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Archives for March 16, 2017

The art of shakkei or ‘borrowed scenery’

Are you lucky enough to have a stunning view of a natural landscape from your garden? Perhaps you have a vista of a mountain or a mountain range. Or maybe you look out over a lake, a pond or a stream or across a meadow. Then again, on the opposite end of the gardening spectrum, do you live in an urban area where the line of sight from your little piece of paradise features a city skyline or the architecture of a standout skyscraper?

If you are fortunate enough to have a view that speaks to you, there’s an ancient technique you can use to make that distant landscape a part of your garden. It’s called shakkei.

“The literal meaning of shakkei is ‘borrowed scenery’ or ‘borrowed landscape,'” said Ayse Pogue, the senior horticulturist for the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden at the Chicago Botanical Garden. “This is a technique where distant views are incorporated into the garden setting and become part of the design.

“Basically, when the designer captures this landscape and makes it part of the design, it remains alive, as when before it was captured. That means what is being captured is not something that is going to be easily changed.” Mount Fuji is an example of a borrowed landscape feature that Japanese designers frame in Tokyo gardens, she said.

The history of shakkei

Shakkei is an ancient concept that was used in Japan long before anyone gave it a name. Bringing distant landscapes into gardens, for example, was practiced in Japanese gardens as early as the Heian period (794-1185 A.D.) when the Japanese court moved the country’s capital to what is now Kyoto. It was also practiced during the Kamakura period from 1336-1558, Pogue said.

The Chinese appear to be the first to have given the term a name, calling it shakkei in the 17th century. In Japan, during the 19th century, Japanese garden designers, appropriately enough, essentially borrowed the term from the Chinese, calling it ikedori, which Pogue said means “capturing alive.” As the practice continued in succeeding generations it became this whole concept of shakkei gardening, she said.

Some of the best examples of shakkei gardening are in Japan’s imperial capital of Kyoto, explained Pogue, who won a scholarship to study Japanese gardens last fall at the Japanese Garden Intensive Seminar offered by the Research Center for Japanese Garden Art Historical Heritage. Spending two weeks in Kyoto, Pogue visited gardens and temples that featured shakkei design, several of which she described as “impressive and transformative” in a blog about the trip.

“The gardens for the rich and the ruling classes were all up in the foothills where you have wonderful views of the mountains and the landscape is gorgeous,” she said in explaining the history of Kyoto’s gardens. In the city, as it grew, it was different. “Kyoto was an expanding city, the population was growing and the size of these gardens and the available views began to shrink because of all the buildings. So, it fell onto the gardeners to make the best of the views that remained. By carefully designing these gardens they tried to shut out the surrounding buildings and let in the views that were still beautiful. They also tried in that way to make the gardens not only look larger but make them feel like they were in the country because of the views of the mountains and waterfalls and things like that.”

Four basic elements of shakkei design

Senganen Garden in Japan emphasizes Sakurajima as part of its landscape.
The very top of Sakurajima, an active volcano, is visible as part of Senganen Garden’s design. (Photo: Kimon Berlin/flickr)

The shakkei concept of letting views into the garden to give the garden a natural continuity with distant landscapes, while screening out undesirable views, has four essential elements, Pogue said.

First, this type of technique can be used in a lot of gardens, she said. “It could be a stone and gravel garden or it could be a natural landscape garden or a stroll garden like the one we have at the Chicago Botanical Garden.”

Second is the borrowed scenery, what the designer is trying to capture alive. “The most common features are mountains, hills, waterfalls, lakes, and forests,” Pogue said. In Kyoto where the technique originated in Japan, it is usually Mount Hiei, although there are many other hills commonly framed through vantage points in various gardens.

Several gardens that Pogue visited in Kyoto that offer stunning views of Mount Hiei include the Entsuji temple gardens, which Pogue called “one of the best examples of the shakkei technique,” and the zen rock garden at the Shoden-ji Temple in the city’s northern mountains.

Another garden she saw in the very southern part of Japan that also uses shakkei is Senganen Garden. It has a borrowed view of Kagoshima Bay and Sakurajima (above), one of Japan’s most active volcanoes, which sits in the middle of the bay.

In Tokyo, Mount Fuji is the favorite landscape to “capture alive.” It is 96 miles from Tokyo, but many gardens use Mount Fuji as the back drop and incorporate it into the garden, Pogue said. In the United States, Pogue said that on clear days the Portland Japanese Garden offers beautiful views of Mount Hood, which she likens to the view of Mount Fuji in Tokyo. “It is beautiful and amazing and absolutely a part of that garden.” Closer to home, she said the view of the Chicago Botanical Garden’s Waterfall Garden from the Malott Japanese Garden is an example of shakkei design.

But, she added, don’t think you can only use a mountain or hillside as your borrowed scenery. “You can also use marine landscapes, lakes, woods, forests and other natural elements.”

Mount Fuji from the Kawaguchiko Music Forest
Mount Fuji, framed here at the Kawaguchiko Music Forest in Kawaguchi, is a popular bit of natural landscape to borrow. (Photo: Cliffano Subagio/flickr)

Manmade objects can also become the focal point of borrowed scenery. “For example,” Pogue said, “there is a garden in Kyoto called Shinshin-an that incorporates the view of the triple gate and the bell tower of the Nanzen-ji temple.” Like mountains and hillsides, the framed view meets the critical shakkei criteria that the borrowed scenery must “always be there.”

A third aspect of the shakkei concept is mikiri, said Pogue, explaining that in Japanese this means trimming. “This is basically how the gardener limits the borrowed landscape to the features that he or she wants to show in the garden and to conceal or limit the features that are not necessary or are undesirable. The designer kind of carefully screens the views they don’t want to be part of the garden design and opens the views they want to bring in from the distant landscape. In Japan, they use clay walls, usually with tiles on top or on the edges, or a natural elevation such as a hill in the garden itself. This way the designer is precisely controlling what the viewer should see.”

A fourth element that is very important is the linking of the borrowed scenery with the foreground of the garden. “There is the scenery in the distance and the garden itself, but they somehow have to be tied together so there is a continuity,” Pogue said. “The designer does that by placing intermediary objects in the garden. These could be an arrangement of rocks, trees or an architectural element such as a stone lantern to guide the eye towards wherever the designer wants it to go. Or, it could be a building. When this is done carefully, artfully, craft-fully the distant scenery is brought closer and the garden becomes one integrated vista.”

How to apply this technique to a home garden

A path of colorful hydrangea leads to a rural house
It not be a natural part of the landscape, but your house can be an easy focal point for your garden. (Photo: Theo Snijder/Shutterstock)

So, how does a home gardener apply this ancient Asian technique to a 21st century American landscape? “The first thing I would say is to look at a lot of pictures,” said Pogue. “That’s because this is very conceptual. Sometimes it can be hard to understand what it means and it can be confusing. But when you look at these pictures and you see the top of Mount Fuji and you’re viewing it in between the trunks of trees carefully placed in the garden, it makes a lot sense.

If someone wanted to apply this in their own garden, Pogue said a feature they might want to highlight would be a group of trees or even a single tree in a neighboring yard. They could do this she suggested by using plant materials or hardscapes as a frame.

“If you look at the pictures, you will often see that there will be a short wall and then behind it this amazing majestic mountain,” she said. Or, instead of a wall, you could use a hedge. Be aware, though, that the Japanese do not use hedges like Western gardeners.

“In Japan they usually use two or three different kinds of plants in a hedge,” said Pogue. That’s because the Japanese believe if you just use one plant that it absorbs your eye, she explained. “But, if you mix several plants, the hedge doesn’t absorb your eye as much because there are different textures in it, and your eye will go beyond the hedge and look at the view beyond.”

And that, after all is the intent — as much now in suburban or rural America as in ancient Japan.

Recommended reading

Pogue recommends these books for those who want to know more about shakkei garden design:

  • “Space and illusion in the Japanese Garden” by Teiji Itoh
  • “Creating Japanese Gardens” by Philip Cave
  • “A Japanese Touch for Your Garden” by Kiyoshi Seike, Masanobu Kudo and David H. Engel


A container rock garden with purple flowers


Nighttime flower bloom


Surreal landscapes

Article source: http://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/art-shakkei-or-borrowed-scenery

Treasure Valley gardening events | Idaho Statesman

Wednesday, March 15

Terrariums/Fairy Gardens: 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Marianne, our custom potting expert, will teach the class on making a mini garden. $30, includes container, soil, plants and natural embellishments. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Thursday, March 16

Tree pruning: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Dennis Matlock, city arborist. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Saturday, March 18

Eat Your Leafy Greens Containers: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Doreen, our head grower, will show how to plant up a leafy greens salad bowl in this edible growing class. $25, includes materials. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Gardens to Dine For: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Designing gardens for entertaining and relaxing. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Tuesday, March 21

Herb Gardening: 7 to 9 p.m. at Boise Library Collister branch, 4724 W. State St. Explore the ins and outs of herb gardening with a local gardening expert. Free. 972-8320.

Wednesday, March 22

Tree selection and planting: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Ryan Rodgers, city arborist and nursery specialist with the Laura Moore Cunningham Arboretum. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Horse Pasture Management: 6:30 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Start the grazing season out right by finding out how you can make your pastures more productive and control weeds with a least toxic approach. Join Alayne Blickle, Horses for Clean Water, U of I master gardener, to learn the basics of how to become a “grass farmer” including the types of pasture grasses to plant for horses, how grasses grow, rotational grazing, small farm equipment, spreading compost, creating sacrifice areas, least-toxic weed control, and effective irrigation. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Friday-Sunday, March 24-26

Boise Flower and Garden Show: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St. Shop for the latest in landscape design, garden art and decor, yard furniture, plants, decks, greenhouse, more. Also, display gardens, seminars, orchid and bonsai displays, wine nights, a silent auction. $8 general, $3 children 12-17, free for under 12. gardenshowboise.com.

Saturday, March 25

Bountiful Berries: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Tom Elias, founding member of the Snake River Table Grape Growers Association, will introduce some of the best berry varieties for our area. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Wednesday, March 29

Tree problems: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Debbie Cook, city arborist. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Saturday, April 1

Table Grapes: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Tom Elias, founding member of the Snake River Table Grape Growers Association, presents a class on planting, training, and pruning grapes. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Orchid Basics: 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Janet Crist, member of Treasure Valley Orchid Society and American Orchid Society, will introduce you to the rewarding pastime of growing these extraordinary plants with an emphasis on how to encourage them to bloom year after year. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Wednesday, April 5

Lawn and irrigation: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Dave Beck, who is responsible for the care and maintenance of more than 300 acres of turf in city parks. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Small Footprint Gardens: 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Get ideas for gardening or landscaping a small space. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Saturday, April 8

Welcome to Boise Gardening: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Doreen will take you down the path of basic tips for successful planting and growing in our climate and soil. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Kick off Your Outdoor Pantry: Cool Season Veggies: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Get your garden, tools, timing and tricks you need to start your spring veggie garden early and maximize your success with edibles. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Raised Bed Gardening: 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Tamara Micone, U of I advanced master gardener, will discuss topics of soil choices, watering, planting for increased yield, and how to clean up at the end of season so the bed is prepped for the next growing season. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Tuesday, April 11

Get Outside: Landscaping with Native Plants: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Library Hillcrest branch, 5246 W. Overland Road. Get inspiration and tips for landscaping with native plants from Ann DeBolt, member of the Idaho Native Plant Society and botanist at the Idaho Botanical Garden. Free. 972-8340.

Wednesday, April 12

Landscape Design: 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Introduction to design of gardens and outdoor living spaces. Learn the basic principles of landscape design — form, function, flow, aesthetics — and apply those principles to the process of designing a new outdoor garden room. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Roses and landscape: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Andrea Wurtz, master gardener and certified landscape technician. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Saturday, April 15

Chip Carved Gourd Birdhouse Workshop: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Alan Sweeney and Duane Langworthy, Idaho Gourd Society, will help you create a unique, one-of-a-kind home for feathered friends. $40 general, $35 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Spring Wall Basket: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Bring your gloves and create a beautiful spring basket to hang on a wall, just in time for Easter. $30, includes all materials. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Building Bodacious Borders: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Techniques to design a layered flower bed with structure, color and year round interest. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Thursday, April 20

What’s Eating My Vegetable Garden: 6:30 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Class on sustainable pest management for vegetable gardens class from Sierra Laverty, IBG vegetable gardener. Learn how to: spot the difference between insect, viral, bacterial and fungal damage and diseases, identify common Treasure Valley pests, and create your sustainable management plan. $20 general, $15 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Saturday, April 22

Tomatoes: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Doreen will share her tips and secrets for healthy plants and bountiful harvests, favorite heirloom selections, good choices for preserving and, of course, the best types for making salsa. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Earth Day Essentials: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Hey There Pollinator: How to Attract Native Pollinators; Get Xerius: Water and Firewise Gardens; Get the Mix Right: Soil Amendments; Planting Perfection: Best Practices. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Wednesday, April 26

Hypertufa Pot (Part 1 of 2): 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. In this two-part class, Rebecca Needles, of the Idaho Botanical Garden, will show how to create a Hypertufa pot. Part one of this class you will form your pot. Part two is a few weeks later, which allows your pot to cure. In part two, you get to put soil and plants in your creation. $40. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Saturday, April 29

Blueberries: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Dennis Fix, owner of FarWest, will teach how to grow blueberries in Idaho. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Raised Bed Gardening: 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Tamara Micone, U of I advanced master gardener, will discuss topics of soil choices, watering, planting for increased yield, and how to clean up at the end of season so the bed is prepped for the next growing season. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Article source: http://www.idahostatesman.com/living/home-garden/article138773173.html

Philly Flower Show highlights "Holland: Flowering the World"

This week’s Philadelphia Flower Show is the nation’s largest indoor show, and the vibrant colors and creativity will capture every gardener’s attention, even with a foot of snow on the ground. We can dream, can’t we?

This year’s theme, Holland: Flowering the World, is appropriate and somewhat surprising. This tiny country shines in its week of floral glory, and it stresses that Holland isn’t all tulips, but daffodils, roses, astilbe, etc.  Small signs boast of the Netherland‘s rich flower history, celebrating some amazing figures. The Dutch produce 4.32 billion (that’s with a B) tulip bulbs each year, some 53% of which (2.3 billion) are grown into cut flowers. The Dutch are the world’s largest exporter of seeds. Each day it sells 34.5 million flowers and 2.3 million plants and conducts 120,000 transactions. This in a country a bit bigger than Maryland.

Getting to the show is amazingly easy on Amtrak. From its Lancaster station, take the train to 30th Street Station in Philly, and then walk– always under roof– to the SEPTA station. Two stops later at Jefferson Station, you’re at the Convention Center. Cost is about $30, depending on discounts.  Gas and parking would probably cost that much, and there’s no stress of driving downtown. Show admission is $31 for adults when purchased online, for children $15. The show continues through the week, closing Sunday at 6 p.m.

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The cavernous Pennsylvania Convention Center hosts the show — it dates back to 1829– and it is expected to attract about 250,000 people this year. Tuesday’s storm prompted postponement of 200 bus trips here, but most were rescheduled for later in the week. The Amtrak and SEPTA trains never stopped, making it easy for out-of-towners to visit. And today, the show continues without a hitch.

Last year’s U.S. National Parks theme was a tough act to follow, but this year’s main entrance is remarkable. Visitors enter through a large flower-covered bridge/archway, and are immediately walking under thousands of lighted flower arrangements that hang from the ceiling. Directly in front are trademark Holland windmills. A light show covers visitors and flowers alike.

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From the extraordinary entrance, the show continues its usual excellent standards. Bikes are everywhere, decorated with flowers, lights, used as water features, in dining sets, canals. Landscaping ideas from nationally known companies, container gardening, gardening tools, books, flower arranging competitions are all here. As Pennsylvania Horticultural Society president Matt Rader points out, there is something here for everyone.

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/entertainment/arts/blogs/lifes-a-snapshot/2017/03/15/philly-flower-show-highlights-holland-flowering-the-world/99217012/

Hotel proposals lead to rezoning ideas

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Article source: http://www.hmbreview.com/news/hotel-proposals-lead-to-rezoning-ideas/article_06702836-099d-11e7-b7cd-5bb67b0b2994.html

Spring Atlanta Home Show returns March 24-26

SEMCO Productions, a Roswell-based producer of consumer and trade shows, will present the Spring Atlanta Home Show, Georgia’s largest home show, at the Cobb Galleria Centre in southeast Cobb County March 24 through 26.

The annual event will bring together over 350 experts in the home remodeling and landscaping industries to showcase the latest products and services designed to remodel, repair and refresh homes of all sizes and styles. Jeff Devlin, host of HGTV and DIY Network’s “Stone House Revival,” “I Hate my Bath” and “Good, Better, Best,” will bring his entertaining blend of know-how and good humor to the Reliable Heating Air Home Show Stage March 25 at 1 and 3 p.m., headlining a roster of exciting speakers who will appear throughout the three-day event.

The show offers attendees one-stop shopping for everything from the roof to the basement, from interiors to landscapes, as well as live radio broadcasts and presentations on a variety of subjects. One lucky attendee will win a 7 LED fixture outdoor lighting package provided by Outdoor Lighting Perspectives of Atlanta.

“The Spring Atlanta Home Show is presented in a fun, festive atmosphere where you can see new products demonstrated, ask questions, talk to the experts, comparison shop and enjoy interactive presentations by popular home and landscape professionals like Jeff Devlin,” SEMCO President Michael Schoppenhorst said in a news release. “This is Georgia’s largest home show and it features hundreds of exhibitors who can bring new life to a home by building a new addition, replacing or repairing systems and structures, creating outdoor living spaces and refreshing both interiors and exteriors including decks, kitchens and baths.

“Show attendees can drop in on a cooking demonstration, pick up product samples and schedule appointments with experts to visit their homes. Many of the exhibitors offer show specials, which can save people up to thousands of dollars if they decide to use an exhibitor’s services. The show’s exhibition space is sold out, so we will literally feature wall-to-wall products, services and information.”

The event includes three days of expert speakers on a variety of home remodeling subjects. Walter Reeves, the Georgia Gardener, will kick off the speaker roster March 24 at noon, and will return the following morning to broadcast “The Lawn Garden Show” live from the Reliable Heating Air Home Show Stage on WSB 95.5 FM and AM750, followed by a live broadcast of WSB’s “Home Fix-It Show” hosted by Dave Baker.

HGTV’s Joe Washington will take the stage March 26 to speak about landscape ideas including adaptive gardening. Additional speakers will present ideas on The New Right Plant, Critter Control, The Art of Saving Thousands on a Renovation, Outdoor Lighting and Planning for a Remodel.

A popular gathering spot will be the Backyard Beer Garden, where a team of outdoor living experts headed by Bruce Holliday of Landscape Plans Plus will be on hand to discuss services and products ranging from grass to fire pits, flowers to water features, patios, walkways and much more. Live radio shows, including Belinda Skelton’s “Atlanta Living” on WSB 95.5 FM and AM750, will broadcast from the garden. Red Hare Brewing Co. of Marietta will offer beer tastings for attendees age 21 and older, and the $5 tasting donation will benefit Hope Atlanta, the programs of Travelers Aid.

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In addition to the experts onsite at the Spring Atlanta Home Show, there will be helpful tips and information posted regularly on the show’s website and on its Facebook page.

Show hours are March 24 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., March 25 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and March 26 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.. General admission tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the show’s entrance and online. Children 12 and under and adults 65 and older (with valid ID) are admitted free. Military personnel and first responders receive a free ticket with the purchase of one general admission ticket (with valid ID). Members of Atlanta’s housing industry (Realtors, contractors, interior designers, landscapers, etc.) will be admitted for free (with business card at the show entrance) March 24, compliments of PMC Building Materials.

On-site parking is free. The centre is located at Two Galleria Pkwy., Atlanta, Ga., 30339, across from Cumberland Mall.

Article source: http://www.mdjonline.com/neighbor_newspapers/northside_sandy_springs/spring-atlanta-home-show-returns-march/article_cb2ef87c-09a3-11e7-a00c-5ba33d726d35.html

Ooltewah Nursery plans events to help with your gardening

Since 1989, Ooltewah Nursery and Landscape Co. has grown from a center with “five acres and a few dogwood trees” to a full-service garden center. In 2011, it expanded into a 11,000-square-foot center with a greater selection of landscaping choices.

Also in 2011, the nursery began a series of free community workshops. They are “designed to be informational on a broad range of topics concerning gardening, lawn care and landscaping,” said Gena and Wendell Whitener, owners.

Ooltewah Nursery and Landscape Co. has become the go-to garden center for horticultural knowledge.

Among the events planned this spring are a succulent container workshop, Kids in the Garden, Growing Blueberries and Other Fruits at Home; Straw Bale Gardening, Herb Gardening and the Farmers Market.

– The Make and Take program “Plant A Succulent Container” will be held Saturday, March 18, from 9 to 11 a.m.

Participants may plant a small container with succulents. They will have a choice of pot, soil and plants at a discounted bundle price. Sample gardens will be on display to spur creativity. The experts will assist and help answer questions. There is no preregistration needed. Individuals may drop by during the two-hour window.

– On Tuesday, March 21, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. or 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Kids in the Garden will be offered.

Youngsters will be able to join Miss Faith for an hour of gardening. The hands-on program is designed for kids ages 5 to 10.

They will get a behind-the-scenes tour of the nursery, a demonstration on plant root systems and how they work, plant a flower to take home and help plant a kids’ veggie garden. Youngsters should wear sturdy shoes and clothes they can get dirty.

– On Saturday, March 25, at 9 a.m., horticultural expert Jim Yates will use example plants from the nursery to show how easy it is to grow fruit at home. Each attendee will receive a booklet to take home and a coupon to help you get growing.

– On Thursday, March 30, at 3 p.m., and on Saturday, April 1, from 10 to 11 a.m., a session on Straw Bale Gardening will be held. Greta Basham will show how simple and inexpensive it is to grow anything in a straw bale.

The straw bale is the actual container. The outside crust of the bale serves as the container while the inside bale begins to decompose. The straw becomes conditioned and ready to plant. It creates a productive, warm, moist and nutrient-rich rooting environment for plants. Attendees will receive a full-color how-to booklet, and a discount to help you get started.

– On April 6, the nursery’s Ooltewah Farmers Market opens for the season. Local farmers and food artisans bring in fresh produce, milks, eggs, breads, mushrooms and more. The market is open from 3 to 6 p.m.

– On April 22, a make and take event will be held on planting a herb garden. Your choice of pot, soil and plants will be included at a discounted price. Sample gardens will be on display to inspire participants, while experts will also be on hand to help you. Attendees will receive a free, full-color booklet on growing herbs. No pre-registration is required. Interested individuals should drop by during the two hour window — 9 to 11 a.m.

The horticultural staff at Ooltewah Nursery is highly skilled with many holding degrees in horticulture.

Ooltewah Nursery and Landscape Co., Inc. is located at 5829 Main St. in Ooltewah. For directions, call 423-238-9775.

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www.OoltewahNursery.com

Article source: http://www.clevelandbanner.com/stories/ooltewah-nursery-plans-events-to-help-with-your-gardening,54481

Westlake’s 2017 Rain and Garden Show scheduled for new Market Square venue

WESTLAKE, Ohio – The arrival of spring has Westlake City Engineer Robert P. Kelly hoping residents think about the 2017 Rain and Garden Show, which is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 25 at the new Market Square in Crocker Park.

“It gets people thinking about being green, especially when you’re out in your yard,” Kelly said. “Everybody here in Westlake has the five-step program for fertilizer, but it washes right into our streams and retention basins, and becomes big algal blooms.

“We’re telling people to cut back on fertilizer or use organic fertilizers or build rain gardens and get yourself a rain barrel.”

The sixth annual Westlake Watershed Group-sponsored event, which boasts an unofficial theme of “Go green for Westlake, for the world,” is free and open to the public. Previously held at the Westlake Recreation Center, the Rain and Garden Show has relocated to the recently opened Market Square at Crocker Park.

More than two dozen green-friendly vendors will be on hand selling everything from rain barrels, tower gardens and landscaping supplies to native species plants. In addition, there’s a chef demo and a Kid Zone featuring Jungle Bob, face painting, a balloon clown and a recycling creations contest.

The Earth Day-like affair fulfills the city’s EPA required public education and outreach commitment.   

“The reason we do it is the unfunded federal mandate that you had to start treating your stormwater,” Kelly said. “We formed the Westlake Watershed Group to discuss outreach projects. We used to develop posters and put them around town about fertilizer getting into the creek and not washing your car and letting the soap go into the storm sewer, but we still needed more education.

“So, we started this Rain and Garden Show. Looking ahead, it’s definitely going to get bigger and expand as a free show that gives residents ideas of what to do in their yard.”

Article source: http://www.cleveland.com/westlake/index.ssf/2017/03/westlakes_2017_rain_and_garden.html

Treasure Valley gardening classes includes help in creating terrariums, fairy gardens

Wednesday, March 15

Terrariums/Fairy Gardens: 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Marianne, our custom potting expert, will teach the class on making a mini garden. $30, includes container, soil, plants and natural embellishments. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Thursday, March 16

Tree pruning: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Dennis Matlock, city arborist. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Saturday, March 18

Eat Your Leafy Greens Containers: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Doreen, our head grower, will show how to plant up a leafy greens salad bowl in this edible growing class. $25, includes materials. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Gardens to Dine For: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Designing gardens for entertaining and relaxing. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Tuesday, March 21

Herb Gardening: 7 to 9 p.m. at Boise Library Collister branch, 4724 W. State St. Explore the ins and outs of herb gardening with a local gardening expert. Free. 972-8320.

Wednesday, March 22

Tree selection and planting: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Ryan Rodgers, city arborist and nursery specialist with the Laura Moore Cunningham Arboretum. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Horse Pasture Management: 6:30 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Start the grazing season out right by finding out how you can make your pastures more productive and control weeds with a least toxic approach. Join Alayne Blickle, Horses for Clean Water, U of I master gardener, to learn the basics of how to become a “grass farmer” including the types of pasture grasses to plant for horses, how grasses grow, rotational grazing, small farm equipment, spreading compost, creating sacrifice areas, least-toxic weed control, and effective irrigation. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Friday-Sunday, March 24-26

Boise Flower and Garden Show: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St. Shop for the latest in landscape design, garden art and decor, yard furniture, plants, decks, greenhouse, more. Also, display gardens, seminars, orchid and bonsai displays, wine nights, a silent auction. $8 general, $3 children 12-17, free for under 12. gardenshowboise.com.

Saturday, March 25

Bountiful Berries: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Tom Elias, founding member of the Snake River Table Grape Growers Association, will introduce some of the best berry varieties for our area. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Wednesday, March 29

Tree problems: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Debbie Cook, city arborist. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Saturday, April 1

Table Grapes: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Tom Elias, founding member of the Snake River Table Grape Growers Association, presents a class on planting, training, and pruning grapes. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Orchid Basics: 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Janet Crist, member of Treasure Valley Orchid Society and American Orchid Society, will introduce you to the rewarding pastime of growing these extraordinary plants with an emphasis on how to encourage them to bloom year after year. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Wednesday, April 5

Lawn and irrigation: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Dave Beck, who is responsible for the care and maintenance of more than 300 acres of turf in city parks. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Small Footprint Gardens: 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Get ideas for gardening or landscaping a small space. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Saturday, April 8

Welcome to Boise Gardening: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Doreen will take you down the path of basic tips for successful planting and growing in our climate and soil. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Kick off Your Outdoor Pantry: Cool Season Veggies: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Get your garden, tools, timing and tricks you need to start your spring veggie garden early and maximize your success with edibles. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Raised Bed Gardening: 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Tamara Micone, U of I advanced master gardener, will discuss topics of soil choices, watering, planting for increased yield, and how to clean up at the end of season so the bed is prepped for the next growing season. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Tuesday, April 11

Get Outside: Landscaping with Native Plants: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Library Hillcrest branch, 5246 W. Overland Road. Get inspiration and tips for landscaping with native plants from Ann DeBolt, member of the Idaho Native Plant Society and botanist at the Idaho Botanical Garden. Free. 972-8340.

Wednesday, April 12

Landscape Design: 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Introduction to design of gardens and outdoor living spaces. Learn the basic principles of landscape design — form, function, flow, aesthetics — and apply those principles to the process of designing a new outdoor garden room. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Roses and landscape: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd. With Andrea Wurtz, master gardener and certified landscape technician. Free, but register at parks.cityofboise.org or call 608-7700.

Saturday, April 15

Chip Carved Gourd Birdhouse Workshop: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Alan Sweeney and Duane Langworthy, Idaho Gourd Society, will help you create a unique, one-of-a-kind home for feathered friends. $40 general, $35 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Spring Wall Basket: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Bring your gloves and create a beautiful spring basket to hang on a wall, just in time for Easter. $30, includes all materials. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Building Bodacious Borders: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Techniques to design a layered flower bed with structure, color and year round interest. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Thursday, April 20

What’s Eating My Vegetable Garden: 6:30 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Class on sustainable pest management for vegetable gardens class from Sierra Laverty, IBG vegetable gardener. Learn how to: spot the difference between insect, viral, bacterial and fungal damage and diseases, identify common Treasure Valley pests, and create your sustainable management plan. $20 general, $15 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Saturday, April 22

Tomatoes: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Doreen will share her tips and secrets for healthy plants and bountiful harvests, favorite heirloom selections, good choices for preserving and, of course, the best types for making salsa. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Earth Day Essentials: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Hey There Pollinator: How to Attract Native Pollinators; Get Xerius: Water and Firewise Gardens; Get the Mix Right: Soil Amendments; Planting Perfection: Best Practices. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or email info@madelinegeorge.com.

Wednesday, April 26

Hypertufa Pot (Part 1 of 2): 6 p.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. In this two-part class, Rebecca Needles, of the Idaho Botanical Garden, will show how to create a Hypertufa pot. Part one of this class you will form your pot. Part two is a few weeks later, which allows your pot to cure. In part two, you get to put soil and plants in your creation. $40. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Saturday, April 29

Blueberries: 10 a.m. at FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise. Dennis Fix, owner of FarWest, will teach how to grow blueberries in Idaho. Free. RSVP to 853-4000. farwestgardencenter.net.

Raised Bed Gardening: 1 p.m. at Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise. Tamara Micone, U of I advanced master gardener, will discuss topics of soil choices, watering, planting for increased yield, and how to clean up at the end of season so the bed is prepped for the next growing season. $17 general, $12 IBG members. Register: 343-8649.

Article source: http://www.idahostatesman.com/living/home-garden/article138773173.html

5 Tips For Spring Gardening – Story | Utah | Good4Utah


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Local Experts give Gardening Tips to Northlanders

Get Ready to Grow

FLOODWOOD, Minn. – The official start of Spring is just days away and many folks around the Northland are getting anxious to start gardening.

This morning Bob Olen, Horticulturalist and Educator for St. Louis County, stopped by FOX 21 to chat about an upcoming gardening program.

The county is hosting a seminar to give new home fruit and vegetable growing tips.

The program will be March 16, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Downtown Fair Center, 107 West 7th Avenue in Floodwood.

With a theme of “Get Ready to Grow,” this year’s program includes a session on gardening and good nutrition.

Growing fruits and vegetables is a good way to support a healthy lifestyle, but getting started can be intimidating for beginner gardeners.

The program will feature discussion on growing great blueberries, asparagus, tomatoes, squash, and sweet potatoes as well as current weather trends.

Olen, has particular expertise with blueberries, having been involved with the introduction of the original “half high” Minnesota blueberry.

The program fee is $22, and includes the new 2017 edition of Fruits for Northern Minnesota, as well as reference materials and refreshments.

More information is available online at stlouiscountymn.gov/ext or by contacting the St. Louis County Extension Office at 218–749–7120.

Article source: http://www.fox21online.com/2017/03/15/local-experts-give-gardening-tips-northlanders/