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Archives for August 18, 2017

Gardening column: Dead grass can be fixed with these tips – News …

Q. I am finding spots of dead looking grass in my lawn. What could be causing that and what are some things I can do to repair those areas?

A.There are various causes so I’ll mention a few and some suggestions of what you can do to fix each one. Some causes could be: Urine burn made by a pet dog; lawn mower blades so dull that they actually cut unevenly ripping the grass off instead of cutting it; a mower that is set too low and cuts grass too short; grub damage; and fertilizer and weed killer damage. These are probably the most common reasons for grass damage and bare spots. I’ll begin with the last reason and work forward:

Fertilizer and weed killer burn:Fertilizer and weed killer applied unevenly over the lawn can burn and kill grass in spots. (Also if there were a lot of weeds, dying weeds could be causing some of the bare spots.)

• Proper settings for your spreader are provided on the bag of weed and feed if you are applying it yourself. If this is what has happened in your lawn, resist fertilizinguntilearly spring.

• Rake off the dead grass, loosen up the soil in the bare spots, add compost, and sow with grass seed. Keep watered.

Grub damage:Grubs can be the problem and to know if that is what you have, pull on the dead grass and if it is grubs, the grass will lift right off the spot. This happens because the grubs have eaten the grass roots.

• We are seeing an upsurge in Japanese beetle damage this year so grubs in the lawn are a possibility.

• If you determine this is what is causing the problem, you can purchase environmentally safe grub control products such as milky spore, a hose end spray product by Safer, and several other products that are offered at most garden centers or online.

• After treatment rake off any dead grass, then aerate your lawn.

• You can do this by using your heavy duty garden rake or rent an aerator.

• If you want to do it the inexpensive way and your lawn isn’t a large one, lay the rake tines down and press with your foot in strips throughout your lawn.

• Then spread compost over the area and match grass seed to your present grass and seed the bare spots. Keep all well watered.

Dull mower blades:The answer to this is almost self-explanatory. Always make sure your mower blades are sharp and set your mower high (3 or 4 inches for Fescues). Both of these suggestions can provide you a low maintenance, drought tolerant lawn. That also protects your grass from disease and pests.

• It this has caused the bare spots, after you correct the mower problems, aerate, spread compost evenly over the damaged areas, and sow grass seed. Always keep watered.

Pet burns:If you have a dog you know they often use the same spots over and over and soon there are urine burns throughout your lawn.

• These are said to be nitrogen burns like what happens if a high nitrogen fertilizer was wrongfully applied and you wind up with damaged and spotty grass as a result.

• One method to stop the damage (or slow it down) is to stop the high nitrogen fertilizer on the grass the pet uses and then take it a step further and every day flush the area with water.

Jane Ford is an Advanced Master Gardener. Email questions to bloominthing@gmail.com. This column is the opinion of the writer and does not necessarily reflect the views of The News-Sentinel.

Article source: http://news-sentinel.com/living/gardening_column_dead_grass_can_be_fixed_with_these_tips_20170818&profile=1016

Gardening column: Dead grass can be fixed with these tips – News …

Q. I am finding spots of dead looking grass in my lawn. What could be causing that and what are some things I can do to repair those areas?

A.There are various causes so I’ll mention a few and some suggestions of what you can do to fix each one. Some causes could be: Urine burn made by a pet dog; lawn mower blades so dull that they actually cut unevenly ripping the grass off instead of cutting it; a mower that is set too low and cuts grass too short; grub damage; and fertilizer and weed killer damage. These are probably the most common reasons for grass damage and bare spots. I’ll begin with the last reason and work forward:

Fertilizer and weed killer burn:Fertilizer and weed killer applied unevenly over the lawn can burn and kill grass in spots. (Also if there were a lot of weeds, dying weeds could be causing some of the bare spots.)

• Proper settings for your spreader are provided on the bag of weed and feed if you are applying it yourself. If this is what has happened in your lawn, resist fertilizinguntilearly spring.

• Rake off the dead grass, loosen up the soil in the bare spots, add compost, and sow with grass seed. Keep watered.

Grub damage:Grubs can be the problem and to know if that is what you have, pull on the dead grass and if it is grubs, the grass will lift right off the spot. This happens because the grubs have eaten the grass roots.

• We are seeing an upsurge in Japanese beetle damage this year so grubs in the lawn are a possibility.

• If you determine this is what is causing the problem, you can purchase environmentally safe grub control products such as milky spore, a hose end spray product by Safer, and several other products that are offered at most garden centers or online.

• After treatment rake off any dead grass, then aerate your lawn.

• You can do this by using your heavy duty garden rake or rent an aerator.

• If you want to do it the inexpensive way and your lawn isn’t a large one, lay the rake tines down and press with your foot in strips throughout your lawn.

• Then spread compost over the area and match grass seed to your present grass and seed the bare spots. Keep all well watered.

Dull mower blades:The answer to this is almost self-explanatory. Always make sure your mower blades are sharp and set your mower high (3 or 4 inches for Fescues). Both of these suggestions can provide you a low maintenance, drought tolerant lawn. That also protects your grass from disease and pests.

• It this has caused the bare spots, after you correct the mower problems, aerate, spread compost evenly over the damaged areas, and sow grass seed. Always keep watered.

Pet burns:If you have a dog you know they often use the same spots over and over and soon there are urine burns throughout your lawn.

• These are said to be nitrogen burns like what happens if a high nitrogen fertilizer was wrongfully applied and you wind up with damaged and spotty grass as a result.

• One method to stop the damage (or slow it down) is to stop the high nitrogen fertilizer on the grass the pet uses and then take it a step further and every day flush the area with water.

Jane Ford is an Advanced Master Gardener. Email questions to bloominthing@gmail.com. This column is the opinion of the writer and does not necessarily reflect the views of The News-Sentinel.

Article source: http://news-sentinel.com/living/gardening_column_dead_grass_can_be_fixed_with_these_tips_20170818&profile=1016

Make the most of your container garden with these tips | WHNT.com

Container gardening is a great way to save space and add some variety to your garden.  With the right planning and care, you can plant your containers in the spring, watch it thrive through the summer, and have full, beautiful plants coming into the fall.  Here are the three big tips for your container plants.

  1. Size:  Make sure your container is large enough and can hold enough soil to allow the plants to grow.  If the container is to small, your flowers will suffer during the summer months.
  2. Water and Drainage: It’s important to make sure that your plants are getting the water they need, but equally important is to ensure proper drainage.  Choose a container that has holes in the bottom to release excess water.
  3. Fertilizer: In order for these plants to get large and full, fertilize them regularly.  Slow release fertilizer in the soil at planting and then fertilizer in the water each week will help them grow big and beautiful.

Keep these tips in mind when you’re doing a container garden, and you’ll have success in growing gorgeous full plants.

 

Have a gardening question?  Use the form below to ask the folks at Bennett Nurseries.  We may feature this in an upcoming Garden Tips segment!

Article source: http://whnt.com/2017/08/17/make-the-most-of-your-container-garden-with-these-tips/

Make the most of your container garden with these tips | WHNT.com

Container gardening is a great way to save space and add some variety to your garden.  With the right planning and care, you can plant your containers in the spring, watch it thrive through the summer, and have full, beautiful plants coming into the fall.  Here are the three big tips for your container plants.

  1. Size:  Make sure your container is large enough and can hold enough soil to allow the plants to grow.  If the container is to small, your flowers will suffer during the summer months.
  2. Water and Drainage: It’s important to make sure that your plants are getting the water they need, but equally important is to ensure proper drainage.  Choose a container that has holes in the bottom to release excess water.
  3. Fertilizer: In order for these plants to get large and full, fertilize them regularly.  Slow release fertilizer in the soil at planting and then fertilizer in the water each week will help them grow big and beautiful.

Keep these tips in mind when you’re doing a container garden, and you’ll have success in growing gorgeous full plants.

 

Have a gardening question?  Use the form below to ask the folks at Bennett Nurseries.  We may feature this in an upcoming Garden Tips segment!

Article source: http://whnt.com/2017/08/17/make-the-most-of-your-container-garden-with-these-tips/

Garden tips for the harvest season

The time is here to harvest a number of garden crops. First, let’s look at garlic.

Pull garlic when three-quarters of the stems have become dry and yellow. It won’t hurt to pull earlier, though, and given the current spate of dry conditions, I pulled my garlic when only the top few inches of stem and leaves had turned yellow. This was because garlic need lots of water, and I preferred to pull the garlic early rather than continue watering.

Now here’s a real helpful tip. Many people try to remove clinging dirt and debris from garlic bulbs by tapping on a hard object. I have done this myself, but last year had to pay the price. My usual practice was to hold the garlic by the stem and with some degree of force, tap the bulb on the wooden frame of a raised bed.

But that’s a risky practice and every so often, garlic so handled will not last through the winter. Indeed, my garlic last season became soft and the bulbs broke apart on their own, no help from me. Also, the individual cloves became mildewed, rendering them unfit for use.

So handle your garlic cloves gently. Remove clinging dirt by rubbing lightly with your fingers. After that, spread your garlic out on a table or something similar and leave in the sun for one or two days. Then bring in and place in a shaded, dry place for the final cure. After the remnant of stem has thoroughly dried, place the bulbs in an onion bag and store in a cool, dry area.

Summer squash

Pick zucchini and yellow summer squash when the fruits are about 6 inches long. Do your best not to allow any individual squashes to grow much larger. And keep ‘em coming. That is, pick as frequently as needed. This will assure continued production right up to frost time.

So what do we do with all those summer squash? Well, I just learned from a friend that the yellow variety (and probably zucchini as well) make excellent pickles. Use a bread-and-butter pickle recipe and substitute summer squash for cucumbers.

I used to slice summer squash into rounds and then sauté them for a minute or so. After that, the squash would be placed on a baking sheet so that none were touching. The sheet, with its complement of squash, then went in the freezer. When fully frozen, the squash slices are easily removed from the baking sheet and placed in a plastic freezer bag for winter storage.

To use, just partially thaw and then sauté as per fresh squash.

Summer squash is tasty when sliced and briefly boiled. One gardener likes to mix cut-up onions with squash slices. It’s easy, then, to parboil summer squash, drain and place in freezer bags for storage in the freezer. To use, just get a slight amount of water boiling in a saucepan and drop in the frozen slices.

And then we have friends, neighbors and food pantries. Where there’s a will there’s a way, so keep picking and enjoying those little squash. And remember, in winter any summer squash we find in the produce aisles will probably be soft and half-gone by. I’d rather have my own frozen product than a wizened squash from the store.

Bush beans

This year I tried a new, for me, bush bean called “Strike.” I give these top rating because they have a fine, delicate taste and remain straight and tender even as they get larger. But it’s best not to let them get too large. Better to pick all beans of a harvestable size than to leave medium-size ones on the vines to become too large.

I like to buy bush beans that continue producing over a long time. The best way to encourage long-term production is to keep the beans picked. Does this sound familiar? It should, because that’s the same way we need to treat our summer squash.

Barring any unforeseen circumstances, I plan on planting Strike bush beans next year, too. They are delicious and worthy of our attention.

Sometimes despite our efforts to keep beans picked, some of them manage to grow to an exceptional size. That’s when I break out my cast-iron bean slicing (Frenching) device. Even the toughest old bean tastes fine and becomes tender after going through a bean-Frenching device.

Cucumbers

What goes for summer squash and bush beans also holds true for cucumbers. Try your best to keep eating-size cucumbers picked and the plants will reward you with increased production.

As mentioned in a past column, I grow my cukes on a trellis. This keeps the fruits clean, off the ground and easy to find. My two cucumber types for this season were Summer Dance and Delikatesse. Summer Dance are long and thin, making them great for slicing. Delikatesse is a rather short, thick cucumber that serves equally well for fresh eating (even when rather large) and pickling.

But cucumbers are prone to a debilitating plant disease called bacterial wilt. This occurs when bacteria enter the plant stem through insect-caused wounds. Those yellow-and-black striped cucumber beetles are prime culprits and can transfer bacterial wilt by feeding on the plants. Rotenone works to solve this problem.

But controlling insects represents just part of the cure. The bacteria can linger in the soil, so if your plants become infected, pull them and burn them. Then next year, plant in a different location.

I grow my cucumbers in an EarthBox and have always done well until last year one of my plants developed bacterial wilt. Thinking that I had somehow damaged the plant, I didn’t take remedial measures. But now with the disease confirmed (stems dry and leaves wilt), I must empty the potting soil in my EarthBox and sterilize the inside of the water receptacle. The old soil will be disposed of far from my garden, and before planting next year, I will add new, clean soil. The soil in this EarthBox has served me for more than 10 years, so it’s past time for a change.

Chard

Did you plant your Swiss chard so thick that now it only produces lots of little leaves? Well, don’t despair, since chard responds well to thinning. It’s not too late to begin thinning and I suggest leaving at least one foot between plants in a row. So thin now, water, and in only a few days your chard will begin to take on new life. Before too long you will only need one or two leaves for a meal.

Tom’s tips

Do you like how things went with your garden this year? Or does it seem apparent that some things ought to change, perhaps certain plants need to grow in a new location to avoid depleting soil. The best way to remember all of this is to write it down. I like to make line drawings depicting what grew where. This comes in quite handy for future reference.

In addition to taking notes, it helps to take photographs of your garden from different angles. That way, it’s easy to see at a glance just how the garden was set up. Next winter, when snow flies and temperatures plummet, those garden photos will help to relieve winter blues. It works for me, and I’m sure it will do the same for you.

Article source: https://waldo.villagesoup.com/p/1678072

Garden tips for the harvest season

The time is here to harvest a number of garden crops. First, let’s look at garlic.

Pull garlic when three-quarters of the stems have become dry and yellow. It won’t hurt to pull earlier, though, and given the current spate of dry conditions, I pulled my garlic when only the top few inches of stem and leaves had turned yellow. This was because garlic need lots of water, and I preferred to pull the garlic early rather than continue watering.

Now here’s a real helpful tip. Many people try to remove clinging dirt and debris from garlic bulbs by tapping on a hard object. I have done this myself, but last year had to pay the price. My usual practice was to hold the garlic by the stem and with some degree of force, tap the bulb on the wooden frame of a raised bed.

But that’s a risky practice and every so often, garlic so handled will not last through the winter. Indeed, my garlic last season became soft and the bulbs broke apart on their own, no help from me. Also, the individual cloves became mildewed, rendering them unfit for use.

So handle your garlic cloves gently. Remove clinging dirt by rubbing lightly with your fingers. After that, spread your garlic out on a table or something similar and leave in the sun for one or two days. Then bring in and place in a shaded, dry place for the final cure. After the remnant of stem has thoroughly dried, place the bulbs in an onion bag and store in a cool, dry area.

Summer squash

Pick zucchini and yellow summer squash when the fruits are about 6 inches long. Do your best not to allow any individual squashes to grow much larger. And keep ‘em coming. That is, pick as frequently as needed. This will assure continued production right up to frost time.

So what do we do with all those summer squash? Well, I just learned from a friend that the yellow variety (and probably zucchini as well) make excellent pickles. Use a bread-and-butter pickle recipe and substitute summer squash for cucumbers.

I used to slice summer squash into rounds and then sauté them for a minute or so. After that, the squash would be placed on a baking sheet so that none were touching. The sheet, with its complement of squash, then went in the freezer. When fully frozen, the squash slices are easily removed from the baking sheet and placed in a plastic freezer bag for winter storage.

To use, just partially thaw and then sauté as per fresh squash.

Summer squash is tasty when sliced and briefly boiled. One gardener likes to mix cut-up onions with squash slices. It’s easy, then, to parboil summer squash, drain and place in freezer bags for storage in the freezer. To use, just get a slight amount of water boiling in a saucepan and drop in the frozen slices.

And then we have friends, neighbors and food pantries. Where there’s a will there’s a way, so keep picking and enjoying those little squash. And remember, in winter any summer squash we find in the produce aisles will probably be soft and half-gone by. I’d rather have my own frozen product than a wizened squash from the store.

Bush beans

This year I tried a new, for me, bush bean called “Strike.” I give these top rating because they have a fine, delicate taste and remain straight and tender even as they get larger. But it’s best not to let them get too large. Better to pick all beans of a harvestable size than to leave medium-size ones on the vines to become too large.

I like to buy bush beans that continue producing over a long time. The best way to encourage long-term production is to keep the beans picked. Does this sound familiar? It should, because that’s the same way we need to treat our summer squash.

Barring any unforeseen circumstances, I plan on planting Strike bush beans next year, too. They are delicious and worthy of our attention.

Sometimes despite our efforts to keep beans picked, some of them manage to grow to an exceptional size. That’s when I break out my cast-iron bean slicing (Frenching) device. Even the toughest old bean tastes fine and becomes tender after going through a bean-Frenching device.

Cucumbers

What goes for summer squash and bush beans also holds true for cucumbers. Try your best to keep eating-size cucumbers picked and the plants will reward you with increased production.

As mentioned in a past column, I grow my cukes on a trellis. This keeps the fruits clean, off the ground and easy to find. My two cucumber types for this season were Summer Dance and Delikatesse. Summer Dance are long and thin, making them great for slicing. Delikatesse is a rather short, thick cucumber that serves equally well for fresh eating (even when rather large) and pickling.

But cucumbers are prone to a debilitating plant disease called bacterial wilt. This occurs when bacteria enter the plant stem through insect-caused wounds. Those yellow-and-black striped cucumber beetles are prime culprits and can transfer bacterial wilt by feeding on the plants. Rotenone works to solve this problem.

But controlling insects represents just part of the cure. The bacteria can linger in the soil, so if your plants become infected, pull them and burn them. Then next year, plant in a different location.

I grow my cucumbers in an EarthBox and have always done well until last year one of my plants developed bacterial wilt. Thinking that I had somehow damaged the plant, I didn’t take remedial measures. But now with the disease confirmed (stems dry and leaves wilt), I must empty the potting soil in my EarthBox and sterilize the inside of the water receptacle. The old soil will be disposed of far from my garden, and before planting next year, I will add new, clean soil. The soil in this EarthBox has served me for more than 10 years, so it’s past time for a change.

Chard

Did you plant your Swiss chard so thick that now it only produces lots of little leaves? Well, don’t despair, since chard responds well to thinning. It’s not too late to begin thinning and I suggest leaving at least one foot between plants in a row. So thin now, water, and in only a few days your chard will begin to take on new life. Before too long you will only need one or two leaves for a meal.

Tom’s tips

Do you like how things went with your garden this year? Or does it seem apparent that some things ought to change, perhaps certain plants need to grow in a new location to avoid depleting soil. The best way to remember all of this is to write it down. I like to make line drawings depicting what grew where. This comes in quite handy for future reference.

In addition to taking notes, it helps to take photographs of your garden from different angles. That way, it’s easy to see at a glance just how the garden was set up. Next winter, when snow flies and temperatures plummet, those garden photos will help to relieve winter blues. It works for me, and I’m sure it will do the same for you.

Article source: https://waldo.villagesoup.com/p/1678072

Better student nutrition by design

There’s nothing like a new set of wheels to launch the school year, only those coming from the College of Environmental Design’s embARC Summer Design Academy will help the human engine.

The ­products of this summer’s embARC Design Build project aim to enhance the accessibility and visibility of a host of services providing fresh, affordable and nutritious food to students in need at UC Berkeley.

The wheels have been installed on two cargo trailers, a small pop-up kitchen and a mobile farm stand constructed by about 50 high school juniors and seniors during a four-week summer program in which they learned metalworking, woodworking, digital fabrication and design skills. One cart with wooden baskets is dubbed the Tour de Fruit, another the Kitchlet, and the small and large cargo trailers are adorned with a Basic Needs Security logo.

 

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Every week, the devices, pulled by electric bikes, will collect about 50 pounds of fresh food grown at UC Berkeley’s Gill Tract in Albany as well as from garden sites on the north side of campus and at the Clark Kerr campus on the south side.

Supplies can be transported via two of the carts to the campus Food Pantry in the basement of the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, or to special events at other locations. The farm stand trailer will be used by the Food Pantry as a pop-up pantry and by the campus gardens as a farm stand.

The Kitchlet cart features a couple of propane-powered burners and countertops for demonstrations of healthy meal preparation by nutritionists from University Health Services.

A 2016 UC Student Experience Survey found that 39 percent of UC Berkeley students experience food insecurity, which can range from having insufficient food supplies, undergoing disrupted eating patterns or lacking balanced meals.

The embARC Summer Design Academy brings high school students from around the world to UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design for immersive study in architecture, design, fabrication and sustainable city planning as they respond to local social/environmental justice issues.

In previous summer sessions, embARC students have applied design solutions to real-world problems by constructing nesting boxes to promote East Bay bird conservation, and building storage devices for the Verde Partnership Garden in North Richmond to promote healthy eating.

With this summer’s Design Build project, the students responded to lectures and presentations by campus Food Pantry and nutrition services leaders as well as instruction in the Sustainable City Planning Workshop before heading into the fabrication shop.

The embARC program convinced Sam Leung, 16, of Seattle, to study architecture rather than structural engineering when he goes to college in a couple of years. His classroom learning, team research with classmates and hands-on experience smoothing and carefully bending the thin, wooden fenders in the studio for the Basic Needs Security trailer “was quite enlightening,” Leung said.

RELATED INFORMATION

“Ask the Dietitian” is a University Health Services blog in which experts answer common student nutrition concerns, such as how to eat well on a budget, how to handle cravings, and how to avoid the myth of the “Freshman 15” weight gain.
● The Bear Pantry is a volunteer-run food bank at University Village in Albany for low-income UC Berkeley students with dependent children.
● The UC Berkeley Food Pantry provides emergency nutritional support to undergraduate and graduate students, dispensing aid to more than 2,500 students since opening in 2014.

Article source: http://news.berkeley.edu/2017/08/17/better-student-nutrition-by-design/

Government Center courtyard redesign to include recognition for Ellwood City war hero

NEW CASTLE — Plans for a newly designed courtyard outside the Lawrence County Government Center will include recognition for an Ellwood City war hero who received the U.S. military’s highest award for combat valor.

The commissioners approved a contract Tuesday with Mary Burris Landscape and Garden Designs of New Castle, at a maximum cost of $1,400. She will design a new courtyard, including expanded green space and monuments.

“We’re going to update the space, make it more accessible,” Burris said.

Lawrence County Commissioner Dan Vogler said the new courtyard, which is expected to be built next year, will include a new Medal of Honor exhibit that includes former Ellwood City resident Leslie Sabo.

Sabo, a 1966 Lincoln High School graduate, was killed May 10, 1970, in Cambodia during the Vietnam War. Army records indicate that he saved the lives of more than 50 soldiers during an ambush by North Vietnamese troops. Sabo ultimately died in a suicide grenade attack on an enemy bunker that was firing on U.S. troops.

His fellow soldiers immediately recommended him for the Medal of Honor, but the records went missing until 1999, when another Vietnam veteran discovered Sabo’s file in the National Archives. Based on that discovery and interviews with eyewitnesses who served with Sabo, he was awarded the Medal of Honor in 2012 by President Barack Obama.

Sabo is the third Lawrence County resident to receive the Medal of Honor, and the first since the American Civil War.

Joseph Chambers and Cyrus Lowers, the Civil War Medal of Honor recipients, are recognized on a memorial stone outside the Lawrence County Government Center main entrance.

Burris said the memorial will incorporate a star matching that of the Medal of Honor in its design, with a fountain and bronze plaques for Sabo and the remaining two Medal of Honor recipients, and space for two additional recipients.

The commissioners said a redesign is necessary for aesthetic and safety reasons, specifically the threat of trip-and-fall accidents.

Vogler said the project for the courtyard would probably be completed next year, with most of the funds coming from the state workers’ compensation board, which gave the county a $40,000 grant this year.

Article source: https://www.ellwoodcityledger.com/news/local_news/government-center-courtyard-redesign-to-include-recognition-for-ellwood-city/article_ab4d80e8-82b4-11e7-b0f1-af3298aa55a5.html

Explore The Insider

Low-maintenance and user-friendly, this 20-foot-wide backyard garden, built and planted by Crown Heights-based Brook Landscape, proves that garden design needn’t be complex to be successful. “You don’t need a ton of ingredients to make a good meal,” points out Brook Klausing, who founded the design/build company in 2007 with Brian Green, an architect and fellow Kentuckian.

There wasn’t much to work with when they arrived on the scene — just “weeds and dirt,” Klausing said. An existing plate-glass picture window and minimal steel stair by Brooklyn-based architects vonDALWIG, who oversaw earlier interior renovations, suggested the garden’s modernist style.

The Brook Landscape team began by pruning back some of the neighbors’ overhanging trees and excavating soil near the house for a below-grade patio. They built a raised deck made of ipé, a Brazilian hardwood highly rated for weather resistance, and surrounded the yard with horizontally slatted cedar fencing.

Find your Brooklyn design inspiration

The plant palette is limited for simplicity of design and ease of care. There are classic rows of hornbeams on three sides of the yard; topiary boxwood balls in front and back; shade-loving, early-blooming hellebores around the garden’s perimeter; and a pink-blooming kousa dogwood, under-planted with rosemary, in a raised central bed.

A hidden soaker system takes care of irrigation.

Klausing sees a lot of urban gardens so heavily planted that there’s “just one pathway and a little seating area,” with hardly any space left over for family use or entertaining. “We’re always striving for the right balance between usable space and horticulture,” he said. “I love this garden because it’s open and spacious, with nicely partitioned rooms for different functions. But we still allowed for diverse, layered plantings and let the garden be a garden.”

Boxwood balls soften the rear foundation and underline the wide picture window that overlooks the garden.

Mondo grass in front of the boxwood requires no mowing. A fig tree in a pot has its own illumination.

The richly veined marble pavers, set in gravel for easy drainage, were imported from Turkey  “We thought it would be fun to do something textured,” Klausing said. “It’s really vibrant when it rains.”

As evening falls, uplights around the garden’s perimeter impart a glow to the limbed-up trunks of the hornbeams.

The curvy Loop chairs, made of lightweight cement, are a 1954 design by Willy Guhl, still in production.

The dining table and benches are a vintage find, with classic French bistro chairs from Fermob for extra seating.

[Photos by Anna Shive]

Check out the new ‘The Insider’ mini-site: brownstoner.com/the-insider

The Insider is Brownstoner’s weekly in-depth look at a notable interior design/renovation project, and The Outsider is an occasional series on garden design, by design journalist Cara Greenberg. Find The Insider here every Thursday morning. Got a project to propose for The Insider? Contact Cara at caramia447 [at] gmail [dot] com.

Related Stories

Businesses Mentioned Above


Brook Landscape


vonDALWIG


Fermob

Article source: http://www.brownstoner.com/neighborhood/midwood/garden-design-ideas-brooklyn-brook-landscape-midwood/

Expanding personal space improves environment

The impact of the trees on a lawn, or a neighbor’s landscaping, vegetation and greenery has a huge impact on the structure of the D.C. region.

The founder of Ed Ball Landscape Architecture sat down with What’s Working in Washington to explain how sustainable landscaping can have a positive effect on the greater Washington area.

“I spent a lot of time working on projects for about five or six years in the Bahamas… over that period of time, I really did see ocean levels rising,” said Ball. As a result, he began experimenting with how canopy cover and foliage work to control temperature.


Sponsored Content: How is your agency managing and maximizing its data? Share your opinions in a Federal News Radio survey.


“I started thinking on how to integrate with my own design work, to reduce the ambient temperature, so people want to bring the indoors outside,” he said. First focusing on single houses, Ball’s ideas quickly expanded to neighborhoods and entire communities.

“How can we change the spaces that we live in, now, today, so that they become more usable when it’s warmer?”

In the current political environment, however, Ball says he is frustrated. “You’re in the weeds, it’s molasses. I think my pitch — or my communication — to people is, we need to change our impact on the environment by doing it on our own, not just recycling or driving a hybrid vehicle. We need to look at existing principles, existing technology,” he said, to solve environmental problems.

“I think everybody wants to make a change, but they don’t know how… not everybody can afford a Tesla. Not every government allows you to recycle,” said Ball, noting that if he can teach individuals more about how to reduce their impact on the environment, then it will help the health of the area.

“We all care about how we look and present ourselves in society every day… I think we need to expand that concept a little bit,” he said. “We need to care about how our greater community looks.”


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Article source: https://federalnewsradio.com/whats-working-washington/2017/08/expanding-personal-space-improves-environment/