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Archives for July 3, 2017

There’s no point trying to convince millennials to garden, Monty Don says

He said that the older generation must be patient, and wait for youngsters to appreciate gardening when they are ready, which he said may not be until they are 30 or 40.

“I just think that gardening is about the future, a slow thing, that is deep and spiritual as well as spiritually rewarding,” Don said.

“These are not things that are immediately attractive to the average 15, 16 or 17-year-old. And that’s fine, that;s ok, it doesn’t have to work for all the people all the time.”

Gardeners’ World, the BBC’s flagship horticultural show,is one of the longest running gardening shows, having been on air since the 1960s.

Don revealed why he never wears gloves while he gardens, telling the history festival in Wiltshire: “I never wear gloves because I like to feel the soil on my hands.

“I do wear gloves for things that sting a lot or prick a lot. But I just like to feel with my hands. I find gloves cumbersome and uncomfortable and I’ve got tough old hands so the old cut doesn’t matter.”

Article source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/02/no-point-trying-convince-millennials-garden-monty-don-says/

Bishop Commons Offers Classes on Gardening Led By Master Gardener

Bishop Commons Offers Classes on Gardening Led By Master Gardener


OSWEGO – Bishop’s Commons in Oswego will host two evening classes on gardening led by Cornell Cooperative Extension Certified Master Gardener Bonnie Amedio.

Bishop Commons invites you to gardening classes led by Cornell Cooperative Extension Certified Master Gardener Bonnie Amedio. The gardening classes will address topics. She will also share her tips on caring for orchids and African violets as well as other varieties that can be difficult to maintain.

Bishop Commons invites you to gardening classes led by Cornell Cooperative Extension Certified Master Gardener Bonnie Amedio. The gardening classes will address topics. She will also share her tips on caring for orchids and African violets as well as other varieties that can be difficult to maintain.

In the classes, Amedio will address topics and offer gardening tips on how to treat sick foliage, perennials, and annuals, soil tips, and how to take care of houseplants in the summer months. She will also share her tips on caring for orchids and African violets as well as other varieties that can be difficult to maintain.

“Digging It With Bonnie – Gardening Tips from a Master Gardener” classes will take place in the Garden Room at Bishop’s Commons, located at 4 Burkle St. The first class is scheduled for July 11 beginning at 6 p.m. A second class will take place on July 25 at 6 p.m.

Classes are free of charge and open to the public.

To reserve your spot in a class, please call Bishop’s Commons at 315-349-0799. Those attending are also welcome to bring along smaller plants as some gardening supplies will be available.

You can email your gardening questions or plant photos in advance to Amedio at [email protected]

Tours of the Enriched Housing residence will be available. Bishop’s Commons is located on the St. Luke healthcare campus.

For more information, contact Bishop’s Commons at 315-349-0799. On the web at www.bcommons.com

Article source: https://oswegocountytoday.com/bishop-commons-offers-classes-on-gardening-led-by-master-gardener/

30 Garden Tips for the Next 30 Summer Days

These hot days of Summer, which officially started this week, may be tempting us to sit back and simply enjoy what we planted in spring. But this is the time when we must turn our attentions to the real aspects of gardening: tending to plants and reaping their rewards. (This week the first squashes were picked and grilled to the delight of our summer palates!) Glumly, we also entering our gardens’ peak pest and problem season. That means it is time to restart and refuel our gardening “engines” with these simple summer tasks every gardener should focus on within the next 30 days.

30 gardening tips that keep a summer garden growing:

1. Stay cool – Work outside when it’s less hot and humid: in the early morning, late afternoon, and evening.

2. Hand water – Give a helping hand to new trees and shrubs planted this spring. In addition to the drip irrigation most trees and shrubs are on, new plants appreciate supplemental hand watering once a week until the monsoons arrive in July.

3. Mulch – Check mulch layers and reapply over bare spots before those areas are homesteaded by new weeds.
4. Check leaves – A plant’s leaf damage is a good indicator of nutrient deficiency. These issues only become worse as summer heat progresses.
5. Pinch and deadhead – This is a must-do task if flowers are to be kept blooming all season long.
6. Cut back – Tall perennial bloomers like asters, monarda, Helianthus, and mums should be cut back to make them stockier, to fill with flower buds, and so they don’t bloom too early.
7. Remove – Pull out cool season crops like spinach that bolt into flower because of the heat.

8. Plant – Fill in empty spaces with succession plantings of summer greens like kale, chard, and lettuce. Also plant vegetables that like being planted during hot weather: tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants.

9. Bush beans – After harvesting, plant new succession crops at two-week intervals.

10. Tomato plants – Stake them as they grow. Pinch out suckers.

11. Asparagus and rhubarb – These two plants should not be harvested in summer. Let them build up reserves for next season.

12. Corn – To prevent earworms, put a couple of drops of mineral oil on corn silks within a week after they appear.

13. Berries – Protect fruits with nets, row covers, or scare tape.

14. Harvest – Vegetables like squash, beans, and tomatoes should be checked daily.

15. Wisteria can – Once they finish blooming prune the vines to keep them a manageable size.

16. Evergreens – Pine, spruce, and cedar should be pruned back as soon as new growth starts to turn a dark green or blue.

17. Compost – That simmering pile of future plant nutrients should be turned to take advantage of the summer heat.

18. June Fruit Drop – This is standard on fruit trees. They are thinning fruit to a manageable crop size. Clean up any fallen fruit.

19. Insects love summer – Be vigilant! Walk through the gardens checking both sides of leaves for eggs and nymphs. Check trees for nests of bagworms.

20. Spider mites – Look for plants with spider webs that have no visible spiders, especially evergreens like spruces and junipers. YouTube on how to Control Spider Mites.

21. Lawns – Allow lawns to grow taller. Set the mower blade higher so grass has a chance to shade the soil and stay cooler.

22. Water – Make sure plants stay hydrated. Look for leaves that are wilting, or that show their undersides in the heat of the day. Water by hand if needed, or bump up your irrigation and water longer for each cycle. Watters water guide.

23.Feed – The entire landscape should be fed before summer rains arrive. Within the next 30 days feed plants with my ‘All Purpose Plant Food’ 7-4-4.

24. Houseplants – After many months of breathing indoor air, it’s like their summer vacation when moved outside.

25. Birds – Whether in a birdbath or shallow dishes placed around the garden, provide the fresh water essential to birds’ survival.

26 through 30 – OK, so the article isn’t long enough for 30 tips. But I like the look of “30 for 30”, so the title remains as is!

Garden classes have been posted to the website and start Saturday, July 8th with “Containers that Bloom like Crazy!”. If you have read this far, take special notice of the class on July 15 “Attract Birds, Bees Butterflies”. Classes will be held at 9:30 am each Saturday through summer. Take a look at the entire class schedule here.

Until next week, I’ll be helping gardeners with their summer “To-Do List” here at Watters Garden Center.

Ken Lain can be found throughout the week at Watters Garden Center, 1815 W. Iron Springs Rd in Prescott, or contacted through his web site at WattersGardenCenter.com or FB.com/WattersGardenCenter .

Article source: http://www.prescottenews.com/index.php/features/columnists/mountain-gardener/item/30297-30-garden-tips-for-the-next-30-summer-days

5 garden tips for this week (July 1-7)



Show of support

Prop up fruit-laden tree branches so the weight doesn’t break the branches. Use a Y-shaped, padded support to reduce damage from rubbing during breezes. A pruned-off tree branch with a forked branch or an old rake make perfect supports, especially when cushioned with a clean rag or even an old glove. Angle the support into the soil so the branch is free to move when breezes blow. Destroy fallen fruit to decrease insect and disease problems.

Go early or late

As the temperature rises, irrigate your garden and landscape in the evening or early in the morning, but not in the middle of the day. Allow water to run long enough to soak in deeply, then turn it off. Plants use the most water, not only when temperatures are high, but also whenever a breeze blows, or during flowering, or as fruit is developing. Containerized plants usually need more frequent watering than those in the ground.

Harvest time

In spite of summer heat, harvest your garden vegetables every day or two, preferably in the morning or evening. Store them in the refrigerator if you can’t use them right away. Mature vegetables that remain on the plant produce a plant hormone that prevents them from blossoming, reducing your chances for additional harvests. By harvesting ripe produce regularly, your plants will keep blooming and setting crops — especially your cucumbers, beans, eggplants, squashes and tomatoes.

Here’s a grape idea

Grape vines seem to keep going with relatively little water, but to get good quality fruit be sure to water them about once a week, long enough so the water sinks into the soil. And if birds tend to eat your ripening grapes before you get to them, try this: put a paper bag (not plastic) around each grape cluster. Staple the bag together around the top of the stem. The grapes will sweeten and ripen properly for you, not for the birds. You’ll just need to peek in periodically to see exactly when they are ripe — unless you want raisins in the fall. Or, if you have plenty, leave a cluster or two uncovered to see when they ripen. And to protect your tree fruits from birds, cover the trees with bird netting, or attach brightly colored streamers to the stems to frighten the birds away.

Cutting back

When boysenberries, blackberries and olallieberries finish bearing, cut back the spent fruiting canes all the way to the ground, sparing only the vigorous shoots that did not bear fruit this season. Feed with a balanced plant food and continue regular watering. Vigorous new canes will emerge and provide the scaffolding for a bountiful crop next year — and you won’t have to prune and separate them this winter. Just train them out horizontally for optimum yield next year.

Article source: http://www.dailynews.com/lifestyle/20170702/5-garden-tips-for-this-week-july-1-7

Newport News nonprofit wants to make ‘signature’ city entry points

With its 20th property acquisiton, the Newport News Green Foundation is hoping to embark on new territory by sprucing up gateways to the city.

The nonprofit foundation bought a fifth of an acre at 1351 39th St. for $15,000 from a private seller on June 13, according to city property records. The plot is near the Hampton city line.

Usually, the foundation buys land to preserve green space along the city’s main corridors, but this purchase was a little different, said Tami Farinholt, the group’s executive director.

“How do people know that they are in Newport News? So, creating some sort of visual green gateway,” Farinholt said. “This will be our first attempt at, can we actually do something cool that is sort of a signature for Newport News?”

K9 Trigger Bucket-list

CAPTION

Newport News narcotics detective Jamie Huling is giving his ailing K-9 partner Trigger a chance to just be a normal dog after spending most of his life as a working dog.

Newport News narcotics detective Jamie Huling is giving his ailing K-9 partner Trigger a chance to just be a normal dog after spending most of his life as a working dog.

Civil War Map of Gloucester Point

CAPTION

Local Historians are using a newly uncovered 1862 map in attempt to find the location of a lost Civil War fort that defended Gloucester Point and the York River during the Civil War. 

Local Historians are using a newly uncovered 1862 map in attempt to find the location of a lost Civil War fort that defended Gloucester Point and the York River during the Civil War. 

Colonial Williamsburg Announces Layoffs

CAPTION

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation announced that it will outsource a number of its commercial interests and will lay off 71 workers. 

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation announced that it will outsource a number of its commercial interests and will lay off 71 workers. 

Farinholt said City Council members and Green Foundation board members talked about the idea again in 2015.

The idea for the 39th Street property, which is mostly bare right now, is to fill it with certain signature items so that people have more than a sign denoting their entry into the city, Farinholt said.

Newport News Shipbuilding so “anytime you see an anchor, you realize you’re in Newport News.” They’re also talking about creative landscaping, Farinholt said.

Nonprofit will organize future Newport News marathons

A nonprofit group will eventually replace city staff in organizing future One City marathons to help the event grow and stay sustainable, city officials told Newport News City Council members on Tuesday.

The timeline of when that transition would happen or how the nonprofit would be created is…

A nonprofit group will eventually replace city staff in organizing future One City marathons to help the event grow and stay sustainable, city officials told Newport News City Council members on Tuesday.

The timeline of when that transition would happen or how the nonprofit would be created is…

(Reema Amin)

The Newport News Green Foundation was established on a simple plan in 1998 by a resolution from the City Council. Council members were concerned the city was getting built out, and green space would become too scarce. They created the nonprofit foundation so it could buy up plots of land and preserve some greenery along main roads.

Since 1998, the group has acquired land along the entire length of the city. The group, funded through some city funding, grants and private donations, purchased some of the properties, while others were donated.

“You see them all the time; you just don’t realize you’re passing them,” Farinholt said. “It’s like Where’s Waldo.”

The group is trying to find ways in making their spaces more user-friendly and more noticeable because a lot of them are places that are tough to access, she said.

Its first attempt at accessibility is with its property near Bland Boulevard and Chatham Drive, near the retention pond. The group is planning to create walking trails and add benches near the pond.

If the group is preserving green space and adding to it, what makes it any different from the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation? It’s a question that Farinholt said she gets often. Parks and Recreation has to think about how its resources would be beneficial to the whole city, but the Green Foundation can use its money to spruce something up even if only a dozen people would use it on any given day, she said.

“For us, because we’re a small independent foundation whose mission it is to create green space, we can create those spaces for the sake of creating that space,” Farinholt said. “We don’t have to look at the cost benefit of how many people are going to use it.”

And sure, Parks and Recreation could do the same thing if “the sky was the limit and we had an unlimited budget,” Poplawski said.

“They do things that we just can’t do,” Poplawski said.

Amin can be reached by phone at 757-247-4890.

Article source: http://www.dailypress.com/news/newport-news/dp-nws-evg-newport-news-rental-inspection-program-20170703-story.html

Charlene Maurer Finerty: Business ideas are all around us – Times Herald

Why didn’t I think of that?

Money-making business ideas abound. Hundreds of thousands have been discovered. What remains?

For a business idea or business-expansion concept, think of yourself as a problem-solver.

What annoys you? What entertains you? Do you often say, “I wish xyz?” Wish you had a way to make something easier, quicker, better, more fun? Is the idea a want or a need?

In the not-so-distant past, a more frugal society would not have dreamed that grown people, primary male, would support a now-huge industry built around driving off-road vehicles over rocks, desserts and mountains, bouncing their bodies over rough terrain, being splashed with mud for no reason other than spending time and money.

People and equipment get filthy. Vehicles and parts wear out. Is that fun? To some yes.

The other side of the equation? Opportunity! A perfect example of disposable income leading to money and profits.

The realization that millions and billions are spent unnecessarily presented itself after multiple four-wheelers zoomed past me during a half-hour traveling Route 17 through Orange and Sullivan counties on a bright spring Saturday.

One roadworthy vehicle with no doors was completely plastered with mud. Others were piggy-backed on trucks and trailers, all exceeding the speed limit. Most participants travel miles to reach recreational acreage.

Few people owning 4x4s, roadworthy or not, need them every day. This is a want. A fraction live on ample acreage, enabling a fun spin on the back 40, scaring wildlife and polluting the air after supper.

Still fewer use them for farming, traversing large warehouses, for landscaping businesses, etc.

There’s a business here. A large industry.

Not many years ago, a person envisioning local, national and worldwide organized rallies with grown people spending millions annually to participate in such fun would have been labeled insane.

Now, like-minded individuals rent property, buy vehicles, rent or buy trailers – and what good are trailers without a trailer hitch connected to different reliable vehicles?

Some want or need pickup trucks to transport 4x4s, or better yet, wide-bodied pickups to hold two 4x4s side by side.

Common interests lead to membership-fee club formations and organized fee-based rallies/contests.

Other wants and needs extend to magazines and websites advertising gloves, clothing, special tires, fuel, helmets, replacement parts, etc.

Plus, all these people need or want to eat, and many sleep over at destination jamborees.

Needed or wanted, serious or fun, billions are spent every year.

Let your mind wander, get off the couch, write down ideas.

Do you need a new idea or dovetail into an existing concept? One-half of one percent, or less, of a large, existing industry is more than enough to keep most of us busy, happy and profitable.

Charlene Maurer Finerty, owner of Plans and Profits, LLC, edits, teaches and writes custom business plans. See PlansAndProfits.com. She also offers a Write-Your-Own-Business Plan class on DVD at BusinessPlanWritingClass.com. Email finerty@aol.com anytime or call 343-1515 from 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Her column appears alternating Mondays.

Article source: http://www.recordonline.com/news/20170702/charlene-maurer-finerty-business-ideas-are-all-around-us

Color all year

<!–
–>-Messenger photo by Chad ThompsonSkip Thompson, of Fort Dodge, kneels in one of her flower gardens at her home, 701 Crest Ave., recently. Her gardens are part of the Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club annual tour of gardens July 7.

-Messenger photo by Chad Thompson

Skip Thompson, of Fort Dodge, kneels in one of her flower gardens at her home, 701 Crest Ave., recently. Her gardens are part of the Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club annual tour of gardens July 7.

All throughout the year, variations of colors can be seen in Skip Thompson’s flower gardens.

“We try to keep color at all times,” Thompson said. “We have spring flowers and then as they no longer bloom then something else comes in.”

“Out on the corner there is always color,” she added. “There is always something blooming.”

Thompson is a member of the Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club. Thompson and her husband D.J. Campney’s flower gardens, located at 701 Crest Ave., will be featured during the 16th annual tour of gardens on Friday.

Six homes will be showcased during the tour. Attendees can go to the homes in whatever order they choose, Thompson said. Tickets can be purchased at any of the homes or at Becker Florists, 1335 First Ave. N.

-Messenger photo by Chad ThompsonSkip Thompson, of Fort Dodge, removes some of the old blooms from her hibiscus at her garden recently. Hibiscus boom in July and also rebloom, she said. Thompson's flower gardens are being featured in the Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club annual tour of gardens July 7.

-Messenger photo by Chad Thompson

Skip Thompson, of Fort Dodge, removes some of the old blooms from her hibiscus at her garden recently. Hibiscus boom in July and also rebloom, she said. Thompson’s flower gardens are being featured in the Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club annual tour of gardens July 7.

“It’s a fun evening out,” she said. “This will be our first twilight tour.”

Thompson said the tours are typically held earlier in the day.

“We normally have it on a Saturday,” she said. “This time we are trying something different — an evening tour.”

“People can come and go after work and it might be a little cooler,” she added. “Every garden looks different at different times of the day. We think it will be a positive to try something new.”

Proceeds from the tour will go to support Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club projects such as local tree plantings, local flower shows, and book donations to the Fort Dodge Public Library.

-Messenger photo by Chad ThompsonA section of Skip Thompson's flower gardens are shown here. Pink roses, mint, basel, and sage are among the items planted in the garden.

-Messenger photo by Chad ThompsonA section of Skip Thompson’s flower gardens are shown here. Pink roses, mint, basel, and sage are among the items planted in the garden.

“It’s a way to raise money for the garden club,” Thompson said. “It also allows people in the city to walk through some of these gardens that they might see driving by. It helps people get ideas. It’s like an open house. Maybe a chance to see something different or say, ‘hey I hate that.’”

Thompson said everything in her gardens is a work in progress.

“It’s never done,” she said.

Depending on the time of year, crocus, daffodils, tulips, columbine, daylilies and hibiscus can all be seen throughout Thompson’s property.

“We have a lot of hosta,” she said. “We have a lot of flowers.”

Her gardens also feature pink roses and herbs such as mint, basel, and sage.

Thompson said she tries to match the flower with the amount of light that it gets.

“We have a shaded yard, so there are a lot of things that are not grown well in the sun,” she said.

Lost trees have also impacted the gardens.

“We lost two trees this year, so that has changed the complexity of what our garden is,” Thompson said. “We lost half a tree in the storm. The others were just of old age.”

During the summer months, Thompson spends much of her time in the garden watering the plants.

“It’s watering this time of year when everything is blooming,” she said. “It takes a lot of nutrients to keep the flower in bloom and in nice shape. We try mulch as much as possible. Once you have things weeded, you don’t have to weed as much. You water and then you fertilize when you water.”

Thompson also spends time removing the old blossoms.

“Some flowers will bloom, but you have to take the old spent blossoms off or they won’t rebloom,” she said. “We water early in the morning and late in the evening. When it was really hot like last week, a lot of the hanging baskets we water twice a day.”

Thompson said she spends between three and four hours a week in the gardens.

Campney is responsible for the landscaping aspect of the gardens.

“My husband does digging, planting, and restructuring,” Thompson said. “He does brick and mulching. If we put it in stones, he does all of that. I do weeding and day-to-day upkeep. He does all the heavy work.”

Campney works as a journey lineman.

“He works for multiple companies,” Thompson said.

Thompson retired from Nestle Purina Pet Care Co. in August 2016. She worked there for 19 years as logistics manager.

She has lived in Fort Dodge for about 25 years. She moved to her current residence about eight years ago with Campney.

Gardening has served as an escape for Thompson.

“Being outside is very pleasant,” she said. “I use it as stress relief. When I worked I would come home and work in the garden. It’s quiet. The phone isn’t ringing. It’s just something nice about nature. If you have a bad day at work you can go pull weeds.”

Thompson said she plants the flowers that she likes.

“I raise flowers I like,” she said. “They are for my pleasure. We have garden club members that know what those are. I just raise what I like.”

“We pick flowers for what we will grow in our climate,” she said. “We want to put everything into perennials. It’s color all year long. It’s matching the plant with the amount of light in the day.”

Thompson and Campney have plans for the gardens for years to come, she said.

“My husband has plans for the next 10 years,” Thompson said.

—–

If you go:

-Messenger photo by Chad Thompson

Skip Thompson, of Fort Dodge, kneels in one of her flower gardens at her home, 701 Crest Ave., recently. Her gardens are part of the Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club annual tour of gardens July 7.

-Messenger photo by Chad Thompson

Skip Thompson, of Fort Dodge, removes some of the old blooms from her hibiscus at her garden recently. Hibiscus boom in July and also rebloom, she said. Thompson’s flower gardens are being featured in the Fort Dodge Federated Garden Club annual tour of gardens July 7.

-Messenger photo by Chad ThompsonA section of Skip Thompson’s flower gardens are shown here. Pink roses, mint, basel, and sage are among the items planted in the garden.

FD Tour of Gardens

What: Fort Dodge 16th annual Tour of Gardens, twilight tour

When: Friday

Time: 4 to 8:30 p.m.

Cost: $10 for adults, children 14 and under are free

n Tickets can be purchased in advance at Becker Florists or on the day of the tour at the first garden, 337 Ave. G.

Article source: http://www.messengernews.net/life/local-lifestyle/2017/07/color-all-year/

Dirty hands, magical results — Master Gardeners gear up for Q&A

MOUNT VERNON — From persistent weeds to malicious insects, a garden or landscape can be marred by a host of problems.

Next week, members of the Skagit County Washington State University Master Gardeners will become allies for county gardeners who are looking to take up arms — OK, shovels and wheelbarrows — against those problems.

The Master Gardeners will host a free gardening workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, July 8, at the Discovery Garden. Registration will begin at 9:45 that morning for an event that will include one-on-one consultations, clinics devoted to specific topics and even a tool-sharpening demonstration station.

Story continues below video

Master Gardener Dave Buchan said, “We want every gardener and homeowner to come and ask questions, ask gardening and landscaping questions. We think it’s a really good chance to have a great resource. You can drop in, browse, ask questions … it’ll be informal.”

Last year, Master Gardeners celebrated the Discovery Garden’s 20th anniversary. Kicked off in 1996 with some fencing and border trees, it has grown into a diverse series of 27 gardens connected by paths. There’s a quiet Japanese garden dedicated to contemplation and a herb garden with an English design; a four-season garden spotlights plants that grow well in each season; and a children’s garden provides a fun and open space that includes a small library. There’s also a new shade structure installed specifically as a space under which to hold workshops.

Buchan said last year’s celebration helped this year’s event.

“It’s something we’ve wanted to do for a while,” he said. “(After the anniversary) we wanted to do another event, and we thought, ‘Why not help every gardener in the valley?’”

Diana Wisen said 40 to 50 Master Gardeners such as her will be available to provide tours and answer questions.

“We’ll be available to give tours and help them figure out what may fit their landscape or garden,” she said.

Visitors are encouraged to bring items from home that may help solve whatever garden-related problems they are experiencing, such as branches or insects. (In the latter case, it’s helpful if one or more of the creatures are brought alive in a refrigerated container.)

Topics addressed in the workshops are expected to include growing herbs and vegetables, caring for roses and the best way to incorporate native plants into your landscape.

Jean Nelson, another Master Gardener who is preparing for the event, said she’s looking forward to it.

“It’s a fun thing to do,” she said.

Article source: http://www.goskagit.com/entertainment/dirty-hands-magical-results-master-gardeners-gear-up-for-q/article_5dbbaed6-485d-5f5e-8550-3b79c08af9d8.html