.

— Compiled by Terence McArdle

Email: districtlocalliving@washpost.com (to the attention of Terence McArdle)
Mail:
Community Calendar, District Local Living, The Washington Post, 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071.
Details:
Announcements are accepted on a space-available basis from public and nonprofit organizations only and must be received at least 14 days before the Thursday publication date. Include event name, dates, times, exact address, prices and a publishable contact phone number.

Article source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-community-calendar-aug-31-sept-6-2017/2017/08/29/eaf9af20-803c-11e7-902a-2a9f2d808496_story.html

This summer proved perfect for many plants

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Article source: http://www.jhnewsandguide.com/opinion/columnists/gardening_marilyn_quinn/this-summer-proved-perfect-for-many-plants/article_42d9054d-aefd-540a-a117-dd78bb32ff4a.html

Gardening Advice And Tips On Food Preservation | WVXU

While some local gardeners are disappointed in their late-summer harvest, others are gathering more fruit and vegetables than their families can eat. No one likes to see that food go to waste, so if you’ve already supplied neighbors and friends with all the tomatoes they can use and you can’t bring yourself to make one more loaf of zucchini bread, consider preserving your produce for use all through this winter.


Joining us to discuss food preservation methods and to answer your gardening questions are Campbell County Extension Office Horticulture Agent Sarah Stolz; Turner Farm Chef and Culinary Manager Stephanie Michalak; Boone County Horticulture Agent for Family and Consumer Science, Diane Mason; and Boone County Cooperative Extension Horticulture extension agent, David Koester.

For information and registration on Turner Farm gardening programs, click here. For upcoming Boone County Extension program information, click here. For information on classes and events in Campbell County, click here. For the Campbell County Extension Horticultural Newsletter, click here.

OSU Extension, Hamilton County is now accepting applications for its 2017 Master Gardener Volunteer Training Class. Training will be conducted each Thursday for 10 weeks beginning September 14.  Classes will be from 9am to 4pm. For more information or an application, please call Julie Crook at 513-946-8998 or email her at crook.46@osu.edu.

Article source: http://wvxu.org/post/gardening-advice-and-tips-food-preservation

Tim’s Tips: Looking forward to fall? Get your yard ready

With September right on our doorstep, there are things that you should be doing in the early fall. Here are a few of the things you should pencil in on your to-do list.

If you need to repair an existing lawn or if you are going to start a new lawn from scratch, you should have the grass seed in place by the end of September.

Depending on the type of grass seed that you use, it can take up to three weeks for the grass seed to sprout, and then the seed will need another month to get out sufficient roots for it to turn into a permanent lawn.

It is true that some years you can get the seed down later. If you want to do all the work and hope that Mother Nature doesn’t freeze up the soil early, then you can wait. On the other hand, it probably is best to get the seed down by the end of September.

If you have Japanese bamboo growing in your yard, I don’t have to tell you how hard it is to control. I once owned a piece of property that had some of this invasive bamboo. I soon learned that trying to pull it up was futile. Trying to kill it with weed killer was futile most of the time.

I did learn that when this weed was forming its white flower clusters, it would soon be dying back for the winter. When the Japanese bamboo forms its flowers, it is preparing to pull all the food that has been made in the leaves down to the plant’s massive underground root system.

If you prepare and spray the leaves with a weed killer with glyphosate, the weed killer will be taken down to the roots along with all the food in the leaves. This will severely damage the root system of the bamboo.

The weed killer will kill other desirable vegetation, so you need to be very careful in how you apply it. I have seen the white flower clusters forming on the Japanese bamboo, so now is the time to spray the weed killer.

If you have space in your garden, now is the time to plant garlic. Many of the garden stores are selling untreated garlic that you can plant now.

The garlic is divided into the individual cloves, and each clove is planted in the ground. The clove will root and put out growth. The growth will overwinter, and come the spring, the clove will put on a growth spurt that will allow each clove to turn into full-size garlic.

You still have time to make use of some of the empty space in your vegetable garden. There are so many different types of greens that can be planted now that will give you a fall harvest of fresh vegetables. I had one customer who did a fall planting of greens, and with a mild fall, she was still harvesting fresh greens at Thanksgiving!

Well, Labor Day is coming up on Monday. Please have a safe weekend.

I’ll talk to you again next week.  

¢¢¢

Tim Lamprey is the owner of Harbor Garden Center on Route 1 in Salisbury. Do you have questions for Tim? Send them to ndn@ecnnews.com, and he will answer them in upcoming columns.

Article source: http://www.newburyportnews.com/news/lifestyles/tim-s-tips-looking-forward-to-fall-get-your-yard/article_42177498-c3a7-592f-ab7d-5f4e4d26c38b.html

Learn gardening hacks from national writer at Scottdale fundraiser – Tribune

Updated 4 hours ago

As a joint fundraiser for West Overton Village and Museum and the Mt. Pleasant Public Library, nationally known gardening author Shawna Coronado of Chicago will speak at the museum on Sept. 14.

Coronado, author of six books on gardening, will present “Secret Blow-Your-Mind Organic Gardening Hacks,” revealing ways to up-cycle everyday items in the garden to save money and benefit the environment.

Her hacks are natural or organic and easy for home gardeners to incorporate, according to a release from the library.

Coronado will use photos and tales from her own creative home garden to demonstrate tips she uses to make her plantings flourish.

A gardening expert whose speaking engagements have included TEDx and Google talks, Coronado also is scheduled to speak on Sept. 15 at Mother Earth News Fair at Seven Springs Mountain Resort in Champion.

The blogger for Better Homes and Gardens and Jung Seed was named among “Top 8 Gardeners to follow on Twitter.” She has shared her expertise on television and radio features including on PBS, WGN News and NPR.

Following a diagnosis of severe spinal osteoarthritis, Coronado became a wellness lifestyle advocate, practicing healthier habits including daily walking and consuming a mostly anti-inflammatory diet.

A limited number of her books, “100 Gardening Hacks” and “Grow a Living Wall,” will be sold at the Sept. 14 event. Only 100 tickets will be sold.

Event sponsors include West Overton Garden Society, Arona Road Greenhouse in New Stanton; Penn State Extension Master Gardener Kim Bringe of Greensburg; Mary Beth Kline of Jeannette, and Martha Oliver of the Primrose Path in Scottdale.

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-836-5401 or mpickels@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MaryPickels.

Article source: http://triblive.com/lifestyles/homegarden/12677024-74/learn-gardening-hacks-from-national-writer-at-scottdale-fundraiser

Gardening Advice And Tips On Food Preservation

While some local gardeners are disappointed in their late-summer harvest, others are gathering more fruit and vegetables than their families can eat. No one likes to see that food go to waste, so if you’ve already supplied neighbors and friends with all the tomatoes they can use and you can’t bring yourself to make one more loaf of zucchini bread, consider preserving your produce for use all through this winter.


Joining us to discuss food preservation methods and to answer your gardening questions are Campbell County Extension Office Horticulture Agent Sarah Stolz; Turner Farm Chef and Culinary Manager Stephanie Michalak; Boone County Horticulture Agent for Family and Consumer Science, Diane Mason; and Boone County Cooperative Extension Horticulture extension agent, David Koester.

For information and registration on Turner Farm gardening programs, click here. For upcoming Boone County Extension program information, click here. For information on classes and events in Campbell County, click here. For the Campbell County Extension Horticultural Newsletter, click here.

OSU Extension, Hamilton County is now accepting applications for its 2017 Master Gardener Volunteer Training Class. Training will be conducted each Thursday for 10 weeks beginning September 14.  Classes will be from 9am to 4pm. For more information or an application, please call Julie Crook at 513-946-8998 or email her at crook.46@osu.edu.

Article source: http://wvxu.org/post/gardening-advice-and-tips-food-preservation

De Gournay Creates a Wallpaper Worthy of Pauline de Rothschild’s Praise

While Pauline de Rothschild shared Chateau Mouton with her husband, Philippe, the couple maintained separate apartments in Paris; his in the 16th arrondissement and hers on the Left Bank. The style maven’s home on rue Méchain showcased her personal affinity for refined interiors. Inside, Louis XVI furniture sat atop parquet wood floors, and the bedroom walls teemed with 18th-century chinoiserie wallpaper that complemented a tented taffeta bed.

The jade garden design that wrapped the walls became iconic when fashion photographer Horst P. Horst captured the baroness, peeking behind a hidden door, in her whimsical oasis for Vogue in 1969. Nearly fifty years later, London wallpaper purveyor de Gournay will release a re-creation of the famous print with its latest chinoiserie design.

The motif is rooted in traditional, historic chinoiserie.

“We’ve been working a lot with papers that have more of a contemporary feel, with designs based on Rousseau paintings and ’60s pop art, but this time around we wanted to really recreate the past,” said de Gournay’s design director Jemma Cave. ‘We wanted to create something that had more of a classic chinoiserie look, reminding people that we can craft these wonderfully rich panels with historic roots.”

The resulting paper, Salon Vert, mimics the original panel’s energy, with fluttering pheasants, sparrows, and parakeets against a turquoise silk background. A magpie sits amid the foliage filled with chrysanthemums and butterflies, while intertwined branches wind up to the ceiling.

A hand-painted panel.

Like all of de Gournay’s wallpapers, the design was realized following 18th-century techniques, and the pattern was sketched and embedded onto silk panels with watercolor paint. “We wanted to make a paper that looks like it’s 100 years old with bleached-out pigments from decades of sun exposure, which makes the background look crisp and uneven.”

Pauline de Rothschild’s bedroom panels were removed from her flat in 1988, following her death, and were last seen for sale at a Parisian antique shop in the ‘90s. But de Gournay is determined that their legacy lives on. “The iconic Horst photo that depicts the beautiful panels crops up time and time again,” explains Cave. “It’s a look that will continue to surface.”

Article source: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/de-gournay-salon-vert-wallpaper-pauline-de-rothschild

Get Growing: How to paint your town with colorful flowers

Special to Reading Eagle: Gloria Day | A front cottage garden style expands to several adjoining homes in Buffalo, N.Y.

Article source: http://www.readingeagle.com/berks-country/article/get-growing-how-to-paint-your-town-with-colorful-flowers