Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for March 5, 2017

This week’s gardening tips: Check for buck moth caterpillars, fertilize roses, plant veggies

<![CDATA[]]>

This week’s gardening tips: Looks like we will have an early spring this year. The azaleas are in full bloom about three weeks ahead of time.

Fertilize roses now with a general-purpose fertilizer or rose fertilizer following package directions. Begin spraying susceptible varieties of roses for disease (black spot) and insect problems (thrips and aphids).

Check your oak trees (use binoculars) for masses of young, black buck moth caterpillars and consider having your tree sprayed if you see large numbers.

Over the next few weeks, make notes on your spring-flowering bulbs while they are blooming. Record when they bloom, how well they performed and other relevant information. This will help you plan what to plant this coming fall.

Begin planting warm-season vegetables, such as tomatoes and bell peppers (use transplants for these two), cucumbers, corn, snap beans and squash. Even though we may still get some chilly weather and you could need to cover a few things, it is unlikely we will see harsh cold at this point. The great advantage of early planting is increased production during the milder early summer period and often fewer pest problems. For a free copy of the Vegetable Planting Guide, contact your parish LSU AgCenter Extension office.

Dan Gill is a horticulturist with the LSU AgCenter. 

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2017/03/this_weeks_gardening_tips_chec.html

Master Gardeners: March gardening tips – CCHeadliner.com …

Garden

Garden




Posted: Saturday, March 4, 2017 3:00 pm
|


Updated: 3:02 pm, Sat Mar 4, 2017.


Master Gardeners: March gardening tips


0 comments

Houseplants

Subscription Required


An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.


You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?


Subscribe

Choose an online service.


    Subscribe

    Choose an online service.

      on

      Saturday, March 4, 2017 3:00 pm.

      Updated: 3:02 pm.

      Article source: http://ccheadliner.com/news/education/master-gardeners-march-gardening-tips/article_c0a59b88-feb1-11e6-8b5e-7fb0e8367881.html

      Gardening Tips: March 4, 2017

      DES MOINES, Iowa  —  Spring is just around the corner, and that means it’s almost time to get back out in the garden. Tim Rundlett from Earl May stopped by to give some gardening advice as the weather starts warming up.

      If you have any questions for Tim, submit them on the Gardening page on our website.

      Article source: http://whotv.com/2017/03/04/gardening-tips-march-4-2017/

      Master Gardeners: March gardening tips

      Garden

      Garden




      Posted: Saturday, March 4, 2017 3:00 pm
      |


      Updated: 3:02 pm, Sat Mar 4, 2017.


      Master Gardeners: March gardening tips


      0 comments

      Houseplants

      Subscription Required


      An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.


      You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

      Have an online subscription?


      Subscribe

      Choose an online service.


        Subscribe

        Choose an online service.

          on

          Saturday, March 4, 2017 3:00 pm.

          Updated: 3:02 pm.

          Article source: http://ccheadliner.com/news/education/master-gardeners-march-gardening-tips/article_c0a59b88-feb1-11e6-8b5e-7fb0e8367881.html

          Creative gardening tips for the spring season

          Gardeners often focus on the science of their hobby: how much water and sunlight their plants need and how to improve soil quality and keep pests at bay. But there can be a lot of artistry behind the craft as well — from how you harvest and enjoy flowers to how you convert unused spaces of your home into a viable indoor edible garden.

          Put your creativity to good use this spring season by gardening with style.

          Indoor Gardening

          For those who don’t have an outdoor garden or yard, the dream of enjoying your own freshly picked fruits and vegetables may seem out of reach. However, the nooks and crannies of your home can be creatively rendered into productive growing zones. And experts say that nearly all homes can support indoor gardening.

          “Whatever the size of your home, there will be a selection of edible plants you can grow indoors, as long as you have some natural daylight filtering in,” says Zia Allaway, author of “Indoor Edible Garden: Creative Ways to Grow Herbs, Fruit and Vegetables in Your Home.” “The areas where plants will grow can be windowsills, beneath a skylight or even in a dark, unlit area if you install grow lights.”

          In “Indoor Edible Garden,” a highly visual guide full of practical tips and stylish ideas, Allaway offers step-by-step directions for everything from creating suspended shelves and hanging jars for growing herbs to mounting edible orchids onto bark and displaying them on walls. She points out that those embarking on indoor gardening should first evaluate the level of time they can commit.

          “Just remember that unlike other projects in the home, such as decorating and cooking, all gardening projects require some aftercare. So, if you have a busy schedule, choose crops that will tolerate less watering and feeding.”

          Flower Arranging

          While your flower garden is likely a beautiful work of art in and of itself, you can spread the joy by harvesting your flora and bringing the beauty indoors. Floral arrangements add vitality to any interior space.

          “For me, every arrangement starts with the container. Think about what mood or style you want to evoke, and remember, anything can be a container as long as it can be made watertight,” says Rachel Siegfried,” author of “The Flower Book: Natural Flower Arrangements for Your Home,” which explores 60 flowers, bloom-by-bloom in portraiture, including quick-reference profiles and tips.

          Siegfried recommends that, when selecting flowers for your arrangement, pay attention to shapes, textures and colors to achieve good balance. Start with a primary focal flower and build out with a couple of secondary focals, a final flourish, and foliage.

          For her part, she relies on instinct. “I get a ‘buzz’ when I find a good combination,” she says.

          From flowering bouquets to spicy pepper plants, apply creativity to your gardening this spring.

          Article source: http://www.wral.com/creative-gardening-tips-for-the-spring-season/16561410/

          Spring tips for the home garden and landscape – Herald

          Spring has a way of surprising us year to year. Already my daffodils are up, and lilacs are beginning to leaf out. Crocus are in full bloom, and the forsythia are poised to start its show any day. My lawn mower hibernates in my garage, and it seems I may have to wake it early this year.

          Here are some tips on getting the landscape and garden in shape:

          Lawns

          º Your turf may be a poor sight especially with our lack of snow this winter.

          º One of the most overlooked items on a spring checklist is getting your lawn mower serviced. Getting an annual service ensures your mower is running in tip-top shape and can help prolong your mower’s life. Besides the oil change and new air filter, an annual service also should include sharpening your mower blades.

          º Many homeowners use this time to overseed and fertilize cool-season lawns. While spring is the second best time for these practices, the optimal time for overseeding and fertilizing is late summer to early fall.

          Landscape Beds

          º After a long winter, it’s always refreshing to tend to your planting beds in the spring. Early in the season is a good time of year to freshen up landscape mulch. If you use shredded wood mulch, a three-pronged cultivator or hard tooth rake are excellent tools to break up the “shell.” Cultivate your existing mulch before putting down new mulch. Remember mulch only needs to be 2 to 4 inches thick and keep it at least 1 inch away from tree trunks.

          º Pruning is an important practice that improves air flow and light penetration for the plant and surrounding space. The best time to prune spring-flowering shrubs is after they are done flowering. Some examples of spring flowering shrubs are lilac, forsythia and viburnum. You can prune summer-flowering shrubs or shade trees in early spring while they are still dormant.

          Vegetable Gardens

          º If you start vegetable plants from seed, now is a good time to get those warm season plants going indoors. However, if you are new to vegetable gardening, I would suggest you skip the seed starting for the first few years and use store-bought transplants instead. In early March, your vegetable garden can be planted with cool-season veggies such as spinach, lettuce, turnip, carrot, kale and Swiss chard. Some cool-season plants may require protection if winter decides to return. (Remember, central Illinois has had blizzards in April!) As the temperatures heat up and we transition to summer, you can begin rotating in your summer vegetables such as pepper, tomato, yellow squash and cucumber.

          Want more timely garden advice? Consider attending an Extension gardening event near you. Go online to our website, or contact your local Extension office for more information.

          Article source: http://www.whig.com/20170305/spring-tips-for-the-home-garden-and-landscape