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Archives for July 10, 2017

6 tips from master gardeners during the Wisconsin Rapids Garden …

Peaceful fountains, well-manicured lawns, colorful flowers and every shade of green were among the sights prepared for participants in the 18th Annual Wood County Master Gardeners Garden Walk.

Money from the annual walk goes to help fund Master Gardener projects, including community gardens in Wisconsin Rapids and Marshfield and garden displays around Wood County, said Ruth Cline, Wood County Master Gardner board president.

Master gardeners and the owners of the six properties included in Saturday’s walk were on hand to answer people’s questions about gardening. USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin got some of their best tips to share. 

1. The key to a good garden: patience.

Start small and let your confidence grow to avoid getting discouraged, said Karen Houdek of Rome. Karen and Greg Houdek’s gardens at their Rome home have been certified a wildlife habitat and monarch way station.

“Gardening is all about patience,” she said. 

2. Start small and see what works.

Diane and Roger Babcock’s gardens have a mix of annuals, perennials and ornamental grass, but Diane’s favorites are their peonies. Most of them started in her grandmother’s garden in International Falls, Minnesota.

“Try planting a variety of things and see what works for you,” she said. 

3. Love the work.

Some people get excited and plant a large garden, said Barb Herreid, of Rome. After planting, they realize how much work is involved, she said. Herreid’s garden has many native plants and plants that don’t require a lot of maintenance.

“Start small and be successful with that before you expand,” Herreid said. 

RELATED: Preventive July chores for your garden

RELATED: How to deal with too much rain in the garden

4. It’s all about the dirt.

Soil preparation is the most important part of a good garden, said Richard McClain of Grand Rapids. McClain has a wide variety of foliage plants in the shaded gardens that surround his home. Tucked in the back of his property are piles of dirt composting until ready for planting.

“Some plants can adopt, but it’s best to have the right soil,” McClain said. 

People can find out more about soil testing and how to amend their soil at the University of Wisconsin Wood County Extension Office in Wisconsin Rapids, 715-421-8440. 

5. Experimenting is key.

Gardening is learning as you go, said Chari Seebruck of Grand Rapids. Chari and Chad Seebruck’s garden have more than 20 varieties of hostas. Gardens have to be tended to constantly, Chari Seebruck said.

“It’s a lot of trial and error to get a successful garden,” she said. 

6. It’s important to plant early.

People should plant their gardens as early as possible in the spring, said Sharon Vollert of Wisconsin Rapids. Sharon and Irv Vollert’s gardens feature several varieties of hostas, many astilbes and other perennials. 

“Don’t start your plants too close together,” Sharon said. 

Karen Madden: 715-424-7308, karen.madden@gannettwisconsin.com; on Twitter as @KMadden715.

Article source: http://www.wisconsinrapidstribune.com/story/news/2017/07/10/6-tips-master-gardeners-during-wisconsin-rapids-garden-walk/462707001/

This week’s gardening tips: deadhead flowerbeds, ignore milkweed aphids

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This week’s gardening tips: Keep flowerbeds well-groomed and weed free. Try to deadhead as regularly as possible to encourage continued flowering.

For late summer color: Continue to plant heat-tolerant bedding plants. Excellent choices for sunny areas include angelonia, coleus, torenia, periwinkle, melampodium, salvia, scaevola, purslane, pentas, blue daze, lantana and verbena. In part-shade, plant caladium, impatiens, begonia, torenia and coleus.

Small, yellow aphids on your butterfly weed or milkweed: The tiny insects will not damage the plants or affect the feeding of adult and larval monarch butterflies. Do not attempt to control them, as this could be detrimental to the monarch caterpillars. Give plants a little fertilizer now to encourage vigorous growth and blooming.

Sharpen your lawn mower blades: Typically, they have gotten dull by this time of the year. Mow regularly. It’s unhealthy for the grass to allow it to get too tall and then cut it back short. Try to mow frequently enough so that you remove no more than one-third of the length of the leaf blades.

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2017/07/this_weeks_gardening_tips_dead.html

Master Gardners gardening tips

CCHN

CCHN




Posted: Saturday, July 8, 2017 2:00 pm
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Updated: 2:01 pm, Sat Jul 8, 2017.


Master Gardners gardening tips

from our staff

Christian County Headliner News – Ozark, Missouri

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      on

      Saturday, July 8, 2017 2:00 pm.

      Updated: 2:01 pm.

      Article source: http://ccheadliner.com/news/master-gardners-gardening-tips/article_fc14f53c-601e-11e7-8996-9f63a96323e5.html

      Garden Tips: Recovering your yard and garden from recent storm damage – Tri

      Thank goodness the storm that blew through here two weeks ago did not ruin the sweet cherry and other fruit crops. However, high winds, punishing rain and scattered hail did do a bit of harm in some local yards.

      I rode out the storm safely inside my house while wondering what problems the fierce weather was causing. Storms like these can cause wreak havoc in landscapes and gardens. When I ventured out to assess the damage, I was relieved to find no serious problems.

      In my yard, it was a chore to pick up the millions of twigs that had blown off of my three river birches. Birches are considered “dirty trees” because they regularly drop twigs and small branches. This is a normal, albeit aggravating, characteristic of birches that I am willing to overlook since the river birch is one of my favorite trees.

      The winds of our recent storm were probably the hardest on the tender leaves of veggie plants, especially on the leaves of cucumbers, squashes and melons.

      The wind did bring down larger tree branches and limbs in some yards. Most of the time, branch and limb drop is caused by tree neglect and previous bad pruning cuts, especially topping. After a tree is planted, it should be monitored for competing main trunks and for branches that are attached to the trunk with narrow branch angles. Broken, damaged or dead branches should be pruned off correctly whenever they are noticed.

      If a tree was topped in the past, the resulting regrowth of weakly attached sprouts are prone to breakage in wind storms, especially as these crowded sprouts grow older and larger. In addition, topping cuts do not heal over, making the tree more vulnerable to wood rot and limb breakage.

      Trees, especially healthy mature ones, contribute to your home’s property value. Protect your investment by having a certified ISA (International Society of Arboriculture) arborist periodically inspect and prune your trees if needed.

      One type of damage I did find in my garden after the storm was the tearing and tattering of some plant leaves. This often happens earlier in the season when spring winds whip about the delicate new leaves on trees and shrubs.

      The winds of our recent storm were probably the hardest on the tender leaves of veggie plants, especially on the leaves of cucumbers, squashes and melons. Their leaves thrash about in the wind, ripping and injuring themselves on their own stem and leaf spines. The results are torn leaves with dry, grayish-white crusty patches. Usually, all except the youngest plants will recover, but it will set back their growth a bit.

      Also, strong winds can blow over or break the stems of vegetables and flowering perennials. I had a very robust heirloom pepper growing in a container. After the storm, the pepper plant and my Shasta daisies were all lying on their sides. I could have prevented these problems by providing my peppers, eggplants and taller flowering perennials with support, such as cages or stakes. This is advisable if your garden is in a wind-prone area. You can also protect your garden from wind by planting tall shrubs to create a windbreak or constructing one with windbreak fabric.

      Our recent storm was not normal, but just one severe storm with hail can spell disaster for growers of high-value crops like cherries and Honeycrisp apples. That is why some Washington growers are considering using protective netting covers on structures as insurance against hail damage. Netting is already being used in other countries, like New Zealand, Italy, and South Africa. The netting can also protect against bird damage and help reduce both tree heat stress and fruit sunburn.

      Marianne C. Ophardt is a retired horticulturist for Washington State University Benton County Extension.

      Article source: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/living/home-garden/marianne-ophardt/article159997644.html

      How a pocket garden can give a big return from a small space

      July kicks off the summer season of farmers’ markets. Here are some garden tips on creating pocket gardens — small space gardens and plants for problem areas.

      WHAT IS A POCKET GARDEN?

      Any small space can be turned into a pocket garden — from an urban alley that needs a bit of beauty to a small balcony or deck that can produce crops in pots.

      Pocket gardening also can be about designing a theme or smaller garden area within the framework of a larger landscape.

      PROBLEM-SOLVING WITH POCKETS OF GARDENS

      New homes are getting larger but their yards are becoming smaller. Our need for more parking means available space for plants is being paved for driveways and garages. Yes, paradise really is being turned into a parking lot.

      One of the biggest problems we now see is fewer plants for our pollinating insects, bees and butterflies. Adding just a few plants to a small space can improve air quality and provide nectar for hummingbirds and pollen for bees.

      You can turn pavement into paradise — and a balcony into a bounty of edible plants

      Even the ugliest alley way can support a few pots of herbs or some blooming sedums or succulents. A sunny balcony can grow a potted patio tomato and a patio or balcony facing north in the shade can grow mint for tea or impatiens for summer long color.

      The trick is to figure out the right plant for the right place and then provide soil if needed for plants to grow.

      Any plant, even a blooming weed is better than no plant when it comes to air quality and wild life. Growing your own edible plants does not have to mean canning beans or harvesting sweet corn. A pot of basil on a windowsill can add flavor to your cooking as well as life to your outdoor space.

      BEST PLANTS FOR POCKET GARDENS

      The plants that will thrive in small spaces where nothing much wants to grow sometimes are the same plants that some gardeners call invasive weeds.

      This is because the survivor methods used by really tough plants can get out of control when the plant has room and better conditions.

      The best plants for beginning gardeners are the same plants that will survive a small space — plants that are adaptable and forgiving and just plain hard to kill.

      POCKET GARDEN PLANTS FOR SUN

      Hens and chicks are succulents that grow even in the cracks of tile roofs all over Europe. This is how they get their other common name “house leaks” as they can stop a leaky roof.

      In our climate, you can fill an old leather boot with potting soil and plant with hens and chicks or use the golden draping sedum Sedum Angelina to fill in narrow spaces or to spill from small pots.

      Sage and salvia plants such as Hot Lips salvia and Tricolor Sage will adapt to dry soil and sunny sites and the bonus of the blooms on these tough plants makes pollinators happy.

      POCKET GARDEN PLANTS FOR SHADE

      Mint tea is full of healthful micro nutrients and growing any mint in a container is one way to keep it from spreading all over a garden.

      Dry shade under trees, or an empty spot near the back door or along the northern side of the house can become a haven for growing not only shade-tolerant mint plants but also groundcovers such as Sweet Woodruff, ajuga, lamium and lungwarts.

      Moss is also a plant. If you have an area that supports a bed of moss, add some stepping stones and call it a Japanese moss garden. Dwarf Nandina or heavenly bamboo, black mondo grass and a potted Japanese maple are other Japanese garden pants that can add to the Eastern garden theme.

      Any space can be turned into a garden no matter how small. Every plant makes a difference and so every gardener has the power to improve our world. Leaving the world a better and more beautiful place is a pretty good legacy to leave behind.

      Don’t give up, get growing.

      Marianne Binetti has a degree in horticulture from Washington State University and is the author of several books. Reach her through her website at binettigarden.com or write to her at P.O. Box 872, Enumclaw WA 98022.

      Meet Marianne

      11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday: Learn more about pocket gardens and problem-solving plants from Marianne Binetti at the Auburn Farmers’ Market free samples, located at the Auburn Sound Transit Center on A Street. More information is available at auburnfarmersmarket.org.

      Article source: http://www.theolympian.com/living/home-garden/marianne-binetti/article160353339.html

      6 tips from master gardeners during the Wisconsin Rapids Garden Walk

      Peaceful fountains, well-manicured lawns, colorful flowers and every shade of green were among the sights prepared for participants in the 18th Annual Wood County Master Gardeners Garden Walk.

      Money from the annual walk goes to help fund Master Gardener projects, including community gardens in Wisconsin Rapids and Marshfield and garden displays around Wood County, said Ruth Cline, Wood County Master Gardner board president.

      Master gardeners and the owners of the six properties included in Saturday’s walk were on hand to answer people’s questions about gardening. USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin got some of their best tips to share. 

      1. The key to a good garden: patience.

      Start small and let your confidence grow to avoid getting discouraged, said Karen Houdek of Rome. Karen and Greg Houdek’s gardens at their Rome home have been certified a wildlife habitat and monarch way station.

      “Gardening is all about patience,” she said. 

      2. Start small and see what works.

      Diane and Roger Babcock’s gardens have a mix of annuals, perennials and ornamental grass, but Diane’s favorites are their peonies. Most of them started in her grandmother’s garden in International Falls, Minnesota.

      “Try planting a variety of things and see what works for you,” she said. 

      3. Love the work.

      Some people get excited and plant a large garden, said Barb Herreid, of Rome. After planting, they realize how much work is involved, she said. Herreid’s garden has many native plants and plants that don’t require a lot of maintenance.

      “Start small and be successful with that before you expand,” Herreid said. 

      RELATED: Preventive July chores for your garden

      RELATED: How to deal with too much rain in the garden

      4. It’s all about the dirt.

      Soil preparation is the most important part of a good garden, said Richard McClain of Grand Rapids. McClain has a wide variety of foliage plants in the shaded gardens that surround his home. Tucked in the back of his property are piles of dirt composting until ready for planting.

      “Some plants can adopt, but it’s best to have the right soil,” McClain said. 

      People can find out more about soil testing and how to amend their soil at the University of Wisconsin Wood County Extension Office in Wisconsin Rapids, 715-421-8440. 

      5. Experimenting is key.

      Gardening is learning as you go, said Chari Seebruck of Grand Rapids. Chari and Chad Seebruck’s garden have more than 20 varieties of hostas. Gardens have to be tended to constantly, Chari Seebruck said.

      “It’s a lot of trial and error to get a successful garden,” she said. 

      6. It’s important to plant early.

      People should plant their gardens as early as possible in the spring, said Sharon Vollert of Wisconsin Rapids. Sharon and Irv Vollert’s gardens feature several varieties of hostas, many astilbes and other perennials. 

      “Don’t start your plants too close together,” Sharon said. 

      Karen Madden: 715-424-7308, karen.madden@gannettwisconsin.com; on Twitter as @KMadden715.

      Article source: http://www.wisconsinrapidstribune.com/story/news/2017/07/10/6-tips-master-gardeners-during-wisconsin-rapids-garden-walk/462707001/

      BOOST in bloom

      All of the gardens at Bullington Gardens in Hendersonville are certainly a sight to see this summer. But Director John Murphy believes four new additions deserve some extra attention: Those designed by students in the horticulture center’s BOOST program, one of several educational and therapeutic youth offerings.

      Bullington Onsite Occupational Student Training, aka BOOST, helps sophomores with special needs in Henderson County Public Schools’ occupational course of study learn the basic job skills they’ll need to be independent upon graduation. At the end of the year, the students form teams by school and go head-to-head in a garden battle.

      “The four gardens this year were the best ever as a group,” says Murphy. Each team picked a theme, with focuses on bullying (“victim” plants were separated from “bullies” by a row of supportive plant “friends”); remembrance and acceptance of Mexican culture (plants were chosen in honor of a student’s lost brother and the colors of the Mexican flag); school pride (called “Purple Reign” in honor of their knight mascot); and peace and harmony. The latter, by West Henderson High School, claimed victory.

      “It has a blend of harmonious colored flowers, a natural trellis backdrop with a peace sign, and a dry river of sand flowing through,” Murphy says. The BOOST gardens will remain in bloom throughout the season.

      GARDEN GLORY: Students from West Henderson High School took home the gold in this years battle-of-the-schools BOOST garden competition for their peace and harmony design. All four gardens remain in bloom and on display throughout the summer. Photo courtesy of Bullington Gardens
      GARDEN SAVVY: BOOST students learn job skills they’ll need after graduation through a variety of gardening tasks, including designing and planting their own gardens — which will remain in bloom throughout the summer. Photo courtesy of Bullington Gardens

      Murphy started BOOST in 2003, when the occupational course of study — which requires sophomores to complete 180 hours of work — was fairly new to the school system. “Teachers were trying to find meaningful ways for students to get those hours,” he explains. “At the same time, I needed help to maintain the property.”

      The students come once a week to assist in keeping up the gardens and nature trail, spreading mulch, clearing brush and potting plants in the greenhouse. All horticultural tasks, Murphy acknowledges, yet tasks designed to teach skills valuable in any work setting — from staying focused to getting along with coworkers to taking care of tools.

      After completing the year, and particularly the culminating competition, Murphy finds that students walk away more self-assured and ready for the future. “Most of these students haven’t grown any plants before, let alone designed a garden,” he notes. “By the end of the semester, they’ve grown in confidence … they’re proud of something they created that they weren’t sure they could do.”

       

       

      Article source: https://mountainx.com/living/boost-in-bloom/

      Mass Hort celebrates 10th anniversary of Bressingham Garden

      On Tuesday, July 25, Massachusetts Horticultural Society will host some of the most renowned horticulturists for a symposium and reception. The day has been organized in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Bressingham Garden of the Gardens at Elm Bank.

      Editor’s Note: The following was submitted by Mass Hort.

      On Tuesday, July 25, Massachusetts Horticultural Society will host some of the most renowned horticulturists for a symposium and reception. The day has been organized in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Bressingham Garden of the Gardens at Elm Bank.

      The symposium will be kicked off by the designer of the Bressingham Garden, Adrian Bloom. Bloom is a gardener, author, nurseryman, and photographer who developed his own renowned Foggy Bottom garden more than 50 years ago. He has designed gardens in North America and Germany, authored several books, and has presented for BBC “Gardener’s World” and WGBH “Victory Garden.”

      Bloom has been awarded the Victoria Medal of Honour by the Royal Horticultural Society and Roland White Medal by Mass Hort. He will share the story of how the Bressingham Garden came about and how inspirational gardens can be a catalyst for enthusing more gardeners to create and enjoy success in much smaller gardens.

      Also speaking will be Michael Dirr, expert on woody plants, and author of “The Manual of Woody Landscape Plants.” Dirr will present on advances in ornamental plant breeding that can enrich our gardens. Award-winning garden designer, author and lecturer Kerry Ann Mendez will present on perennials that can be incorporated into your landscape design to both add impact and reduce maintenance. Hydrangea expert Mal Condon will focus on hydrangea varieties that can be used in your landscape and how they have been used with great impact in New England gardens.

      Using the Bressingham Garden as a backdrop, attendees will gain an understanding of what and how to plant for the greatest impact. Additionally, Russell’s Garden Center will be on-site selling plants that are being featured throughout the day. Proceeds raised from the event, as well as a portion of plant sales, will support the Bressingham Garden and future projects.

      The symposium will run from noon-5 p.m. Additionally, Mass Hort will host a reception from 5:30-7:30 p.m. featuring the Hort Panel of Champions. Bring your plant questions to test 300-plus years of combined expertise of Adrian Bloom, Mal Condon, Michael Dirr, Wayne Mezitt, and Kerry Ann Mendez. We’ll also have an open mic session to hear memories of some of the 200 volunteers who helped install the garden, as well as wine, beer and hors d’oeuvres.

      For more details, schedule and to register, please visit www.masshort.org.

      Symposium hours are noon-5 p.m.

      Reception Hours are 5:30-7:30 p.m.

      Registration is $99 for the symposium, $25 for the reception, $119 for both.

      Article source: http://raynham.wickedlocal.com/news/20170707/mass-hort-celebrates-10th-anniversary-of-bressingham-garden

      Afterglow Farm enchants with lush gardens and family history

      Horticulture student wins UGA’s Next Top Entrepreneur competition

      ATHENS, Georgia — The key to maximizing water conservation and a lush landscape is an informed use of water. University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) horticulture student Jesse Lafian developed a webconnected soil moisture sensor to help landscape management companies monitor irrigation and enable them to use water wisely.

      His patent-pending design, which is the centerpiece of his startup, Reservoir LLC, is the winner of UGA’s Next Top Entrepreneur prize of $10,000 to put toward his company.

      UGA’s Next Top Entrepreneur is a student entrepreneurship contest open to student startup teams from all over the country. During this live event, teams pitch their existing business plans or business ideas in front of a live audience and a panel of judges. This year, 36 teams from 22 colleges and universities participated.

      “Our student entrepreneurs are among the most creative and diverse group we have here at UGA,” said Matt Miller, coordinator of the UGA Terry College of Business’ Entrepreneurship Program. “Their ambition and willingness to collaborate allows them to take on major problems in this world and come up with unique solutions.”

      Lafian plans to market his system to landscape management companies for use around tree installations, typically the most valuable parts of a landscape.

      His work in horticulture helped him identify a very expensive problem: the overwatering that kills a large portion of the trees that landscapers install and warranty. Landscaping companies pay millions of dollars each year to remove and replace these trees. Lafian’s goal is to help landscapers save time, trees and water.

      The lynchpin of this automated system is Lafian’s sensor. Lafian has applied for a patent on the sensor, which measures soil moisture in a novel way.

      “Jesse’s system works fundamentally differently from the sensors I have used in the past,” said Marc van Iersel, a professor of horticulture at UGA, smart irrigation pioneer and Lafian’s adviser. “The soil moisture sensors I have been using measure how much water is in the soil, but not how tightly that water is held in the soil. Some — or much, depending on soil type — of the water in the soil cannot be extracted by plants because the soil holds it too tightly. Jesse’s sensor measures exactly that: how tightly the water is bound to the soil. That tells us whether the plants can actually use that water.”

      Lafian plans to sell his technology to managers of high-end landscaping companies, then to other types of customers, such as farmers, golf course superintendents and homeowners.

      Since starting work on his design in 2016, Lafian’s company continues to gain momentum. He’s secured funding from the UGA Kickstart Fund, a $5,000 UGA Campus Sustainability Grant and $2,500 from CAES’s FABricate entrepreneurship program.

      Lafian moved to Athens, Georgia, to work as a research assistant in the UGA College of Engineering in 2014 after receiving his associate’s degree from Tompkins Cortland Community College in Dryden, New York, and completing a National Science Foundation-funded oceanography internship. He began completing his bachelor’s degree in fall 2015.

      To find out more about Terry College of Business’s Entrepreneurship Program visit here.

      Written by J. Merritt Melancon, UGA Office of Communications and Creative Services

      Photo: provided by UGA

      Jesse Lafian, a fourth-year horticulture student, designed a patent-pending moisture sensor that is the centerpiece of his startup, Reservoir LLC. Lafian won UGA’s Next Top Entrepreneur contest this spring, which included a prize of $10,000 to put toward his company.

      Article source: http://www.nurserymag.com/article/hort-student-wins-uga-next-top-entrepreneur/