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Archives for June 2, 2017

Tips for growing your own herb garden

When you’re cooking, there’s nothing better than being able to use fresh herbs from your own garden.

Now that summer is just about here, it’s a great time to start growing some herbs.

Tal White from White’s Nursery in Chesapeake stopped by the News 3 morning show Friday to share some tips.

  • Grow herbs in a container since it’s easy to move into a shaded spot if it gets too hot outside.
  • Look for a container that’s about 10 to 12 inches. The bigger the container, the better so that it can hold enough water to last through the afternoon.
  • You can put all different types of herbs into the same pot.
  • Make sure to keep your herbs pinched back, especially basil.  If you don’t, it can start to flower and won’t last very long after that.
  • Watering should be done every other day for a container that’s about 10 inches.
  • You can use liquid fertilizer periodically or a slow-release fertilizer called Osmocote. As you water your herbs, the fertilizer will slowly be released into the plant.

 

Article source: http://wtkr.com/2017/06/02/tips-for-growing-your-own-herb-garden/

Top five gardening tips from Bloom’s big winner

For large gardens, Mr Schurmann believes it is often beneficial to seek professional consultation, as large areas can seem like a daunting task to cultivate.

“The best things is get a consultant that would have a few ideas, who has the lay of the land, who understands how the garden fits into the landscape, what you want to block out, how you want to create shelter. That’s so individual depending on the actual site.”

4. Longevity

Article source: http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/top-five-gardening-tips-from-blooms-big-winner-35782557.html

Garden Tips for June 2017 – Visalia Times

The beginning of June is your last chance to plant heat-tolerant plants before the heat really sets in for the summer. Maintain container plants, and harvest herbs, fruits and vegetables on a regular basis.

To avoid overexposure to the sun, wear a large brimmed hat and long sleeves, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water. Don’t forget Dad on Father’s day, Buy him a great new plant in a colorful pot or a shiny new garden tool.

WHAT TO PLANT

Annual color: There are plenty of flowers that can take the heat of our summer. Try ageratum, bedding begonias, coleus, cosmos, gerbera daisy, impatiens, marigolds, petunias, salvias, sunflowers, verbena, and zinnias.

Vegetables: Beans, corn, cucumber, gourds, melons and squash can be planted as seeds. Eggplant, peppers, and tomatoes should be planted using seedlings. Don’t forget late June is the time to plants pumpkins if you want to harvest them for Halloween.

LAWNS

All lawns should be watered deeply and infrequently to promote deeper root growth and to prevent crabgrass. When mowing the lawn, try not to mow in the same direction all the time; vary your path so you don’t form ruts.

More: Preventing sunburn, heat stress in your garden

Local Realtors argue in favor of mortgage tax break

Who’s eating our petunias and roses?

Indoor plants bring green goodness

Warm season lawns like Bermuda, St. Augustine and zoysiagrass will benefit from fertilizer in June, July and August.

You can also plant, patch and reseed these heat lovers all summer long. Fertilize cool season lawns like tall fescue and perennial rye in June (unless the heat comes early), then don’t fertilize again until September.

CRITTER CONTROL

Spider mites- Signs of these tiny little critters are mottled leaves and ultra-fine webs. Plants along dusty roads are particularly susceptible. Wash off with plain water and use insecticidal soap if necessary.

Stink bugs- Shield-shaped bugs with a triangle on their back. Most are brown or green with red, pink or yellow markings. They attack fruit and vegetables, leaving blemishes or dimples on the fruit. Insecticides are not recommended–handpick or let parasites and predators control them.

Tomato worms- These big green guys can strip a tomato plant of leaves in no time at all. Tell-tale signs besides the chewed off leaves are their deposit of large black droppings. Hand pick or use BT (Bacillus thuringiensis), sometimes called Caterpillar Killer.

Tobacco budworm- If your geraniums, petunias or roses have stopped blooming, the culprit may be the tobacco budworm. The flying moth lays its eggs in the flower buds and the hatching larva feeds on the bud, then travels down the stem. Try spraying BT or a rose systemic. Do not use rose systemic near any plants you plan to eat.

GARDEN CHORES

  • Check your irrigation system for damaged sprinkler heads or clogged emitters.
  • Deep-water ground covers, lawns, shrubs and trees. Deep-watering your stone fruit trees now will prevent co-joined fruit next year.
  • Divide bearded iris. First carefully dig up plants and discard old rhizomes and any diseased or rotted sections. Replant the healthy rhizomes, making sure to plant shallowly. Just barely cover the rhizome with soil, then water.
  • Harvest vegetables regularly to keep them producing.
  • After harvest, it’s time to clean up those berry vines. Cut this year’s fruiting canes back to the grown and then tie up the new green canes to take their place. It’s also a good time to spread some compost or fertilizer in the bed, then deep water.
  • Prune Apricot trees in the summer. Beware of pruning too much, since bark that has previously been in the shade can be extra-sensitive to sunburn.
  • Pinch asters, chrysanthemums, and sedum Autumn Joy to encourage branching and more blooms in the fall.
  • Lightly cut back any perennials that are becoming too leggy.
  • Snip spent flowers from summer-blooming annuals and perennials to keep them blooming.
  • Wisteria can be pruned aggressively now. Cut back to two nodes on the new branches, as this will keep the plant from unrestrained growth while giving it time to put on a spectacular display of blooms next year.

WEED CONTROL

  • Crabgrass: This annual weed thrives in lawns that are watered too often in the summer. Mowing your lawn a little higher and watering less often will discourage seed germination. It is more effective to apply a preemergence herbicide in the winter than to selectively try to remove crabgrass from the lawn with a postemergence herbicide. IF you use an herbicide, be sure to follow the directions carefully; don’t just throw it on by handful. Be mindful of the possibility of groundwater contamination.
  • Nutsedge: Wet, waterlogged conditions favor the growth of nutsedge, so improve drainage and keep the area as dry as possible. Nutsedge is one tough weed to get rid of, so be diligent with hand pulling, hoeing and spraying to remove it before it takes control of your garden or lawn.
  • Spurge: This is the flat creeping weed with a red spot on the leaves. When you pull it, sticky white sap gets on your hands. Ants love it. Hand pull or hoe spurge plants before they set seeds and remove them from the site. In flowerbeds, spot treat with Roundup and add a thick layer of mulch to prevent weed germination. You can also apply a preemergent herbicide in established beds, but be aware it will also harm newly-planted transplants. To discourage infestations in lawns, mow fescue at least 3 inches high to shade out seeds, and fertilize Bermuda grass to keep it actively growing.

For answers to all your home gardening questions, call the Master Gardeners in Tulare County at (559) 684-3325, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9:30 and 11:30 am; or Kings County at (559) 852-2736, Thursday Only, 9:30-11:30 a.m; or visit our website to search past articles, find links to UC gardening information, or to email us with your questions: http://ucanr.edu/sites/UC_Master_Gardeners/

Where can the UCCE Master Gardeners be found this month?

Visit us at the Visalia Farmers Market at the Sear’s Parking lot on Mooney on each Saturday. On the second Saturday of the month, we will be presenting ongoing talks.

8:30-11:30 a.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27: Porterville Farmer’s Market at Sierra View Hospital

We love to talk plants. Come ask us your gardening questions!

 

Article source: http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/06/02/garden-tips-june-2017/360266001/

Garden inspired by Connemara coast wins top prize at Bloom festival

A show garden inspired by the rugged Connemara Coast has won the main award at this year’s Bloom festival.

The garden, which was designed by Oliver and Liat Schurmann of Mount Venus Nursery in Dublin, features a water-landscape with a dramatic tidal effect, capturing the essence of the Irish coast and won the Overall Large Garden category.

The husband and wife team have won seven Bloom awards previously.

The winners of this year’s festival were announced on Thursday morning as the gates opened on the annual five-day event, which runs until Monday, June th5 at the Phoenix Park in Dublin.

Tickets are on sale from Ticketmaster and can also be purchased at the gate with prices varying from €16-€22.50 while children under 16 go free. The festival is open 9am-6pm from Thursday until Monday.

The flower and food festival features 22 show gardens, 13 postcard gardens and 110 food and drink exhibitors.

First-time Bloom entrants, Laura Cassin, Louise Jones and Linda Murphy were announced as Overall Medium Garden winners for their Teagasc Garden of Hope in association with Pieta House.

The garden, which aims to evoke serenity and connection with nature to raise the spirit, will move to a permanent home at one of the Pieta House centres after the festival.

Previous Bloom-medal and Super Garden winner, Leonie Cornelius received the Overall Small Garden award for the ‘Everyone Has a Dream’ garden which aims to show how, through careful design and creative thinking, we can build the garden of our dreams on a small scale.

The Oxfam Ireland and GOAL garden ‘A World Beyond Walls’ designed by previous Bloom medal winner Niall Maxwell received the Best Concept Garden award for creating a vibrant, social garden space to highlight the need for tolerance and acceptance in an increasingly divided world. The Best Planting Award went to garden designer Alan Rudden for the Savills Urban Retreat garden.

Gary Graham, Bord Bia’s festival manager said it took over 30 days to put together the site at the Phoenix Park.

“Before Bloom opened its doors to the public this morning, each of the show gardens, nursery displays, floral artistry and postcard gardens were adjudicated over two days by an independent panel of judges,” Mr Graham said.

“We are delighted to be awarding more than 100 awards this morning which is testament to the high standard of garden design, nursery and floral artistry available in Ireland. After more than 30 days building the site here in the Phoenix Park, we are excited to finally be able to share these stunning displays with the public.”

The judging panel for Bloom 2017 included 14 Irish and international horticultural experts.

Thursday’s line-up includes live cookery demonstrations with Neven Maguire, Edward Hayden and Rory O’Connell on the Bord Bia kitchen stage in the Food Village while the GIY stage will feature a number of talks including ‘Food Be Thy Medicine’ from Operation Transformation’s Professor Donal O’Shea.

Bloom 2017 Medal Winners

Show Garden Medal Winners

Best in Category

Large: “FBD Insurance “Transition” by Oliver Liat Schurmann, Mount Venus Nursery, Dublin.

Medium: ‘The Teagasc Garden of Hope’ in association with Pieta House by Louise Jones, Laura Cassin Linda Murphy from Teagasc, Kilkenny.

Small: ‘Everyone has a Dream’ by Leonie Cornelius at Woodies by Leonie Cornelius, Sligo.

Concept: Oxfam Ireland and GOAL Garden: ‘A World Beyond Walls’ by Niall Maxwell, Dublin.

Planting: ‘Savills Urban Retreat’ by Alan Rudden, Dublin.

Gold Medal Winners

Niall Maxwell: Oxfam Ireland and GOAL Garden ‘A World Beyond Walls’

Louise Jones, Laura Cassin Linda Murphy: ‘The Teagasc Garden of Hope’ in association with Pieta House

John Durston: ‘Nature’s Resurgence’ sponsored by Ria Organics

Alan Rudden: ‘Savills Urban Retreat’

Kevin Dennis: ‘Living Oasis by Santa Rita: Living La Vida 120’

Oliver and Liat Schurmann: ‘FBD Insurance Transition’

Silver Gilt Medal Winners

Leonie Cornelius: ‘Everyone has a Dream’ by Leonie Cornelius at Woodies

Kieran Dunne Anthony Ryan: ‘Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin Garden’ sponsored by Crumlin and Bord na Mona

Bríd Conroy: ‘Despicable Me 3’ Garden sponsored by Universal Studios

James Purdy + Dan Henson: ‘Cuprinol Kaleidoscope of Colour’ sponsored by Cuprinol

Dara O’Daly: ‘Greening the City’ sponsored by Dublin City Council and Greenleaf Ireland

Tünde Szentesi ‘My Land, Your Land – Ireland’ sponsored by Agri Aware

Silver Medal Winners

Maeve O’Neill: ‘The Strawberry Bed Garden’ sponsored by Bord Bia

Tricia Harris Seamus Furlong: ‘A Space to Collaborate’ sponsored by Chocolate Factory Collective

Tom Grey Dementia-Friendly Garden Team: ‘Dementia Friendly Garden’

Paul Dunne Tünde Szentesi: ‘Marie Keating Foundation Heroes of Hope Garden’

Des Kingston: ‘Rustica Hibernia’ sponsored by Super Garden

Brian Burke: ‘On Cloud CaNine’ sponsored by Dogs Trust

Joan Mallon: ‘The Enable Ireland ‘No Limits’ Garden in association with Solus Light Bulbs’

Linda McKeown: ‘Until Love Conquers Fear – A Garden for Trocaire’ sponsored by Trocaire

Bronze Medal Winners

Hugh Ryan: ‘Stem Cell’

Fingal County Council Institute of Technology Blanchardstown: ‘Flúirse Fingal’

Nursery Garden Medal Winners

Best in Category – Best in Show Winner: Kells Bay Gardens, Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry



Images from Bloom festival 2017

Gold Medal Winners

O’Reilly Nurseries, Mountnugent, Co. Cavan

Navan Garden Centre, Co. Meath

Plant Store, Tallaght, Dublin 24

Heritage Bulbs, Dublin Industrial Estate, Dublin 11

Fuchsiavale, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, UK

Kells Bay Gardens, Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry

Kilmurry Nursery , Gorey, Co. Wexford

Teagasc, Glasnevin, Dublin 9

Mr Middleton Garden Shop, Dublin 1

W.S. Warmenhoven, Hillegom, The Netherlands

Silver Gilt Medal Winners

Hughes Roses Ltd, Garristown, Co. Dublin

Riverlane Nursery, Trim, Co. Meath

Irish Water Plants, Strokestown, Co. Roscommon

Cois Na Trá Plants, Westport, Co. Mayo

Association of Irish Floral Artists, Rathfarnham, Dublin 14

Silver Medal Winners

Garden Direct, Naas, Co. Kildare

Western Plant Nursery Ltd, Skreen, Co. Sligo

Premium Pelargoniums, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, UK

Shady Plants, Youghal, Co. Cork

Dublin School of Horticulture, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin

Harrington Exotics, Saggart, Co. Dublin

Papervale Trees, Newry, Co. Dublin

Green Art Production, Alkmaar, The Netherlands

Three Gates Florist Nursery, Naul, Co. Dublin

Bronze Medal Winners

Flannery’s Nurseries, Donadea, Co. Kildare

Waterford Institute of Technology, Co. Waterford

A.O.I.F.A Floral Art Competition 2017 Medal Winners

Best in Category – Best in Show Winner: Maeve Duke: ‘Vision of Beauty’, Rathfarnham, Dublin

Gold Medal Winner

Margaret Murphy: ‘High Summer’, Sallins, Kildare

Maeve Duke: ‘Vision of Beauty’, Rathfarnham, Dublin

Helen Kelly: ‘Vision of Beauty’, Stamullen, Meath

Sharon O’ Sullivan: ‘The Evening Shades Prevail’, Malahide, Co. Dublin

Karen O’ Farrell: ‘Patterns From Nature’, Rush, co. Dublin

Carol Bone: ‘Perfectly Formed’, Bray, Co. Wicklow

Silver Gilt Medal Winner

Christine Foley: High Summer, Kells, Meath

Kathleen Barnett: Vision of Beauty, Athea, Limerick

Maura Quirke: The Evening Shades Prevail, Portrane, Dublin

Terri Kennedy: The Evening Shades Prevail, Dublin

Marion Mc Gee: Patterns From Nature, Tynan, Armagh

Ann Clifford: Perfectly Formed, Dundrum, Co. Dublin

Silver Medal Winner

Bernadette Cullen: High Summer, Monasterevin, Kildare

Louise Bolger: Vision of Beauty, The Naul, Dublin

Margaret Quinn: Vision of Beauty, Dublin

Beatrice Hertog: The Evening Shades Prevail, Warrenstown, Meath

Bridget Morley: Patterns From Nature, Ougtherard, Galway

Karen Robinson: Perfectly Formed, Ballinteer, Dublin

Sharon O’Sullivan: Perfectly Formed, Malahide, Dublin

Bronze Medal Winner

Elizabeth Kenny: High Summer, Enniscorthy, Wexford

Adrienne Flood: Vision of Beauty, Donabate, Dublin

Ann Clifford: The Evening Shades Prevail, Dundrum, Dublin

Anne O’Dowd: Patterns From Nature, Dublin

Ann Hester: Patterns From Nature, Passage West, Cork

Terri Kennedy: Perfectly Formed, Dublin

Postcard Medal Winners

Best in Category – Best in Show: ‘Caoga Bliain ag Fás – Fifty Years a Growing’ by County Wexford Garden Flower Club.

Certificate of Distinction

‘Drogheda on the Boyne’ by St. Josephs Secondary School Drogheda.

‘Nuture and Nature the path to Wonder’ by NCCWN / ACCESS 2000 Community Development Project, Co. Wexford.

‘Magic of Mindness’ by Procrastimake in collaboration with Shannon Orchard, Longford.

‘Discovery beyond Windows’ by NLN Park House, Co. Dublin.

‘Caoga Bliain ag Fás – Fifty Years a Growing’ by County Wexford Garden Flower Club.

Highly Commended

‘Good for the Heart’ by The Heartbeat Trust, Dun Laoghaire.

‘Reflection of Life’ by PACE Training Services Social Enterprise, Santry, Dublin.

‘On the b-right side of life’ by Friends of the Earth Ireland, Dublin.

‘The Cunnigar Crossing’ by Dungarvan Hillwalking Club, Cappoquin, Co. Waterford.

‘Together as One’ by PACT Youth Diversion Project and Pathfinders Brothers of Charity joint exhibition Waterford

Commended

‘Coolmine 2017’ by Coolmine Therapeutic, Dublin 15

‘Escape Into Nature’ by Merlin Woods Primary School, Doughiska, Co. Galway

‘Burren in Bloom’ by Fiona Bichard in collaboration with Burrenbeo Conservation Volunteers, Athenry, Co. Galway

Botanical and Floral Art 2017 Medal Winners

Best in Category – Best in Show Winner: Prunus Domestica ‘Victoria’, Victoria Plums by Shevaun Doherty, Sandyford, Dublin

Gold Medal Winners

‘Fading Papaver orientale’ by Mary Dillon, Roscrea, Co. Tipperary

‘Prunus Domestica ‘Victoria’, Victoria Plums’ by Shevaun Doherty, Sandyford, Dublin

‘Gerbera’ by Siobhan Larkin, Dublin

‘Magnolia x soulangeana ‘Black Tulip’ by Holly Somerville, Baltinglass, Co. Wicklow

Silver Gilt Medal Winners

‘Rosebay Willowherb / Chamerion angustifolium’ by Lynn Stringer, Kilcoole, Co. Wicklow

Silver Medal Winners

‘Tulipa Rococo’ by Mary Dillon, Roscrea, Co. Tipperary

‘Wheat Field Castlewarden’ by Katherine Geoghegan, Straffan, Co. Kildare

‘Coconut Tree “Cocos nucifera” by Nayana Sandur, Co. Limerick

‘Turning’ by Holly Somerville, Baltinglass, Co. Wicklow

‘Japanese Anemones’ by Sue van Coppenhagen, Co. Cork

Bronze Medal Winners

‘Citrux reticulata’ by Shevaun Doherty, Sandyford, Dublin

‘Barley Field Bodenstown’ by Katherine Geoghegan, Straffan, Co. Kildare

‘Opium Poppy’ by Siobhan Larkin, Dublin

‘Apple blossom’ by Anne McLeod, Co. Wexford

‘Primroses’ by Anne McLeod, Co. Wexford

Article source: http://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/garden-inspired-by-connemara-coast-wins-top-prize-at-bloom-festival-1.3104125

CdA Charter grad puts ideas into action – The Spokesman

Mason Magee, a senior at Coeur d’Alene Charter Academy, has a resume that rivals a successful 40-year-old.

His accomplishments include the Congressional Award Gold Medal in 2015, given to distinguished young Americans by the United States Congress. The gold medal is the highest achievement in the program, open to people ages 13-23, and requirements include 200 hours of physical fitness, 200 hours of personal development and 400 hours of volunteer service.

“There were only about 200 people nationally that got it that year,” Magee said. “I was probably one of the youngest by far.”

Magee exceeded the minimum hours for volunteer service. He teaches younger children music through Lake City Community Church and has logged more than 600 hours at Kootenai Health, including a position on the hospital’s teen volunteer board of directors for the past two years.

“When I first started out I worked in a bunch of different departments – the pre-operation rooms to senior care or I’d transfer patients around the hospital,” he said.

He recently shadowed Dr. Duane Craddock at Coeur d’Alene Pediatrics and is now interested in being a pediatrician. This fall he will attend Baylor University in Waco, Texas, majoring in medical humanities with a minor in biology.

Part of his desire to enter pediatrics sprang from supporting his younger brother, Carson, who has Type 1 diabetes.

“I hope to be able to change a couple things about testing kids for blood sugars,” Magee said. “There are a lot of kids who are dying and it goes undiagnosed.”

Mason has a knack for invention. He placed first in the 2015 Invent Idaho state competition with the QmediR, a QR code bracelet that would allow medical staff to access a complete medical history for an unresponsive patient. Though he hasn’t pursued the invention further, he’s continued to volunteer for the I3 (I Cubed) young inventor’s program.

And if for some reason Magee decides to shift away from medicine, he can fall back on a history of entrepreneurship. He gives private guitar and drum lessons and founded a freelance landscaping business, Coeur d’Alene Grass Masters. Magee and his brother also started an entertainment enterprise called Pockets Productions. They’ve performed for businesses, private parties and events, including functions for the Festival at Sandpoint and Northern Quest Casino.

There are other honors – he participated in the Idaho Music Educators Association All-State band in 2016, was named a Duke University Talent Identification Program Scholar in 2012, and earned a Superior Rating on the National Latin Exam in 2013.

If all that wasn’t enough, Magee works at Coldstone Creamery in Coeur d’Alene, and claims to have occasional free time.

“I like the outdoors, to go kayaking or camping with my friends,” Magee said. “I’m not a guy who likes to stay cooped up playing video games.”

If he were, he’d probably find a way to make it sound impressive.

Article source: http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2017/may/31/pre-med-charter-graduate-a-congressional-award-gol/

Longmont Landscaping by RSL Outdoor Living, Patios and Backyard Design Ideas

Longmont, CO — (SBWIRE) — 06/01/2017 — Home improvement projects needn’t focus solely on the home itself, the outdoor living area has the potential to be a place to relax, a place to have fun and a place to entertain. For those looking to relax, water features offer a bubbling soundtrack to ease the stress of a long day. With so many designs and styles to choose from, the experts at RSL Outdoor Living are helping residents with Longmont, Boulder, Fort Collins, Erie, Lafayette and Broomfield landscaping solutions for their dream backyard. On-site consultations are the perfect opportunity to match design ideas to a rock solid plan moving forwards.

With the long Colorado evenings in the summer, the patio can also be home to fireplaces, fire pits, pizza ovens, built-in barbecues and pergolas to provide some shade. Specialty Outdoor Living can be customized to each client so familiar looks can be copied or something unique can be imagined, planned and crafted. Rock landscaping can be incorporated around pathways, waterfalls, dry river beds and seat walls whilst stone can be versatile as decorative boulders or functional patios.

For inspiration, the RSL Outdoor Living website has pictures to showcase a selection of styles and designs. Outdoor patios are being transformed into unique outdoor living spaces. To request a quote or sign up for the newsletter, simply access the forms from any page on the website.

Other services include everything clients would need for their yard throughout the Colorado seasons: snow removal in the winter, mowing, fertilization, irrigation maintenance, irrigation winterizations, and spring irrigation reactivations, as well as lawn aeration and of course, backyard landscaping. Customers are commercial and residential.

About RSL Outdoor Living
RSL Outdoor Living is a division of Rock Solid Landscapes Inc. Based in Longmont, Colorado, they bring their backyard landscaping ideas, backyard design ideas, and creation skills to yards and patios in the Longmont, Boulder, Broomfield, Erie Lafayette areas. When every outdoor space is unique, they bring experience to blend the local conditions, soil and rock composition with the dreams of the homeowner.

Contact Details:
Online at http://www.rslinc.net/
Address: 3686 Stagecoach North, Unit A. Longmont, CO 80504
Phone: 303-772-4736
Email: info@rslinc.net

Article source: http://www.military-technologies.net/2017/06/01/longmont-landscaping-by-rsl-outdoor-living-patios-and-backyard-design-ideas/

Longmont Landscaping by RSL Outdoor Living, Patios and …

Longmont, CO — (SBWIRE) — 06/01/2017 — Home improvement projects needn’t focus solely on the home itself, the outdoor living area has the potential to be a place to relax, a place to have fun and a place to entertain. For those looking to relax, water features offer a bubbling soundtrack to ease the stress of a long day. With so many designs and styles to choose from, the experts at RSL Outdoor Living are helping residents with Longmont, Boulder, Fort Collins, Erie, Lafayette and Broomfield landscaping solutions for their dream backyard. On-site consultations are the perfect opportunity to match design ideas to a rock solid plan moving forwards.

With the long Colorado evenings in the summer, the patio can also be home to fireplaces, fire pits, pizza ovens, built-in barbecues and pergolas to provide some shade. Specialty Outdoor Living can be customized to each client so familiar looks can be copied or something unique can be imagined, planned and crafted. Rock landscaping can be incorporated around pathways, waterfalls, dry river beds and seat walls whilst stone can be versatile as decorative boulders or functional patios.

For inspiration, the RSL Outdoor Living website has pictures to showcase a selection of styles and designs. Outdoor patios are being transformed into unique outdoor living spaces. To request a quote or sign up for the newsletter, simply access the forms from any page on the website.

Other services include everything clients would need for their yard throughout the Colorado seasons: snow removal in the winter, mowing, fertilization, irrigation maintenance, irrigation winterizations, and spring irrigation reactivations, as well as lawn aeration and of course, backyard landscaping. Customers are commercial and residential.

About RSL Outdoor Living
RSL Outdoor Living is a division of Rock Solid Landscapes Inc. Based in Longmont, Colorado, they bring their backyard landscaping ideas, backyard design ideas, and creation skills to yards and patios in the Longmont, Boulder, Broomfield, Erie Lafayette areas. When every outdoor space is unique, they bring experience to blend the local conditions, soil and rock composition with the dreams of the homeowner.

Contact Details:
Online at http://www.rslinc.net/
Address: 3686 Stagecoach North, Unit A. Longmont, CO 80504
Phone: 303-772-4736
Email: info@rslinc.net

Article source: http://www.satprnews.com/2017/06/01/longmont-landscaping-by-rsl-outdoor-living-patios-and-backyard-design-ideas/

Eat your yard: How to mix edibles into the landscape

Just because you can eat a plant doesn’t mean it’s ugly.

And just because you want to grow edible plants doesn’t mean you have to rip up a big chunk of lawn to create a traditional vegetable-garden rectangle.

Plants aren’t officially “ugly” just because you can eat them. 

There’s a hybrid idea in those two schools of thought. It’s called “foodscaping,” and sometimes “edible landscaping” or gardening with “veggimentals.”

Whatever you call it, the idea involves plugging edible plants into the existing landscape.

That’s right – herbs and vegetables next to the shrubs and flowers… maybe even in the front yard.

It’s a hot topic in gardening lately, especially among younger gardeners who don’t have the time or inclination to tend a big garden or who don’t have much space to work with in the first place.

The latest charge comes from a North Carolina horticulturist and garden writer named Brie Arthur whose driving belief is that we all should “eat less from a box and more from the Earth.”

Arthur is author of the 2017 book “Foodscape Revolution” (St. Lynne’s Press, $21.95), which offers ideas and inspiration on how to work edibles into the yard.

Two more good foodscaping books: Rosalind Creasy’s 2010 “Edible Landscaping” (Sierra Club/Counterpoint, $39.95) and Nan Chase’s 2010 “Eat Your Yard!” (Gibbs Smith, $19.99).

“Grow whatever you love in whatever space you have,” Arthur urged would-be food gardeners at a talk launching her book at this year’s Philadelphia Flower Show. “If you’re out there trimming your boxwood hedge, why not grow some chard at the base? At least you’ll have something to eat at the end of the day.”

The prevailing mood of suburbia is that’s heresy. So-called “ornamentals” like trees, shrubs, flowers, and lawn are what you plant in the yard and around the house, while anything you eat is “ugly” and therefore should be hidden as far away in a back corner as possible.

In other words, flowers are pretty and edible plants are not, so no respectable gardener should ever mix the two.

This variety of kale called ‘Redbor’ turns deep purple in fall. 

 “Edibles are beautiful,” says Lloyd Traven, owner of Peace Tree Farm in Bucks County and another foodscape proponent. “By growing only ‘pretty’ flowers in the front yard, we’re wasting space and wasting resources.”

Traven says it’s better to drop the labels and look at each plant for what it offers in texture, form and color.

He says herbs like purple basil, golden oregano and assorted sages plus vegetables like frilly kale, red lettuce and even tomatoes are attractive plants in their own right. The fact that you can eat them is a bonus.

“You could weave these into your landscaping and nobody would notice,” he says. “It’s decorating with food.”

Arthur says a good place to start is by looking for openings in the existing landscape – spots where you see unplanted mulch (or worse, bare areas that are invitations for weeds).

Without even digging up any new space, it’s possible to tuck in some greens here, some onions there, and a few herbs to fill the gaps.

Since most edibles are annuals (ones that live just one season), it’s convenient to plant them in spring, harvest them when they’re ready, then do something different each year.

Some crops, including most greens and cold-tolerant plants such as radishes, carrots and beets, grow early enough and quickly enough that it’s possible to plant them in April, then follow up with summer crops such as beans, okra or peppers when the cool-season stuff is yanked.

Arthur says border beds are particularly good spots to look and plant.

Edibles themselves can become loose “hedge” plants along borders.

Blueberries make a good hedge plant. This one is called ‘Blueberry Glaze.’ 

Traven says blueberries are perfect for that with their 4- to 5-foot height, white spring flowers, tasty June fruits, and brilliant fall foliage.

Arthur says she switched to growing wheat instead of ornamental grasses, which gives the same textural look – except you can’t bake bread out of feather reed grass at the end of the season.

She also likes patches of asparagus with their ferny, wispy foliage as an ornamental-grass substitute.

And she’s always looking for good edible/ornamental pairings, such as Shasta daisies with basil, phlox with purple cabbage and eggplant, salvia with broccoli, and orange butterfly weed with cilantro, okra and peppers.

Purple basil pairs nicely with orange marigolds. 

The possibilities are almost endless if you’re going by looks and not by whether something is edible or not.

As in a traditional vegetable garden, animals are the biggest threat. Rabbits, groundhogs, voles, chipmunks and especially deer are hungry vegetarians that have all day every day to hunt for tasty treats.

They’ll eat many shrubs and flowers, too, but tomatoes and lettuce out in the open are particular draws.

Traven says dogs, motion-activated sprinklers, repellents, spot-fencing and draping netting over particularly targeted edibles are ways to combat animal attacks.

But ironically, sometimes this strategy of plugging in edibles here and there is enough to win the harvest. Mr. Groundhog may find and eat the cabbages you planted along the west property border, for example, but not the ones you tucked in among the hydrangeas lining the back patio.

If nothing else, you’re making animals work harder to find everything than the traditional vegetable garden where everything is concentrated in one rectangular buffet.

Arthur says you’ll also have to stay on top of watering since most annual edibles need regular moisture when rain doesn’t do the deed for you.

And a third possible challenge is if you live in a community with homeowner association (HOA) rules. These rules sometimes ban vegetable gardens or edibles in general – and some require planting plans before you add anything.

Arthur herself lives in such a community and said it took some selling – including a written design plan – to get permission to plant her foodscape.

Now’s a good time to give this a try. Start small, maybe plant some cooking herbs or hot peppers or purple-leaf kale where you were going to plant annual flowers.

If it works out, branch out into more.

As Arthur points out, America has 180 million acres of suburbia that could produce a lot of ultra-local, great-tasting, peak-nutrition, pesticide-free food instead of grass clippings.

“Imagine if every landscape grew just a little bit of food,” she says. “What a difference that would make.”

Some edibles worthy of ornamental treatment:

This thyme plant is being used as a rock-garden plant — and it’s leaves can be used in cooking. 

Plants with colorful foliage or stems: golden oregano, kale, lemon thyme, lettuce, malabar spinach, mesclun, mustard, okra, orach, pineapple sage, purple basil, purple kohlrabi, purple or tricolor sage, radicchio, red cabbage, silver thyme, Swiss chard.

Plants with colorful fruits or flowers: beans, blueberries, orange or purple cauliflower, chamomile, chives, cucumbers, currants, dill, eggplant, gourds, grapes, hardy kiwi, lavender, melons, nasturtiums, okra, pansies, peas, peppers, squash, strawberries, tomatoes.

Plants with interesting texture or form: asparagus, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, cardoon, carrots, celery, chives, corn, dill, fennel, globe artichokes, kale, kohlrabi, leeks/onions, okra, parsley, rhubarb, rosemary, tarragon.

Article source: http://www.pennlive.com/gardening/2017/06/eat_your_yard_how_to_mix_edibl.html

Rain garden eases erosion issues at Goodwood Museum

Positioned atop the highest hill within the city limits of Tallahassee, the Main House at Goodwood Museum and Gardens, formerly Goodwood Plantation, was surrounded by open farm land and could be seen from miles around.

While providing a commanding view of the region, the hilltop topography also posed challenges for those trying to farm the land, and for the museum which now resides on the site. Erosion of the soil and controlling water runoff continues to be an issue for maintaining gravel driveways, preventing basement flooding, and for capturing and filtering rainwater runoff before it reaches the region’s lakes and rivers.

 

 

Ongoing soil erosion at Goodwood prompted the leadership to call for a topographical survey of the property, which was completed in early 2016 by volunteers Carlos Boueres and Keith McCarron. Once the property was mapped, Boueres and McCarron began to look at ways to direct water runoff to reduce this erosion.

After meeting with representatives from the City of Tallahassee’s TAPP (Think about Personal Pollution) program, they proposed installing a rain garden near the East Drive below Goodwood’s historic swimming pool. This garden was strategically located to capture roof runoff from the newly renovated Rough House cottage/cafe, as well as ground surface runoff from several uphill sources.

 

 

TAPP began offering education and assistance with rain gardens 10 years ago, in the hopes that residents would embrace this landscaping technique. Rain gardens are landscaped areas planted with wildflowers and vegetation that can capture and soak up rainwater flowing from the roof, lawn, paved driveway, or walkway. This minimizes the amount of water entering a storm drain or nearby stream, and allows the water to slowly soak into the ground and filter through the soil and plants in the garden.

The garden, consisting of plants, mulch, and porous soil, can be a beautiful way to help slow the flow and improve the quality of water in nearby lakes and streams. TAPP awards small grants to qualified applicants to cover the plants and soil amendments used in a rain garden. The grant received by Goodwood included design assistance, provided by William Dickerson.

 

 

One of the top design priorities for the new rain garden was consideration of the Goodwood “aesthetic,” that is to say the overall property’s look, feel, and ambiance. Specifically, using nothing but historically used and native plants, repeating design elements found elsewhere on the grounds (especially at the entrances), and using plants that help tell the story of Goodwood and its previous owners.

The labor of digging the rain garden runoff was donated by Frank Willis of Old Willis Dairy, late last year, and many of the plants were installed by Habitat for Humanity volunteers. Purple Martin Nurseries provided additional assistance on a voluntary basis.

The result of this effort by so many wonderful Goodwood supporters is a striking, well-massed landscape featuring needle palms, coontie palms, irises, hydrangeas, and ferns that will be enjoyed by visitors for many years to come. A great debt of gratitude is owed to the rain garden’s contributors and to Goodwood’s leadership, staff, and volunteers who will care for the garden going forward.

This new rain garden is a wonderful intersection of historical plant and landscape preservation, good stewardship of the property’s natural resources, and enhancement of Goodwood’s already beautiful grounds. The TAPP garden is a garden of which our predecessors would be proud.

Courtney Schoen is the coordinator for the City of Tallahassee’s TAPP Program and volunteer writer for UF/IFAS Leon County Extension. Mike Herrin is the former Garden and Grounds Manager at Goodwood Museum and Gardens. For gardening questions, email the extension office at AskAMasterGardener@ifas.ufl.edu. 

Article source: http://www.tallahassee.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/06/01/rain-garden-eases-erosion-issues-goodwood-museum/361906001/

Project EverGreen dedicates two more projects

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Project EverGreen formally dedicated two of its most recent Healthy Turf. Healthy Kids. projects when it cut the ribbon on the Hazlet Youth Athletic League’s William B. Paterson Field in New Jersey, and the Neighbors of Vega Baja community garden in East Harlem, New York City.

“With more than half of the population living in urban areas, it’s critical that neighborhood parks and community gardens are available for the health benefits and social well-being of kids and adults,” said Cindy Code, executive director of Project EverGreen. “Additionally, green spaces in cities work to sequester carbon and create oxygen for those living in the community. Project EverGreen works collaboratively with individuals, businesses and like-minded groups to renovate and restore green spaces.”

The Hazlet project started in Oct. 2016 with a professional landscaping renovation to restore and improve the health and vigor of the weather-damaged grass field which serves as the home playing surface for nearly 1,500 children in HYAL fall football and spring flag football leagues within the Hazlet Township community.

With the financial assistance of the performance nutrition division of Hazlet-based LidoChem, Inc., and Bridgewater, New Jersey-based Natural Green Lawn Care, and community members, a work party reshaped, fertilized and seeded the field to create a safe greenspace where community children can play.

“We’re proud to partner with Project EverGreen on this initiative to restore our own hometown Hazlet Hawks youth natural grass athletic field for our kids,” said Don Pucillo, president of LidoChem, Inc. “We’re especially pleased to contribute earth-friendly and kid-safe products to produce a greener, healthier, cooler play area where our children can play outside and just be kids.”

The in-kind donations of materials and labor from professional landscape contractor and supplier volunteers’ to improve the playability and safety of 100,000 sq. ft. of playing surface, totals more than $25,000.

Code was joined at the dedication ceremony (held on May 18), by Pucillo, HYAL President Seb Burtone and John Woody, president, Natural Green Lawn Care.

HYAL Hazlet Hawks football players and cheerleaders, current and former Hazlet High players, including Bennet Jackson, Notre Dame alumnus and New York Giants player, were also on hand for the dedication.

Across the Hudson River, the dedication of the renovated Neighbors of Vega Baja community garden took place on Saturday, May 20. The project was supported by a Con Edison community service grant, NYC Parks GreenThumb and local landscape and nursery industry professionals.

The community garden – more than 40 years old – is named after the Puerto Rican hometown of numerous local residents, including the garden’s founder. Due to garden-adjacent construction, the garden had been mostly inactive for nearly a year before the first phase of the restoration last fall.

The first phase started with Brian Tauscher, owner of Artisan Gardens Landscape, donating gravel lining and topsoil to fill large planter boxes in place, applying a truckload of mulch to the open garden center area, and planting new apple trees, 30 hydrangeas and fruit-bearing bushes supplied by Plant Detectives, Inc.

Prior to dedication ceremony, 350 additional vegetables, herbs and ornamental flowering shrubs (donated by Plant Detectives, Inc.) were planted by ConEd employee volunteers.

Project EverGreen’s Code was joined in the dedication ceremony by Carlos Martinez, deputy director, NYC Parks GreenThumb, East Harlem District Leader Johnny Rivera and ConEdison’s Walter Shay.

“Community gardens, such as this, changes the trajectory of knowledge and way of thinking,” said Carlos Martinez, deputy director, GreenThumb (NYC Parks). “For the kids of NYC, growing vegetables is a new experience. Our job is far from done.”

In total more than $15,000 of in-kind materials and services were donated for this transformation project, restoring the sustainable fruit and vegetable garden and community park for The Neighbors of Vega Baja Association now, and in the future.

Article source: http://www.lawnandlandscape.com/article/ll-060117-project-evergreen-dedicates/