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Archives for August 27, 2017

Gardening tips to get the most out of your vegetable patch

HOPEFULLY, you’ll now be reaping the rewards of your efforts with rich harvests from your vegetable patch. But there are ways to help the harvest along and promote better cropping as you go.

1. Tomatoes

You should be picking tomatoes now, but many may still not be ripe. The secret is optimum sunshine, so remove the yellowing lower leaves up to the first truss. When these have ripened, take off the next set of leaves. If the leaves are really dense, you can thin them a little to help air circulation and light. Cut off the growing tip of the plant, if you haven’t already done so, which will then transfer the remaining energy to the fruits to reach full size. If you still have green tomatoes left when the weather cools off, harvest them and put them in a brown paper bag with a banana and they should ripen more quickly. Alternatively, you can make green tomato chutney.

2. Peppers

If the fruits are big, but still not ripe, they will need some support. Feed them regularly with a tomato fertiliser and pick peppers when they are ripe but the skin is still smooth. If some have wrinkled skins, you may be better adding them to cooked dishes as they won’t taste good raw.

3. Courgettes

Don’t let your courgettes grow too large or they’ll become watery, tasteless marrows; check them at least twice a week, picking them when they reach around 15cm. For best results, feed plants with a dilute tomato feed once a week and harvest them regularly throughout the month to encourage further cropping. Most types will continue to produce fruits until the first frosts. If you want to extend the season, cover the plants at night with garden fleece. If you’re going on holiday, remove flowers and fruits before you go, which will mean more should have appeared by the time you come back.

4. Runner beans

Like sweetpeas, beans benefit from regular harvesting, which will promote further crops. Throughout summer, you should be picking them every other day, if you can, before they grow tough and stringy. The best time to pick them is when the bean snaps cleanly without any string, when it’s around 17-18cm long. Pick off every bean to prolong cropping into late summer and if you’re lucky, you should be picking them until October.

5. Lettuce

You can make a final sowing in August for an autumn crop, sowing a loose-leaved type and harvesting the leaves as required. Oriental leaves such as pak choi, mizuna and komatsuna are best sown from mid-summer onwards as earlier crops tend to produce flowers rather than leaves. To get the best flavour, harvest lettuces in the early morning when the leaves are at their freshest. To store, dampen under the tap and put them in a plastic bag in the fridge to keep them moist.

Article source: https://www.irishnews.com/lifestyle/2017/08/19/news/gardening-tips-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-vegetable-patch-1110671/

This week’s gardening tips: what to do about splitting citrus fruit

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Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2017/08/this_weeks_gardening_tips_citr.html

Garden Help Desk: Getting rid of the brown tips on house plant leaves, aspen suckers in lawns

Utah State University Extension provides informal education outreach to residents throughout the state. This question-and-answer column is designed to give you research-based information whether your gardening interest is producing fresh food, creating a landscape area or everything in between.

Question: My potted spider plant on my kitchen table has started getting brown tips on the leaves. I water it twice a week and fertilizer it. What’s going on?

Answer: There are a few possibilities for what’s happening to your spider plant. A watering issue is the most likely reason for what’s happening. Both over-watering and under-watering can cause leaf symptoms like wilting and tip browning. Houseplants need a good soak, but they also need time for the soil dry out just a bit so that air can move into the soil and bring oxygen to the roots. Some houseplants prefer evenly moist soil while others need more time between waterings.

For most houseplants, the top ½-1” of the soil should be dry and the pot should feel lightweight for its size. If the surface is still moist, or if the pot still feels heavy, it isn’t time to water yet.

Good drainage: It’s important that your house plants be in containers with enough holes to provide good drainage. When you water your plants, water completely so that the soil is thoroughly moistened and you also see at least a little a little water come out the drainage holes. If there is a saucer under your plants, make sure that there is no standing water left in the saucers.

Leaching out salt: It sounds like you are fertilizing on a regular schedule. Sometimes fertilizer salts build up in the potting soil and causes tip burn on leaves. These salts will need to be leached out. You can do this by watering very deeply several times over the course of an hour. Then let the pot drain well and wait until the soil has dried a bit before resuming your regular watering schedule.

Question: My neighbor’s aspen tree has started sending up little sprouts in my lawn. Mowing them down doesn’t kill them. What can I do?

Answer: Those little sprouts are called suckers. Suckering is a natural habit for aspen trees. That’s how we get the beautiful stands of aspens that we enjoy up in the mountains. Unfortunately, that suckering habit causes problems when we bring these trees out of the mountains and into our yards where they can spread throughout our lawns.

I’m afraid there isn’t a simple or easy solution to this problem. If the tree was your tree, you could kill the tree and then remove it. If you were to just cut your tree down without killing it, the roots in your lawn could send up even more suckers than you already have.

If the tree isn’t yours: Since the tree isn’t yours, let’s look at other options. One thing you can try is to put a solid barrier in the soil along your property line between you and your neighbor’s tree. This is a challenging project and there are no guarantees that you’ll be successful. The barrier would need to be at least 12 inches down into the soil and going 24 inches deep would increase your chances of success.

If you’ve dug down deep enough to separate the suckers in your yard from the tree in your neighbor’s yard, you can start using a chemical control on those little sprouts. Cut back each sucker and then either hand apply glyphosate (KillzAll, Roundup) or triclopyr (brush killer) to the cut surfaces, or you can use a multi-ingredient broadleaf herbicide for lawns in the spring and the fall.

It will take more than one year to get rid of all the sprouts. Using a chemical control without taking steps to sever the connection between the suckers and the tree isn’t an option because the chemical can travel back to your neighbor’s tree and cause damage.

Talk to your neighbor: One thing you’ll probably want to do is talk to your neighbor. Frequent watering encourages trees to keep their roots closer to the soil surface, which might promote suckering. If you’ll both water your lawns deeply, but infrequently, it will encourage the tree to be more deeply rooted, which might slow down suckering.

Article source: http://www.heraldextra.com/news/community/garden-help-desk-getting-rid-of-the-brown-tips-on/article_2b6187c6-8cb4-52a7-9a8a-ada8aceeae71.html

Gardening Tips: Preparing your lawn and garden for fall

I’M JULIE RILEY, HORTICULTURIST WITH THE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, WITH MIKE SHULTZ BEHIND THE CAMERA.
WE’RE DOWN AT CITY HALL BECAUSE THE LAWN IS BEAUTIFUL. BUT, WHEN YOU DRIVE BY IT’S THE FLOWERS THAT YOU NOTICE.
BUT A HEALTHY MAINTAINED LAWN IS WHAT MAKES THE FLOWERS LOOK SO GOOD.
SO THINK ABOUT I, IF OYUR LAWN DOESN’T LOOK THIS GREAT THERE’S STILL TIME TO FERTILIZE.
ACCORDING TO UAF RESEARCH, FALL FERTILIZATION DOES NOT CAUSE PROBLEMS WITH WINTER INJURY.
YOU WANT TO USE A COMPLETE FERTILIZER, APPLIED AT HALF THE RATE YOU USED IN THE SPRING.
IT’S THE NITROGEN THE FIRST NUMBER THAT GREENS UP THE GRASS SO NICELY.
BUT IT’S THE POTASSIUM THAT HELPS TO DEVELOP WINTER HARDINESS, COLD HARDINESS.
FALL IS ALSO A GOOD TIME FOR WEED CONTROL.
PERENNIAL WEEDS LIKE DANDELIONS, ARE MOVING ALL OF THEIR STORED RESERVES DOWN INTO THE ROOTS FOR STORAGE.
SO YOU GET BETTER PERENNIAL WEED CONTROL WHEN HERBECIDES ARE APPLIED AT THIS TIME OF YEAR.
IF YOU DECIDE TO GO THIS ROUTE, YOU WANT TO SELECT A PRODUCT THAT HAS A LABEL FOR USE ON THE LAWN.
SO LOOK FOR HEREBIDES THAT SHOULD BE APPLIED THIS TIME OF YEAR WHEN THERE IS NO BREEZE BECAUSE YOU DON’T WANT THE SPRAY DRIFTING OVER YOUR LILACS OVER THROUGHT HE VENTS INTO YOUR GREENHOUSE.
GRANULAR PRODUCTS THAT NEED TO DISOLVE IN WATER, ARE ALSO TAKEN UP BY TREE ROOTS UNDER THE LAWN.
IF YOU DON’T HAVE MANY WEEDS AT ALL, YOUCAN TRY DIGGING, BUT REMEMBER THAT ANY LITTLE PIECE OF DANDELION ROOT LEFT IN THE LAWN, WILL SPROUT A NEW PLANT IN SPRING.
SO THIS IS OUR LAST SEGMENT, GET YOUR FALL GARDENING CHORES DONE, AND ENJOY THE GOOD WEATHER.

Article source: http://www.webcenter11.com/content/news/Gardening-Tips-Preparing-your-lawn-and-garden-for-fall--441799043.html

Regal palace or farmhouse table, fresh-cut flowers are always a star – Omaha World

Shane Connolly’s work as a floral designer has taken him all over the world, propelled by two royal weddings to his credit. In mid-September, the Northern Ireland-born Connolly will travel from London to speak at the Lauritzen Gardens Antique Garden Show. In a phone interview from his studio in North Kensington, he chats about seasonal harmony in his designs, cow parsley and a vow of silence when it comes to his work for the British royals.

You enjoy status as the British royalty’s go-to designer, holding a Royal Warrant of Appointment both to the Queen of England and Charles, Prince of Wales. What’s behind that designation?

When you work for the royal family, you can’t talk about the personalities or the intricacies. Having the Royal Warrant is public acknowledgment of your discretion and reliability … I’ve had the Royal Warrant from the Prince of Wales since 2006 and from the queen for two years.

You were artistic director for the 2011 wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. Were they very involved?

They were very involved. It was a completely normal family wedding.

Do you have royal greenhouses at your disposal?

When it is something like one of the weddings, then I have many things at my disposal, such as the gardens of Windsor Castle and the gardens of Sandringham in the case of the Cambridges’ wedding, and the gardens of Highgrove in the case of the Prince’s wedding (to the Duchess of Cornwall).

It sounds so exotic and exciting.

It’s like work for any client. It’s important to put the client first, and to be very respectful of what they like and of their privacy. It’s no different from working for anyone in the public eye.

Is it nerve-racking having your work on such a public stage?

On the occasion of the Cambridges’ wedding, I wasn’t nervous at all until the press got involved. As far as I was concerned, I was really only trying to please the main client — the bride. If I were doing your wedding, I would want you to be pleased. The most important thing is that the bride was happy. That was how I kept reassuring myself.

What makes a good flower arrangement?

To me, it is something that is aware of a sense of place, that feels right in its setting. Hopefully, you get a feeling for the formality or informality of the occasion. You wouldn’t do a golden bowl of roses and orchids in the middle of the Nebraska countryside. It would look pretentious. Usually the way to find that balance is to see what is available in local gardens and markets. That to me makes a good arrangement. It looks as one with the setting and the season.

Is there a flower in Nebraska you’re looking forward to working with in your floral-arranging demonstration at the antique show?

I haven’t done my research yet. I’m really looking forward to finding out what I can get. I have requested that I might go to a few gardens to cut things.

What is the creative process behind an arrangement?

It’s more every event and every commission. We don’t often do just one arrangement. It’s more the look of a whole event. Every one is completely different. Keeping the sense of place, that’s the most important thing. If it’s a party for your birthday, I would want to know about your interests, and I would want to know how you are. Do you like your friends to be impressed, or do you want them to feel relaxed? It’s the same approach to every commission.

What has been your most outrageous commission?

Once we lined the inside of a grave with flowers. That’s unusual. It was the request of the dead person’s wife. I had to climb into the grave and stick flowers into the earth.

What advice do you have for people doing their own arrangements?

Don’t try too hard. Keep everything simple. Also, find the right container. To me the easiest way is to have several simple containers rather than a big arrangement. You can put flowers in little containers in the middle of a table. That’s a very easy way to get a beautiful effect, and you also see the flowers.

Do you follow the latest trends?

I don’t like the word “trends.” People feel they have to follow them. Especially brides, because they are usually younger and not quite so confident in their tastes. It’s nice to not be strung into that.

Do you have a beautiful garden?

I certainly have a garden. But I wouldn’t like to say it’s beautiful. I try hard.

Do you have a favorite flower in your garden?

Gardening is the thing that brought me to flowers. It’s the thing I’m constantly guided by. If you are a gardener, your favorite flower changes all the time. The first time a lily of the valley blooms, you think “That’s my favorite flower,” and then it’s gone.

If you were a flower, what would you be?

I think I would want to be something like cow parsley or a wildflower. I wouldn’t want to be an orchid or a rose.

Lauritzen Gardens Antique Garden Show

What: Weekend filled with noted speakers, fine antiques exhibitors, mini seminars, designer walks and a garden market.

When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sept. 15-17. Patron party, Sept. 14.

Highlights: Friday, 11:30 p.m. lunch and lecture with interior designer Mark D. Sikes and House Beautiful editor-in-chief Sophie Donelson; Saturday, 10:30 a.m. floral demonstration with London-based designer Shane Connolly, using personally selected flowers and foliage from local gardens; Sunday, complimentary mimosas while supplies last; 11:30 a.m. lunch and cooking demonstration with Omaha Steaks chef Grant Hon and award-winning mixologist Tyler Fry. Nikki Boulay fields questions from the audience.

Information, reservations: omahaantiqueshow. org

Article source: http://www.omaha.com/inspiredliving/design-decor/regal-palace-or-farmhouse-table-fresh-cut-flowers-are-always/article_1bbed0a0-cfc9-5233-9026-30a6d26c0a20.html

Antiques can add personality, focal point to a garden

By Dean Fosdick

Associated Press

Adding antique garden ornaments to the landscape blends horticulture with history. One-of-a-kind pieces will personalize your property, and over time may grow into something richly rewarding — financially as well as artistically.

“Really outstanding good old pieces such as a swan bench, unusual large decorative urn or piece of sculpture will continue to go up in value, but really more important to my client is the same artistic pleasure that placing a certain piece in their garden gives to them,” said Aileen Minor, owner of Aileen Minor Garden Antiques Decorative Arts in Centreville, Maryland.

Some of her garden antiques have been installed in the U.S. Capitol, the Smithsonian Institution, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and in private collections around the United States, Germany, England and France.

The definition of “antique” is somewhat elastic but generally applies to objects more than 100 years old.

“What makes a piece worth collecting? I would say rarity, design detail, all original parts and age,” Minor said.

Garden antiques are most commonly made of wicker, metal or stone, and range from pergolas and gazebos to cemetery headstones and fountains, from ironwork, fencing and gates to outdoor furniture and windows.

Family heirlooms certainly qualify.

Each person has his or her own idea about what constitutes a collectible, said Troy Rhone, owner of Troy Rhone Garden Design in Birmingham, Alabama.

“Typically, I look for pieces that are over 120 years old and have a unique history,” Rhone said. “I’m not as concerned about the price because I’m usually looking for a specific item for my gardens.”

Rhone studies each piece to determine if there are markings to determine who made it, signs of wear and tear, and areas that might deteriorate quickly.

“Not many pieces can stand the test of time when exposed to weather, so using pieces that have proved their sustainability is something most people are drawn toward,” Rhone said.

Many people shape their garden antique collections around a theme. Some may want to match a Victorian-era setting, highlighting the looks of their home and neighborhood. Others simply want practical antiques spotted tastefully around their landscape.

“Collectors do collect pieces based on forms such as antique hitching posts or interesting sculpture,” Minor said. “But more often they are looking to find unusual pieces such as a fountain for a focal point in a garden, or are looking for an attractive antique or vintage bench or settee for seating in their garden.”

Estate sales, auctions and antique dealers are good places to look, Rhone said. “They can be a great resource when searching for a specific item. Most of the time it’s pretty easy to have shipping arranged.”

Living at a time when so much is mass-produced, it’s nice to have something that no one else has, Rhone said.

“That is easily accomplished with an antique that was handmade,” he said. “No one else is likely to have that exact piece so it allows a space to have individuality, which is what makes one garden stand out from the rest.”

Secure them, though. High-end antique pieces are prime targets for thievery.

Article source: http://staugustine.com/living/garden/2017-08-26/antiques-can-add-personality-focal-point-garden

Antiques can add personality and a focal point to a garden … – Observer



Adding antique garden ornaments to the landscape blends horticulture with history. One-of-a-kind pieces will personalize your property, and over time may grow into something richly rewarding – financially as well as artistically.



“Really outstanding good old pieces such as a swan bench, unusual large decorative urn or piece of sculpture will continue to go up in value, but really more important to my client is the same artistic pleasure that placing a certain piece in their garden gives to them,” said Aileen Minor, owner of Aileen Minor Garden Antiques Decorative Arts in Centreville, Maryland.



Some of her garden antiques have been installed in the U.S. Capitol, the Smithsonian Institution, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and in private collections around the United States, Germany, England and France.



The definition of “antique” is somewhat elastic but generally applies to objects more than 100 years old.



“What makes a piece worth collecting? I would say rarity, design detail, all original parts and age,” Minor said.



Garden antiques are most commonly made of wicker, metal or stone, and range from pergolas and gazebos to cemetery headstones and fountains, from ironwork, fencing and gates to outdoor furniture and windows.



Family heirlooms certainly qualify.



Each person has his or her own idea about what constitutes a collectible, said Troy Rhone, owner of Troy Rhone Garden Design in Birmingham, Alabama.



“Typically, I look for pieces that are over 120 years old and have a unique history,” Rhone said. “I’m not as concerned about the price because I’m usually looking for a specific item for my gardens.”



Rhone studies each piece to determine if there are markings to determine who made it, signs of wear and tear, and areas that might deteriorate quickly.



“Not many pieces can stand the test of time when exposed to weather, so using pieces that have proved their sustainability is something most people are drawn toward,” Rhone said.



Many people shape their garden antique collections around a theme. Some may want to match a Victorian-era setting, highlighting the looks of their home and neighborhood. Others simply want practical antiques spotted tastefully around their landscape.



“Collectors do collect pieces based on forms such as antique hitching posts or interesting sculpture,” Minor said. “But more often they are looking to find unusual pieces such as a fountain for a focal point in a garden, or are looking for an attractive antique or vintage bench or settee for seating in their garden.”



Estate sales, auctions and antique dealers are good places to look, Rhone said. “They can be a great resource when searching for a specific item. Most of the time it’s pretty easy to have shipping arranged.”



Living at a time when so much is mass-produced, it’s nice to have something that no one else has, Rhone said.



“That is easily accomplished with an antique that was handmade,” he said. “No one else is likely to have that exact piece so it allows a space to have individuality, which is what makes one garden stand out from the rest.”



Secure them, though. High-end antique pieces are prime targets for thievery.

Article source: http://www.observer-reporter.com/20170826/antiques_can_add_personality_and_a_focal_point_to_a_garden

Candidate’s View: Light-rail loop would better connect Duluth

I am planning an independent study project with the science and engineering school at the University of Minnesota Duluth. The school is working with me to set it up.

The continuous loop I propose would service high-volume destinations, including the hospitals, the transit center on Michigan Street, educational facilities, malls, tourist attractions, and businesses. The Duluth Transit Authority would be the operating company.

For most of my life I have worked in positions related to electrical and electronics fields, including in U.S. Navy communications, for business machines, for the taconite industry, as a teacher at Lake Superior College, and electrical inspection with the pipelines. I am familiar with the operation of light-rail units.

The loop I propose in Duluth would avoid normal traffic interaction and physical obstacles while minimizing the impact on private property. The loop would be powered by electricity with no exhaust and little noise. The route would not have stop signs, traffic lights, or surface conditions. It would eliminate rush-hour traffic delays as well as delays from accidents, funeral processions, and road construction. I have many ideas for passenger terminals and a business plan. My proposal includes a park-and-ride feature.

My idea would be a boost for construction trades and local suppliers. It may even result in another attraction for tourism as a portion of the proposed route would travel behind Skyline Parkway with a view of Lake Superior. With some creative landscaping, it could be invisible. The rest of the loop would travel along highways, use right-of-ways and railroad corridors, and would be elevated to avoid traffic.

This would be an express train, providing efficient travel for ease of access to and from popular destinations in Duluth.

During my campaign, I plan to meet in Q-and-A- or town hall-style meetings to present my idea.

Minnesotans are fortunate to have two light-rail lines in the Twin Cities. I have ridden on both. Our train in Duluth would be different. It would have a single set of tracks and would always be traveling in the same direction, resulting in half the weight and savings in infrastructure. Additional train units during high-volume periods would mean faster service rotating around, like spokes on a wheel.

No job losses would result for DTA drivers as trains need monitors, conductors, and maintenance personnel.

I’ve received positive responses to my idea from labor organizations and contractor associations. I entered the race late, however, and they already had voted to support other candidates. They can’t change their endorsements, but they still would like the jobs my proposal would generate.

This proposal needs a spokesperson. Its fruition would be advanced by the citizens of Duluth giving me their vote. The tourism industry has kept Duluth alive, and this project would bring in more tourism dollars.

Let’s also bring back manufacturing jobs. This would help solve revenue stream problems. The other issue would be increasing revenue through new housing on vacant land that could generate tax income with residences or businesses.

Richard Williams is a candidate for an At Large seat on the Duluth City Council.

Article source: http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/opinion/4317241-candidates-view-light-rail-loop-would-better-connect-duluth

Ai Weiwei wants to build “security fence” in Washington Square Park

Artist Ai Weiwei is known for standing up to the Chinese government and making political statements. But now, the celebrated artist is taking his message to New York, where he hopes to erect some 300 artworks challenging ideas about immigration.

Weiwei lauched a Kickstarter campaign in conjunction with the Public Art Fund to bring the project, entitled “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors,” to life.

Specifically, the artist wants to add security fences and borders “addressing human rights issues” in all five boroughs at sites, including Central Park, Washington Square Park and the Unisphere monument, according to Dezeen.

“The issue with the migration crisis has been a longtime focus of my practice,” Weiwei said. “And the fence has always been a tool in the vocabulary of political landscaping.” [Dezeen]Christopher Cameron

Article source: https://therealdeal.com/2017/08/26/ai-weiwei-wants-to-build-security-fence-in-washington-square-park/

Master Gardener: Chautauqua brings beauty to both the mind and the landscape

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If you are looking to add late-season flowers to your garden, Chautauqua Institution is a great place to visit for inspiration. The community known for presenting learning opportunities across a variety of subjects each summer also has endless spectacular landscaping.

This lovely community is on Chautauqua Lake, in the southwestern corner of our state. You can get there from Geneseo in 2-1/2 hours, an easy day trip on Interstate 86, formerly Route 17. The program season ends Aug. 26, after which there is no admission fee. Throughout the summer, admission is free on Sundays.

I recently had the opportunity to spend a few days at Chautauqua, near my hometown of Jamestown.

My sister and I both worked at the main entrance gate for several summers – from the time each of us turned 16 until graduating from college. This historic property has changed and improved significantly in more than 40 years.

It can be challenging to summarize the flowers I saw, but hydrangeas reigned supreme and they looked amazing in this summer of frequent rain. Many varieties were represented, but the paniculata type Limelight, and the arborescens type Annabelle were quite common. The wall of oakleaf hydrangeas against the main entrance building was breathtaking. Hibiscus, Russian sage, and coreopsis were also all well-represented.

Institution staff maintain much of the property within the gates, including countless public gardens. Homeowners maintain their own homes and properties, following standards established by their local government. Properties range from small cottages perched on sloped lots to large lakefront estates. Maintaining the historic theme is priority. Most visitors must leave their cars in parking lots near the main entrance during the summer season.

Because this community slopes toward the lake, run-off can contribute to lake pollution. To reduce this tendency, rain gardens with native plants have been installed in several locations, including around the new amphitheater. Additional plantings on the lakefront help stabilize the shoreline. Purple Joe Pye weed, Lobelia cardinalalis (red cardinal flower), and Lobelia siphilitica (great blue lobelia) were commonly used in the more moist areas, supplemented by Rudebeckia (brown eyed susans), white coneflowers, and a shorter variety of Russian sage in dryer areas. No two gardens were the same; many additional plants were incorporated.

Annual flowers reach their peak in late August, and my love of zinnias was well-nourished during my visit. There are many mature trees in this community, making coleus and begonias popular in shady areas. Even the common marigold was a star in this environment.

Chautauqua Institution is a unique place. According to its website, “The Chautauqua Institution is a not-for-profit, 750-acre educational center beside Chautauqua Lake in southwestern New York State, where approximately 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during a nine-week season, and a total of over 100,000 attend scheduled public events.”

During their nine-week summer season, classes, lectures and other inspiring events are scheduled throughout the day. Evenings include plays, operas, symphony concerts and other forms of entertainment.

Some families have spent summers there for generations.

Chautauqua is also a year-round community hosting conferences and other events during the period from September to June.

Additional information about Chautauqua may be found online at Chq.org.

Julie Brocklehurst-Woods has been a Master Gardener Volunteer with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Livingston County for more than 10 years.

Article source: http://www.thelcn.com/lcn05/master-gardener-chautauqua-brings-beauty-to-both-the-mind-and-the-landscape-20170826