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Archives for March 14, 2017

Manon wins Kilsaran garden design competition

Manon wins Kilsaran garden design competitionManon wins Kilsaran garden design competition

At a special event in Kilsaran’s Headquarters in Dunboyne, Manon Bordet Chavanes has been announced as the Kilsaran Student Competition winner for 2017. Manon, a student of the landscape Design Academy in Dublin, will now see her garden brought to life for the Peter McVerry Trust as well as receiving a cheque for €3,000.

“I’m so happy to have won. I’m so excited to see my design being brought to life by Kilsaran for the Peter McVerry Trust. It is such an honour that someone like Diarmuid Gavin would pick me as the winner. He has won so much himself it’s amazing to be chosen by someone like that”, said the winner, Manon Bordet Chavanes.

Diarmuid Gavin and Kilsaran called on all students of Horticulture, Garden Design, Landscape Architecture and other similar courses to get involved in the competition this year. This attracted a broad and mixed list of submissions and designs. Diarmuid Gavin was the head judge on the panel and was joined by members of the Kilsaran design team when picking the winner.

Diarmuid Gavin also spoke at the event: “We’re delighted for all the finalists, especially Manon. Judging this year’s competition was so difficult. The standard is going up every year but this year was exceptional. There was very little between first and fourth. We just felt Manon’s designed would be more sustainable and timeless for the people the McVerry Trust will be helping.”

Manon’s garden design will now be brought to reality for Peter McVerry Trust at their new homeless facility currently being constructed in Kildare.

Neil Ward from the Peter McVerry Trust said: “We’re so lucky Kilsaran asked us to get involved with the competition. Manon’s design is beautiful. We can’t wait to see it brought to life for our homes in Kildare. We wanted to makes these facilities as welcoming as possible and this garden will go a long way towards that”.

For more information on Kilsaran, the competition and Peter McVerry Trust. Please follow Kilsaran on social media, www.twitter.com/Kilsaran, www.facebook.com/kilsaran.home/ and check out the website, http://www.kilsaran.ie/.

 

Manon Bordet Chavanes has been announced as the Kilsaran Student Competition winner for 2017. It was announced at a special event in Kilsaran’s Headquarters in Dunboyne, Co Meath. Manon, a student of the landscape Design Academy in Dublin, will now see her garden brought to life for the Peter McVerry Trust as well as receiving a cheque for €3000.

 

            “I’m so happy to have won. I’m so excited to see my design being brought to life by Kilsaran for the Peter McVerry Trust. It is such an honour that someone like Diarmuid Gavin would pick me as the winner. He has won so much himself it’s amazing to be chosen by someone like that”, said the winner, Manon Bordet Chavanes.

 

Diarmuid Gavin and Kilsaran called on all students of Horticulture, Garden Design, Landscape Architecture and other similar courses to get involved in the competition this year. This attracted a broad and mixed list of submissions and designs. Diarmuid Gavin was the head judge on the panel and was joined by members of the Kilsaran design team when picking the winner.

 

Diarmuid Gavin also spoke at the event, “We’re delighted for all the finalists, especially Manon. Judging this year’s competition was so difficult. The standard is going up every year but this year was exceptional. There was very little between first and fourth. We just felt Manon’s designed would be more sustainable and timeless for the people the McVerry Trust will be helping.”

 

Manon’s garden design will now be brought to reality for Peter McVerry Trust at their new homeless facility currently being constructed in Kildare.

 

            Neil Ward from the Peter McVerry Trust said, “we’re so lucky Kilsaran asked us to get involved with the competition. Manon’s design is beautiful. We can’t wait to see it brought to life for our homes in Kildare. We wanted to makes these facilities as welcoming as possible and this garden will go a long way towards that”.

 

For more information on Kilsaran, the competition and Peter McVerry Trust. Please follow Kilsaran on social media, www.twitter.com/Kilsaran, www.facebook.com/kilsaran.home/ and check out the website, http://www.kilsaran.ie/.

 

END

Article source: http://www.meathchronicle.ie/news/roundup/articles/2017/03/10/4136455-manon-wins-kilsaran-garden-design-competition/

Proportion and placement and scale are keys to great landscaping

This is a story about lines and circles and proportion and placement and scale. It’s a story about landscaping, and it’s going to be pertinent to your own Texas landscape. It’s going to be fact-filled and fast-paced. Let’s go!

Landscapes are the “frames” to the artwork “your house.” They should complement that art, not draw attention away from it.

Landscapes reflect our personal tastes, so while there are guidelines and suggestions, no one is entirely right or completely wrong with any garden design. It needs to be a fit for your life and your loves.

“Simple” is always a great starting point. Complicated designs often get wacky and end up being detriments to the houses they attend.

“Natural” can be a good thing, but it does demand an accurate understanding of the word. Think of a lush forested meadow with pretty flowers and ankle-deep green grass. Picture your house there. That’s “natural,” and that’s a pretty good mindset to follow. When I mention “natural” to my wife, though, she starts talking about old wagon wheels, cow skulls, yuccas and brown ornamental grasses. That’s not what I’m talking about. (I married a music major. I can’t sing, and she can’t landscape. Perfect match.)

Long, straight rows of plants can be really boring. If that’s all you want, build boxes out of plywood and paint them green. You won’t have to water or feed them, and they’ll never need pruning. Same thing when you plant some kind of privacy screen along the side of a property. If it’s in a straight row it’s going to make you look like your house is pushed into a mail slot.

Clusters, sweeps and groupings work a lot better. Stick with odd numbers. For some reason they’re more restful visually. Use triangles of eastern red cedars for privacy in a large suburban lot, and space them 18 to 22 feet apart (varying the distances) so they look like a natural grove. If you need a longer screen, plant seven or nine, but keep zig-zagging the row so it won’t look like a straight line.

For beds in front of your house (my trick I’ve written about in the Star Telegram for 40 years), use a supple garden hose on one of these warm spring days and lay that hose where you want your bed edging to be. Have somebody stand on the far end of the hose to secure it while you lay it in place. Sometimes you just pick the hose up and give it a gentle whirl for a fresh start. Your goal will be a long and gentle sweep that runs entirely across the front of your house – all the way from the left corner to the right corner. You even lay the hose across the sidewalk, letting it emerge from the two sides at slightly different distances from the front door.

Try it! It works. And if you don’t like the results, you just lay the hose out again. When you’re satisfied, leave the hose in place while you carefully spray all the existing vegetation with a glyphosate-only herbicide to kill the lawngrass and weeds you don’t want in the bed. You’ll be able to work the soil and plant the bed within just a couple of weeks.

This would be a good time to introduce the concept of scale and proportion. The beds you design and the plants you put in them should be in keeping with the size of your home.

Think about that artwork and picture frame. If you wanted to have a lovely large painting framed to hang behind your massive sofa, you probably wouldn’t settle for a 3/4-inch lightweight frame. You’d say something like, “That’s not in scale.” Yet I see a lot of two-story houses with the equivalent: 3-foot beds drawn tightly around them. Most landscape beds should be a minimum of 4 feet deep, but they should flare out to 6 and even 10 feet at corners. That gives you ample working room for your garden design.

Enter “the plants.” These will be the stars of the garden, and how well they help frame your lovely home will depend on how carefully you choose them. Know how tall and wide they will grow. Choose plants that will fit the spaces you have available for them. Be mindful of window heights, and plant carefully near walks and entries where routine pruning might be needed to keep access open.

Plain green plants are usually most natural. The farther you depart from basic green, the more chance you’re taking that your landscape (remember that picture frame) is going to hog the viewers’ eyes when they look at your home.

Golden variegated plants may look like they need iron, so use them with restraint in this Blackland clay area where we see too much iron chlorosis anyway. Red-leafed plants are rather dramatic, but handsome. Use them for accents. White variegated plants are refreshing, especially when used in front of dark green foliage. Many white variegated plants don’t handle full summer sun very well, so be a bit cautious. Gray plants are striking, but use them with great respect. Too many gray plants and your landscape can look cold and uninviting.

Textures are the overlooked variable. As you’re choosing plants for the design, include some with small leaves and airy textures, and let them contrast with plants with bolder foliage and tough-as-nails appearances.

That’s it. They tell me that’s all I can write for this visit, but I’ll have more suggestions another time. Garden design, after all, is a lot like good baseball — there’s a lot more going on that the casual observer will realize.

Happy landscaping!

Article source: http://www.star-telegram.com/living/home-garden/neil-sperry/article138346143.html

Tiny homes popular at Stark County Home and Garden Show …

Whatever it is you are looking for, the Stark County Home and Garden Show is the place to look.

“Oh yes,” said Evelyn Philpott of Navarre Village Mobile Home Park. “‘If you have an idea of what you want to do, inside or outside your home, this is the place to be.”

The Canton Repository and Building Industry Association’s 66th annual show continues through Sunday. It’s open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. today, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

By noon on Friday’s opening day, lines were forming at the Tiny Houses on display. The homes, both built by Olde Wood, are timber frame homes.

“I love them,” said Sue Bolling of Canton. “These remind me of the house I grew up in, in Virginia, only we didn’t have bathrooms! We had to go outside.”

Visiting the show with her husband, Emory, he said he is a big fan of the old wood with which the homes were built.

“It is not livable,” said Carol Carson of East Canton, of the 160-square-foot home. “There is no kitchen in there. If it was a little bigger it would be more complete.”

Mandy Sancic, co-owner of the home, refers to the small structure as a woman’s retreat, which explains why there is no kitchen.

However, the 200-square-foot tiny home across the way in the hall has more of a kitchen. It is only missing the stove.

As popular were the landscapers, this year inside the main exhibition hall. Crowds gathered around each of the beautifully designed areas. Displaying their works of art this year were Lady Bug Garden Center; Country View Landscaping; Classico Landscape; Mike’s Landscape; and Naturescapes.

That is what attracted Florence and Roosevelt Pettway of Lake Township to attend the show for the first time.

“The show is good,” she said. “We are still looking around. I am looking for different landscaping ideas and for kitchen ideas.”

The Stark County Home and Garden Show continues through Sunday at the Stark County Fairgrounds at 305 Wertz Ave. NW.

Reach Denise at 330-580-8321 or denise.sautters@cantonrep.com. On Twitter:@dsauttersREP

 

 

 

Article source: http://www.cantonrep.com/entertainmentlife/20170310/tiny-homes-popular-at-stark-county-home-and-garden-show

ABSOLUTELY BUSHED: Landscaping for a peaceful backyard

Ah, finally home from a hard day at work. Finally out of the traffic that is so often at a standstill. You are now away from the nagging boss, ringing telephones, the barrage of e-mails from customers. Now is your time for peace and tranquility. What better place to be than your own backyard? But wait, your backyard is plain, dull and boring. How many colors do you see? How many different kinds of plants and wild life do you see? Then you start thinking, maybe I should do something to fix up my backyard.

You are sitting and pondering about what you should do or how to do it. What if I put some flowers here, or some bushes there? I wonder what it would like if I put some big containers with grasses or tall growing flower over there? Your mind starts running wild with ideas. What’s new? What are some ideas that people have come up with that I would have never thought of? You go and buy some gardening and landscaping magazines at your local store and you see some of the most beautiful ideas.

So now you are thinking, will this idea or project work for me? Do a little research on your ideas. Say you would like a certain kind of flower. You might want to find out all about that flower so you know if it would fit into the scheme of things including the time you can and want to devote to it. For instance, if you want to plant flowers that do not require much care, check with your local greenhouse on those types of plants.

There are many themes for planting a garden. One of my favorites is an aroma garden. I love soft succulent smells and an aroma garden is one of the most therapeutic things you can do for yourself. You could create a small winding path out of brick, stone or shredded mulch and take a slow stroll and just inhale all the wonderful smells and enjoy all the wonderful sea of colors that you yourself created. You can say, “I did this all by myself.”

You can also add plants that attract butterflies, birds and other wild life for you to enjoy. These kind of plants usually require more watering than the average plant as they need to be more succulent as to nourish the butterflies and birds. You could plant a trumpet vine plant that will attract humming birds. The humming bird is the most enjoyable bird of all to admire. With their acute speed and spectacular coloring I can watch them for hours. Watching the butterflies should be the most relaxing of all. They are so graceful and colorful too. And with all the studies that are out today, colors and smells can do so much for your mental psyche.

The sound of running water has it calming quality also. You could set up a fountain. If you have a large enough area you could set up a pond with a fountain in the middle or you could create a small stream created with rocks so you have the sound of rushing water. If you have a pond you could add frogs or Koi fish. If you enjoy wildlife having water available at all times will bring them in. Not only for your personal enjoyment, but also for the benefit of the animals.

This is just a few ideas of the multitude of ideas out there. After you have done some research like we do for our clients, you will be amazed at all the different tips, tricks and ideas that you have to choose from. Got ahead be a little daring. Think of your garden as nature’s canvas and you are the painter. Play with it. Mix and match colors. If you don’t like something you can always re-plant it next year if you are not happy with the plants that you have chosen.

Remember one thing before you get started — design around your lifestyle. If you are constantly on the go then keep things simple that require minimal maintenance. If you have a little extra time and enjoy gardening or find it somewhat therapeutic then you may want to include a few higher maintenance things in your game plan. And when all else fails, you can always call a pro to help you out or at least steer you in the right direction.

Question: Jimmie, I enjoy your column and web site and have learned a lot. I have a huge perennial garden and was wondering how you add compost, fertilizer, black dirt, etc when the plants are so close together and I can’t work the soil for fear of disturbing the plants. Thanks for your time, Pam K. in Prosper.

Answer: Hi Pam, Late winter/early spring is a great time to do this as the plants have died back to the ground and you don’t have branches/leaves to contend with. Mix aged manure/compost (I really like the Back to Earth compost brand available in most high-end nurseries) into the top portion of the soil, not disturbing the root systems. You can also follow with some mulch at this time to keep the weed populations down. Early spring (just before your perennials begin to leaf out) is good to begin with a first application of fertilizer (especially if not adding in aged manure/compost mixture). A mild 5/10/5 slow release fertilizer applied in a ring around each plant with an additional two applications at six-week intervals. Late bloomers will need an additional application in late summer. Broadcasting the fertilizer will also work as long as it doesn’t land on any leaves or in buds. Be sure to always water after fertilizing.

Until next time… Happy Gardening!

Jimmie

Send your landscaping and gardening questions to Jimmie Gibson Jr. at http://www.absolutelybushedlandscaping.com or in care of the Prosper Press at mwilcox@prosperpressnews.com. Jimmie is the owner of Absolutely Bushed Landscaping Company. He is a resident in Prosper. His landscaping and gardening column runs every other week in the Prosper Press.

Article source: http://www.yourvalleyvoice.com/opinion/20170313/landscaping-for-peaceful-backyard

Can new lab space in Palm Beach Gardens keep Scripps spinoffs in town?

Marino said if the biotech companies don’t come fast enough, the developer still has light industrial space to rely on. In 2008, city officials approved a 37,834-square-foot building for light industrial use with offices, plus a 5,167-square-foot professional office building at the Business Center at the Gardens, according to city documents.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/local/can-new-lab-space-palm-beach-gardens-keep-scripps-spinoffs-town/FLYgMdb2Ye58iGxHSA4azJ/

Beautiful citizen gardens make RVA happier, safer – why not celebrate them?

RICHMOND, Va. — To paraphrase a friend with a very green thumb, it’s harder to be a criminal in a city that’s pretty.

Police officials often talk about how broken windows and vacant buildings lure criminals.

Beautiful gardens and landscaping does the opposite. It brings out the good in people.

All around Richmond there are people who not only design and maintain sweet yard gardens, they take over medians and right-of-ways, beautifying them with plantings, making them grow flowers or vegetables to share.

They do it because they know they’re also growing their neighborhoods, transforming them, shifting the feng shui to a healthier, safer mood.

“Probably this bed, maybe about 20 years,” Michelle Banalett said when I asked her how long her garden has grown in the divided median in 3900 block of Fauquier Avenue in a nice northwest section of Richmond.

“It started out as a tomato and marigold patch and just kind of grew from there,” she said.

How come she came out and took over some city property? Is she a something of a renegade?

“Little bit,” she said. “The city actually dug the beds here originally . . .  But then they didn’t come back and maintain them. So they became weedy beds. So we just decided, five or six of us, to clean them out and try to grow things in them.”

Neighbor Barry Long is among the team. “We saw the opportunity and decided if we got more sun here our tomatoes and peppers would be better out in the street than in the backyard.”

Imagine them out there digging, planting and weeding, their garden hoses stretched off and on across the street – for years.

“People with kids come and show how a tomato grows,” said Guylaine Desrosiers. “And we’ve got herbs, we’ve got eggplant, we’ve got peppers . . . We’ve met a lot of neighbors we didn’t know.”

Maybe that’s part of why this block has such a different vibe.

Kids play – gasp! – In the streets, sometimes with their parents. You can see children playing ball, riding bikes and pedaling scooters. It’s almost like it’s 1950 again.

Dog walkers linger, as do young parents with strollers.

“We’ve got some active folks around this block these days,” Long said. “And the kids love it out here.”

Banalett said the feedback is powerful. “Perfect strangers come by and really just stop and say, ‘thanks a lot for doing this,’ (or) ‘I enjoy watching it and seeing it!'”

And, she added, “It’s great to give away vegetables.”

How cool is that, to be able to see and feel the fruits and vegetables of your labors?

“We are proud of it,” Desrosiers said with her French-Canadian accent. “And people are expecting it so you know we have to keep it clean and the weeds off!”

They should get an award, dangit!

Friends, there’s a town called Whitehall, Montana, and every month in the growing season they give this thing called the “golden spade” to a resident or family that stands out for their gardening or beautification efforts.

It doesn’t go to people in the garden club or on the tour, but everyday people just hoeing and growing their best.

That golden spade stands brightly in their yard for the whole month, inspiring others to get their green thumbs busy.

The town of Kilmarnock on Virginia’s Northern Neck does the same thing, except they have a banner.

Garden club members weigh the use of native plants and how much work the resident does, explained Genny Chase with the 20-member Kilmarnock Garden Club.

No, she said, they haven’t given one award to club members.

Now in its third year, their beautification challenge had fostered “a little competition . . . There’s more gardening,” she said.

How cool is that?

Why can’t we do that in Richmond so more of the city looks and feels like that block of Fauquier Avenue?

After all, it’s harder to be ugly in a city that’s pretty.

Article source: http://wtvr.com/2017/03/11/beautiful-citizen-gardens-make-rva-happier-safer-why-not-celebrate-then/

Your Life: Green-thumb Masters | Community | palestineherald.com

The Texas Master Gardener program is an educational volunteer program conducted by the Texas AgriLife Extension Service of the Texas AM University System.

Master Gardeners are volunteers for the local Extension Office, providing research-based information to folks in their own county through educational programs.

Master Gardeners are members of the local community who take an active interest in their lawns, trees, shrubs, flowers and gardens.

Current projects in Anderson County include school gardens, numerous seminars, plant sale, research and demonstrations gardens, participating in Ag Day for youth, YMCA Garden raised beds, landscape at Wildcat Golf Course Club House, Community Garden, Grow Your Own Garden Project and classroom gardens at Elkhart ISD, Westwood ISD and Neches ISD, where the vegetables are actually served in the school cafeteria as part of lunch.

Currently there are 24 certified Master Gardeners in the Anderson County program.

For those who are interested, Master Gardener volunteer training is conducted annually by AgriLife Extension for adults interested in gardening, horticulture and related topics.

Master Gardener classes address topics ranging from water harvesting, invasive species to Anderson County, plant growth and development, disease, importance of honey bees as pollinators, basic garden and landscaping design, insects, soils, fertility and much more.

Individuals who complete the training become certified Master Gardeners and assist AgriLife Extension through community education in horticulture.

Volunteer hours may be applied to a variety of approved projects discussed during training.

Master Gardeners support the community by providing information and on gardening and landscaping, providing technical assistance, and being involved in a variety of horticulture-related community service projects.

To help fund these projects, the Anderson County Master Gardeners hosts fundraisers.

The biggest fundraiser for the group is its annual Tree Plant Sale.

This year’s sale has been set for 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on March 25 in the Federal Building Parking Lot, at 101 E. Oak.

The Anderson County Master Gardeners will also be at the Farmers Market April 1, from 8 a.m. until they are sold out.

The sale will feature more than 70 varieties of native Texan plants including trees, shrubs, roses and butterfly garden plants.

For pre-sales call 903-724-5429, 903-724-0073 or 903-584-3275.

Article source: http://www.palestineherald.com/community/your-life-green-thumb-masters/article_ef1d4f66-0617-11e7-90f0-bb5b0db54f40.html