Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for February 26, 2017

Professional Landscape And Garden Design Consultations

  • WHEN
    Multiple dates from Feb 4 – Mar 3, 2017[days times]

    • Sat, Feb 4, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
    • Sun, Feb 5, 10 a.m. – 5 a.m.
    • Fri, Mar 3, 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.
  • WHERE
    Del Mar Fairgrounds, 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., Del Mar, CA
    Map | Website

  • AGES All ages
  • COST $30

The Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD) will be at the Spring Home and Garden Show to help you with your landscape. For just $30 you’ll get 30 minutes with a professional residential landscape designer to talk about your hopes, dreams and desires for your new landscape.

Designers can advise you on how to transform your yard into a fabulous outdoor living space, a retreat for wildlife, a low maintenance / low water garden and much more! Bring pictures, questions and any other pertinent information to get the most out of your consultation. Free admission to the show is included!

Dates and times of events are subject to change without notice. Always check the event organizer’s website for the most updated schedule before attending.

Article source: http://www.kpbs.org/events/2017/mar/03/professional-landscape-and-garden-d/?et=74233

Vision 2025 Highlights Feb. 26, 2017

Vision 2025 highlights

Here’s a look at recent highlights and developments connected with the Vision 2025 initiative in Johnstown:

• Train Station reuse planning underway.

With the support of PennDOT, a new steering committee has been formed to look at options for redeveloping Johnstown’s Train Station.

In January, community stakeholders began working with project consultants to plan for possible futures for the historic station.

The committee represents the City of Johnstown, CamTran, Johnstown Redevelopment Authority, Lift Johns-town, Community Foundation for the Alleghenies, Johnstown Area Heritage Association and others. PennDOT has engaged two consultants, Urban Partners and KSK Architects Planners Historians Inc. of Philadelphia on this project.

The Urban Partners team is conducting a series of interviews with commercial developers, adjacent businesses and area economic and community development officials concerning the potential role for the train station in larger community revitalization efforts.

Urban Partners will provide a comprehensive market analysis to determine the range of feasible uses for the Johnstown Train Station and surrounding site.

Retail, commercial/industrial, office, service and entertainment/tourism options will be explored. Urban Partners will analyze the development and operational economics for each option.

KSK will develop architectural plans for selected options arising from reuse ideas resulting from the market analysis.

The goal of the project is to create a plan for the Train Station that will support revitalization and investment in the core of the city.

JAHA, owner of the station, began initial building rehabilitation of the station in August, and will complete roof replacement and masonry repairs in the spring.

Funding for building repairs came from PennDOT, local private donations, the Community Foundation for the Alleghenies, and other sources. Amtrak also is completing a major project to make the station accessible for passengers with disabilities.

• Visionary of the Month recognized.

Beginning in January, V25 started to recognize an outstanding capture team leader to be Visionary of the Month.

This month, V25 celebrates and thanks Linda Messer, a grant writer from Johnstown.

With what V25 capture teams and projects are you active? In what ways have you helped to drive/participate in these efforts?

“I am the Greenspace capture team leader. Our team assists other V25 teams such as the trails, community gardens and other teams to create sustainable greenspace within the city.

Recent projects include a PennDOT Adopt-a-Highway stretch through the city, Arbor Day celebrations, assisting the city Tree Commission and Planning Commission with green infrastructure plans, landscaping the Welcome to Cambria City sign, planting tulips in Central Park, street cleanup and weeding and installing a pollinator garden at Sandyvale Conservatory, with 2017 plans for a downtown beautification contest.”

In your own words, what does Vision 2025 mean to you?

“Vision 2025, at its core, is neighbor helping neighbor through grassroots volunteerism for all. It is the glue that binds our creative efforts and ties us together from our ideas to our actions.”

What has been your most enjoyable or rewarding experience with your V25 involvement?

“It just feels good to work together around a common vision. I think most of us enjoy the rush of creating something good that makes people happy and more proud of our city. You meet a lot of new, friendly people along the way and V25 is truly purposeful living.”

On the calendar:

March 6: Capture Team leader seminar. By invitation only. For information, email inquiry@realdla.com

March 15: River issues discussion. 5:30 p.m., JAHA Heritage Discovery Center, 201 Sixth Ave., Johnstown.

Article source: http://www.tribdem.com/news/vision-highlights-feb/article_5c5eea4c-fbd4-11e6-90d9-4710e426a45e.html

Cincinnati Home & Garden Show – Cincinnati Enquirer

0) { %

0) { %

0) { %

Article source: http://www.cincinnati.com/picture-gallery/entertainment/2017/02/25/cincinnati-home--garden-show/98407664/

Speaker Promotes Gardens that Are Sweet on Bees

The Beekeepers Guild of Santa Barbara has teamed up with Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens to host a free talk by Kate Frey, author of the Bee-Friendly Garden, 2-3:30 p.m. Saturday, March 11, at Unity of Santa Barbara, 227. E Arrellaga St.

A world-class garden designer and consultant, Frey specializes in sustainable, bio-diverse, ecological gardens and landscaping. She won the Chelsea Flower Show in London, receiving gold medals in 2005 and 2007, and receiving a Silver Gilt in 2003.

After rolling out its Plant Bee Friendly initiative with nine local nurseries last year, the Beekeepers Guild of Santa Barbara secured a grant from the Fund for Santa Barbara to continue its educational program for 2017.

While continuing to promote backyard beekeeping, the guild engages the whole community in growing plants that support bees. As Guild president Kathy Rem said: “You don’t have to be a beekeeper to help the bees.”

Frey will be signing her book following the talk. Many native, drought tolerant, and bee friendly plants have been donated by our local nurseries to be given away. Refreshments will be served.

— Kathy Rem for Beekeepers Guild of Santa Barbara.

Article source: https://www.noozhawk.com/article/speaker_promotes_gardens_that_are_sweet_on_bees

Petite fruit trees fit into any size garden – Tribune

Updated 12 hours ago

If you’ve always wanted to grow fruit trees but have been reluctant to take the plunge because you think you don’t have enough room, I’d like to try to change your mind.

While some fruit trees can grow fairly large, others stay quite petite. Many gardeners plant fruit trees that have been grafted onto dwarfing root stocks which keeps their stature a bit smaller. But, even dwarf trees can grow too large for the smallest of backyards. Plus, if you grow apples, pears, or plums, you’ll need to grow more than one variety so the trees can cross-pollinate each other.

For those looking to dip their toes into fruit tree growing without having to grow multiple trees or take up a lot of room in the garden, I suggest starting with genetic dwarf peaches (Prunus persica).

Though regular grafted dwarf peach trees are certainly smaller statured than full-sized peach trees, genetic dwarfs are even more diminutive. These varieties top out at a mere 5 feet in height, and they can be pruned to stay even smaller. They produce full-size fruit, despite the petite nature of the tree.

Peaches are self-fertile, meaning each tree does not need a pollination partner of another variety in order to set fruit. A single genetic dwarf peach tree will produce plenty of fruit on its own, starting when it’s just 3 or 4 years old.

Because peach trees need to be exposed to a certain number of hours of cold weather in the winter (called chill hours), they’re a great crop to grow here in Pennsylvania.

If you’d like to grow genetic dwarf peach trees in your garden, good varieties to look for include, “El Dorado,” “Pix Zee,” “Honey Babe,” and “Empress.”

There are also several varieties of genetic dwarf nectarines on the market, too, including “Necta Zee” and “Nectar Babe.” These smooth-skinned peach relatives also do not need a pollination partner in order to set fruit.

And, if you want to try something even more unique, look for dwarf 2-on-1 combination trees that have both nectarine-bearing and peach-bearing branches grafted onto the same tree. Because these two fruits are so closely related, the grafting process allows you to have a single tree that produces both fruits.

Genetic dwarf peach and nectarine trees are perfect for small and large gardens alike. You can also grow them in containers, provided the pot holds a minimum of about 40 gallons of potting soil. If you grow these trees in containers, you’ll need to sink the pots into the ground or a compost pile for the winter. This provides a good layer of insulation to protect the roots.

If you grow the containerized trees on a balcony and don’t have anywhere to sink the pot for the winter, surround the pot up to its rim with a large cage of chicken wire filled with shredded leaves or straw to insulate the roots for the winter.

Genetic dwarf peach and nectarine trees are available from the following sources: Raintree Nursery (raintreenursery.com), Nature Hills Nursery (naturehills.com) and Dave Wilson Nursery (davewilson.com). You may also be able to find them at your favorite local nursery.

Horticulturist Jessica Walliser co-hosts “The Organic Gardeners” at 7 a.m. Sundays on KDKA Radio with Doug Oster. She is the author of several gardening books, including “Attracting Beneficial Bugs to Your Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control” and “Good Bug, Bad Bug.” Her website is jessicawalliser.com.

Send your gardening or landscaping questions to tribliving@tribweb.com or The Good Earth, 622 Cabin Hill Drive, Greensburg, PA 15601.

Article source: http://triblive.com/lifestyles/jessicawalliser/11978068-74/trees-fruit-grow

Seed catalogues; Part 2

Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 12:15 am

Seed catalogues; Part 2

By Bob Beyfuss
For Columbia-Greene Media

thedailymail.net

Before I begin this week’s column, I want to send out a belated happy birthday to George Story — founder of Story’s Nursery in Freehold in Greene County.

George turned 97 Feb. 22 and I am happy to say he is still very active. He was named George after George Washington, our first President, who was also born on this day.

Subscription Required


An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety.


You need an online service to view this article in its entirety.

Have an online subscription?


Subscribe

Login

Current print subscribers


Subscribe

Login

Current print subscribers

on

Saturday, February 25, 2017 12:15 am.

Article source: http://www.thedailymail.net/columnists/weekly_gardening_tips/article_120a6eea-fab1-11e6-b5a7-9321efcedd98.html

This week’s gardening tips: sow lettuce seeds, cut back ground covers, pick snow peas

<![CDATA[]]>

This week’s gardening tips: Lettuce can be direct seeded into the garden now. Good cultivars include Black-seeded Simpson, Oakleaf, Redsails, Cos Romaine, Buttercrunch and many others. There’s still time to plant other greens, such as mustard, collard and turnip.

To remove unattractive foliage, rejuvenate the plants and control growth, clip ground covers now before new growth appears. Liriope, monkey grass, ferns (if browned back by freezes), wedelia, Japanese ardisia and Asiatic jasmine, among others, can be cut back with a lawn mower adjusted to its highest setting (make sure the blade is sharp), a string trimmer or even hedge clippers. Selectively remove unattractive leaves on aspidistra (cast iron plant) and holly ferns by hand.

Pick snow peas frequently. Ideally, the pods should be harvested when flat before the seeds begin to enlarge.

Continue to regularly mow lawns overseeded with annual ryegrass. Warm temperatures and rainfall will make it grow rapidly.

At this time of year, you may find blooming calla lilies available in pots at area nurseries. The white-flowered Zantedeschia aethiopica is a reliable, long-lived perennial here. Plant calla lilies into beds that receive sun in the morning and shade in the afternoon. They grow well in wet soil and can be used in aquatic gardens and around ponds.

Dan Gill is a horticulturist with the LSU AgCenter.

Article source: http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2017/02/this_weeks_gardening_tips_sow.html

Gardening: Tips for pruning hydrangea bushes

The recent “heat” wave has been perfect for getting to those mid- to late-winter tasks. I chose a warm afternoon to get to some pruning.

My hydrangea bushes on the section of a hillside haven’t been cut for a few years. Note that these are Hydrangea arborescens, White Dome (Dardom), to be exact. Not a particular favorite of many gardeners, I find the white lacecap blooms on thick, sturdy stems ideal for our hillside. They are underplanted with tiarella, and the combination helps stabilize the bank.

Anyway, H. arborescens and H. paniculata bloom on new wood, another reason I favor them. This means that I don’t have to worry about winter deer damage destroying the next season’s buds.

So every winter or so, I cut them back, quite drastically, to within a few inches of the ground. It keeps their size in check and seems to invigorate the plants. Admittedly, the blooms are better in years that I don’t cut them back but even a trimmed bush puts on a good show.

CDC updates vaccine guidelines for flu, HPV and more

Caption CDC updates vaccine guidelines for flu, HPV and more

A immunization committee for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control released its 2017 advisory for recommended shots affecting adults. (Feb. 9, 2017)

A immunization committee for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control released its 2017 advisory for recommended shots affecting adults. (Feb. 9, 2017)

Hospital admissions jump after snow storms

Caption Hospital admissions jump after snow storms According to a new study from the American Journal of Epidemiology, “heart-related admissions jump 23 percent in the two days following major snowstorms.” With heavy snowfall comes lots of shoveling, and shoveling that snow puts stress on your cardiorespiratory system, which could put you at risk of heart attack.

 

According to a new study from the American Journal of Epidemiology, “heart-related admissions jump 23 percent in the two days following major snowstorms.” With heavy snowfall comes lots of shoveling, and shoveling that snow puts stress on your cardiorespiratory system, which could put you at risk of heart attack.

 

Camping may reset your body clock

Caption Camping may reset your body clock

A new study suggests that a couple days of camping in the great outdoors can reset your circadian clock and help you get more sleep. (Feb. 3, 2017)

A new study suggests that a couple days of camping in the great outdoors can reset your circadian clock and help you get more sleep. (Feb. 3, 2017)

Newer introductions — the ever-bloomers or repeat bloomers — bloom on both old and new wood. They are also often bred to control size and do not need regular pruning. If you are in doubt, either remember when they bloom (early or late), risk sacrificing a season’s bloom or wait until next year.

Other projects

Another outdoor task to consider is trimming the ornamental grasses.

grdnkpr@gmail.com or mail: Garden Keeper, The Morning Call, P.O. Box 1260, Allentown, PA 18105.

This week in the garden

Planting:

•Start seed for: Dianthus. Finish sowing seeds for transplanting: Ageratum, lobelia, scabiosa, torenia and verbena. Next week start: Dahlia, larkspur and portulaca.

•Create and follow a schedule for starting seeds. Check packets for instructions such as starting indoors four weeks before last frost date. Then, using a calendar, count back from your area’s date (April 10-15 for southern Lehigh Valley, May 10-15 for northern areas) for the appropriate starting time.

Seasonal:

•Cut back ornamental grasses. Divide when you see new green growth.

•Examine trees and shrubs. Note damaged limbs and candidates for winter pruning. Check proper pruning information for each plant.

•Get seeds for plants you intend to start yourself. Check germination rate for all stored seeds.

•Rotate amaryllis bulbs as they grow to keep stalks straight and strong. Cut back spent flower stalks and continue to water greens to keep bulbs for next year.

Chores:

•Check for heaved plants when the ground is bare of snow.

•Place deicing material, shovels, scrapers and other winter tools in a convenient spot.

•Maintain winter equipment.

•Clean and store seed-starting containers and other pots as you finish using them for the season.

•Check supplies for spring, and note or purchase as needed.

•Use a humidifier, humidity trays or misting to around your houseplants.

•Provide deer, rabbit and groundhog protection for vulnerable plants. Reapply taste or scent deterrents.

•Clean and fill bird feeders and birdbaths regularly. Clean up spilled seed and empty hulls.

•Clear gutters and direct rainwater runoff away from house foundations.

Safety:

•Photograph storm damage before clearing or repairing for insurance claims and file promptly.

Article source: http://www.mcall.com/features/family/mc-garden-hydrangea-trim-prune-20170224-story.html

Guest Speaker Will Share Tips on Early Spring Gardening

Guest Speaker Will Share Tips on Early Spring Gardening

Guest Speaker Will Share Tips on Early Spring Gardening



Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 6:00 am

Guest Speaker Will Share Tips on Early Spring Gardening


0 comments

WOODBURY — Getting a Head Start on Spring Gardening will be the topic of a program offered at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 7, at Flanders Nature Center and Land Trust.

Professional gardener Fabienne Audette, the owner of Nibbling Brook Gardens, will share tips and techniques to attain a garden’s maximum potential with early spring planning and care.

Consideration will be given to the stressful environmental conditions plants are exposed to, such as the current drought and temperature extremes.

Fundamentals of soil preparation, soil amending and site selection will be discussed as well as techniques for getting tools and materials ready.

The program is the first in a four-part series.

Fabienne Audette received a master’s of science in horticulture at Ohio State University and has had a lifelong passion for gardening.

The program will meet in the Flanders Studio at the corner of Flanders and Church Hill Roads.

The cost is $10 for Flanders members and $15 for non-members.

Those interested may register online at www.flandersnaturecenter.org or call 203-263-3711, ext. 10, for more information.

on

Saturday, February 25, 2017 6:00 am.

Article source: http://www.primepublishers.com/voicesnews/arts_and_living/garden/guest-speaker-will-share-tips-on-early-spring-gardening/article_d07d72b6-fad2-11e6-a439-471535cebe77.html

Gardening: Tips for pruning hydrangea bushes – The Morning Call

The recent “heat” wave has been perfect for getting to those mid- to late-winter tasks. I chose a warm afternoon to get to some pruning.

My hydrangea bushes on the section of a hillside haven’t been cut for a few years. Note that these are Hydrangea arborescens, White Dome (Dardom), to be exact. Not a particular favorite of many gardeners, I find the white lacecap blooms on thick, sturdy stems ideal for our hillside. They are underplanted with tiarella, and the combination helps stabilize the bank.

Anyway, H. arborescens and H. paniculata bloom on new wood, another reason I favor them. This means that I don’t have to worry about winter deer damage destroying the next season’s buds.

So every winter or so, I cut them back, quite drastically, to within a few inches of the ground. It keeps their size in check and seems to invigorate the plants. Admittedly, the blooms are better in years that I don’t cut them back but even a trimmed bush puts on a good show.

CDC updates vaccine guidelines for flu, HPV and more

Caption CDC updates vaccine guidelines for flu, HPV and more

A immunization committee for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control released its 2017 advisory for recommended shots affecting adults. (Feb. 9, 2017)

A immunization committee for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control released its 2017 advisory for recommended shots affecting adults. (Feb. 9, 2017)

Hospital admissions jump after snow storms

Caption Hospital admissions jump after snow storms According to a new study from the American Journal of Epidemiology, “heart-related admissions jump 23 percent in the two days following major snowstorms.” With heavy snowfall comes lots of shoveling, and shoveling that snow puts stress on your cardiorespiratory system, which could put you at risk of heart attack.

 

According to a new study from the American Journal of Epidemiology, “heart-related admissions jump 23 percent in the two days following major snowstorms.” With heavy snowfall comes lots of shoveling, and shoveling that snow puts stress on your cardiorespiratory system, which could put you at risk of heart attack.

 

Camping may reset your body clock

Caption Camping may reset your body clock

A new study suggests that a couple days of camping in the great outdoors can reset your circadian clock and help you get more sleep. (Feb. 3, 2017)

A new study suggests that a couple days of camping in the great outdoors can reset your circadian clock and help you get more sleep. (Feb. 3, 2017)

Newer introductions — the ever-bloomers or repeat bloomers — bloom on both old and new wood. They are also often bred to control size and do not need regular pruning. If you are in doubt, either remember when they bloom (early or late), risk sacrificing a season’s bloom or wait until next year.

Other projects

Another outdoor task to consider is trimming the ornamental grasses.

grdnkpr@gmail.com or mail: Garden Keeper, The Morning Call, P.O. Box 1260, Allentown, PA 18105.

This week in the garden

Planting:

•Start seed for: Dianthus. Finish sowing seeds for transplanting: Ageratum, lobelia, scabiosa, torenia and verbena. Next week start: Dahlia, larkspur and portulaca.

•Create and follow a schedule for starting seeds. Check packets for instructions such as starting indoors four weeks before last frost date. Then, using a calendar, count back from your area’s date (April 10-15 for southern Lehigh Valley, May 10-15 for northern areas) for the appropriate starting time.

Seasonal:

•Cut back ornamental grasses. Divide when you see new green growth.

•Examine trees and shrubs. Note damaged limbs and candidates for winter pruning. Check proper pruning information for each plant.

•Get seeds for plants you intend to start yourself. Check germination rate for all stored seeds.

•Rotate amaryllis bulbs as they grow to keep stalks straight and strong. Cut back spent flower stalks and continue to water greens to keep bulbs for next year.

Chores:

•Check for heaved plants when the ground is bare of snow.

•Place deicing material, shovels, scrapers and other winter tools in a convenient spot.

•Maintain winter equipment.

•Clean and store seed-starting containers and other pots as you finish using them for the season.

•Check supplies for spring, and note or purchase as needed.

•Use a humidifier, humidity trays or misting to around your houseplants.

•Provide deer, rabbit and groundhog protection for vulnerable plants. Reapply taste or scent deterrents.

•Clean and fill bird feeders and birdbaths regularly. Clean up spilled seed and empty hulls.

•Clear gutters and direct rainwater runoff away from house foundations.

Safety:

•Photograph storm damage before clearing or repairing for insurance claims and file promptly.

Article source: http://www.mcall.com/features/family/mc-garden-hydrangea-trim-prune-20170224-story.html