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Archives for March 19, 2017

Michigan themed garden design competition at Home & Garden Show

Home Garden Show: Celebrating Michigan Garden

Article source: http://www.wzzm13.com/entertainment/television/programs/my-west-michigan/michigan-themed-garden-design-competition-at-home-garden-show/418539395

A whimsical landscaping makeover in Long Beach

Somewhere between DIY and hiring a contractor to do all the work is a home improvement sweet spot for those who aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty but respect the skill of professionals and know when to call in the cavalry.

It’s a middle ground where Long Beach homeowners Wendy Manasse Wiese and David Wiese felt at home.

With the goal of transforming the long, uninspired lawn in front of their classic 1934 Streamline Moderne home into something with more style and less maintenance, the creative couple embarked on a journey of renovation defined by informed choices and personal style.

Their high-concept landscape design and the process behind it are inspiring and imitable. Here’s how:

OKC Home, Outdoor Living Show offers ideas to enjoy home outside

OKLAHOMA CITY – As buds pop up from the earth and birds whistle their first tunes, Oklahomans are anxious to get outside and begin checking off their spring to-do lists. At the OKC Home + Outdoor Living Show March 24-26, more than 300 experts and two of DIY Network’s biggest stars will be on hand to offer expert advice and inspiration for making the outdoors an extension of the home.

The OKC Home + Outdoor Living Show is a three-day event held March 24-26 at State Fair Park showcasing hundreds of experts in patios, decking, windows and more for home improvement projects inside and out. Adult admission is $9 and children under 12 get in free. Buy tickets online and save $2 at www.homeshowokc.com or at Buy for Less stores. Show hours are Friday 12 to 9 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

    •    Alison Victoria, designer and host of DIY Network’s Kitchen Crashers, introduces you to quick and simple tips to show off the kitchen’s best features. Forget expensive, lengthy renovations. Alison’s ideas will add function and style to any kitchen without breaking the budget.

    •    Sara Bendrick, is a landscape designer on DIY Network’s I Hate My Yard. She helps homeowners transform their dreary back yards into paradise. Learn from her tips and experiences about how to turn your yard into a space you’ve always dreamed of.

    •    Check out Backyard Wars, a competition between local landscape designers. From water features to sculptures to lighting and more, each team will show guests how to turn their backyard into a relaxing haven.

    •    Plaza Palooza – An Outdoor Living Event! is an outdoor event featuring live grilling demonstrations and music from local bluegrass, country, gospel and rock bands.

    •    Don’t miss the tasty treats in FoodieVille. On Sunday only, a variety of food trucks will be on hand to satisfy any craving.

    •    Active and retired fire, police and military personnel get in free with a valid ID on Sunday, March 26 for Hero Day.

    •    Other favorite heroes serving in the communities – teachers – can enjoy free admission to the show on Teacher Day Friday, March 24.

    •    The Homeless Alliance is this year’s featured charity. Visitors can purchase original art created by people in the organization’s Fresh stART program, purchase the Curbside Chronicle, written by the shelter’s guests, and learn how to help end long-term homelessness in Oklahoma City.

Article source: http://www.edmondsun.com/news/okc-home-outdoor-living-show-offers-ideas-to-enjoy-home/article_36752ddc-0c3c-11e7-9f20-3b31a7d2a1a7.html

Ideas bloom at QCCA Flower & Garden Show

QCCA Flower Garden Show – If you go

When: Friday, March 24 to Sunday, March 26

Where: QCCA Expo Center, Rock Island

Admission: $8, adults, $7 in advance; $1, children age 6-15; and free, under 6. Senior Day is Friday (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) $6, age 65 and older. 

Hours: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday. Parking is free.

Preview Party: The annual Preview Party will be from 4-8 p.m., Thursday, March 23. Tickets are $20 (in advance) or $25 at the door. Visit www.qccaexpocenter.com for advance tickets.

What is the QCCA?

The Quad City Conservation Alliance, or QCCA, was founded in 1984 as a not-for-profit conservation alliance by five local conservation clubs that recognized they could accomplish more working together. The managing clubs are: Frye Lake Sportsmen’s Club, Mississippi Valley Chapter of Muskies Inc., Moline Conservation Club, Quad City In-Fisherman, and the Rock Island Conservation Club.

The QCCA owns and operates the QCCA Expo Center. Monies raised through Expo Center events help fund conservation activities within a 90-mile radius of the Quad-Cities.

The alliance provides a mechanism for achieving the aims of protecting, preserving, and enhancing the natural resources and the quality of life in the Quad City area through joint action. It has invested more than $1.2 million in Quad-City conservation activities since 1984.

More information: Call the Expo Center at 309-788-5912.


Article source: http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/ideas-bloom-at-qcca-flower-garden-show/article_9ff6040d-7575-51f9-a92e-e7104cff3f23.html

Home, garden show remains water-aware

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The drought hasn’t been forgotten at the 25th annual Ventura County Home, Garden RV Show at the Ventura County Fairgrounds. Water-conserving landscaping still plays a major role in the event that runs through Sunday.

The rains may have come, but this weekend’s home and garden show in Ventura is still emphasizing the importance of saving water by featuring water-resistant plants, drought-tolerant landscaping and more — and the county’s top master gardener couldn’t be happier.

“We are still in a drought and need to conserve water,” said Leah Haynes, who coordinates the Ventura County Master Gardeners program.

The gardeners are among this year’s vendors at the 25th annual Ventura County Spring Home Garden RV Show, which takes place through Sunday at the Ventura County Fairgrounds.

They’ll be available to answer garden-related questions and talk about saving water in the home landscape, Haynes said. And if people want to see examples of their work, the experts have created five water-wise gardens near the frontage road of the Goebel Adult Community Center in Thousand Oaks, in partnership with the Conejo Recreation and Park District, Calleguas Municipal Water District and city of Thousand Oaks.

Other vendors at the show are showcasing artificial turf and other products and services that can help save water, said Robert Pegos, operations manager of the show, which is produced by Capital Showcase.

“The Department of Water Resources has three booths at the show, and they talk about drought-tolerant landscaping,” Pegos said.

He urged people to take advantage of the resources offered at the show.

“Nowadays, so many people can go on the internet and look for what they want,” he said. “But here, you’re face-to-face with experts, and you can ask them questions. All of them offer something special, and they’re here to help.”

The California Department of Water Resources has a display that uses real plants to create a front-yard garden — something local residents can use as a blueprint for their own yard.


Fairy Gardens: the latest in landscapes

Whenever Marla Toncray posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://www.maysville-online.com/lifestyles/fairy-gardens-the-latest-in-landscapes/article_bb3873fc-d596-59d2-a5a2-2bb9eb54253d.html

Gardening column: Tips for selecting a professional pest control service – Florida Times


See Also


Folks new to Florida quickly discover that our climate is ideal for many insect pests and plant diseases. Plant pathologists often joke that they move to Florida to study plant diseases because of the warm humid climate and then move back to the Northwest in retirement where there are less disease issues. The same can be said of entomologists, who have a full plate trying to keep up with managing our many pest problems plus the new ones arriving from other countries on a regular basis.

Many homeowners are simply overwhelmed at having to manage a landscape and home pest problems. Others desire a pristine landscape free of weeds, pests and diseases but don’t want to handle chemicals themselves. Those of us that have lived here for a while realize that there is no such thing as a pristine landscape and the idea that your home will be completely free of pests is also unrealistic. But for those who don’t have the time or desire to manage these issues, there are lots of options for hiring pest control services. In addition, there are pests like termites and bedbugs that homeowners should not tackle themselves. Before signing on the dotted line, do a little research to find out information about the company and what services they provide.

The Extension Service is often asked to make recommendations for a pest control or a lawn care company, and that is one thing we don’t do. However, we can advise homeowners how to make educated decisions. When selecting a service, the two biggest factors to look at are the effectiveness of their program and their customer service. I always suggest that a homeowner should check their neighbor’s lawn/landscape and find the ones they like. Ask them if they have a pest control company, how long they have maintained their property, and if they are happy with their services. A referral from a happy client is one of the best ways to select a company. You might also ask about other experiences they encountered where a company did not meet their expectations.

If you have family members that are sensitive to chemicals, this needs to be discussed with the company up front. Can the company provide services using a more organic approach? Some pest control companies offer an Integrated Pest Management approach that uses pesticides as a last resort. This approach will be more expensive because it will likely require more trips to the property.

It’s a good idea to get bids from several companies. Compare the number of trips the company plans to make over the course of a year and what services they will provide. If they have to make an additional visit to control a problem, is there an additional charge? Did they measure the square footage of your lawn/landscape area and is that number accurate? This will determine how much fertilizer and/or pesticide is applied so it’s important that the number is accurate.

Ask the company for references from other clients so you can drive by and inspect their landscape. You can also check with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), which publishes a quarterly report of companies cited for disciplinary actions.

Ask for the pesticide license number of the business or person; pesticide and fertilizer applicators must be certified and licensed. To verify, you can call FDACS at (850) 617-7997 or search online at app1.flaes.org/ceu. Also ask if the business has a certificate of insurance. By law, commercial pesticide applicators must have either insurance or a surety bond.

It’s important that the company belongs to professional associations so they keep up with the latest research involving pest/landscape management. Sometimes, the association names will be posted on their vehicles or included on their letterhead. The key ones in Florida are the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association, Florida Pest Management Association, and the Certified Pest Control Operators of Florida. UF/IFAS Extension also offers certifications in Best Management Practices and continuing education credits required for pesticide applicators.

When looking at the contract, make sure the name and the address of the company is included and that you understand the terms of the contract; if not, ask questions. It is very important to be an informed consumer. Is the contract for a specific time frame, like one year, or continuous until you decide to discontinue? Are there penalties if you decide to cancel the contract? Make sure you read it from start to finish, including the fine print.

Termite service agreements are always a little confusing. There are retreatment service agreements, meaning that if termites are found, the company will come back and retreat your property. They are not responsible for any damage caused by the termites. Other service agreements include both retreatment and damage replacement but there is typically a limit on the amount. Obviously the retreat and repair service agreement is preferred because the company has more of a vested interest in your property. Are Formosan or drywood termites included in the contract? Will they not honor your contract if they have noted that the landscaping or mulch is too close to the structure during termite inspections? All of these questions should be clarified before signing.

Does the company have a good rapport with their customers? Are they receptive when you call and respond to questions regarding your concerns? This may not be obvious until you are under a service agreement with the company but it would be a good idea to get a handle on this before you make your selection.

If a pest control or lawn care company is taking over your property to resurrect your lawn, don’t expect a miracle. It may take up to a year to turn a property around, and that also depends on you. If you are responsible for irrigation and mowing, make sure you are following recommended practices. Pest control companies will often let you know they are coming the next day to make a treatment. They will also leave information regarding the treatment along with what you should do following the treatment. You may need to irrigate for the treatment to be effective or avoid mowing for several days so a herbicide will be taken up by the plant. Unless they have total control of your landscape (mowing, irrigation, fertilization, pest control service), this is a team effort. Again, be an educated consumer and be observant of your home and landscape. The sooner that you can report a problem to the company, the easier it will be to correct.

For more information on selecting a professional pest control service, go to: edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi075 and edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg237.

Terry Brite DelValle is a horticulture extension agent with the Duval County Extension Service and the University of Florida/IFAS.

Article source: http://jacksonville.com/entertainment/home-and-garden/2017-03-18/gardening-column-tips-selecting-professional-pest-control

Gardening column: Tips for selecting a professional pest control … – Florida Times


See Also


Folks new to Florida quickly discover that our climate is ideal for many insect pests and plant diseases. Plant pathologists often joke that they move to Florida to study plant diseases because of the warm humid climate and then move back to the Northwest in retirement where there are less disease issues. The same can be said of entomologists, who have a full plate trying to keep up with managing our many pest problems plus the new ones arriving from other countries on a regular basis.

Many homeowners are simply overwhelmed at having to manage a landscape and home pest problems. Others desire a pristine landscape free of weeds, pests and diseases but don’t want to handle chemicals themselves. Those of us that have lived here for a while realize that there is no such thing as a pristine landscape and the idea that your home will be completely free of pests is also unrealistic. But for those who don’t have the time or desire to manage these issues, there are lots of options for hiring pest control services. In addition, there are pests like termites and bedbugs that homeowners should not tackle themselves. Before signing on the dotted line, do a little research to find out information about the company and what services they provide.

The Extension Service is often asked to make recommendations for a pest control or a lawn care company, and that is one thing we don’t do. However, we can advise homeowners how to make educated decisions. When selecting a service, the two biggest factors to look at are the effectiveness of their program and their customer service. I always suggest that a homeowner should check their neighbor’s lawn/landscape and find the ones they like. Ask them if they have a pest control company, how long they have maintained their property, and if they are happy with their services. A referral from a happy client is one of the best ways to select a company. You might also ask about other experiences they encountered where a company did not meet their expectations.

If you have family members that are sensitive to chemicals, this needs to be discussed with the company up front. Can the company provide services using a more organic approach? Some pest control companies offer an Integrated Pest Management approach that uses pesticides as a last resort. This approach will be more expensive because it will likely require more trips to the property.

It’s a good idea to get bids from several companies. Compare the number of trips the company plans to make over the course of a year and what services they will provide. If they have to make an additional visit to control a problem, is there an additional charge? Did they measure the square footage of your lawn/landscape area and is that number accurate? This will determine how much fertilizer and/or pesticide is applied so it’s important that the number is accurate.

Ask the company for references from other clients so you can drive by and inspect their landscape. You can also check with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), which publishes a quarterly report of companies cited for disciplinary actions.

Ask for the pesticide license number of the business or person; pesticide and fertilizer applicators must be certified and licensed. To verify, you can call FDACS at (850) 617-7997 or search online at app1.flaes.org/ceu. Also ask if the business has a certificate of insurance. By law, commercial pesticide applicators must have either insurance or a surety bond.

It’s important that the company belongs to professional associations so they keep up with the latest research involving pest/landscape management. Sometimes, the association names will be posted on their vehicles or included on their letterhead. The key ones in Florida are the Florida Nursery, Growers and Landscape Association, Florida Pest Management Association, and the Certified Pest Control Operators of Florida. UF/IFAS Extension also offers certifications in Best Management Practices and continuing education credits required for pesticide applicators.

When looking at the contract, make sure the name and the address of the company is included and that you understand the terms of the contract; if not, ask questions. It is very important to be an informed consumer. Is the contract for a specific time frame, like one year, or continuous until you decide to discontinue? Are there penalties if you decide to cancel the contract? Make sure you read it from start to finish, including the fine print.

Termite service agreements are always a little confusing. There are retreatment service agreements, meaning that if termites are found, the company will come back and retreat your property. They are not responsible for any damage caused by the termites. Other service agreements include both retreatment and damage replacement but there is typically a limit on the amount. Obviously the retreat and repair service agreement is preferred because the company has more of a vested interest in your property. Are Formosan or drywood termites included in the contract? Will they not honor your contract if they have noted that the landscaping or mulch is too close to the structure during termite inspections? All of these questions should be clarified before signing.

Does the company have a good rapport with their customers? Are they receptive when you call and respond to questions regarding your concerns? This may not be obvious until you are under a service agreement with the company but it would be a good idea to get a handle on this before you make your selection.

If a pest control or lawn care company is taking over your property to resurrect your lawn, don’t expect a miracle. It may take up to a year to turn a property around, and that also depends on you. If you are responsible for irrigation and mowing, make sure you are following recommended practices. Pest control companies will often let you know they are coming the next day to make a treatment. They will also leave information regarding the treatment along with what you should do following the treatment. You may need to irrigate for the treatment to be effective or avoid mowing for several days so a herbicide will be taken up by the plant. Unless they have total control of your landscape (mowing, irrigation, fertilization, pest control service), this is a team effort. Again, be an educated consumer and be observant of your home and landscape. The sooner that you can report a problem to the company, the easier it will be to correct.

For more information on selecting a professional pest control service, go to: edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pi075 and edis.ifas.ufl.edu/mg237.

Terry Brite DelValle is a horticulture extension agent with the Duval County Extension Service and the University of Florida/IFAS.

Article source: http://jacksonville.com/entertainment/home-and-garden/2017-03-18/gardening-column-tips-selecting-professional-pest-control

Tips for Good Luck With Your Garden | Iowa Public Radio

On this St. Patrick’s Day, the Hort Gang discusses some holiday-specific greenery. Associate Professor in the Department of Horticulture at Iowa State University Cindy Haynes says that contrary to the common belief that shamrocks and clovers are indistinguishable, they actually come from two different plant families and often live in two different environments. Clovers are described as adaptable, resilient, and are often found in people’s yards.

“There’s a real resurgence in clovers because they are a good cover crop outdoors, so there might be some that you could try to seed and have indoors for blooms for a short time. I don’ think it would make for a long-lived house plant but you might be able to keep it long enough just so that it blooms because there are some beautiful red, white, and pink blooming clovers out there.”

On maintaining and taking care of shamrocks, Haynes has more advice. 

“Shamrocks are plants that do well indoors next to a window. Usually, they need a little bit of a sunny window … Sometimes they’ll go through a bit of a rest period in the summer when it starts to get hot. Some people will take them outside in the summer and put them in a shady location and they’ll manage to continue to grow for a while. But they do need to go through this less vigorous growth period and may even go dormant … Let them rest for a couple of months, and then they usually come right back and you can start this whole process again.”

On this Talk of Iowa, guest-host Jason Burns talks with Haynes and Richard Jauron, ISU Extension Horticulturist. They discuss tips for spring planting and answer listener questions.

Article source: http://iowapublicradio.org/post/tips-good-luck-your-garden

Tips for Good Luck With Your Garden

On this St. Patrick’s Day, the Hort Gang discusses some holiday-specific greenery. Associate Professor in the Department of Horticulture at Iowa State University Cindy Haynes says that contrary to the common belief that shamrocks and clovers are indistinguishable, they actually come from two different plant families and often live in two different environments. Clovers are described as adaptable, resilient, and are often found in people’s yards.

“There’s a real resurgence in clovers because they are a good cover crop outdoors, so there might be some that you could try to seed and have indoors for blooms for a short time. I don’ think it would make for a long-lived house plant but you might be able to keep it long enough just so that it blooms because there are some beautiful red, white, and pink blooming clovers out there.”

On maintaining and taking care of shamrocks, Haynes has more advice. 

“Shamrocks are plants that do well indoors next to a window. Usually, they need a little bit of a sunny window … Sometimes they’ll go through a bit of a rest period in the summer when it starts to get hot. Some people will take them outside in the summer and put them in a shady location and they’ll manage to continue to grow for a while. But they do need to go through this less vigorous growth period and may even go dormant … Let them rest for a couple of months, and then they usually come right back and you can start this whole process again.”

On this Talk of Iowa, guest-host Jason Burns talks with Haynes and Richard Jauron, ISU Extension Horticulturist. They discuss tips for spring planting and answer listener questions.

Article source: http://iowapublicradio.org/post/tips-good-luck-your-garden