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Archives for June 28, 2017

Brief-blooming irises add color to gardens

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Article source: http://www.jhnewsandguide.com/opinion/columnists/gardening_marilyn_quinn/brief-blooming-irises-add-color-to-gardens/article_c37f782f-4e7d-50d7-b297-e90f70b6c0f9.html

Pupils get top gardening tips from RHS School Champion – Ulster Star

Fort Hill Integrated Primary School were the winners of Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council’s recent Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) School Champion competition.

During Compost Week the council offered local schools that participate in its food waste recycling initiative the opportunity to win a visit from the RHS School Champion 2016, Sharon McMaster.

Fort Hill Integrated Primary School were winners of Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council's recent Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) School Champion competition. Fort Hill pupils Phoebe and Dale are pictured helping Councillor James Baird, former Chairman of the council's Environmental Services Committee, and Sharon McMaster, RHS Champion 2016, water the community garden at Hilden.

Fort Hill Integrated Primary School were winners of Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council’s recent Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) School Champion competition. Fort Hill pupils Phoebe and Dale are pictured helping Councillor James Baird, former Chairman of the council’s Environmental Services Committee, and Sharon McMaster, RHS Champion 2016, water the community garden at Hilden.

Sharon, a parent volunteer at Ballycarrickmaddy Primary School, established a fantastic school garden and runs gardening clubs for children outside school hours.

P3 pupils and staff from Fort Hill met with Sharon at the Hilden Community Garden on the Low Road. Also in attendance were Councillor James Baird, former Chairman of the council’s Environmental Services Committee; Roberta Mitchell from the NI Housing Executive; Councillor Jonathan Craig and members of Hilden Community Association.

Speaking about the visit, Councillor Baird, said: “It was a lovely final engagement as I had the opportunity to view first-hand the positive interaction between young schoolchildren and the local community. Fort Hill has been involved with the Hilden Community Association since the garden was in its planning stage five years ago. I was very pleased to have the opportunity to view the mosaic the schoolchildren designed and made specifically for the garden alongside their gardening skills as the bulbs they have planted over the years are growing well.

“Due to the close involvement of the school in this local garden it was very fitting that the compost the council delivered and the wildflowers Sharon provided are being used in this central location to be enjoyed by the whole community. The pupils were very attentive to Sharon’s gardening tips and they had fun planting the new flowers in the community garden assisted by both community and Housing Executive representatives. Well done Fort Hill Integrated Primary School, keep up the gardening.”

Mr Clive Anderson, school principal at Fort Hill Integrated Primary, added: “In our school all the Nursery and P1 to P3 pupils take a keen interest in gardening and plant bulbs in the autumn and vegetables in the spring and summer term in the school poly tunnel and Nursery play area. The successful growth of these plants is helped by the wonderful compost received from the council through its recycled waste programme. The school supports the scheme by ensuring all the pupils’ break and lunch food waste is available for collection by the council as part of its brown bin recycling service.

“By encouraging the pupils to garden and learn from the wonders of growth, we are teaching our children a lot about the world around us and how recycling works, in an age when many of us are so used to buying all our food from the supermarket. We value the partnership with John Kelly, from the council, in helping make our pupils aware of the importance of recycling for the environment. Being involved in the Community Garden on the Low Road gives the pupils and indeed their families a sense of pride and ownership. It is very important for us as a school to work in partnership with this local community project.”

Chair of Hilden Community Association, Trisha McCormick and husband Tommy have continued to keep the garden running and coordinate volunteers since it was created.

Speaking about the recent visit, Trisha said: “On behalf of our committee I would like to thank Fort Hill Integrated Primary School for their continued support of our community garden. The pupils have been a great help every year. We would also like to thank the NIHE as without their help to secure funding we wouldn’t have a community garden, Roberta Mitchell has been a huge help. Thanks also to the council for donating compost. Most importantly I would like to thank Ta McCormick for the up keep of the garden each week, you are an asset to our community.”

Article source: http://www.lisburntoday.co.uk/news/education/pupils-get-top-gardening-tips-from-rhs-school-champion-1-8029202

Pupils get top gardening tips from RHS School Champion

Fort Hill Integrated Primary School were the winners of Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council’s recent Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) School Champion competition.

During Compost Week the council offered local schools that participate in its food waste recycling initiative the opportunity to win a visit from the RHS School Champion 2016, Sharon McMaster.

Fort Hill Integrated Primary School were winners of Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council's recent Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) School Champion competition. Fort Hill pupils Phoebe and Dale are pictured helping Councillor James Baird, former Chairman of the council's Environmental Services Committee, and Sharon McMaster, RHS Champion 2016, water the community garden at Hilden.

Fort Hill Integrated Primary School were winners of Lisburn and Castlereagh City Council’s recent Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) School Champion competition. Fort Hill pupils Phoebe and Dale are pictured helping Councillor James Baird, former Chairman of the council’s Environmental Services Committee, and Sharon McMaster, RHS Champion 2016, water the community garden at Hilden.

Sharon, a parent volunteer at Ballycarrickmaddy Primary School, established a fantastic school garden and runs gardening clubs for children outside school hours.

P3 pupils and staff from Fort Hill met with Sharon at the Hilden Community Garden on the Low Road. Also in attendance were Councillor James Baird, former Chairman of the council’s Environmental Services Committee; Roberta Mitchell from the NI Housing Executive; Councillor Jonathan Craig and members of Hilden Community Association.

Speaking about the visit, Councillor Baird, said: “It was a lovely final engagement as I had the opportunity to view first-hand the positive interaction between young schoolchildren and the local community. Fort Hill has been involved with the Hilden Community Association since the garden was in its planning stage five years ago. I was very pleased to have the opportunity to view the mosaic the schoolchildren designed and made specifically for the garden alongside their gardening skills as the bulbs they have planted over the years are growing well.

“Due to the close involvement of the school in this local garden it was very fitting that the compost the council delivered and the wildflowers Sharon provided are being used in this central location to be enjoyed by the whole community. The pupils were very attentive to Sharon’s gardening tips and they had fun planting the new flowers in the community garden assisted by both community and Housing Executive representatives. Well done Fort Hill Integrated Primary School, keep up the gardening.”

Mr Clive Anderson, school principal at Fort Hill Integrated Primary, added: “In our school all the Nursery and P1 to P3 pupils take a keen interest in gardening and plant bulbs in the autumn and vegetables in the spring and summer term in the school poly tunnel and Nursery play area. The successful growth of these plants is helped by the wonderful compost received from the council through its recycled waste programme. The school supports the scheme by ensuring all the pupils’ break and lunch food waste is available for collection by the council as part of its brown bin recycling service.

“By encouraging the pupils to garden and learn from the wonders of growth, we are teaching our children a lot about the world around us and how recycling works, in an age when many of us are so used to buying all our food from the supermarket. We value the partnership with John Kelly, from the council, in helping make our pupils aware of the importance of recycling for the environment. Being involved in the Community Garden on the Low Road gives the pupils and indeed their families a sense of pride and ownership. It is very important for us as a school to work in partnership with this local community project.”

Chair of Hilden Community Association, Trisha McCormick and husband Tommy have continued to keep the garden running and coordinate volunteers since it was created.

Speaking about the recent visit, Trisha said: “On behalf of our committee I would like to thank Fort Hill Integrated Primary School for their continued support of our community garden. The pupils have been a great help every year. We would also like to thank the NIHE as without their help to secure funding we wouldn’t have a community garden, Roberta Mitchell has been a huge help. Thanks also to the council for donating compost. Most importantly I would like to thank Ta McCormick for the up keep of the garden each week, you are an asset to our community.”

Article source: http://www.lisburntoday.co.uk/news/education/pupils-get-top-gardening-tips-from-rhs-school-champion-1-8029202

Garden clubs on Long Island

LONG ISLAND DAHLIA SOCIETY

LONG ISLAND DAHLIA SOCIETY, longislanddahlia.org, 631-754-1002 Meets 6:30
LONG ISLAND DAHLIA SOCIETY, longislanddahlia.org, 631-754-1002 Meets 6:30

(Credit: Daniel Brennan)

LONG ISLAND DAHLIA SOCIETY, longislanddahlia.org, 631-754-1002 Meets 6:30 p.m. third Thur. at East Islip Public Library, 381 E. Main St., East Islip, and 9 a.m.-noon every Sat. for instructions at Bayard Cutting Arboretum, dahlia garden, Oakdale; call or visit website for schedule. Dahlia Show Exhibition Sept. 2-3. Photo Contest, Oct. 14-15. Largest display of dahlias in New York, Bayard Cutting Arboretum, June-Sept. Dues $20.

Article source: http://www.newsday.com/lifestyle/home-and-garden/garden-clubs-on-long-island-1.11887888

ARB asks for design changes to Summer Street project

A proposed mixed-use development slated for 483 Summer St. in Arlington will have to wait a little longer in order to get the go-ahead.

The Arlington Redevelopment Board on Monday, June 26 continued a public hearing on the project’s special permit application for the second time. The project would include four storefronts consisting of 2,774 square feet of retail space, 782 square feet of office space and seven residential units.

The project applicant, Campobasso Properties, intends to occupy the office space. The residential units would consist of one one-bedroom apartment and six two-bedroom units. One of the seven would be priced as an affordable housing unit for a tenant making no more than 80 percent of the area median income. The income limit for a one-person household seeking an affordable unit is roughly $51,000.

Design and siting

“It feels like it’s fighting with the site,” said ARB member Andrew West, who said he is still concerned with the siting and design of the project, sentiments echoed by others on the ARB. “It feels a little tight to the street. It feels crushed to the sidewalk.”

West suggested trying to turn the building so it is more parallel to Summer Street, a move that he said would make the structure feel further away from the street without reducing square footage.

West also suggested making the second and third floor of the three-story structure taller, and also increasing the window heights to make them more aesthetically interesting.

“It doesn’t [currently] feel like a new residential building,” he said, adding that there is an opportunity to do more and incorporate “a little more zing to this thing.”

ARB member Kin Lau said he thought the proposed structure would fit into the neighborhood a little better if the footprint of the building could be reduced by decreasing the actual size of the building or by lowering the building, possibly below grade.

Parking and transportation

The public hearing on 483 Summer St. began back in February.

During that hearing, the ARB and residents had concerned about the parking layout for the project, which included some tandem parking, as well as concerns regarding transportation management, bicycle parking and storm water control.

Attorney Robert Annese, representing the applicants, said they had worked hard to integrate into the project suggestions from the ARB at the last meeting.

To address parking and the concern over the tandem parking proposed in February, Annese said the applicants had come up with a plan to combine parking at 483 Summer St. with parking next door at 489 Summer St., which Campobasso Properties also owns.

Because there had been excess parking at 489 Summer St., also a residential complex, combining parking on both properties would create a total of 26 parking spaces, four more spaces than required for both properties under the town’s zoning code.

Annese also said the applicants had made plans to incorporate enclosed bicycle parking for the residents and bicycle spaces for the retail commercial properties.

“You took it to heart and I appreciate that,” said ARB member David Watson, a strong cycling advocate. “With respect to the bike parking, you have made a huge amount of progress.”

Watson said he was slightly disappointed there was not a more extensive transportation demand management plan, but also said that with the reconfigured parking and new bicycle parking, he is okay with the trade-off.

Storm water runoff

Residents had also previously expressed concern regarding storm water runoff generated by the site.

Jack Sullivan of Sullivan Engineering, who worked on the storm water mitigation efforts for the project, said he had taken out his initial rain garden design and reverted to a more conventional infiltration system.

Sullivan said his team implemented design elements such as a berm, a raised structure that acts like a barrier, to direct runoff flow to three distinct drainage points.

The new system would be able to contain all runoff from a 100-year storm, while also reducing the volume of runoff to certain parts of the site, he said.

“To deal with runoff to abutters, we went well beyond what is required,” said Sullivan, a point that ARB member Lau agreed with.

Residents still had some concerns regarding traffic congestion, the scale of the building and runoff, but ARB members indicated that they would be open to giving the project the green light if their design and siting suggestions could be implemented.

The date for the next session of the public hearing has not yet been determined.

Article source: http://arlington.wickedlocal.com/news/20170627/arb-asks-for-design-changes-to-summer-street-project

Here’s what $100K can buy you in Detroit right now

This week, we’re taking a look at four listings in four different neighborhoods in Detroit, all coming in for under $100,000. Fixer upper? Move-in ready? Duplex? Single-family? Which house and neighborhood would you choose?






14837 Ashton Road

First up is this recently rehabbed three bedroom, one and a half bath home in Rosedale Park. It has hardwood downstairs, carpeting upstairs, sun rooms, a big backyard, and a garage. It’s listing right at the top of our range at $99,900.






4865 Grayton

This charming duplex in East English Village has been maintained through the years, but could use some updating. Live in one while updating the other? This house has four bedrooms total, newer systems and roof, and some original details. It’s listing for $87,500.






2509 Van Dyke

This duplex near West Village could use a lot of work. It’s located on Van Dyke, a couple blocks up from Kercheval. We’ve seen the market around West Village grow this year. Each unit has two bedrooms and one bath, and it’s listing for $89,000.






15856 Forrer Street

This rehabbed home in Crary St. Mary’s has three bedrooms, one and a half baths, and a lot of carpet. Bring your lawnmower and landscaping ideas to this one. There’s also a deck off the back and ceiling fans inside, which could come in handy these days. The price? $94,900.

Article source: https://detroit.curbed.com/2017/6/19/15829666/homes-for-sale-100k-detroit

Burlington Area Garden Club hosts garden walk

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Article source: http://journaltimes.com/lifestyles/leisure/burlington-area-garden-club-hosts-garden-walk/article_7333b760-b58b-5911-8e91-c1e6ecac7e6b.html

The Creative Gardener – Little Henry Sweetspire

Most gardeners are just too busy to spend all of their time in their gardens or landscapes anymore. I get asked multiple times, whether I am working in my garden center or designing a landscaping for a client, to include dwarf type plants that require little to no maintenance. I will be the first to tell you there is no such plant that requires no maintenance. However, I will tell you about a plant that is pretty close to no maintenance and provides you color multiple times per year.

Little Henry Sweetspire, the exciting dwarf version of Sweetspire, is covered with scented white flowers that shoot off like a sparkler in early summer gardens or landscapes. Its unique compact and low mounding growth habit, reaching a 2 to 3 feet in height, and is hardy in our zone, makes this little shrub perfect for use in mixed perennial gardens or mass landscape plantings.

To read the full article, pick up a copy of this week’s paper on newsstands now. Or, click here for the digital edition.

Article source: http://www.ofallonweekly.com/2017/06/27/the-creative-gardener-little-henry-sweetspire/

North Hempstead tries out eco-friendly landscaping tools

North Hempstead Town officials want to trim back their reliance on the gas-powered tools that landscapers use to maintain public gardens and parks.

Town leaders recently purchased electric leaf blowers, weed whackers and tree trimmers because they believe the tools are cheaper, weigh less and are more eco-friendly. Workers in the parks department will use the tools this year at Clark Botanic Gardens in Albertson. Town officials want to use their experience with electric blowers to someday craft a law that limits the use of gas-powered leaf blowers.

Supervisor Judi Bosworth said Thursday that there’s no timetable for when a draft law could be presented, but ultimately the law would address what kinds of leaf blowers could be used and at what hours of the day.

“We’re in the exploratory stage and we want to make sure it is something we can make enforceable,” she said.

North Hempstead Parks Commissioner Jill Weber said that if the tools can survive the year, she will look to buy more electric blowers and use them at parks across the town.

Bosworth’s intent for new legislation comes as long-awaited relief for some town residents, who have complained to town leaders for months about gas-powered leaf blowers creating unwanted noise and polluting the air with dust and gas emissions.

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New Hyde Park resident Alan Franklin, for example, has urged town officials to ban the blowers, saying he must wear a gas mask and headphones to enjoy his home when landscapers are around.

“We need to regulate these dirty tools,” Franklin told council members during their May meeting. “When you’re retired and want to enjoy yourself, you can’t. They drive you back into your property.”


Nassau2015 North Hempstead salaries

Great Neck Estates has already banned the use of gas-powered leaf blowers between June 15 and Sept. 15. Oyster Bay is considering a restriction as well.

Lawn maintenance equipment has evolved in recent decades into versions that use no gasoline yet maintain high horsepower. But those newer versions still kick hazardous particulate matter into the air, said Bonnie Sager, co-founder of Huntington CALM, an advocacy group that pushes for banning gas-powered leaf blowers.

Sager, an optometrist who lives in Huntington, said more Long Island communities are considering restricting gas-powered leaf blowers because the tools are noisy and the particulate matter is especially harmful to children and senior citizens “with compromised immune systems.”

Banning gas-powered versions of leaf blowers is the best and most healthy option for everyone on Long Island, Sager said.

“People are paying weeks after weeks to have their homes bathed in toxic pollutants,” Sager said. “And if you work from home, you’re constantly being interrupted and you have to close your windows.”

CURBING USE OF GAS-POWERED LEAF BLOWERS

Other locales across New York State have already restricted or are looking into curtailing gas-powered leaf blowers.

Great Neck Estates

The village passed a local ordinance in 1997 banning their use from June 15 to Sept. 15. Violators could face a fine imposed by the village judge.

Oyster Bay

Town Supervisor Joseph Saladino said in March that the town is considering restricting the use of gas-powered leaf blowers. The town’s planning and development commissioner said the tools cause problems for residents.

Yonkers

In 2007, the city passed a gas-powered leaf blower ban, which is in effect from June 1 to Sept. 30. Failure to comply with the ban is punishable by fines ranging from $250 to $5,000.

Rye

In 2008, the city in Westchester County decided to ban gas-powered leaf blowers between June 1 and Sept. 30. Violators could face a $250 fine or up to 15 days in jail.

Article source: http://www.newsday.com/long-island/nassau/north-hempstead-tries-out-eco-friendly-landscaping-tools-1.13764446