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Archives for July 22, 2017

This week’s gardening tips: harvest herbs, don’t worry about webworms

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This week’s gardening tips: Remember to harvest herbs. Mint, basil, rosemary, lemon balm and Mexican tarragon regularly should be harvested to keep the plants shapely and under control. Some herbs, such as thyme, sage and lavender, don’t tolerate heat and rain very well and may be struggling now.

Keep things under control: A long growing season and rapid growth often leads to overgrown beds at this time of year. Trim bedding plants and tropicals to keep them under control. Stake or otherwise support plants that need it.

Don’t worry about webworms: The caterpillars that form tents of webbing at the ends of branches of various trees (especially pecans) look bad but rarely do much damage. If control is needed, spray with a product containing BT (Dipel, Thuricide) or other labeled insecticides. Make sure the caterpillars are actually present in the webs before you spray.

Think before you water: We have been getting regular rainfall this summer. As a result, we’ve not had to do much irrigation to established trees, shrubs, ground covers and lawns. Be sure not to irrigate unless the soil is dry enough to warrant it. Irrigating when not needed often creates problems with fungal diseases.

Keep an eye out for large numbers of small tan moths: This indicates a sod webworm infestation that may damage the lawn. If you see a large number of moths, contact me for information on controlling sod webworms.

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2017/07/this_weeks_gardening_tips_harv_1.html

Tips for taking better pix of your garden, wildlife | Daily Chronicle

The texture of this small cactus growing in a garden in Dallas, Texas, can be seen at close range. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
A flowering Crape Myrtle in Dallas, Texas. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
This July 11 photo shows a Dusty Miller in a front yard garden in Dallas, Texas. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
In this June 20 photo, dew drops are seen on the leaves of lady’s mantle in a front yard in Mamaroneck, New York. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
This July 11 photo shows Purple Coneflowers in a front yard garden in Dallas, Texas. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
This July 6 photo shows a flowering Crape Myrtle in front of a dead tree in Dallas, Texas. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
This April 2017 photo provided by Patty Hankins shows a Sunset Miami Tulip at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland. This close-up photograph shows the pattern and texture details in the flower.
This July 11 photo shows cactus in a front yard garden in Dallas, Texas. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
In this March 2016, photo provided by Brenda Tharp, a bright red male cardinal sits in a tree in eastern Tuscon, Arizona. Composing to place the bird on the left in the rule of thirds zone gives room for the bird to look into the frame and creates more impact.
In this Nov. 2016 photo, Japanese maple leaves blanket a front yard in Mamaroneck, New York. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.
This July 6 photo shows a flowering Crape Myrtle in Dallas, Texas. When taking photos in your garden, of your landscaping or in the natural world, elements like shutter speed, light, composition and lens choice can all work together to help capture all the natural beauty you observe with your eye.

So the garden you planted or enjoy each day is flowering. Birds and animals are busy in your yard or neighborhood. And you’d love to capture all this natural beauty in photos.

It’s so easy these days to pull out a phone and take pictures of anything anytime, but a little time and thought can produce better garden and wildlife photos.

“There’s a big difference between that for-the-record shot that preserves a memory and getting a really nice image,” says Brenda Tharp, author of the new book “Expressive Nature Photography” (The Monacelli Press).

Pause before pressing the shutter, she says, and consider: Is the light right? Can you give your photo a unique point of view by shooting from different angles and levels, moving to the side, crouching or standing on something?

Try to identify what it is about the subject matter that “stopped you in your tracks,” she says. “It’s really about narrowing down your purpose in making that picture.”

Some tips from Tharp and other nature photographers:

THE RULE OF THIRDS

Resist the temptation to center the subject, suggests Rob Simpson, an instructor in nature photography at Lord Fairfax College in Middletown, Virginia. Think of your photo as a tic-tac-toe board, and place the subject in one of the off-center thirds of the space. “It’s going to make the photo more pleasing to the eye,” he said. “It gives it balance.”

TEXTURE IS TERRIFIC

One of the most exciting things about photographing flowers and leaves is capturing something that passersby won’t see – their textures up-close, says Patty Hankins, a floral photographer in Bethesda, Maryland, who sells her work and offers photography tips at beautifulflowerpictures.com.

A camera’s “macro” setting lets you take an extreme close-up and keep it in focus. “It shows you all these incredible things that people who aren’t stopping to look won’t see,” she says. “It’s about filling the frame with small details.”

STAYING STILL

When using the macro setting, keep the camera as still as possible, Hankins says. “If you’re taking a picture of the Grand Canyon and your hand shakes a little, people aren’t likely to notice,” she said. “But if you’re taking a photo of the center of a sunflower, they’re much more likely to see it.”

A tripod can help. Look for one that is lightweight and can get low to ground, she says. If you don’t own a tripod, find somewhere solid to place the camera or set it on a bean bag or bag of rice on the ground, and use the timer to take the photo. Many cameras also have settings designed to reduce vibrations.

PRACTICE
PERIMETER PATROL

Before you shoot, scan the edges of your picture for buildings, outdoor furniture or other things that could distract from your subject.

LIGHT MATTERS

Often, outdoor photos come out better on cloudy days or when the sun is not directly overhead, Simpson says. The soft light that comes through on an overcast day will not cast harsh shadows, and may result in a more even exposure and better details.

“People love sunlight, but it’s not the right light for every subject,” Tharp says. “For intimate views of nature, opt for soft or diffused light.”

For landscape photos, however, sunlight can add drama. Consider shooting in the warm light found in early morning or late afternoon when the angle of the sun is low.

THINK 3-D

Having items in a picture’s foreground and background helps put the viewer in the photo and creates a sense of depth, Tharp says. When taking a photo of a meadow or landscape, include objects closer to the camera, as well.

Another way to create dimension is to angle the camera downward a bit, emphasizing the foreground and creating that near-far relationship.

ANIMAL ACTION

The best animal photos reveal the subject’s behavior or personality, Tharp says. Take time to observe the animals and wait for the best shot. But be ready to capture the action when it happens. Simpson recommends a fast shutter speed to avoid missing the shot.

Keep the animal’s eye in focus.

SHUTTER SELECTIONS AND APERTURES

Becoming a better photographer will mean understanding shutter speeds and apertures, Tharp said.

The right shutter speed can mean the difference between freezing the motion of a moving animal or ending up with a blur. When photographing something in motion – an animal, bird or waterfall – give precedence to shutter speed over aperture, which is the amount of light being allowed into the lens.

If controlling the sharpness of the background is the goal, prioritize aperture, because it defines the depth of what will be in focus, she said.

“Experimenting with different apertures and shutter speeds on your subject will quickly show the various effects,” Tharp said.

Article source: http://www.daily-chronicle.com/2017/07/12/tips-for-taking-better-pix-of-your-garden-wildlife/awueddy/

Garden Tips: Setting the record straight on watering myths – Tri

When summer temperatures climb into the triple digits, gardeners are very mindful of watering their lawns, gardens and container plants. But there are several widespread faulty beliefs that need to be corrected to ensure that you are watering wisely.

False Belief 1: Never water your lawn or garden at night.

The caveat of not watering at night is true in warm, wet, humid areas of the country. In those regions, plants do not dry off quickly, especially during the cooler hours of the night.

This high moisture situation is conducive to numerous plant fungal and bacterial diseases. In these areas, early morning is the best time for watering.

Our local dry climate with its pervasive low relative humidity means plants dry off fairly rapidly whatever time of day or night they are watered.

Because water loss due to evaporation will be less, it is better to irrigate during the night or early in the morning when it is cooler and there is less wind.

Irrigating at night or very early morning is most efficient, but gardeners may be required to water at other times of the day because of watering restrictions when the supply is limited. If so, follow your irrigation district’s guidelines.

False Belief 2: It is normal for the leaves of some plants, like those of squash, to wilt on very hot sunny days and then recover in the evening. It does not mean that they are drought stressed.

False Belief 3: When a plant wilts, it means there is not enough soil moisture and more water is needed.

These two beliefs contradict each other, but are commonly thought to be true by many gardeners.

Both are incorrect. Wilted leaves are an indication that a plant is not getting enough water when it needs it. The plant is stressed. Inadequate root systems and excess moisture are the two main reasons a plant may wilt even when there is plenty of water available in the soil.

Underdeveloped, restricted roots or damaged roots make it impossible for a plant to absorb enough water to support the top of the plant.

If a squash transplant has pot-bound roots and they are not sufficiently loosened at planting time, the roots will not be able to grow out into the surrounding soil to access the water available there. Likewise, physical damage to the roots from deep cultivation close to the plant will impair a plant’s ability to absorb water.

When soil is compacted, roots have a difficult time developing into an adequate root system. Similarly, plants growing in containers may not have a large enough volume of soil to grow enough roots to supply the plant’s water needs.

Plants growing in wet soil may wilt despite the plentiful moisture. This is because oxygen is excluded from saturated soil.

Without oxygen, the roots are not able to function properly and are not able to absorb water. Soil compaction and poor drainage are often the underlying causes of excess soil moisture. Also, persistent wet soil conditions can lead to bacteria and fungi infecting and killing the roots, resulting in wilting and plant death.

With our summer heat and the sun beating down on our yards and gardens, it is important to water properly. If a plant wilts or shows signs of drought stress, investigate.

Before watering, check the moisture in the soil and check the roots for signs of problems.

Marianne C. Ophardt is a retired horticulturist for Washington State University Benton County Extension.

Article source: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/living/home-garden/marianne-ophardt/article163027658.html

5 garden tips for the week starting July 22 – San Gabriel Valley Tribune



Spruce up roses

Since rose blossoms don’t like long hot days, take this opportunity to tidy up the plants. Prune out sprawling stems and cut back growth that has become too tall — sort of like giving them a haircut. You may safely remove up to a third of the height and breadth, but retain a good amount of foliage to nurture new growth. Remove rose suckers by tearing them off at the base with a harsh downward and outward tug (and be sure to wear gloves). This usually prevents their return, whereas trimming off the suckers almost always causes more to grow back. And be sure to feed them within the next few weeks to encourage abundant blooms this autumn.

Time for a trim

As fast-growing shrubbery next to walkways and houses grows beyond its proper bounds and gets in the way, trim it back to shape. However, don’t just hedge-sheer or whack indiscriminately; that results in a bundle of sticks rather than a leafy pretty plant. Cut back each offending branch to a leaf or side stem well within the acceptable boundary so there’s room for new sprouts to grow several inches. This way the plants will retain an attractive and more natural appearance and be polite at the same time.

Orchid maintenance

Divide overgrown cymbidium orchids when bulbs fill the container and as soon as flowers wither. Remove the dormant leafless bulbs and separate the rest into clumps of 3 or 4 bulbs with leaves. Dust the cuts with sulfur or powdered charcoal to prevent rotting, then plant them in fresh orchid mix. Clean individual dormant bulbs and let them heal for a week or two, then plant them, remembering to keep the mix moist and feed them every 10-14 days.

For weeds only

Keep string trimmers away from tree trunks. Weed wackers work great on weeds, but many who use them often inadvertently cut away bark and wood near the base of the tree, effectively girdling it. Girdling stunts growth and can eventually kill trees. It’s best to pull weeds away from tree trunks.

Give nature a hand

Corn plants may be showing tassels now. Tassels are the grainlike flowers on the tops of the plants that release masses of pollen in the morning. Silks will soon appear between the leaves and stalks, and they need pollen to develop full ears of corn. Nature handles it fine when corn is planted in great quantities, but in a small home plot, nature may need help to complete pollination and fill up the ears with edible kernels. Using a small paint brush or even your finger, pick up some of the pollen dust from the upper leaves and daub it onto the fresh silks coming out of the tiny ears forming along the sides of each cornstalk. In four to six days you will have nice, plump ears of delicious sweet corn.

Article source: http://www.sgvtribune.com/lifestyle/20170721/5-garden-tips-for-the-week-starting-july-22

Art in the garden: placing the right work in the right spot

This undated photo provided by the Glass House and the Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS) shows Robert Indiana’s “One Through Zero,” left, at the Glass House in New Canaan, Conn. (Tom Powel/Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS)/the Glass House via AP)

Article source: http://hanfordsentinel.com/features/at_home/art-in-the-garden-placing-the-right-work-in-the/article_ea55cd44-9f04-5816-8480-1b86682a674c.html

Permission to Faint over This Fashion Stylist’s Exquisite San Francisco Tudor

“I am a child of the 80s, so I find a Bonfire of the Vanities or Dallas vibe irresistible,” says renowned New York fashion stylist Lauren Michael Goodman of her beautifully personal San Francisco home. “I love classics, but I also love things that are more avant-garde: color, print, vintage . . . ultra-glamorous things.” With a move to the Bay Area city in 2011—“for love!”—she discovered a new take on style. “New Yorkers, especially fashion people, are very good at mixing super dressy and super casual, like a ripped tee under a Chanel jacket or layering neon Patagonia under gorgeous tailoring,” she says. And yet San Francisco seemed to her both more and less formal at the same time: “Sometimes interiors here can be extremely formal, which has its own charm—so chic and old world. But you’ll also see Patagonia straight-up because you are actually going on a hike.“ Goodman took the best from both coasts and created a home as layered, textured, and thoughtful as the stylist herself.

The move to California allowed Goodman a blank decor slate in a rather formal home, an 1894 Tudor built by English architect Ernest Coxhead, one of the pioneers of the Arts and Crafts movement. A Francophile since she was a small child, Goodman collaborated with New York–based French designer Lili Diallo on the decor. “She clues me in to all the divine, ultra-fusty French interior ideas,” Goodman says. “Lili encourages chintz, which we used a lot.” It is this tension between the formal and casual that gives the interior its youthful balance. A Parsons-style, African-print vintage sofa, for example, is seen as a key piece because it is“so wrong.” ”I can’t tell you how many people with the best taste told me to re-cover it—equal probably to those who loved and ‘got it,’” Goodman says.

For the same mix in her wardrobe, Lauren looks to friend Jane Mayle for the clothing designer’s inimitable mood: “Jane’s pieces are perfect for my Californian life,” Goodman says. “They are beautiful, romantic, unexpected, eclectic, effortless, trend-less, and a little bohemian.” The references pile up, as broad and beautiful as her home: “Old-lady style is a big inspiration for me, both in the way I dress and the way I decorate. I think being really ‘old lady’ is the most cutting-edge thing one can do sometimes.” Goodman cites the dining room and garden—both green—as her two favorite spaces in the house, saying, “they are the same but opposite.” She chose to break the usual decor rules and paint her entire dining room in a beautifully deep green. “In dark rooms, rich color really works,” the sometimes interior designer says. “The dining room barely gets any light, so creating vibrancy with the green made sense.” A dining room table is rigorously basic and rough-hewn, almost brutalist—which mirrors the concrete in the garden.

The garden, on the other hand, is an inverse of the classical lines of the house. The modern hardscaping was designed by Goodman’s friend, the architect Jennifer Weiss. Goodman wanted the plantings to be more traditional and borrowed inspiration—and a green and white color scheme (white flowers only)—from formal English and French gardens, furthering her deft mix of formal and informal and bringing it outdoors. “Creating this garden and living with it everyday has made me realize I am a gardener—something I would probably never have discovered in New York,” she says, adding that she and her family enjoy strawberries, lettuces, and artichokes from the small vegetable plot. She also discovered how much gardening is like styling and has put her amazing talents to work creating an editorial-worthy green space. Like her home, the garden is a mixture of texture and layers. “Gardening is about embracing the wild. It keeps the illusion of control in check.” With a new gardening design venture in the works, we can all look forward to seeing more of her talents moving outside.

Founder of the lifestyle brand LEMIEUX et CIE and co-founder of Cloth Company, a technology-powered home furnishings company, Christiane Lemieux is a design entrepreneur. Prior to these ventures, she founded DwellStudio, a home decor brand that was purchased by Wayfair in 2013—and her second book, The Finer Things, was published by Random House/Clarkson Potter in 2016. Christiane is a graduate of Parsons School of Design and Queen’s University in Canada.

Interiors styling by Lili Diallo. Makeup by Mikaela South.

Wearing a blouse from Apiece Apart, Goodman lounges in her back garden. quot;The deck is ipe, a Brazilian hardwood, designed to bleach out to the same color as the concrete (which it did),quot; she says. quot;We did elevate the deck to meet kitchen floor, so that stepping out was seamless.quot;

Wearing a blouse from Apiece Apart, Goodman lounges in her back garden. “The deck is ipe, a Brazilian hardwood, designed to bleach out to the same color as the concrete (which it did),” she says. “We did elevate the deck to meet kitchen floor, so that stepping out was seamless.”

Article source: http://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/san-francisco-home-fashion-stylist-lauren-goodman

In the Garden: These knotweeds are not weeds to avoid – Yakima Herald

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Article source: http://www.yakimaherald.com/lifestyle/home_and_garden/in-the-garden-these-knotweeds-are-not-weeds-to-avoid/article_e8205bf2-6e65-11e7-a4b3-3f925d3b8ac3.html

50 Offline Business Ideas

These days, having an online presence for your business seems almost mandatory. But that doesn’t mean that every business needs to completely focus on the internet. In fact, there are still plenty of offline business opportunities for entrepreneurs who aren’t super tech savvy to consider. Here are 50 offline business ideas.

Offline Business Ideas

Cleaning Service

You can start a house or office cleaning service where you travel to your clients and use local advertising or word of mouth to build your business.

Child Care

Child care is another popular in-home business idea. You can run the business out of your own home or go to your clients’ homes.

In-home Elderly Care

There’s also a big demand for in-home elderly care. You can provide services to clients in your area daily or on a semi-regular basis.

Coffee Cart

With a coffee cart business, you can bring your cart to the areas where customers are likely to congregate, meaning you don’t even necessarily need a website or other online presence.

Food Truck

Though it may be beneficial to market food trucks on social media platforms, you can set up this type of business completely offline and use local events to attract customers.

Gift Shop

It’s also possible to set up a local gift shop without any kind of ecommerce store, as long as you’re in a great location that customers are likely to visit.

Caterer

For those interested in food businesses, you can start a catering company to provide services for events, individuals and businesses.

Baker

You can also start your own business as a baker, either with your own bakery storefront or by providing baked goods to other businesses and bakeries in your area.

Gardener

If you’re looking for an outdoor business idea, you can set up your own gardening business and provide services to customers in your community.

Landscaping Service

Likewise, you can offer lawn mowing or other landscaping services without a website or extensive online presence.

Pet Cleanup Service

There’s also a market of pet owners looking for businesses to help them clean up their yards .

Home Staging

For design oriented entrepreneurs, you can start a home staging business where you help local homeowners set up their homes to appeal to potential buyers.

Home Painting

You can also focus on home painting, either interior or exterior or both.

Handyman

If you’re good at fixing things around the house, you can also start your own business where you provide general handyman services to homeowners.

Print Shop

Print shops help customers print anything from signs to t-shirts. And you can even provide a place where customers can complete their own printing and copying jobs, all from an offline location.

Direct Mail Marketing

If you want to help businesses with offline marketing, you can start a direct mail business that focuses on printed materials sent the old fashioned way.

Party Entertainer

For those who are musically inclined or have other skills like juggling or balloon sculpting, you can offer your services to local customers looking for party entertainment.

Bed and Breakfast

If you have a large enough space, you could set up your own bed and breakfast where you welcome visitors.

Personal Shopper

You could also start your own personal shopping business where you go with clients to stores and help them pick out the best items.

Event Planner

Or you could focus on event planning where you work with clients in person and deal with vendors mainly over the phone.

Errand Service

It’s also possible to set up a general errand running service. You can do things like pick up groceries or finishing up laundry.

Food Delivery

Or you can offer food delivery services to people in your area who want to order from restaurants that don’t offer delivery.

Florist

A flower shop is another great offline business opportunity. You can open your own location and deal with customers mainly in person.

Farmers’ Market Vendor

If you sell flowers, plants, food or similar items, you can also procure your own booth at local farmers’ markets and sell your goods that way.

Jewelry Maker

If you make jewelry or similar items, you can sell them in person at craft fairs or even wholesale to local boutiques.

Clothing Designer

For those who make clothing, you can also focus mainly on selling your items wholesale to local stores instead of setting up your own ecommerce site.

Tutor

It’s also possible to build a business as a tutor. You can focus on a specific subject and focus on in-person one-on-one sessions.

Dog Walker

If you’re interested in starting a business where you get to hang out with cute animals all day, you can offer dog walking services to people in your neighborhood.

Pet Grooming

Or you can offer pet grooming services, either in your own dedicated location or as part of a mobile business.

Mobile Retail Boutique

Another mobile business opportunity, you can set up a retail shop in a trailer or similar setup and sell goods at fairs or other events.

Car Wash

You can also start your own car washing or detailing business without having any kind of online presence.

Bicycle Repairs

For those who are skilled with bicycle repairs, you can create a business around that skill in your garage or a local storefront.

Mobile Phone Repairs

There’s also a lot of demand for mobile phone repairs. So you can set up a storefront where people can bring their devices with cracked screens or other issues.

Farming

If you have enough land and the skills to farm crops or other types of food, you can offer your food items to retailers, restaurants or other businesses.

Corn Maze

There are also other options for those with some land to work with. For instance, you can create a corn maze and some complementary attractions and welcome customers to your location.

Christmas Tree Farm

You can also grow pine trees on your land and welcome visitors to come pick out their own trees during the holiday season.

Tour Guide

If you live in an area that’s popular with tourists, you can set up a tour guide business where you show visitors around.

Security Service

You can also start your own security service, providing protection for businesses or individuals on a contract basis.

Artist

For artistic entrepreneurs, you can create your own artwork to sell at galleries or special events.

Massage Therapy

You can also work with clients in person as a masseuse or massage therapist.

Personal Trainer

Or if you’re a fitness minded entrepreneur, you can start a business as a personal trainer, working with clients at local gyms or from your home.

Antique Shop

You can also start your own antique shop where you sell items out of a storefront, antique mall or at local events.

Author

While ebooks have increased in popularity in recent years, you can still build a business by writing and publishing actual books as well.

Speech Writer

Writers can also build a business around writing speeches on a freelance basis.

Dance Classes

If you’re a skilled dancer, you can offer dance classes out of your home or a dance studio.

Music Lessons

Similarly, you can offer music lessons to people looking to learn a musical instrument or improve their vocal skills.

Career Counseling

It’s also possible to build a business where you help people find careers by working with them one-on-one.

Moving Service

If you have a truck and some moving supplies, you can offer moving services to local consumers.

Tax Preparation

You can also help people and businesses prepare their taxes by meeting with them in person.

Fundraiser

Fundraisers are also in high demand in some areas. You can help businesses and organizations raise money through events and other campaigns on a freelance basis.

Online/Offline Photo via Shutterstock


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Article source: https://smallbiztrends.com/2017/07/offline-business-ideas.html

Landscaping expert encourages mix of natural and urban design in …

The Heathcote River flooding over Riverlaw Terrace in St Martins at Easter (file photo).

The Heathcote River flooding over Riverlaw Terrace in St Martins at Easter (file photo).

A visiting expert on landscaping flood-prone city zones recommends Christchurch use natural barriers and water-based construction to deal with rising sea levels.

Landscape architect Kristina Hill, from the University of California, Berkeley, spoke at a public meeting organised by Regenerate Christchurch on Thursday night.

She presented research-based ideas that could be implemented in the city’s planning for flood-prone coastal areas and the residential red zone.

A map of high flood hazard management areas as defined in the Christchurch City Council's proposed district plan.

A map of high flood hazard management areas as defined in the Christchurch City Council’s proposed district plan.

Eastern areas of Christchurch sank in the Canterbury earthquake and the Christchurch City Council has identified many residential zones as prone to flooding and sea level rise over the next 100 years.

READ MORE:
Development restricted on flood-prone Christchurch properties
Flood risk looms for new homes in Silverstream subdivision
Four Flockton Basin residents sell flood-prone homes to Christchurch City Council
2700 Waimakariri properties at ‘high risk’ of flood in natural hazards maps
Rising flood risk in a sunken city

Hill encouraged the city to experiment and accept that some ideas might fail.

University of California, Berkeley, associate professor of landscape architecture, environmental planning and urban ...

University of California, Berkeley, associate professor of landscape architecture, environmental planning and urban design Kristina Hill talks about dealing with post-disaster flooding and sea level rises in Christchurch.

“That’s how the Dutch have become the world’s consultants on flooding, through trying things.”

She spoke about different ideas of terraced developments.

One design used in Hamburg, Germany, was multi-level residential buildings with waterproof lower levels.

In extremely high tides the water rises over footpaths and public areas and vehicles are protected in waterproof car parks.

“People don’t evacuate. They stay and they watch the flooding happen with their kids.”

As well as removing the need for costly and disruptive evacuations, Hill said it provided an educational experience.

Another concept was the idea of using wetlands and developed stormwater ponds to hold back the sea. It was simple, Hill said: “Dig hole, make mound.”

Silt dug out from stormwater ponds near the sea would be used to create wetlands, pushing the water back to sea.

Floating houses would be built on the ponds, aimed at the high-end of the market similar to Dutch developments.

The added benefit would be that stormwater would drain from surrounding lower-income areas into the ponds.

Hill called it a “Robin Hood strategy” – getting the rich to pay for wider benefit.

Water would be collected in the city, filter into the ponds, and be released through the wetlands into the sea.

The wetlands would also create habitats for wildlife, she said.

As the sea level rises over time, ponds could be moved further inland, turning the old ponds into more wetland.

“It seems to me that your estuary will be a great place to try some of these wetland terrace ideas,” Hill said.

“We know that this is all really happening to us, so we are trying to take a positive, proactive approach to it.”


 – Stuff

Next The Rebuild story:

Christchurch east frame public space to open early 2018, but where are the houses?

The Press Homepage

Article source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/business/the-rebuild/94889865/landscaping-expert-encourages-mix-of-natural-and-urban-design-in-floodprone-areas

Cal Fire holding fire prevention education program at Mid-State Fair


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CAL FIRE holding fire prevention…






PASO ROBLES, Calif. – In the northwest corner of the Paso Robles Event Center, in the shadow of the Slingshot bungee ride, just down from Jimmy’s Waterin’ Hole and right across from the Pony Espresso, you’ll find a different type of attraction at the California Mid-State Fair.

For several years, CAL FIRE San Luis Obispo County Fire Department has manned a booth at the fair, holding its fire prevention education program.

“This is hands down our single biggest prevention event of the year,” said CAL FIRE public information officer Chris Elms.

For the entire 12-day duration of the fair, firefighters are able to meet the public and speak with the people they serve.

“We bring in a lot of firefighters and a lot of personnel and a lot of resources just to be here so we can engage the public,” said Elms. “It’s hugely important to what we do in prevention because we do have so many people that are coming in to visit the fair.”

Children are able to meet firefigthers, take part in activities, explore a fire engine and take home various give-aways.

“We’re interacting with the kids,” Elms said. “We’re teaching kids about fire prevention and education and that kind of stuff and catching their attention at a young age.”

Geared more towards adults is the Fire Safe Demonstration House. It’s a permanent structure designed as an educational tool.

“It gives them an idea of how they can set their home up for success in a wild fire situation,” Elms said. it gives them an idea of how they can set their home up for success in a wild fire situation. We spend a lot of time talking to people about it, but it’s hard to show them with a picture, so here we have a life-size model that we can show them and they can look at and get those ideas from.”

The house, was dedicated on Wednesday in honor of Es Berliner, who recently retired after a 22-year career as a CAL FIRE Fire Prevention Specialist.

“The structure itself is build with materials that are very fire resistant,” Elms said. “We’ve done things like close the eaves in..and as look inside you’ll see the different construction in the walls as ideas for people to just set their home up to be as fire resistant as possible.”

Berliner worked with the San Luis Obispo County Fire Safe Council, to help build the house at the Event Center. Through her efforts, the building was funded and constructed by donations and grants.

A significant part of the house is to demonstrate proper landscaping around a home to build a sufficient defensive space.

“It’s a fire-resistant landscaping where you have a lot of space in between the landscape and vegetation,” said Elms. “We have a lot rock scape around designed to not let fire pass through to get to the structure.”

For many visitors to the CAL FIRE exhibit, they simply want to express their gratitude.

As the Central Coast, and the rest of California, endures one of the worst fire seasons in recent memory, many people are appreciative of the massive efforts of those who work in the firefighting field.

“We get a lot of thank yous and we are honored to be recognized that way,” said Elms. “It’s our privilege to serve the community of San Luis Obispo County.”

CAL FIRE firefighters are at the fair daily, from noon to about 6 p.m.

For more information on fire education and prevention, visit www.readyforwildfire.org

Article source: http://www.keyt.com/news/wildfire/cal-fire-holding-fire-prevention-education-program-at-mid-state-fair/591075653