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Archives for June 27, 2017

Monsoon décor decoded

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Article source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/home-garden/monsoon-dcor-decoded/articleshow/59336149.cms

Gardening Tips for Kids – EconoTimes

Toronto, June 26, 2017 —

Many families are encouraging their kids to get outside into the garden. Gardening can benefit children’s health and well-being and impact their attitudes towards learning, the environment, nutrition and so much more.

0_int_intelligentplastics1.jpg

1_int_Intelligentplastics.jpg

Gardening has become easier and more accessible for kids, thanks in part to innovative plastic gardening tools and equipment that are readily available at many home or garden stores.

Want to start gardening with the kids? Here are a few gardening tips for kids to get you started:

Gardening Tip for Kids #1: Go Vertical

No backyard? No problem. Create an urban oasis on virtually any wall with vertical gardening, made possible by innovative plastic products that allow plants to grow above the ground. Known also as “green walls” or “living walls,” vertical gardens consist of a collection of plants that grow up a wall or other vertical surface, both indoors and outdoors.

For example, Woolly Pockets are flexible, breathable gardening containers designed for use on just about any wall (as well as floors and tabletops). The felt pockets are made entirely from recycled plastic bottles attached to a moisture barrier made from 60% recycled plastic. Some schools short on space are installing vertical gardens on walls and chain-link fences in only a few hours.

Gardening Tip for Kids #2: Use Plastic Containers

Even if there’s no room for a garden, kids can still enjoy growing and harvesting fresh vegetables. Container gardens are easy to manage, can be as large or small as space permits and allow experimentation with different plants, soils and environmental conditions, indoors and out. Plastic containers are ideal for this type of gardening—they are lightweight and easier to move than heavier pots and reusable many times. And in some locations, depending on the local program and kind of container, they can even be recycled. Check out some of these cool examples of container gardens.

Gardening Tip for Kids #3: Enjoy the Feathered Friends

Most kids love wildlife. They can encourage feathered friends to visit the garden for many seasons with an inviting, durable bird house constructed of recycled plastic. It’s also easy to create bird houses from plastic bottles! Reusing and recycling plastics helps reinforce the environmental lessons of gardening.

Gardening Tip for Kids #4: From Mint to Marjoram, Start from Seeds

Kids can reuse plastic nursery pots and seedling trays to grow herbs year round. Lightweight plastic pots and trays are convenient and easy to move around to capture the sun.

Gardening Tip for Kids #5: Get a Group Together

Most kids enjoy playing in the dirt with their buddies. Gathering friends to create a garden makes the mess into success, turning dirt time into an educational and fun activity. You can even garden at school.

Gardening Tip for Kids #6: Make a Gardening Chore Chart

Many children benefit from the structure of regular, meaningful chores. Daily watering? Weekly weeding? Pest patrol? These simple tasks allow kids to play a genuine role in caring for the garden.

Gardening Tip for Kids #7: Sharing is Caring – Grow Your Own Gifts

A garden takes on special meaning for kids when its fruits can be shared. Sharing a bouquet of flowers with a friend or teacher … planting a row of vegetables specifically for a food pantry or ministry … inviting friends for harvest time … all great ways to cultivate a garden and caring kids.

Find more kids gardening tips and ideas at KiddieGardens.com.

Today’s intelligent plastics are vital to the modern world. These materials enhance our lifestyles, our economy and the environment.  For more information, visit www.intelligentplastics.ca.

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/ba5a0d8f-e789-4e89-b177-dbb0d4326921

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/5a4787b2-c34e-4afd-a41a-02b35ebc7855

Darlene Gray
Intelligent Plastics 
905 678 7748 ext 239
dgray@plastics.ca

EconoTimes 中文版 经客时代已上线

深入了解中国动向

Econotimes China Edition

GET INSIGHTS IN CHINESE

Editor’s Picks


New Study Could End Insulin Dependence Of Type-1 Diabetics

Infertility in men could point to more serious health problems later in life


Electrically stimulating your brain can boost memory – but here’s one reason it doesn’t always work

Fainting and the summer heat: Warmer days can make you swoon, so be prepared

Why bad moods are good for you: the surprising benefits of sadness


Here’s why ‘cool’ offices don’t always make for a happier workforce

Four myths about diabetes debunked


What are ‘fasting’ diets and do they help you lose weight?


Placebos work even when patients know what they are

Article source: http://www.econotimes.com/Gardening-Tips-for-Kids-775736

Gardening Tips for Kids

Toronto, June 26, 2017 —

Many families are encouraging their kids to get outside into the garden. Gardening can benefit children’s health and well-being and impact their attitudes towards learning, the environment, nutrition and so much more.

0_int_intelligentplastics1.jpg

1_int_Intelligentplastics.jpg

Gardening has become easier and more accessible for kids, thanks in part to innovative plastic gardening tools and equipment that are readily available at many home or garden stores.

Want to start gardening with the kids? Here are a few gardening tips for kids to get you started:

Gardening Tip for Kids #1: Go Vertical

No backyard? No problem. Create an urban oasis on virtually any wall with vertical gardening, made possible by innovative plastic products that allow plants to grow above the ground. Known also as “green walls” or “living walls,” vertical gardens consist of a collection of plants that grow up a wall or other vertical surface, both indoors and outdoors.

For example, Woolly Pockets are flexible, breathable gardening containers designed for use on just about any wall (as well as floors and tabletops). The felt pockets are made entirely from recycled plastic bottles attached to a moisture barrier made from 60% recycled plastic. Some schools short on space are installing vertical gardens on walls and chain-link fences in only a few hours.

Gardening Tip for Kids #2: Use Plastic Containers

Even if there’s no room for a garden, kids can still enjoy growing and harvesting fresh vegetables. Container gardens are easy to manage, can be as large or small as space permits and allow experimentation with different plants, soils and environmental conditions, indoors and out. Plastic containers are ideal for this type of gardening—they are lightweight and easier to move than heavier pots and reusable many times. And in some locations, depending on the local program and kind of container, they can even be recycled. Check out some of these cool examples of container gardens.

Gardening Tip for Kids #3: Enjoy the Feathered Friends

Most kids love wildlife. They can encourage feathered friends to visit the garden for many seasons with an inviting, durable bird house constructed of recycled plastic. It’s also easy to create bird houses from plastic bottles! Reusing and recycling plastics helps reinforce the environmental lessons of gardening.

Gardening Tip for Kids #4: From Mint to Marjoram, Start from Seeds

Kids can reuse plastic nursery pots and seedling trays to grow herbs year round. Lightweight plastic pots and trays are convenient and easy to move around to capture the sun.

Gardening Tip for Kids #5: Get a Group Together

Most kids enjoy playing in the dirt with their buddies. Gathering friends to create a garden makes the mess into success, turning dirt time into an educational and fun activity. You can even garden at school.

Gardening Tip for Kids #6: Make a Gardening Chore Chart

Many children benefit from the structure of regular, meaningful chores. Daily watering? Weekly weeding? Pest patrol? These simple tasks allow kids to play a genuine role in caring for the garden.

Gardening Tip for Kids #7: Sharing is Caring – Grow Your Own Gifts

A garden takes on special meaning for kids when its fruits can be shared. Sharing a bouquet of flowers with a friend or teacher … planting a row of vegetables specifically for a food pantry or ministry … inviting friends for harvest time … all great ways to cultivate a garden and caring kids.

Find more kids gardening tips and ideas at KiddieGardens.com.

Today’s intelligent plastics are vital to the modern world. These materials enhance our lifestyles, our economy and the environment.  For more information, visit www.intelligentplastics.ca.

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/ba5a0d8f-e789-4e89-b177-dbb0d4326921

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/5a4787b2-c34e-4afd-a41a-02b35ebc7855

Darlene Gray
Intelligent Plastics 
905 678 7748 ext 239
dgray@plastics.ca

EconoTimes 中文版 经客时代已上线

深入了解中国动向

Econotimes China Edition

GET INSIGHTS IN CHINESE

Editor’s Picks


New Study Could End Insulin Dependence Of Type-1 Diabetics

Infertility in men could point to more serious health problems later in life


Electrically stimulating your brain can boost memory – but here’s one reason it doesn’t always work

Fainting and the summer heat: Warmer days can make you swoon, so be prepared

Why bad moods are good for you: the surprising benefits of sadness


Here’s why ‘cool’ offices don’t always make for a happier workforce

Four myths about diabetes debunked


What are ‘fasting’ diets and do they help you lose weight?


Placebos work even when patients know what they are

Article source: http://www.econotimes.com/Gardening-Tips-for-Kids-775736

Garden Club members learn expert photography tips

Expert photographer, Sue Bennett was the guest speaker at the Calcutta Area Garden Club meeting on June 23. (Submitted photo)

Expert photographer, Sue Bennett was the guest speaker at the Calcutta Area Garden Club meeting on June 23. (Submitted photo)

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EAST LIVERPOOL — Calcutta Area Garden Club members met for their monthly meeting on June 23, at the Peter Metrovich Center in Calcutta.

President, Chris Bell, welcomed members and guests and began the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag and a prayer for teamwork and unity in our gardening activities. The club held their usual business meeting and were busy making plans for their bi-annual Children’s Festival to be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 9, at Thompson Park. The festival is held for the children to have a fun, learning experience in a beautiful, peaceful outdoor setting. Among some of the activities planned will be stations where little fairy princesses can get their nails painted, little pirates will be able to make soft, sponge swords, as well as many other craft activities being planned. Another aspect of the festival is to teach the children about how important the environment is to mankind such as bees and their crucial effect on how plants are pollinated and thus how we get our fruits and vegetables. Snakes are also crucial to the environment for their purpose of keeping things in balance with the insect and animal world. These are just a few of the fun activities in the planning stages at this time. More information will be forthcoming, but please mark your calendars now for this date for a fun, educational day.

After a brief business meeting, Lisa Chronister, Program Chairwoman introduced the featured speaker, Sue Bennett, expert photographer. Sue Bennett passed out “Flower Photo Tips,” to all the members. All eyes were eagerly observing a very vibrant and expert speaker as she entertained the group with her expertise and wit. Sue presented tips such as feeling that you could not take a great photo unless one had very expensive equipment. She dispelled that by saying that an inexpensive camera would take as good a picture, but it is extremely important to use good technique, which she explained how to do. Tips such as getting very close to a flower or insect, picking the right angle, the optimal time of day, which is morning when there is dew on the plant, or you could just add your own dew with a spray bottle.

Learn to “root your picture into nature by adding bees, dragonflies, rocks, etc. into your shots. This adds an element of interest and helps to tell the story.” And lastly, think about the matting and framing aspect of photography. It is kind of like the icing on the cake. It is very important to choose mats that coordinate and add dimension and beauty to the already beautiful photo that you have taken. Who knows you may even get proficient enough to win a photography contest like Bennett has many times over. The members gave her a hearty round of applause for a wonderful presentation.

The next meeting will be held at 11 a.m. July 28 at the Peter Metrovich Center, where the featured presenter will be Jane Zimmerman, instructing on how to make “Victorian Tussie-Mussies.”

The club was privileged to have welcomed two prospective members and induct a new member, Tawni Dischler. The club welcomes membership requests and can obtain information about the club from Lisa Chronister, Membership Chairperson 330-383-0473 or Chris Bell, President 330-385-7962.

Article source: https://www.reviewonline.com/news/community-news/2017/06/garden-club-members-learn-expert-photography-tips/

5 Practical Water Conservation Tips to Keep Your Garden Lean and Green

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

You don’t need a degree in horticulture to know that water is the lifeblood to a green, luscious garden, but the spring and summer seasons also tend to be when many homeowners see a significant increase in their water usage—and utility bills—due to efforts to help their gardens flourish. However, a great looking garden doesn’t have to break the bank. Yes, you can likely rely on Mother Nature from time to time to help fuel your garden’s growth, but there are many other practical tips and strategies you should administer today to conserve water while keeping your garden in peak shape.

  1. Water Early:This is the easiest way to ensure the water that you do use goes further: water early. We’re talking around sunrise, when winds and temperatures are both low. Calm winds ensure that more water is reaching the plants in your garden and not blowing to areas around your garden. Low temperatures reduce water loss from evaporation that is more common later in the day.
  1. Maximize Rainwater/Miscellaneous Water: If natural rainfall can serve as the main source for your garden, why water? While you’re unlikely to go through a whole summer using just rainwater, there are a variety of ways you can make natural rainfall go further; for instance, integrating rainwater collectors, like the popular rain barrel, into your home’s gutter system. The main purpose of your gutters is to direct collected rainwater from the roof and disperse it safely away from your home. Why not capture this rainwater to store and use within your garden? It’s estimated that a 1,000-square-foot roof can shed up to 600 gallons of rainwater per hour in moderate rainfall.

On a related note, consider taking steps to maximize water usage in the home. For example, capture cool shower water in a bucket as you wait for it to heat, and save water used for cooking that you’d otherwise pour down the sink. You can even reuse old fish tank water. Every little bit can go a long way.

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  1. Tune Up Your Sprinklers: If you water your garden with in-ground sprinklers, we encourage you to inspect the system every spring to ensure it’s operating efficiently. Adjust sprinkler heads so that water isn’t wasted on the likes of sidewalks, patios or pavement to maximize watering efficiency, and be sure that there are no breaks in the hoses that run beneath the soil. We’d also recommend integrating a rainfall sensor into your system so that you’re not watering when the garden doesn’t need it.
  1. Tune Up Your Hose: If you water manually by hose, don’t use a standard hose and nozzle. This is inefficient because of the amount of water that is lost to evaporation, runoff and mist. Instead, opt for either a wand nozzle or a soaker hose. Additionally, check the hose connection to the spigot on your home and the hose connection to the nozzle. Is either dripping when the water is turned on? If so, you’re wasting water—and likely much more than you realize. This is easily resolved by purchasing and installing a better hose fitting for either connection.
  1. Incorporate Water-Friendly Details: Finally, there are many things you can do with the plants and garden design tself to maximize water usage. Consider integrating xeriscaping techniques into your landscaping plan. Start with using native plants that are already adapted to the soil conditions at your home, and consider placing mulch around plants to reduce water runoff, minimize weed growth and help keep the soil moist. You might also consider composting, a practice that helps keep moisture in the soil for longer. Finally, consider placing plants that require more water next to each other. This way, you can better target all of them at once with drip irrigation or by adjusting sprinkler zones accordingly.

You’re never going to grow a lush garden without water, but that doesn’t mean you have to pay dearly for it in utility costs.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

Article source: http://rismedia.com/2017/06/27/practical-water-conservation-tips-keep-your-garden-lean-green/

How does your (rooftop) garden grow?

they call it the hobbit house: Within the European-themed Vail Village sits a home with a slanted, green-growing roof. It’s a predecessor to the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens’ Alpine Center, which sports both a rooftop garden and a green roof. The two buildings prove it’s not only possible, but also quite practical to grow plants on rooftops.

But there’s a big difference between green roofs and garden rooftops. Garden roofs provide extra outdoor living space on top of a home; it’s truly a livable area, with concrete pavers and planters, or other means of designing a garden atop a home. Green roofs, on the other hand, employ sedum and other perennials to replace shingles or metal with a vegetative material, which grows 12 to 18 inches high.

” A green roof (requires) decreased maintenance and lowers energy costs,” says Nick Courtens, senior horticulturalist at the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens. “A garden roof caters to someone who does more gardening and wants to control what they grow.”

A truly high country garden

Homes planned with flat roofs become candidates for rooftop gardens, a place where homeowners can grow herbs, edibles and flowers in planters. However, garden roofs require proper waterproofing so it “works like a normal roof,” says Pedro Campos, principal of Zehren and Associates.

Since people walk on the roof, the surface and elements such as railings must be up to code.

“It takes very careful planning with a structural engineer so it can withstand (roughly) 150 people,” Campos says.

Often, rooftop terraces showcase planters organized around gathering spaces and captivating views.

“It’s a clever way to take advantage of the site without adding another story,” Campos says.

“In a residential area, it’s really intriguing because it’s where you get the best views — sunrise or sunset or mountain views. It also (creates) an element of surprise, or privacy, where you’re seeing around neighbors, but you’re not able to be seen. You truly feel like you’re on a crow’s nest on a ship; it gives a commandeering view of what’s around you.”

The Alpine Center’s garden rooftop provides various gathering areas, with staircase access on each side.

“It adds a lot of value with a smaller footprint,” Campos says. “It can take on any kind of aesthetic. It can be more classical or more contemporary — with clean, sleek right angles. There’s a lot of flexibility in design.”

However, it does require its fair share of maintenance. Irrigation is critical for a garden roof, and homeowners end up using more water for a garden roof than a green roof. It also requires seasonal cleaning, though the fact that many of the planters are raised means less bending over. Rooftop gardens provide better growing conditions than the ground because they remain a little warmer, due to the surrounding concrete, which tends to warm better than soil, both day and night, Courtens says.

“It gives me the chance to grow things earlier,” he says. “But the process of building planters is pretty complex, with layers of waterproof membranes.”

Other considerations of the High Country’s weather should be calculated when planning a rooftop garden.

“It can be windy, so you have to be careful with it and secure furnishings,” Campos says. “The main thing is, it really needs to be planned integrally; there’s much more involved,” he says. “It’s a whole other ball of wax, but you can have an entire community garden (on a roof).”

Green rooftops

A green roof, or living roof, involves a completely different type of design, with more sedum and perennial mixes, which grow year-round. Though rooftop gardens aid the environment, green rooftops offer a “great way to reduce the impact environmentally,” Campos says. Either way, “environmentally, you’re reducing the heat island effect, especially where pavement and homes go up and raise the temperature. Even a rooftop garden is better (than a regular roof because) it’s better to have plants than not,” he says. ” It’s a strategy to lower temperatures and soften buildings (so they) blend into the landscape; it’s a lot softer to look at because it doesn’t have reflectivity or glare.”

Article source: http://www.vaildaily.com/real-estate/how-does-your-rooftop-garden-grow/

NYC’s First LGBT Monument Will Be A Luminous Garden Of Rainbows

The monument will be located in Hudson River Park in Greenwich Village and is meant to commemorate both the 49 people who died in the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting in June 2016, as well as all victims of LGBT-targeted hate crimes.

The Brooklyn-based artist Anthony Goicolea designed the site to feature nine boulders, many of which are bisected with a slash of laminated, borosilicate glass. The glass’s refractory quality creates a prism-like effect, reflecting slim rainbows of light onto the surrounding patch of grass that overlooks the Hudson River.

[Photo: courtesy New York State Executive Chamber]

Goicolea—a multi-media artist known for his work examining issues of identity—answered a request for proposals that went out in October 2016 from the governor’s office, shortly after Governor Cuomo set up the LGBT Memorial Commission in response to the Orlando nightclub shooting. In an article for the New York Times, Goicolea cites Stonehenge and Easter Island, as well as burial mounds and African stone circles, as inspirations for his rainbow-churning boulders. “This monument will serve as a communal space filled with light, color, and hope where the visitors can sit, mourn, love, and remember for years to come,” he says in a statement.

Besides the rainbow’s importance in the iconography of LGBT rights, Hudson River Park has its own significance as a site: the nearby waterfront piers have been a meeting place for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people since the 1970s. New York City itself has also historically been a haven for LGBT people and a key city for advancing the movement for LGBT rights. In addition to the Stonewall Inn—site of the 1969 riots and one of the best-known gay historical site in the country—the city houses three other sites that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places for their significance to LGBT. The Greenwich Village gay bar Julius’, the Chelsea residence of civil rights leader Bayard Rustin, and the Staten Island home of the photographer Alice Austen have all been added since 2014.  New York also passed the historic Marriage Equality Act in 2011, becoming the most populous state to allow same-sex marriages until California re-legalized same-sex marriage in 2013.

Yet today, as the Supreme Court announced it would hear a discrimination case against the Colorado cake shop which cited religious objections to same-sex marriage, it’s clear that the LGBT community still has to fight for its rights. The monument, at least, is a luminous symbol that the state of New York stands with them.

Article source: https://www.fastcodesign.com/90131231/n-y-c-s-first-lgbt-monument-will-be-a-luminous-garden-of-rainbows

Chinese flora glasshouse botanic garden design produced for Fleetwood docks by Smiemans


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Article source: http://www.hortweek.com/chinese-flora-glasshouse-botanic-garden-design-produced-fleetwood-docks-smiemans/parks-and-gardens/article/1437598

ISU Extension to offer Master Gardener Summer webinars in Cherokee

Iowa State University (ISU) Extension and Outreach will host three Iowa State University Master Gardener Growing Season webcasts this summer in Cherokee. Master Gardeners will gain educational hours while learning about urban tree selection, gardening with youth and landscaping for wildlife.The two-hour webcasts are scheduled to be hosted at the ISU Extension and Outreach Cherokee County office on July 11, July 25 and August 15.

Summer webcast topics include:

July 11, 6:30 p.m. – Urban Tree Selection, presented by Gabbi Edwards, urban forestry specialist with ISU Extension and Outreach. Build your skills to make recommendations about tree species selection and explore urban considerations for site selection and tree maintenance.

July 25, 6:30 p.m. – Gardening with Youth, presented by Chelsea Krist, FoodCorps. The FoodCorps program engages kids in school gardens to build healthy eating habits. The course will teach best practices for gardening with children.

August 15, 6:30 p.m. – Landscaping for Wildlife, presented by Adam Janke, assistant professor and extension wildlife specialist with ISU Extension and Outreach. Learn about simple steps to bring landscaping alive with birds, butterflies and more. This webinar will also explore ways to beautify the yard and provide critical habitats for migratory and resident birds.

The webcasts will provide ideas for Master Gardener volunteer projects and expand the knowledge base of volunteers.

Master Gardeners can gain six continuing education hours for participating in the webcasts. The webcasts are free of charge and open to the public – anyone who may be interested; individuals need not be Master Gardeners to attend the webinars. To register, contact Mary Tuttle at 712-225-6196 or mtuttle@iastate.edu.

Article source: http://www.stormlakepilottribune.com/story/2423320.html

5 big ideas to improve Southeast Framingham – MetroWest Daily News

FRAMINGHAM — Take a walk through Southeast Framingham and you’ll pass everything from homes and parks to auto parts stores, landscaping suppliers and a scrap metal yard.

With its abundant housing and proximity to downtown, the neighborhood is situated for growth, but the town has struggled to clean up industrial and commercial areas that detract from its character.

A new action plan created by the town and the Metropolitan Area Planning Council seeks to chart a path forward. The plan offers several recommendations to make the neighborhood more attractive and to more clearly distinguish different uses.

The plan pulled together comments and ideas from the public and analysis by town staff. It focused on a 275-acre area, bounded roughly by Waverly Street to the north, Blandin Avenue and train tracks to the west, and Natick and Sherborn to the east.

It includes dense residential areas, such as the Pelham Apartments, as well as green space and open areas, including Mary Dennison Park, Beaver Dam Brook, and wide tracts to the south.

Below are five major recommendations:

Create new zoning: The combination of homes, manufacturers and retail shops in the same neighborhood was identified as one of Southeast Framingham’s major challenges. The plan recommends several zoning changes to help delineate different areas and steer redevelopment.

One such change is the creation of a new smart growth overlay district, designed  to attract mixed-use projects that include affordable housing. Smart growth districts set minimum allowable density requirements for housing. Communities that adopt them are also eligible for financial incentives from the state.

Other proposals include establishing a mixed-use zoning district along Waverly Street — the neighborhood’s “front door” — and a multifamily residential zoning district closer to the Natick border, allowing the area to remain a hub of affordable and market-rate housing.

Enhance Dennison Park: Recommendations for the park include a cleanup program, more programming for local children and building a water feature. The plan also calls for better connections between the park and other parts of the neighborhood.

Add parks/playgrounds: Residents said one of their top requests is a new children’s playground near the existing homes. The plan suggests evaluating properties recently acquired by the town to serve as a new “pocket park,” with potential links to the train or MWRTA bus service. One option is the 0.8-acre parcel at 240 Beaver St. The property consists of wetlands and “may serve more as a robust boardwalk connection, possibly with some benches for seating,” the plan reads. It would also better connect residents of Carlson Road, Beaver Street and Beaver Circle Terrace.

Spruce up the existing businesses: The plan calls for the town to ramp up enforcement of existing regulations to force businesses to clean up their properties. Doing so could improve the quality of life for residents and make the commercial streetscape more pleasant. The plan also recommends creating two landmark gateways — one at Blandin Avenue and Waverly Street, and another at Waverly Street at Taralli Terrace — to signal the town’s interest in revitalizing the area.

Make it easier to get around: With dilapidated sidewalks and commercial vehicles zipping down the road, Southeast Framingham can be a challenging place for pedestrians. The plan calls for sidewalk repairs and more crosswalks, as well as signs and pedestrian lights to calm traffic and discourage industrial vehicles from cutting through neighborhoods. Planners also recommended enhancing mobility by adding more frequent bus service. The bus currently operates weekdays, from 6:45 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturdays until 5:45 p.m.

 

Article source: http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/20170626/5-big-ideas-to-improve-southeast-framingham