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Archives for August 5, 2017

Grow your own. Own your grow

If there’s anything that the farm-to-table movement makes us realise, it’s that life really comes full circle. From childhood days when our food was served fresh by our mothers or grandmothers, we moved into a decade or two of ready-to-eat dinners… only to realise that the journey from packaging to table will never benefit one as much as the journey from farm to table. Mummy was right all along!

While many of us buy organic these days, a few intrepid ones actually grow their own vegetables and herbs to ensure freshness. However, if you are an urban dweller, it’s unlikely that you will be able to grow heaps of vegetables.

You can, however, mitigate the effects of harmful pesticides that raw vegetables seem to come with, by creating a little kitchen garden of your own. Instead of the all or nothing approach — where you feel that the problem of pesticides in food is too big to tackle via a few potted plants — why not try the incremental gains approach where even a little goes a long way in ensuring your health.

The phrase ‘kitchen garden’ is, of course, relative. It depends on whether your kitchen lends itself naturally to a space where the sun shines the strongest and the longest (depending on the plant, though, so you may need to check with your gardener). Also, ensure that the soil drains properly on the spot.

New gardeners, start slowly, get your neighbourhood mali to give you some advice on the right kind of nourishment your green spot needs, and don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Green thumbs are built over time.

Now for the million-rupee question: What can you grow? Anything from potatoes to carrots to bhindi to tomatoes, but I would suggest you start with herbs: they don’t take up as much as space as vegetables, they don’t need to be as frequently replenished, and their health benefits are legendary. And while the process for growing these differs slightly, I thought, I’d highlight the nutritive reasons to get herbs to the table on a daily basis.

Tulsi or Holy Basil

Many families in India already grow this. Brimming with fantastic medicinal properties, this holy herb is a great source of vitamin K, helps combat cancer, maintains hormonal balance and even battles acne.


Pudina or Mint


In addition to its known role in helping with digestion and nausea, mint leaves help with decongestion of the nose, throat and lungs, which aids people with asthma and respiratory disorders.


Dhania or Coriander


A magnificent source of dietary fibre, iron, magnesium and manganese, dhania is rich in immunity-boosting vitamin C, as well as vitamin K and protein. It also contains — in small measure — potassium, phosphorus, calcium and carotene, among other nutrients.


Kadi patta or Curry leaf


Packed with vitamins C, B, A and E, the humble kadi patta can actually boast of fibre, calcium and phosphorus.

Kitchen gardens are also pleasing to the eye. And you’ll never wonder about the freshness of these herbs if the person in charge of their freshness is you.


by Pooja Makhija

Consulting Nutritionist Clinical Dietician

Article source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/home-garden/grow-your-own-own-your-grow/articleshow/59899198.cms

Gardening Tips: problems with Zuchinni

I’M JULIE RILEY HERE TO TALK ABOUT THE BIRDS AND THE BEES WHEN IT COMES TO ZUCHINNI.

NOW GARDENERS HAVE BEEN CALLING, FRUSTRATED THAT THEIR ZUCHINNI IS NOT MAKING FRUIT.
BUT WHAT YOU NEED TO UNDERSTAND IS THAT WE HAVE BOTH FEMALE FLOWERS AND MALE FLOWERS, AND OFTEN TIMES YOU’VE GOT ALL MALE FLOWERS AND NO GIRLS, SO THAT THERE CAN’T BE ANY FRUIT.

LAST NIGHT I HAD LOTS OF BLOSSOMS, TODAY I HAVE NONE THAT ARE IN THE STAGE WHERE THE POLLEN CAN BE TRANSFERRED.

SO IF THE BLOSSOMS YOU KNOW WERE WIDE OPEN AND YOU WERE IN THE GREENHOUSE OR UNDER PLASTICS, OR IT WAS RAINY AND THE BEES WEREN’T FLYING , YOU CAN HELP NATURE ALONG AND DO A LITTLE POLLINATING YOURSELF.

SO WHEN THIS MALE BLOSSOM OPENS UP, IT WILL BE WIDE OPEN, YOU CAN TAKE A CHILD’S WATERCOLOR PAINTBRUSH AND THEN JUST DAB IN THE CENTER, AND THEN TRANSER OVER TO A FRESH FEMALE FLOWER IN THE CENTER, AND THEN POLLINATION SHOULD HAVE OCCURED.

NOW IF YOU DON’T HAVE A LITTLE PAINTBRUSH YOU CAN TRY A COTTON SWAB, OR YOU CAN ACTUALLY PINCH OFF THE FLOWERS, AND I’LL DO THAT AND REMOVE THE PETALS.
AND THEN HERE IS THE MALE PART WITH LOTS OF POLLEN, ITS JUST THAT HE WASN’T OPEN FOR OUR TELEVISION SEGMENT , HE’LL BE OPEN IN A FEW HOURS IF I HADN’T PICKED HIM OFF.
AND THEN YOU HAVE TO HAVE AN OPEN FEMALE FLOWER , AND THEN YOU JUST DAB THE POLLEN STRUCTURE IN THE CENTER OF THE FLOWER, AND THEN ZUCHINNI WILL BE BORN.
JOIN ME NEXT WEEK WHEN WE ARE GOING TO TALK ABOUT POWDERY MILDEW.
GARDENING TIPS BROUGHT TO YOU BE MIDNIGHT SUN FAMILY MEDICINE.

Article source: http://www.webcenter11.com/content/news/Gardening-Tips-problems-with-Zuchinni--438631183.html

Gardening tips to save water in the heat of summer

CORVALLIS, Ore. – As the heat ratchets up so does water use, costing homeowners money and doing no favors for the environment.

Homeowners can learn to save water and money, however, with help from Oregon WaterWise Gardening, a statewide program of the Oregon State University Extension Service. Its website includes profiles of water-efficient plants.

Amy Jo Detweiler, a horticulturist with OSU Extension, compiled the following tips to help you conserve water and save on summer water bills:

  • When you’re selecting new plants, look for plants that use less water such as native globe mallow, black-eyed Susan, sedums, blanket flower, lavender and coneflower. Once established, these plants require minimal irrigation. Group plants together based on their water use for maximum water conservation. 
  • If you like colorful bedding annuals such as zinnias, marigolds, impatiens and petunias, consider putting them in pots or hanging baskets where you can provide water directly, rather than watering the entire garden.
  • Closely manage your watering. Hand watering and automatic irrigation can be adequate if you are an efficient water manager. Monitor how much water is used and adjust it throughout the season for warmer and cooler periods. Water in morning or late evening to mitigate evaporation. 
  • If using automatic irrigation, consider drip emitters in clay type soils and microsprays in sandy soils. Be sure to provide adequate moisture to the entire root zone of the plant.
  • Soaker hoses are an alternative. Hook them to an automatic timer so you don’t forget to turn off the water. This works for vegetable and ornamental gardens.
  • In western Oregon you can let your lawn go dormant for the summer. It will green up when winter rains begin.
  • In central and eastern Oregon, select more drought-resistant types of turf grass such as tall fescue or blended mixes and place turf only where needed. You will need to continue watering throughout the summer to prevent your lawn from dying.
  • You can find profiles and pictures of water-efficient plants for Oregon’s high desert in a 56-page publication authored by Detweiler, much of which is relevant in other areas of Oregon. Also available are Conserving Water in the Garden, and three infographics: Keys to Water-efficient LandscapesIt Pays to Water Wisely and Landscape Maintenance to Conserve Water.
  • For all of your landscape plants, encourage deep rooted plants by watering deeper less often. You can look for clues to water stress, such as slight wilting or a dull, transparent look of the leaves and adjust your watering accordingly.
  • When you plant new shrubs and trees, provide a long soak from a hose to saturate the soil deeply in the immediate area. You should repeat this process several times, especially during dry periods, to give your new shrubs and trees the resources to grow strong and deep roots that will require less water in the future.

— Kym Pokorny

Article source: http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2017/08/gardening_tips_to_save_water_i.html

Gardening tips for hot weather

Whenever Managing Editor Lindsey Renuard posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://www.tulsaworld.com/communities/skiatook/news/communitynews/gardening-tips-for-hot-weather/article_531afd35-ad84-53e4-906b-dc8b72e83b89.html

August Gardening Tips

Use these August gardening tips to get your gardens through this last month of summer:

Lawn

  • Late summer is the most effective time to control fire ants with baits.
  • Treat lawns for grubs only if you find more than 5 grubs per square foot.
  • August is the last month to fertilize bermudagrass, St. Augustinegrass, and zoysiagrass. It is recommended to apply 1 pound of Nitrogen per 1,000 square feet.

Trees, Shrubs and Flowers

  • Now is the time to start making plans for planting trees. Fall is the best time to plant trees and shrubs in the landscape. August is a good time to analyze your site and make decisions on what to plant this coming fall.
  • Do not prune or fertilize landscape shrubs for the remainder of the year to allow them to prepare for dormancy. Properly acclimated plants have a greater degree of winter hardiness.
  • Fall webworms form large masses of webbing on branch ends but usually do not cause much damage. If unsightly, rip webs open with a long pole or disrupt with a strong stream of water.
  • Pull up tired annuals and dead-head those that are healthy.
  • Get a second bloom from faded annuals by cutting them back by one third their height, then feed with a liquid fertilizer.

Fruit, Vegetables and Herbs

  • Be on the outlook for the pecan weevil. The pecan weevil usually emerges from the soil in early August after a significant rainfall. Treatments should begin the first of August after a rainfall. Drench the trunk and lower limbs with insecticide (Sevin).
  • Order seed for your fall garden.
  • To grow your own transplants, start seed of broccoli, kale, collard, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, and cauliflower in containers of potting soil this month.
  • Sow parsley seed direct in the garden or in containers. Soak seed in warm water for 6 to 8 hours before sowing.
  • Sow lettuce, spinach, arugula, and other salad greens in the garden or grow in containers.
  • Direct seed carrots, beets, rutabaga, and kohlrabi.
  • Spray peach tree trunks with permethrin to prevent peach tree borers from killing trees.

 

For your gardening, landscape, and lawn questions contact the Wayne County Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Plant Clinic on Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 am to 1pm. The plant clinic is a free service open to any Wayne County resident that has home gardening questions. One can reach the Wayne County Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Plant Clinic by phone at 919-731-1433, e-mail at Master.Gardener@waynegov.com, or stopping by Room 100 of the Wayne County Extension Office (208 West Chestnut Street, Goldsboro). People contacting the plant clinic with questions are encouraged to bring samples and/or pictures that could help in reaching a solution.  Extension Master Gardeners are trained volunteers with the Wayne County NC Cooperative Extension Service.

Jessica Strickland is an Agriculture Extension Agent, specializing in horticulture for North Carolina Cooperative Extension in Wayne County. Horticulture program information can be found at http://wayne.ces.ncsu.edu/. Forward any questions you would like answered from this week’s column to Jessica.Strickland@waynegov.com.

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Article source: http://goldsborodailynews.com/blog/2017/08/05/august-gardening-tips/

Garden tips for August

• Water all plantings thoroughly unless rainfall has been adequate. It is better to water more in depth, less often and early in the morning.

• The fall vegetable garden is planted now.

• Divide and replant spring blooming perennials like irises, peonies, and daylilies if needed.

• Irrigated warm-season lawns may be fertilized again.

• Hedges and shrubs can be pruned, if necessary, about mid-August.

• Young trees and shrubs may be fertilized again.

• Discontinue dead-heading roses by mid-august to help initiate winter hardiness.

• Brown patch disease of cool-season grasses can be a problem.

• Meet water requirements of turf.

• For areas being converted to tall fescue this fall, begin spraying bermudagrass with glyphosate products in early-August.

• White grub damage can become visible this month.  Apply appropriate soil insecticide if white grubs are a problem.  Water product into soil.

• Watch for a second generation of fall webworm in late August/early-September.

• Pre-emergent herbicides for winter-annual weed control in warm-season grasses can be applied in late-August. Water in the product after application.

General

Water your compost during extremely dry periods so that it remains active.  

Always follow directions on both synthetic and natural pesticide products.

Watch for high populations of caterpillars, aphids, spider mites, thrips, scales, and other insects on plant material in the garden and landscape and treat as needed.

Fall fescue should be mowed at 3” during the hot summers and even up to 3 ½“ if growing under heavier shade.  Warm season lawns like Bermudagrass and Zoysia-grass should be gradually raised to around 2”- 2 ½”  to better adjust for heat stress and the onset of fall.

Avoid late applications of fertilizer on woody plants at this time. The next best time to fertilize woody plants will be mid to late October.  

Vegetables

August is a good month to start your fall vegetable garden. Bush beans, cucumbers, and summer squash can be replanted for another crop. Beets, broccoli, carrots, potatoes, lettuce, and other cool season crops can also be planted at this time.

Soak vegetable seed overnight prior to planting. Once planted, cover them with compost to avoid soil crusting.  Mulching will keep planting bed moist and provide shade during initial establishment of vegetables. Monitor and control insect pests that prevent a good start of plants in your fall garden.

Fact sheets may be obtained from your local Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Office or on line at http://osufacts.okstate.edu.

Article source: http://www.edmondsun.com/news/lifestyles/garden-tips-for-august/article_c919f738-7944-11e7-8232-abbabd10a13f.html

What’s new, what’s next in Lorene Edwards Forkner’s garden

LORENE EDWARDS FORKNER’S name might ring a bell, as the author of a number of gardening books, or as the current editor of “Pacific Horticulture” magazine. You might well have shopped at Fremont Gardens, the tiny urban nursery with all the cool plants, which she owned for many years.

Perhaps you remember the garden Edwards Forkner designed for the Northwest Flower Garden Show. Can you picture the garden’s lust-worthy shelter that helped her win top honors? A version of that charming little shed now holds pride-of-place in her recently renovated garden in West Seattle.

Edwards Forkner’s garden seems to be in a near-constant state of change in response to fresh ideas and her changing neighborhood. Most recently, she and her husband, James Forkner, undertook a major back-garden remodel.

“When a big new house went up behind ours and took away our privacy, and I got a new job, I walked away from the garden and it went feral,” explains Edwards Forkner. “My biggest garden failure was in creating a garden I couldn’t keep up with.”

So she set in to create a lower-maintenance landscape, no small task for such an avid plant worshipper. Edwards Forkner had three main goals for the renovation. First was to screen the garden for privacy. Second was to create space for outdoor living, and third was to design and plant a garden that could take care of itself. Or nearly so.

“The special plants didn’t even matter so much anymore,” she says. Only a few remnants of the old plantings remain, including a gorgeous Eucryphia at the back of the house, and a bunch of acanthus and evening primrose she’s been unable to root out.

The renovation challenges were great. The tall, new house overlooking the back garden is out of scale with the couple’s city-sized lot, which is set at an awkward diagonal. Edwards Forkner hired Seattle designer Virginia Hand to come in and consult.

“I told her that we needed a great idea for the space, and that we wanted some kind of shelter that felt like a porch … I love a shade porch,” says Edwards Forkner.

Lorene Edwards Forkner describes her former back garden in West Seattle as an overgrown mess. With help from designer Virginia Hand, the garden has been renovated for lower maintenance, with large concrete pads, gravel, gabion walls for seating and retaining the slope, feed-trough planters, trellis and a shed to create privacy and space for outdoor living. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)Lorene Edwards Forkner describes her former back garden in West Seattle as an overgrown mess. With help from designer Virginia Hand, the garden has been renovated for lower maintenance, with large concrete pads, gravel, gabion walls for seating and retaining the slope, feed-trough planters, trellis and a shed to create privacy and space for outdoor living. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
Lorene Edwards Forkner describes her former back garden in West Seattle as an overgrown mess. With help from designer Virginia Hand, the garden has been renovated for lower maintenance, with large concrete pads, gravel, gabion walls for seating and retaining the slope, feed-trough planters, trellis and a shed to create privacy and space for outdoor living. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

Hand came up with a diagonal line that runs through the garden and organizes everything — paths, raised beds, seating and shed. Hunky architectural elements — like gabion walls, and a trellis with heavy posts and beam — draw the eye while creating shelter and privacy. Hefty concrete pads and gravel flooring cut down on maintenance, and bring a modern, graphic feel to the space. The materials, like galvanized steel, concrete and rusty iron, are repeated through the garden and fit well with Edwards Forkner’s casual, contemporary, somewhat funky aesthetic. Many of them, like an old wooden fence, pebble mosaics and the gabion walls, have been repurposed from the old garden.

“And it’s all nicely overscaled; I didn’t want anything twee,” says Edwards Forkner.

The new shed, furnished with lights, a fire pit and cushioned benches, provides privacy, shelter and a focal point to the back garden. The family uses the comfy space year-round. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)The new shed, furnished with lights, a fire pit and cushioned benches, provides privacy, shelter and a focal point to the back garden. The family uses the comfy space year-round. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
The new shed, furnished with lights, a fire pit and cushioned benches, provides privacy, shelter and a focal point to the back garden. The family uses the comfy space year-round. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

But it’s the shed, designed by a friend and built by a group of friends, that lies at the heart of the garden. It creates total privacy, with its tall, solid back side oriented toward the looming home behind. The roof is high and slanting, with every inch of space put to good use, including a fire pit, cushioned benches and festival lights strung wall-to-wall. It’s a party of a shed: inviting, comfortable and sufficiently well-appointed to be used year-round.

An Orienpet lily adds height, fragrance and glorious flowers to the July garden. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)An Orienpet lily adds height, fragrance and glorious flowers to the July garden. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)
An Orienpet lily adds height, fragrance and glorious flowers to the July garden. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times)

The garden’s plantings are an inspired integration of vegetables, flowers and fruit, a cottage garden with a modernist, personal feel. Peas climb a rusty trellis, and lettuces, herbs and fava beans grow in galvanized feed troughs.

“I always have to have favas,” says Edwards Forkner. There are tomatoes and pumpkins, strawberries and rhubarb, raspberries, blueberries, asparagus and artichokes, as well as sweet peas, lilies and a pleached hedge of apple trees that she calls her “one high-maintenance thing.”

“The garden is never static,” says Edwards Forkner.

What’s next? The couple has torn the deck off the front of the house and has plans to renovate the foliage-rich entry garden.

“I plan to dig and divide my collection of Pacific Coast iris,” enthuses Edwards Forkner. “You’ve gotta love a plant that weathers anything and dishes up drop-dead sexy blooms as well.”

So we’re back to plants and more plants?

“What I want,” explains Edwards Forkner, “is an architectural, low-maintenance garden, but in my own plant-obsessed way.”

Article source: http://www.seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-magazine/whats-new-whats-next-in-lorene-edwards-forkners-garden/

The Great British Baking Show Season 4 Finale Recap: Who Won?

Friday’s royally themed The Great British Baking Show finale was more than just the ending of a season, it was truly the ending of a deliciously flaky era.

As previously reported, the iconic series — the current season of which already aired in its entirety in the United Kingdom — will look quite different from here on out: Only judge Paul Hollywood will travel with the show when it makes its move from the BBC to the UK’s Channel 4 next season. Judge Mary Berry and hosts Mel Giedroyc and Sue Perkins will not continue with the series; QI host Sandi Toksvig and comedian Noel Fielding have been brought in to host, while chef Prue Leith will take over the judging duties for Berry.

But enough of the sad news, let’s get to the good stuff. Namely, which of three bakers took home the trophy cake stand? Was it methodical engineer Andrew, consistent garden designer Jane or extravagant phys ed teacher Candice? Read on to find out.

SIGNATURE CHALLENGE | The first challenge of the evening was to create a three-tiered meringue crown. Candice was off to a great start, with her mango and strawberry crown earning a coveted handshake from Hollywood himself and impressed eyebrow raises from everyone else in the room. Jane also aced the signature with her strawberry, raspberry, blueberry and nectarine crown, earning herself a two-handed (!) handshake. Sadly, Andrew failed to secure Paul’s approval on his caramel pecan crown.

TECHNICAL CHALLENGE | The technical challenge should have been easy enough: a Victoria sandwich (two pieces of cake with jam and buttercream filling the middle) is a fairly simple dessert after everything they’ve baked over the course of the season. However, the judges had one last twist up their sleeves: Contestants were to bake without a recipe. Jane and Candice, high off their solid first challenge, failed to wow this time around, allowing Andrew to break out from behind and land in first place.

SHOWSTOPPER CHALLENGE | With all the contestants on an even playing field, the pressure was on for the final challenge of the evening: a “Picnic fit for the Queen” (aka the biggest challenge in the history of the series). The finalists had to bake: one chocolate celebration cake, 12 sausage rolls, 12 mini quiches, 12 savory scones and 12 fruit and custard tarts — that’s 49 items (!) — in the allotted five hours.

FINAL FEEDBACK | Jane’s “Family Favourite Feast” looked “right and regal” to Mary Berry, however her sausage pastry wasn’t fully cooked and her scones were touted as too bland. Candice’s “Picnic for Pearly Kings and Queens” fared better, garnering praise for her creative design of the [fully cooked] pig-in-a-blanket sausage rolls. Andrew’s “Family and Friends’ Favourite Picnic” was beautifully displayed, but, like Jane, his sausage pastry was not fully cooked and the glaze used on his strawberry tarts made them too soggy. After the judges gave their feedback, Andrew sagely whispered to Jane, “It’s you two.”

A WINNER IS CROWNED | And how right he was. After joining their family, friends, and former contestants for a picnic, the judges crowned Candice the winner, earning cheers from the crowd and her fellow finalists.

A stunned Candice reminisced about applying to be on the show: “[I] never, ever, ever thought I’d ever even get on this, and I’m standing here, now, with this. And they said my name, and that means more to me than I think anyone will ever, ever realize.”

Clutching her flowers and trophy, Candice proclaimed, “I did it. I’m good enough.”

Now it’s your turn. What did you think of the final BBC episode? Did your favorite win? Grade the episode via the poll below, then leave a comment with all of you thoughts!

Take Our Poll

Article source: http://tvline.com/2017/08/04/the-great-british-baking-show-finale-recap-season-4-winner-candice-brown/

Auburn’s College of Agriculture planning on-campus teaching garden as outdoor classroom

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AUBURN, Ala. — Auburn University’s College of Agriculture has launched a project to establish a highly productive, on-campus teaching garden that will give greater visibility to active agricultural fieldwork at Auburn and enhance the legacy of the historic Old Rotation.

 

Faculty from three of the college’s academic departments—Horticulture; Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences; and Entomology and Plant Pathology—and an Auburn architecture faculty member are finalizing the master design for the 11.3-acre garden, which will be adjacent to the Old Rotation on Lem Morrison Drive.

 

The garden also will extend to the edge of Auburn’s Donald E. Davis Arboretum.

 

Featuring a broad spectrum of ornamentals, crops, trees and turfgrasses, the hands-on teaching garden, designated on the university’s comprehensive campus master plan as Field Lab No. 1, will be a significant resource for Auburn agriculture students and faculty, garden steering committee chair Dave Williams says.

 

“We want to create an experience for our students,” said Williams, Department of Horticulture professor and department head. “The garden will be an outdoor classroom, a living lab for instruction. It’s going to provide support for numerous courses within the college and, in the future, courses in other colleges and schools across campus.”

 

The working garden also will enhance the legacy of the Old Rotation, circa 1896, the longest continuous cotton experiment in the world.

 

“An 1892 map of what was then the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama shows that the vast majority of the campus was agricultural experiment land, but today, agriculture is almost invisible here,” Williams said. “This garden, which we’ll use for research and demonstration as well as teaching, will expand the spirit and range of the Old Rotation and be a reminder that Auburn’s roots are in agriculture.”

 

Charles Mitchell, for one, says it’s about time. Mitchell is professor emeritus in the Department of Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences and was long-time manager and curator of the Old Rotation. Several times over the past 40 years, Mitchell and others have pushed for a teaching, research and demonstration garden on the site where the first agricultural research was conducted after Auburn’s designation as a land-grant institution for Alabama in 1872.

 

“I’m thrilled to see this finally happening,” said Mitchell, who remains involved as a steering committee member. “Finally, we’re seeing progress toward creating a real facility on the Auburn campus that will showcase our land-grant mission in the plant sciences. Students, gardeners, homeowners, faculty and friends will have a place they can use and enjoy and share with others the beauty and productivity of the plant sciences at this university.”

 

In developing the master plan, the steering committee called in David Hill, chair and associate professor of landscape architecture in the College of Architecture, Design and Construction at Auburn and owner of Hillworks, an Auburn-based architecture and landscape architecture design studio. The complete master plan for Field Lab No. 1 at the historic Old Rotation can be found online at http://www.hillworks.us/fieldlab.html.

 

The design calls for the garden to be divided into field plots that will include, among its offerings, an ornamental shade garden, teaching orchards, turfgrasses, field crops, an ornamentals garden and maze, fruit and vegetable crops, trial gardens for annuals and the existing medicinal plant garden which, along with the field crops, will be moved to the new site from its current location on the old agronomy farm on Woodfield Drive.

 

Physical structures include a pavilion, which will be used for classes and outreach events, and greenhouses. Williams is especially excited about the greenhouses.

 

“We’re collaborating with Glenn Loughridge, director of Campus Dining, toward development of hydroponic greenhouses where our students, as well as other interested Auburn students, can work and raise produce that will be served in dining venues across the Auburn campus.”

 

Although the committee and Hill’s design team continue tweaking the plan, preliminary site work has begun.

 

“Our students will be a big part of developing this garden,” Williams said. “It will be a work in progress, but our plan is to have the base structure of the garden and several plots in place early next year.”

 

Well-defined pathways through the garden, marked with informational signage that will enrich the educational value for the community, eventually will be developed into a walking/bike trail system that will extend from the arboretum, through Field Lab No. 1 and on to the new performing arts center site that is under construction on Woodfield Drive.

 

“The long-term vision would be to extend the trail across South College to the museum and on to Town Creek Park on Gay Street,” Williams said.

 

In addition to Williams and Mitchell, steering committee members are Professors Joe Eakes and Wheeler Foshee, Associate Professors Glenn Fain and Jay Spiers and Assistant Professor Daniel Wells, all in the Department of Horticulture; Professors Scott McElroy and Dennis Shannon and Extension Specialist Dennis Delaney, all in the Department of Crop, Soil and Environmental Sciences; and Professor Art Appel in the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology.

 

Appel says the diversity in the garden’s crops will be invaluable for Auburn students enrolled in entomology and plant pathology courses.

 

“Our students will learn to identify a wide range of insect species and the signs of insect damage on plants as well as the effects of nematodes and viral, bacterial and fungal diseases crops,” he said.

 

(Written by Jamie Creamer.)

Article source: http://www.wltz.com/2017/08/04/auburns-college-agriculture-planning-campus-teaching-garden-outdoor-classroom/

The 34th Annual Fall Atlanta Home Show and Outdoor Living Expo …

They’re calling it the “Retail Apocalypse.” National chains such as Sears, Macy’s, JCPenney, Radio Shack, Payless ShoeSource, Gander Mountain and Rue21, to name a few, are shuttering stores across the country at an alarming rate.

Article source: http://www.mdjonline.com/news/business/the-th-annual-fall-atlanta-home-show-and-outdoor-living/article_d3bf8552-758b-11e7-9d8f-bf4aab261b53.html