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Archives for April 14, 2017

VIDEO: A behind-the-scenes look into the making of Longwood …

Everyone knows Longwood Gardens for its dazzling garden design, but what people rarely have a chance to see is the lengthy preparation and time it takes to prepare the exhibits.

“We start the design a year out–so right now–I have already designed next spring’s plantings. It is a matter of building on those designs from year to year,” said April Bevans, Senior Gardener

During peak bloom, The Flower Garden Walk boasts more than 125,000 tulips, making it Longwood’s historic 600-foot walk of thousands of seasonal blooms.

“The Flower Garden Walk is planted in color blocks, the very first boarder is all blue, the second is all pink, the third is red, orange, yellow and the last boarder is all white,” said Bevans. “It is always planted that way, summer, spring, winter, and fall.”

The Flower Garden Walk is designed to help inspire and continue spreading the beauty and art of nature, but creating this masterpiece is no easy task.

“[The walk] has about 130,000 bulbs planted,” said Bevans. “Which takes a crew of eight to 10 about two weeks to plant.”

Longwood Gardens, Spring Blossom is open now until May 26th, 2017. 

Article source: http://www.wdel.com/features/video-a-behind-the-scenes-look-into-the-making-of/article_f450f8da-1fc5-11e7-bd9c-db344813538c.html

LGC meets Monday

Lugoff Garden Club welcomes Elise Holmberg Herron as guest speaker at its meeting Monday.  

Herron is the lead design associate for  J. Dabney Peeples  (JDP) Design Associates in Pendleton, S.C. 

The meeting will be held at the home of Judy Baxley, on Holly Berry Lane in Lugoff. The social hour begins at 6:30 p.m. and the speaker’s presentation is at 7 p.m.  

Elise Herron’s program, “A Ceiling of Sky,” will focus on creating and defining outdoor garden rooms. The presentation will outline ways of organizing the garden to create a variety of spaces, ranging from intimate to open. A visual presentation will include several projects from JDP Design’s portfolio to illustrate the design principles used in creating spectacular outdoor spaces.  

Herron grew up in the Lugoff community, and after graduating from Lugoff-Elgin High School in 2000, attended Clemson University where she received her BA in Architecture. She worked with Ard, Wood, Holcombe Slate (AWHS) Architects in Greenville from 2004 to 2009 as an architectural design intern, focusing primarily on residential architecture and design specifications, then returned to Clemson where she earned a Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture in 2012. After staying at home for several years following the birth of her children and working on various freelance projects with Ike Construction, Elise took a position with J. Dabney Peeples Design Associates, Inc. where she now works as the lead design associate. Established by James Dabney Peeples in 1986, (JDP) Design Associates makes its home in Pendleton, drawing its inspiration for landscape and garden design from traditional Southern and European design principles. 

Featured in publications such as Southern Living, Better Homes and Gardens, and Greenville’s At Home Magazine, JDP Design has consistently found favor with those who appreciate the beauty of artful and thoughtful garden design and was recently selected as the 2016 HGTV Outdoor Awards People’s Pick Winner for their entry in the “Style and Structure” category. 

Herron, her husband, Clay, and their five-year-old twins currently live in Liberty.

Article source: http://www.chronicle-independent.com/section/29/article/47201/

Garden dedicated to Princess Diana opens at Kensington Palace

A stunning memorial garden has opened at Kensington Palace to mark the 20th anniversary of Princess Diana‘s death and to honor her life.

A team of six gardeners and a number of volunteers spent 18 weeks planting the floral tribute of white roses, white Diana tulips, white hyacinth, forget-me-nots and other favorites of Diana in the sunken garden.

More than 12,000 bulbs were planed over the winter to create what is now a breathtaking white garden with pops of color outside the home that Diana’s oldest son, Prince William, shares with his wife, Princess Kate, and their two children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, and the cottage where Diana’s youngest son, Prince Harry, lives.

PHOTO: Diana, Princess of Wales with her sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, at the piano in Kensington Palace, Oct. 4, 1985.Tim Graham/Getty Images
Diana, Princess of Wales with her sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, at the piano in Kensington Palace, Oct. 4, 1985.

Kensington Palace was the Princess of Wales’s home up until her death in August 1997 in a Paris car crash. Diana was just 36 when she died.

The “White Garden,” as it is named, saw an early bloom due to good weather in London. More flowers with a different bloom will be planted ahead of what would have been Diana’s 56th birthday on July 1.

PHOTO: Blossoms are seen in the White Garden, created to celebrate the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, at Kensington Palace in north London, on April 13, 2017. AFP/Getty Images
Blossoms are seen in the White Garden, created to celebrate the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, at Kensington Palace in north London, on April 13, 2017.

PHOTO: A Tulip Florosa is seen in the White Garden, created to celebrate the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, at Kensington Palace in north London, on April 13, 2017. AFP/Getty Images
A Tulip Florosa is seen in the White Garden, created to celebrate the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, at Kensington Palace in north London, on April 13, 2017.

PHOTO: A Lady Diana Tulip is seen at the White Garden, created to celebrate the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, at Kensington Palace in north London, on April 13, 2017.AFP/Getty Images
A Lady Diana Tulip is seen at the White Garden, created to celebrate the life of Diana, Princess of Wales, at Kensington Palace in north London, on April 13, 2017.

Historical Royal Palaces, the charity that maintains the garden at Kensington Palace, described what visitors can expect to see in July.

“In the summer, pots of classic English white roses will surround the reflective pool in the centre of the garden and the planting will become more exuberant, with glowing ornamental grasses weaving through Cosmos daisies and billows of graceful Gaura,” the charity said in a description on its website.

The garden’s design was inspired by Diana’s life and style, including the iconic pearl-encrusted “Elvis dress” which she paired with her famous Cambridge Lovers Knot tiara.

PHOTO: Princess Diana in a Catherine Walker dress and jacket dress embroidered with sequins and pearls, known as the Elvis Dress, on an official visit to Hong Kong in 1989.Tim Graham/Getty Images
Princess Diana in a Catherine Walker dress and jacket dress embroidered with sequins and pearls, known as the ‘Elvis Dress’, on an official visit to Hong Kong in 1989.

The gardeners wanted to create something “very elegant, simple but also joyful” to reflect Diana’s spirit, according to head gardener Sean Harkin.

Kensington Palace has announced a number of events to commemorate Diana’s life this year. Her sons, William, 34, and Harry, 32, have also commissioned a statue on the grounds of Kensington Palace to honor Diana.

“Our mother touched so many lives,” William and Harry said in a statement earlier this year announcing the statue. “We hope the statue will help all those who visit Kensington Palace to reflect on her life and her legacy.”

An exhibition chronicling Diana’s evolving style during her life opened at Kensington Palace in February. The exhibition, titled “Diana: Her Fashion Story,” offers a unique look at Diana’s style and features some of her most stunning outfits.

Harry told ABC News’ Robin Roberts before the Invictus Games last year that he and William intend to keep his mother’s legacy alive.

“We will do everything we can to make sure that she’s never forgotten and carry on all the special gifts, as such, that she had and that she portrayed while she was alive,” Harry said in the March 2016 interview.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/garden-dedicated-princess-diana-opens-kensington-palace/story?id=46797692

Township eyes welcoming east-end gateway

Township Community Development Director Lukas Hill said a developer is eyeing the vacant land on the southwest corner for a mixed-use commercial development. Hill said the developer has not yet filed an application and he doesn’t know any details of the project at this time.

On Monday, the Township Board approved spending up to $16,000 for gateway designs that could include pillars, signage and landscaping.

“When you look at the intersection, it’s one of our only lit intersections in the township,” Hill said. “Obviously, it’s a very popular avenue to the beach and to the lakeshore. We’re hoping to beautify the area and create a sense that you’ve arrived somewhere. If you look at what other communities have done, including the village, they’ve done improvements with brick pillars, wrought iron fencing and signage. We could mirror something like that — a combination of bricks and mortar along with some nice landscaping.”

The plans also include improving pedestrian accommodations on all four corners, including crosswalks with signage and clear markings on the pavement.

“Not only is it nice to look at, it’s functional from a pedestrian standpoint,” Hill said. “It also sets the tone for what we might expect on the private sector. We want to say, ‘Here’s what we’re willing to do in beautification. Can you carry the momentum into the private sector, as well?’

“So, whatever goes in there is hopefully going to be above and beyond standard building practices. We want something that’s attractive in that vicinity,” he added.

Hill said “just about everything” is allowed in a mixed-use commercial district — residential, office and commercial.

“One of the only restrictions is that the residential (portion) would need to be on the second floor,” he said.

Township Manager Gordon Gallagher said that, at some point, property and business owners in the area will be invited to share their ideas of what they would like the gateway to look like.

“I don’t know that we have anything specific in mind,” he said. “I think the issue is we want to start to plan how that intersection will look. That’s in a lot of ways the gateway to the lakeshore. Should that be more of a welcoming kind of intersection or should it stay the way it is? Should there be some ‘welcome’ signage?”

Gallagher said the gateway design would be only in the right of way and that the Michigan Department of Transportation will need to be involved because M-104 is a state road.

Article source: http://www.grandhaventribune.com/Local/2017/04/14/SL-Township-eyes-welcoming-gateway-for-east-end.html?ci=stream&lp=1&p=1

St. John tour garden traded front lawn for drought-tolerant landscaping


Frogs are a common element found throughout the garden at the home of Larry and Michelle Brockett in north Chico. The garden will be one of those on the St. John Episcopal Church garden tour.
Frogs are a common element found throughout the garden at the home of Larry and Michelle Brockett in north Chico. The garden will be one of those on the St. John Episcopal Church garden tour.
Bill Husa — Enterprise-Record




Welcome to what we like to call “Brockett Park.” It’s one of four gardens on the St. John Episcopal Church garden tour, which is May 6 this year.

When we moved into our well-established north Chico neighborhood in 1999, we had considered adding a pool to our moderate-sized back yard. Our plans were quickly changed by the expansive root systems of two large dawn redwoods and a tall ginkgo tree that provided substantial shade.

Both the front and back yards were all lawn, and surrounded by a plethora of agapanthus and irises. Over the next few years, we removed half of the back lawn and put in raised vegetable beds surrounded by gravel.

More projects followed including the addition of a small meditation garden, a planting shed, and patio space designed for entertaining.

A good portion of our backyard is shaded in the hottest part of the day and is home to the nearly 90 azaleas and 10 Japanese maple trees we have planted.

Mandarin orange, Meyer lemon, fig, red delicious apple, and navel orange trees flank the vegetable garden. Border vegetable beds include blackberries on trellises, artichokes, blueberries, and year-round herbs. Summer annuals are intermingled with vegetables and herbs for contrast.

For privacy, two-thirds of the perimeter fence is covered with nandina and privet.

Our biggest garden project started two years ago just before water rationing was the norm. We removed 1,400 square feet of lawn in the front and had a landscaper create a dry creek bed garden that was inspired by hours of searching on Pinterest for drought-tolerant ideas.

By trial and error we discovered what plants would tolerate being surrounded by black lava and river rock as well as the direct sun all day. We worked with the landscaper to supply just the right amount of water to each plant with an intricate drip system for both our front and back yard.

Our efforts paid off and we have seen an approximate one-third decrease in our water usage since making these changes.

Plantings in the creek bed garden include spirea, artemesia, Russian and Mexican sage, day lilies, coreopsis, echinacea, rockroses and junipers.

In addition to the azaleas, the backyard has several dwarf spruce, dwarf mugo pines, cold-tolerant ferns and sages to attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

We have several bird feeders and baths, and enjoy sitting in the garden listening to the sounds of the birds and the fountain.

We hope you enjoy your visit.

Article source: http://www.orovillemr.com/lifestyle/20170413/st-john-tour-garden-traded-front-lawn-for-drought-tolerant-landscaping

Luxurious outdoor living

Spring is here and as the days get warmer, you’ll probably go outside more often instead of staying indoors. Perhaps you’ll think about going to the park or taking a vacation. You may consider just having some fun around the house and backyard. A walk around the neighborhood to observe different gardens can give you some ideas for improving your home’s surroundings. You may relax on the front porch and enjoy being outside with your kids or decide to walk outside and sit on the patio, enjoying the cool breeze and watching flowers.

Photo courtesy of Saussy Burbank

Many homes in the Raleigh area have these features. Whether your home is a large single family residence or a new luxury condominium, take notice of some of the improvements being made to accommodate outdoor living. The real estate market in the Triangle is flourishing and that means many homeowners want customized finishes for their properties. Builders and developers are collaborating with homeowners to ensure luxurious amenities.

Grant Do, marketing coordinator for Saussy Burbank, a new home builder in Raleigh, believes in the importance of the front porch to complement a home. He says “porches have and will always be a focal point in our architectural design as a home builder.” This is in addition to the social aspects homeowners enjoy by relaxing outside.

French doors are another important feature of front porches. Do explains that contemporary design seeks to emphasize luxury while remaining practical. The company is “honoring the essence of the front porch, but striving to stay relevant and functional by design. Our current plans offer double front porches, which allow homeowners to have a private balcony extend from the owner’s suite.”

A back porch often leads to a deck or patio. Many trim options can complement a screened in porch. Some owners choose to have a porch and deck with stairs. Rex Osborne, a real estate agent and leader of the development and sales department at Windjam Properties, a new home and marketing company, says “larger sliding doors and more access from the kitchen areas” are becoming more prevalent because clients want easier access to exploring the outdoor living experience.

Photo courtesy of Saussy Burbank

Of course, you’ll want a nice backyard. Outdoor living includes many features like luxurious patios, swimming pools, and beautiful decks. Some aboveground pools have climate controlled features. A patio may include a canopy to keep out the elements, including sunlight. There are many ways to implement beautiful outdoor living features for your home. Such amenities will result in you wanting to go outside often after dinner. Neighbors and visitors can relax outside with a pool party.

Many backyards in the Triangle area, especially luxury properties, may have a swimming pool or water feature. Children in the neighborhood may take advantage of this amenity. If you are older and use your swimming pool for relaxation and entertaining, you may want warm water to swim in or prefer this for your joints. Many aboveground pools are built with custom features to allow owners to control the water’s temperature and color. Relaxation and tranquility await you in such an environment.

Photos courtesy of Windjam Properties

Cleaning a pool is also easy through technological advances. Many owners will opt to have automated cleaners which get rid of debris and leaves. Most swimming pools have heating and cleaning mechanisms. Upgrades like fiber optic lighting provide beautiful visuals for people planning to swim in the evening or at night. Pool automation through modern technology like smartphones enable you to adjust the pool spa and deck lights.

Automatic timers are another important feature for pools. This allows owners to maintain energy efficiency while ensuring the filters and pumps stop running while the pool is unoccupied. Another contemporary trend in pools is to have a darker shade to the finish. This allows your pool to retain heat and lower the costs of keeping the pool warm.

Concrete pools and vinyl pools often include plaster or granite, depending on the owner’s preferences. These finishes give the swimming pool style and elegance and provide a wonderful ambience. Ceramic and porcelain tile finishes have become more popular for swimming pools. Tile choices are important for the aesthetic of your swimming pool, especially given that glass tiles are preferred because they can be used in different climates.

Fiberglass pools are more difficult to install because of their size but are better for soil shifting and more readily can withstand changes in temperature. Summer in North Carolina can be quite humid. Fiberglass pools often have different curves made with granite and stone. The size of the curves can determine the amount of space available for swimming.

Screened porches have become more prevalent for home owners with young families because they want their children to have large, safe play areas. Some screens have safety precautions built into them, and other amenities such as childproof doors and regulation railings are often used. Ceiling fans, spacious furniture, and effective lighting make these spaces quite appealing for home owners as well.

Outdoor decks are great investments for properties and will add value to any house, but you must be careful about the deck meeting your budget and fitting the house’s proportions. Most decks connect to your house, so a good location for your deck is adjacent to a side room, perhaps the family room. Outdoor decks are often wood, and come in a variety of colors, including grey, chestnut, or mahogany. These fashionable colors add pizzazz and allow owners to show their individual preferences with regards to style.

For a patio or deck at a single-family residence, hardwood lumber or composite lumber often make up the materials used. Therefore, the decks remain durable and sturdy while the surface is resistant to fading and mold. “Outdoor living is a big factor when buyers design a custom home, and when they purchase an existing new home offered for sale. Our homes are now using more permanent materials in and around our deck areas,” says Osborne. These flat surfaces connected to the back of your house are great for outdoor meals and entertaining.

Function remains important for contemporary design. This is true for both single-family residences and luxury condominiums. “We’ve spent a tremendous amount of time working on floorplans, creating ease, convenience, and freedom of movement throughout our spaces, incorporating our strong bias towards outdoor living immediately connected to the homes,” says Justin Hime of The Beacon Street Development Company, which manages The Wade in Raleigh. The company emphasizes the importance of creating architecturally distinct properties with modern interior spacing and customized finishes, including flooring and cabinetry, along with large windows for sunlight.

In the Triangle area, many homeowners enjoy large decks, some of which include furniture and plants. Pergolas can offer additional garden space, which is a great complement to a deck or patio. Consider adding a lamp to enjoy being outside at night or a canopy to reduce sunlight. Contemporary designs for decks include wooden benches and aluminum rails, and enhance the backyard’s beauty.

Consider getting help from a professional if you’re looking to improve your home or buy another home soon. Do explains that Saussy Burbank seeks to “stay relevant by meeting the needs and wants of buyers through our locations, plans, and options. There are a plethora of trends out there, so it is my task to narrow in on the trends that align with our brand. I work hard to ensure that the trends we celebrate are simple and timeless. You can see that initiative reflect in our porches and patios, which are functional and well-crafted.” Saussy Burbank designs custom homes with plan innovations that will make your home more comfortable and luxurious.

Walk around your neighborhood and you’re sure to notice an abundance of landscaping ideas. Landscaping options are an important feature for homeowners, but also for developers. Hime explains The Beacon Street Development Company has plans to collaborate with Frank Liggert, a local landscape architect, to develop community parks. Hime says this is for the benefit of homeowners who traditionally find it difficult to adjust from houses with yards to condominiums. There is a perception that natural beauty may be limited in a condominium, but this is not the case at The Wade. Some of the amenities at The Wade will include walkways, a rooftop terrace, a community garden, and possibly a rose garden. The focus is on “delivering conscious spaces that will add daily value and make living at The Wade even more pleasurable.” Indeed, these are exciting changes in Raleigh.

Continue reading this article on www.NewHomesandIdeas.com.

Article source: http://www.wral.com/luxurious-outdoor-living/16644392/

St. John tour garden traded front lawn for drought-tolerant landscaping – Chico Enterprise


Frogs are a common element found throughout the garden at the home of Larry and Michelle Brockett in north Chico. The garden will be one of those on the St. John Episcopal Church garden tour.
Frogs are a common element found throughout the garden at the home of Larry and Michelle Brockett in north Chico. The garden will be one of those on the St. John Episcopal Church garden tour.
Bill Husa — Enterprise-Record




Welcome to what we like to call “Brockett Park.” It’s one of four gardens on the St. John Episcopal Church garden tour, which is May 6 this year.

When we moved into our well-established north Chico neighborhood in 1999, we had considered adding a pool to our moderate-sized back yard. Our plans were quickly changed by the expansive root systems of two large dawn redwoods and a tall ginkgo tree that provided substantial shade.

Both the front and back yards were all lawn, and surrounded by a plethora of agapanthus and irises. Over the next few years, we removed half of the back lawn and put in raised vegetable beds surrounded by gravel.

More projects followed including the addition of a small meditation garden, a planting shed, and patio space designed for entertaining.

A good portion of our backyard is shaded in the hottest part of the day and is home to the nearly 90 azaleas and 10 Japanese maple trees we have planted.

Mandarin orange, Meyer lemon, fig, red delicious apple, and navel orange trees flank the vegetable garden. Border vegetable beds include blackberries on trellises, artichokes, blueberries, and year-round herbs. Summer annuals are intermingled with vegetables and herbs for contrast.

For privacy, two-thirds of the perimeter fence is covered with nandina and privet.

Our biggest garden project started two years ago just before water rationing was the norm. We removed 1,400 square feet of lawn in the front and had a landscaper create a dry creek bed garden that was inspired by hours of searching on Pinterest for drought-tolerant ideas.

By trial and error we discovered what plants would tolerate being surrounded by black lava and river rock as well as the direct sun all day. We worked with the landscaper to supply just the right amount of water to each plant with an intricate drip system for both our front and back yard.

Our efforts paid off and we have seen an approximate one-third decrease in our water usage since making these changes.

Plantings in the creek bed garden include spirea, artemesia, Russian and Mexican sage, day lilies, coreopsis, echinacea, rockroses and junipers.

In addition to the azaleas, the backyard has several dwarf spruce, dwarf mugo pines, cold-tolerant ferns and sages to attract butterflies and hummingbirds.

We have several bird feeders and baths, and enjoy sitting in the garden listening to the sounds of the birds and the fountain.

We hope you enjoy your visit.

Article source: http://www.chicoer.com/lifestyle/20170413/st-john-tour-garden-traded-front-lawn-for-drought-tolerant-landscaping

Improve Botanic Gardens with clever landscaping, fewer carparks

Recently, I visited the Botanic Gardens’ new Learning Forest.

While I enjoyed my walk there and take pride in the Gardens’ Unesco World Heritage Site accolade,there are three areas which I believe can be improved.

First, there is a new carpark right at the Learning Forest, while not far away, at the Tyersall Gate, there is a big coach-parking area.

I was there on a weekday, and saw that there were only four coaches parked there.

There are already six other carparks, big and small, on the fringes of the Gardens. Singapore is on a drive towards becoming a car-lite nation, so why do we need so many carparks in the area?

The Gardens is well served by MRT stations, so it is already very accessible to the public.

Also, the current carpark at the Nassim Gate is underutilised.

To cater for peak periods, this carpark could be expanded to accommodate more coaches and cars, so there is no need for the new carpark and coach park at the Learning Forest and Tyersall Gate.

Perhaps we can explore levying a higher fee for coach parking at the Gardens to encourage coaches to park somewhere else, and return to pick up passengers at the Gardens only at an appointed time.

Second, to further enhance the “rainforest within a city” experience, the authorities can consider shielding more tall buildings nearby from view.

They have done a pretty good job in the Tanglin and Central cores of the Gardens, but in the Bukit Timah core, a few high condominium units and apartments are still visible at the Eco Lake area.

With clever landscaping and foliage, I am sure the view can be further improved.

Third, the traffic noise at the Gardens can be reduced. Granted, the Gardens is right in the city, but with technology, the noise level can be reduced.

Only the Holland Road side poses a problem. Perhaps a sound barrier near the Tanglin Gate, sandwiched by creepers or tall hedges, can do the trick. Or perhaps a small waterfall can be built to drown out the traffic noise.

Tan Chin Hwee

Article source: http://www.straitstimes.com/forum/letters-in-print/improve-botanic-gardens-with-clever-landscaping-fewer-carparks

Gardening column: Keep tree roots healthy with these tips – News …

Q: I have a beautiful large older tree in the yard and there are roots spreading out from it that cause problems when mowing and lay so close to the surface that sometimes someone stumbles over them. I thought a tree’s roots went straight down under the tree so why is this one different? Also, can I cut these roots out without harming the tree?

A: Here are some facts about tree roots that may answer your questions:

• Almost all tree roots are in the top 2 feet of the soil and they flair out around and under the tree to create a stable base that will keep the tree upright as it grows.

• The reason they lay so close to the surface is because they must have oxygen to survive.

• As the tree grows older and larger, the roots expand to nourish it and to continue to give it stability.

• Like any of our plants, the root system controls how strong and healthy the plant is. We sometimes look at our trees differently because they are so large and complex, but their life literally depends on how healthy the roots are.

• As the tree grows and matures of course the roots swell and become larger and larger to help hold the tree upright and to supply the needed nutrients and water.

• Anytime these roots are removed or cut off for whatever reason, the tree is weakened and more than likely its life shortened. Also, trees that have this happen to them are open to disease and pests.

• If your tree is healthy, I would advise beautifying under it and landscaping in such a way that people automatically walk out around where the roots are laying on the surface. Doing this will also make it easier to mow.

• A tree will take up most or all the nutrients, water and air near and under it so if you add plant material, you need to plant shallow rooted plants and probably shade loving ones then remember to water often.

• Begin your landscaping scheme by cutting a narrow circular trench in the soil around the tree, one that encompasses the roots that are laying on the surface of the ground.

• Doing this will give you a boundary to work within.

• Find the natural areas made by the roots that have spread like fingers under the tree.

• Remove any sod in those areas around the root, then add good soil and work it in to depth of 6 to 8 inches so you can plant plants that like shade and have a shallower root system.

• Add some garden ornaments or a bench taking care not to cut or damage the roots.

• Cover the area with porous material such as mulch or stone. Remember your tree’s roots must be kept fairly uncovered so they can breathe.

• Also, mulch will help the new plants retain moisture and keep grass and weeds from moving in.

• Never pile wood mulch up on the trunk of a tree or inches and inches deep no matter how young or old it is. That is just an invitation to critter and insect damage and will keep water from getting to the roots.

Jane Ford is an Advanced Master Gardener. Email questions to bloominthing@gmail.com. She also answers gardening questions with horticulture educator Ricky Kemery noon-1 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of each month on “The Plant Medic,” a radio show on 95.7fm. This column is the opinion of the writer and does not necessarily reflect the views of The News-Sentinel.

Article source: http://www.news-sentinel.com/living/20170414/gardening_column_keep_tree_roots_healthy_with_these_tips&profile=1016

Gardening tips – Greenwood Index

Gardeners often focus on the science of their hobby: how much water and sunlight their plants need and how to improve soil quality and keep pests at bay. But there can be a lot of artistry behind the craft as well — from how you harvest and enjoy flowers to how you convert unused spaces of your home into a viable indoor edible garden.

Indoor gardening

For those who don’t have an outdoor garden or yard, the dream of enjoying your own freshly picked fruits and vegetables may seem out of reach. However, the nooks and crannies of your home can be creatively rendered into productive growing zones. And experts say that nearly all homes can support indoor gardening.

“Whatever the size of your home, there will be a selection of edible plants you can grow indoors, as long as you have some natural daylight filtering in,” said Zia Allaway, author of “Indoor Edible Garden: Creative Ways to Grow Herbs, Fruit and Vegetables in Your Home.” “The areas where plants will grow can be windowsills, beneath a skylight or even in a dark, unlit area if you install grow lights.”

“Just remember that unlike other projects in the home, such as decorating and cooking, all gardening projects require some aftercare. So, if you have a busy schedule, choose crops that will tolerate less watering and feeding.”

Flower arranging

While your flower garden is likely a beautiful work of art in and of itself, you can spread the joy by harvesting your flora and bringing the beauty indoors. Floral arrangements add vitality to any interior space.

“For me, every arrangement starts with the container. Think about what mood or style you want to evoke, and remember, anything can be a container as long as it can be made watertight,” says Rachel Siegfried,” author of “The Flower Book: Natural Flower Arrangements for Your Home,” which explores 60 flowers, bloom-by-bloom in portraiture, including quick-reference profiles and tips.

Article source: http://www.indexjournal.com/gardening-tips/article_1ca7c945-7284-56d5-8735-055f6fea45b4.html