Rss Feed
Tweeter button
Facebook button

Archives for February 21, 2017

Gardening events starting Feb. 25

Whenever The Daily Progress staff posts new content, you’ll get an email delivered to your inbox with a link.

Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Article source: http://www.dailyprogress.com/lifestyles/gardening-events-starting-feb/article_7c8ada44-f551-11e6-8e9a-eb03ef6f8133.html

Now Anyone Can Build Ikea’s Experimental Garden – Fast Co Design

A few months ago, Ikea’s innovation lab Space10 released a garden structure called the Growroom. Aimed for neighborhood use by city dwellers who don’t have backyards, the spherical wooden planter is meant to be a way to grow food locally and sustainably.

On Friday, Space10 published the entire set of building instructions for the structure for free online, allowing anyone with a hammer, 17 sheets of plywood, and access to a CNC milling machine or laser cutter to build their own. (Plants not included.)

Designed by the architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum, the Growroom is walk-in spherical structure with a bench inside so you can recharge among the plants. Unlike the original structure that debuted in Copenhagen, the open-source version is made entirely of plywood, making it easier for people to build on their own.

When the lab started receiving requests to buy or exhibit the Growroom from all over the world, it decided to open-source the structure because shipping instructions and materials across the planet didn’t fit its goal of encouraging local, sustainable farming. A spokesperson for Space10 says the team knows the design will be used in Helsinki, Taipei, Rio de Janeiro, and San Francisco, and they hope it will pop up in more cities around the world.

The structure itself isn’t very pretty—and you need community space to build it in. Then there’s the matter that once you’ve built it, your work has just begun. You have to keep the plants alive.

The article has been updated to clarify how the garden is intended to be used.

Slideshow Credits:

11 /
Photo: Alona Vibe;


12 /
Photo: Alona Vibe;


13 /
Photo: Alona Vibe;

Article source: https://www.fastcodesign.com/3068284/wanted/now-anyone-can-build-ikeas-experimental-indoor-garden

Finding ‘Serenity By Design,’ At Next Garden Club Meeting

Published: February 21, 2017

The Garden Club of Newtown will host a program titled “Serenity by Design — Serenity, Simplicity Delight in the Garden,” presented by Jan Johnsen of Johnsen Landscapes Pool of Mount Kisco, N.Y., on Tuesday, February 28. The public is invited, free of charge.

Ms Johnsen studied landscape architecture at the University of Hawaii, worked at a firm in Japan, and received her horticultural training from a Versailles-trained French gardener at Mohonk Mountain House in New York.

She teaches at New York Botanical Garden, where she was voted Instructor of the Year. She was also an adjunct professor at Columbia University for seven years. Her landscapes have appeared in many magazines and books.

A designer and the author of Heaven is a Garden — Designing Serene Outdoor Spaces for Inspiration and Reflection, Ms Johnsen is interested in outdoor space and its effect upon everyone’s well being. Garden Design magazine featured her advice in its 2016 Serene Spaces issue.

After her presentation Ms Johnsen will be signing copies of her newest book, The Spirit of Stone — 101 Practical and Creative Stonescaping Ideas for your Garden. She will also have copies of Heaven is a Garden available for purchase and autographing.

The program will begin at 1 pm, in the Olga Knoepke Memorial Meeting Room at C.H. Booth Library, 25 Main Street.

 




Related Articles



Copyright ©2017 The Newtown Bee / All rights reserved

Digital Marketing / Rebel Interactive Group

Article source: https://newtownbee.com/finding-serenity-by-design-at-next-garden-club-meeting/

Nubricks Blog – How to update your commercial landscape design

When creating your commercial landscaping design there are a number of factors that need to be considered. There is so much more involved than just making the landscape attractive and neat looking. Over time it can become necessary to update your landscaping, which is why we’ve put together a number of commercial landscape ideas that may work for your space.

Royalty Free Photo

What is Commercial Landscaping?

It’s easy to assume that commercial landscaping is the same as residential landscaping, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Sure, there is still priority on the look of the landscaping, but there are other factors as well.

Signage tends to take the front seat and needs to be prominent in the design. Entryways are another key focus in this type of design, as they need to be safe, easy to spot, and provide enough space. The overall landscaping design needs to look neat and tidy as it creates a professional image for your business. Businesses also need to think about the maintenance and upkeep, which can play into the type of design they want.

Create a Natural Flow

One of the easiest and most effective ways to update your commercial landscape design is to ensure you are directing customers in the best possible way. You want to create a natural flow to your entryway, leading them to the doors. People shouldn’t get out of the car and be forced to look around for the front door to your business.

Design tips include walkways and pathways, trees and plants that draw attention to the doorway, decorative brick, and stone walls. You may need to make the entrance larger and grander, which can be done through landscaping.

Draw Attention to Signage

Signage is easily the most important aspect of your commercial landscaping design. It is imperative the sign is noticeable from a distance, and as the person approaches the building. You can help to make it noticeable by creating an entire “scene” if you will. A garden surrounding the sign, bushes highlighting it, brightly colored flowers that scream attention, install exterior lighting, etc.

Encourage Clients to Stick Around

Take a look around the exterior of your building, is it a pleasing space, is it a place customers want to hang around? You want your customers and clients to feel welcome and comfortable so why not give them space outdoors to relax and linger. This can be done with bench seating, a gazebo, brick walls meant for seating, tables, and covered patios.

Using these techniques will completely transform not just how the outside looks, but how people view your business as they approach it.

Use Landscaping to your Advantage

Commercial landscaping should be seen as a tool that helps you to convey a message about your business, and create an inviting and comfortable atmosphere for your customers and clients. As you start to look at it in this sense, you’ll find that the design takes on a more organic and natural feel.

Article source: http://www.nubricks.com/archives/56186/how-to-update-your-commercial-landscape-design/

WVU students to study Elkins – The Inter

<!–
–>

ELKINS — West Virginia University Landscape Architecture students will visit downtown Elkins on Wednesday, to create possible design proposals that could benefit the area.

The design students chose the Railroad Avenue corridor to be the location of a class project, after a request for services by Maryann Durland, chairperson of the Elkins Main Street Design Committee.

The partnership will benefit students as well as give Elkins possible proposals for roads. Durland said it is the perfect opportunity for students to practice their skills while helping community leaders evaluate options.

The concepts the design team will create will not be literal plans for redevelopment, but they will give ideas for new possibilities in the future.

“It’s an opportunity to partner with WVU and get a fresh look that may result in some exciting new ideas for us,” Durland said.

Visiting WVU students will view areas along the corridor in hopes of gathering inspiration for their new design. Their route will begin at the Holiday Inn Express, and will then go to City Hall and many more locations.

Traffic on Railroad Avenue and Third Street also will be monitored so students can determine what traffic patterns are like in the city.

“Railroad Avenue has become the gateway for tourists who visit attractions on the Elkins Railyard and historic downtown Elkins,” Durland said. “We need to make this entry route more welcoming for visitors and improve safety for pedestrians at the depot intersection.”

Durland said she hopes a new design will create a better flow of traffic for motorists and pedestrians, and that it will lead more traffic to the downtown businesses. Encouraging motorists to take a route past local businesses will be positive for downtown Elkins business development, she noted.

The project will focus on an entry route and landscaping near the Veterans Memorial to the historic Elkins Depot Welcome Center.

Durland said Elkins Main Street Design Committee members and the design students at WVU are excited for the future possibilities of this project.

Last year, the WVU program designed plans for the West Virginia State Fairgrounds in Lewisburg, and they were used to carry out a new landscape.

Article source: http://www.theintermountain.com/news/local-news/2017/02/wvu-students-to-study-elkins/

Federated Garden Club Members Enter Juried Competition

From the CT Flower Show: Entries from members of more than 115 garden clubs in nearly 90 Connecticut towns and cities will be featured at the impressive juried competition that is part of the “36th annual Connecticut Flower Garden Show”. Starting next Thursday, February 23 through Sunday, February 26, The Federated Garden Clubs of Connecticut’s “2017 Advanced Standard Flower Show” entries and prizes all will be on display at the Connecticut Convention Center on 100 Columbus Blvd. in Hartford.

“One of our show’s popular elements is The Federation Garden Clubs of Connecticut’s high quality competition,” explains Kristie Gonsalves, President of North East Expos which presents the annual Connecticut Flower Garden Show. “Attendees will marvel at the creativity of dozens of talented gardeners from across the state.” One of the largest and most prestigious flower events in all of New England, the Connecticut Flower Garden Show previews spring with live landscapes, expert speakers, and offers many creative and practical ideas for house, apartment and condo dwellers alike. It also is a great place for shopping – for the garden, for the home, and for personal gifts that include jewelry, clothing and accessories.

“This year’s delightful ‘Woodland Enchantment’ theme will be evident in all of our Advanced Standard Flower Show’s entries,” says Cathy Ritch of Trumbull, The Federated Garden Clubs of Connecticut’s Flower Show Chair. The 12,000-sq.-ft. design, horticulture and photography competition will feature over 250 judged entries. “We hope that attendees enjoy viewing the exciting entries as much as our garden club members did creating and designing them.”

Entries will be entered from members of garden clubs in: Avon; Beacon Falls; Berlin; Bethany; Bethel; Branford; Bridgeport; Bridgewater; Bristol; Brookfield; Burlington; Canton; Cheshire; Chester; Clinton; Colchester; Danbury; Darien; Durham; East Haddam; East Hampton; East Hartford; East Haven; East Lyme; Easton; Enfield; Essex; Fairfield; Farmington; Glastonbury; Goshen; Greenwich; Groton; Guilford; Haddam; Hamden; Hartford; Harwinton; Ledyard; Litchfield; Lyme; Madison; Manchester; Middletown; Milford; Naugatuck; Newtown; New Britain; New Canaan; New Hartford; New Haven; New London; New Milford; North Haven; North Stonington; Norwalk; Old Lyme; Old Saybrook; Orange; Portland; Redding; Ridgefield; Roxbury; Shelton; Sherman; Simsbury; Southbury; Southington; Stamford; Stonington; Suffield; Thomaston; Tolland; Trumbull; Wallingford; Washington; Waterbury; Watertown; West Hartford; West Haven; Westbrook; Weston; Westport; Wethersfield ; Wilton; Woodbridge; Woodbury; and Woodstock.

In addition to the Advanced Standard Flower Show, 2017 highlights include:

– Over an acre of gardens in full bloom, created by professional landscape designers and nonprofit organizations, and include naturalistic, low maintenance, native, organic, herb and pollinator gardens. They include: Aqua Scapes of CT, LLC in Portland; the Archdiocese of Hartford; Ballek’s Garden Center in East Haddam; Bosco’s Garden Center in Simsbury; Bryce Studio in Providence, RI; College Cuts Landscaping in Tolland; Connecticut Greenhouse Growers Association; the Connecticut Nursery Landscape Association; the Connecticut Rose Society; Earth Tones Native Plant Nursery Landscaping in Woodbury; Fairy Hop Gift Shop in South Windham; Gilbertie’s Wholesale Farm in Easton; Gresczyk Farms in New Hartford; Miskovsky Landscaping, Inc. in Falmouth, Mass.; the New England Carnivorous Plant Society; Prides Corner Farms, Inc. in Lebanon; Rising Sun Landscaping in Canton; Supreme Landscapes LLC in Bristol; and the University of Connecticut Horticulture Club. Also featured will be a Pollinator Garden designed by Nancy DuBrule-Clemente with flowers and plants “forced” by students at Gideon Welles School in Glastonbury.

  • More than 300 booths of displays, activities and shopping: artisans and handcrafted gifts, fresh flowers, plants, garden ornaments, metalwork sculptures, herbs, bulbs, seeds, fertilizers, soils, gardening books, floral and nature related arts crafts; patio furniture and lawn and garden tools and equipment. Bring a 1/2 cup of soil to the UConn Co-op booth for free soil testing.
  • Over 50 hours of education seminars and demonstrations by expert presenters – Entry is free with admission (see www.CTFlowerShow.com for full schedule)

2017 Show hours: Thursday, Feb. 23 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday, Feb. 24 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sunday, Feb. 26 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission includes entry to seminars: $18 Adults; $16 Seniors Age 62 and Over on Thursday/Friday only; $5 Children 5-12; Free under age 5. Admission payment by Cash Only.

Advance tickets are discounted by $2 and can be purchased no later than February 20 at the following Connecticut locations: The Garden Barn Nursery in Vernon; Garden Specialties in Mystic; Moscarillo’s Garden Shoppe in West Hartford; Natureworks in Northford; Stonehedge Garden Center in Newington; and Woodland Gardens in Manchester.

Show sponsors include B P Turf Farm, Maple Meadow Farm, Bob Buettner Florist, The Garden Conservancy, WRCH Light 100.5, WFSB Channel 3, Bedard Enterprises, and North East Expos, Inc.

To join the email list and get more information about the 2017 Connecticut Flower Garden Show, visit www.CTFlowerShow.com or download the MOBILE APP: CT Flower Show or call North East Expos, Inc. at 860-844-8461, Facebook, Twitter.

Image via Pixabay

Article source: http://patch.com/connecticut/hartford/federated-garden-club-members-enter-juried-competition

Local nursery owner gives tips on spring planting & trimming – WBBJ

JACKSON, Tenn. — With pollen blowing off the trees and plants in bloom, it doesn’t look like it’s still winter, but Mark Carter at Carter’s Nursery says not to get too far ahead.

“The ground is still cold. There’s not enough sunlight. What will happen is we’ll get that late-season frost,” Carter said.

Carter said the cutoff for frost isn’t until mid-April, but there are some ways you can get your gardens and landscaping prepared.

“Think cool season, think cutting back, planting shrubbery, mulching, but don’t try to get too far ahead and plant your impatiens, your warmer season flowers and vegetables,” Carter said.

Experts say carrots, radishes and broccoli can be planted now, to name a few. You can also start treating trees.

“If you have fruit trees, it’s a great time to use dormant oil,” Carter said. “Go out there and get you some dormant oil and spray them down till they’re wet. That’ll help you towards getting great fruit that doesn’t have a lot of pest problems and the dark spots and worms eating into them.”

Spring begins March 20, and most spring plants will be available for purchase the first week of March.

Article source: http://www.wbbjtv.com/2017/02/20/local-nursery-owner-gives-tips-spring-planting-trimming/

Garden of the week: Award-winning landscape in Queenstown – Stuff

Garden of the week: Award-winning landscape in Queenstown

Along the contours, Japanese cherry trees and silver birch soften the landscape to the west; extensive irrigation ...

Well-established Himalayan birch with flax, mountain flax and thriving Hebe odora.

Several tonnes of local river stone were brought in to create the water feature at Robyn and Peter Ireland’s property ...

With panoramic views out over the Shotover River and up towards Coronet Peak, the property receives all-year sun.

An infinity pool on the deck provides a gentle water feature cascading down the concrete walls.

Robyn and Peter Ireland enjoy the sun and views from every corner of their home.

Peter prides himself on mowing all the lawns and extensive grass terraces; the occasional silver birch provides softer ...

A favourite spot under the cherry tree facing east to the Crown Range.

The steep bank at the rear of the house was a challenge to landscape architect Joe Nutting.

The water feature ends in a natural-looking pool to the south of the house alongside a barbecue and outdoor dining area.

The gabion baskets contrast with upright slabs of macrocarpa; Hebe odora is planted above with Libertia peregrinans and ...

Another award-winning feature of the property, the dry creek bed was created to channel stormwater off the hill and down ...

The view out to the garden is uninterrupted and takes in the stream and now semi-forested hillside.

A Corten steel sculpture by Olaf Mengeringhausen in the sheltered stone courtyard.

From the master en suite bathroom the view takes in the rich mix of red and silver tussocks alongside a dry creek bed; ...

Along the contours, Japanese cherry trees and silver birch soften the landscape to the west; extensive irrigation enables drought-prone kowhai and red tussock to flourish.

Well-established Himalayan birch with flax, mountain flax and thriving Hebe odora.

Several tonnes of local river stone were brought in to create the water feature at Robyn and Peter Ireland’s property near Queenstown.

With panoramic views out over the Shotover River and up towards Coronet Peak, the property receives all-year sun.

An infinity pool on the deck provides a gentle water feature cascading down the concrete walls.

Robyn and Peter Ireland enjoy the sun and views from every corner of their home.

Peter prides himself on mowing all the lawns and extensive grass terraces; the occasional silver birch provides softer foliage and shade.

A favourite spot under the cherry tree facing east to the Crown Range.

The steep bank at the rear of the house was a challenge to landscape architect Joe Nutting.

The water feature ends in a natural-looking pool to the south of the house alongside a barbecue and outdoor dining area.

The gabion baskets contrast with upright slabs of macrocarpa; Hebe odora is planted above with Libertia peregrinans and Hebe pauciramosa below.

Another award-winning feature of the property, the dry creek bed was created to channel stormwater off the hill and down the side of the house under the paths in the event of a one-in-a-hundred year flood.

The view out to the garden is uninterrupted and takes in the stream and now semi-forested hillside.

A Corten steel sculpture by Olaf Mengeringhausen in the sheltered stone courtyard.

From the master en suite bathroom the view takes in the rich mix of red and silver tussocks alongside a dry creek bed; ‘James Stirling’ hebes nestle alongside.

The story of Robyn and Peter Ireland’s property near Queenstown is one of transformation of land and lives. Just as this couple ended nearly 40 years of corporate life in Australia with an abrupt change of lifestyle, the 3.5ha of scrubland overlooking the Shotover River would be crafted into an award-winning landscape.

The Irelands stumbled on the site while on holiday in 2010. Some of the landscaping had been done – a rough driveway cutting neatly down through the hills, a few fruit trees planted on the lower slopes. The fruit trees were dying, however, as rabbits had ring-barked their trunks, and the view was barely visible through the metre-high grasses. Surrounding the steep site was prickly rosehip, masses of broom, old man’s beard and willow trees near the end of their lives. 

But Robyn and Peter soaked up the sun and admired the view – a stunning panorama looking out over the Shotover and up to Coronet Peak. “It was an easy decision,” says Peter. 

The steep bank at the rear of the house was a challenge to landscape architect Joe Nutting.

The steep bank at the rear of the house was a challenge to landscape architect Joe Nutting.

Dunedin-born and bred, Peter Ireland trained as an accountant and for the past 25 years worked as finance director and chief operating officer at two of the largest corporate law firms in Sydney. “I’d seen so many colleagues burn out,” he says. “It was a hell of a lifestyle – long work hours, many nights away around the world. I wanted to get out early, before it affected my health.”

READ MORE:
*Garden of the week: Layered loveliness in Wellington
*Garden of the week: Roses in Timaru
*Garden of the week: Waiheke garden’s challenge to its owner

Robyn, originally from Greymouth, had spent the last 20 years working at an investment bank in Sydney. She and Peter met while studying in Dunedin, married young and worked hard all their lives. This next chapter would bring the couple even closer, but both laugh at the idea of retirement being easier. “A lifestyle block means no lifestyle,” says Peter.

Although they enlisted landscape architect Joe Nutting of Southern Landmarx to do the bulk of the work, Peter and Robyn have taken on the ongoing maintenance and planting themselves. “We joke that this is boot camp,” says Peter. “Since arriving here I’ve lost 12kg – back to my pre-corporate weight.” 

The irony is that, having lived in town houses for the bulk of their married life, Peter and Robyn had only had very small gardens. They learned fast. 

An infinity pool on the deck provides a gentle water feature cascading down the concrete walls.

An infinity pool on the deck provides a gentle water feature cascading down the concrete walls.

Southern Landmarx won three gold awards for the garden in 2016, but the company’s co-owner Joe takes his hat off to Robyn and Peter. “You couldn’t create a garden like this without owners who love it and who are willing to work in it,” says Joe. “It’s unbelievable what they’ve taken on, and what they’ve learned.”

The scientific names of the many New Zealand natives spill off their tongues. In the oasis of the rabbit-proof-fenced vegetable plot is an entire raised bed where the couple nurture native seedlings, all propagated by hand. As you walk the property’s many paths, they point out the hybrids of coprosma or hebe, explaining which is more frost-tolerant or hardy in the intense Wakatipu summers. 

“I never knew anything could absorb you to such an extent,” says Peter. “Our problem is that the garden has almost become too personal.” He admits their career backgrounds have carried over into an almost obsessive attention to detail around the garden. 

Well-established Himalayan birch with flax, mountain flax and thriving Hebe odora.

Well-established Himalayan birch with flax, mountain flax and thriving Hebe odora.

Robyn chuckles as she opens the door to the garden shed. Inside, a whiteboard has each item in the vegetable garden listed, with the date of planting and harvesting alongside. “Wait until you see the computer spreadsheet of the garden maintenance regime!” 

Natives abound. Five years since landscaping and planting began, the native shrubland has taken hold and the beautifully crafted water feature now looks more akin to a natural stream. With extensive irrigation, the toetoe, flax, beech, hebe and big red tussocks are now firmly established, some corners soon to be forest. 

“They say natives are low-maintenance,” says Peter. “But that’s rubbish.” They never stop working, he says, pruning toetoe flowers, flax heads and cabbage trees or simply pulling out weeds from between the tussocks. 

Robyn and Peter Ireland enjoy the sun and views from every corner of their home.

Robyn and Peter Ireland enjoy the sun and views from every corner of their home.

And they don’t stop even at the boundaries of the property. As if the mass of lawn mowing, weed-eating, weeding and planting across the massive area of this steep section were not enough, Robyn and Peter took on even more. Below them the Department of Conservation river flats are covered in a morass of introduced weeds. With DOC permission they started work – first spraying, then chainsawing, sometimes bringing in the digger and finally composting and planting their many newly propagated natives. 

The outlook from the house is stunning. But Peter and Robyn are equally enthusiastic about the views from the corners of their magnificent garden. As we wander the contours Robyn points out this seat or that, each offering a different aspect at various times of the day. “This is our morning spot, under the cherry tree,” she says. “Here’s where we bring a bottle of wine in the evening.” 

Not only have the Irelands completely transformed the land, it’s clear that the land has also transformed them. 

The water feature ends in a natural-looking pool to the south of the house alongside a barbecue and outdoor dining area.

The water feature ends in a natural-looking pool to the south of the house alongside a barbecue and outdoor dining area.

QA:

Climate: The block is sheltered and north facing, but has quite an extreme microclimate with snow and frosts down to -9°C, followed by usually very dry and hot summers with temperatures over 30°C.

Soil type: Principally sand, stone and rocks – we often would remove a bucket of stones per hole when planting to be replaced by soil we brought in. Higher up, the land is a little better, having been 

A deer farm in a prior life: Otherwise it is basically a former riverbed.

Watering the garden: The landscapers installed a 12-station automated irrigation system at the start of the build: micro-sprays for the glasshouse and garden beds, drip-line for the broader garden, and lawn sprays for two areas close to the house. We have extended that system as the plantings have increased. 

Best tip for other gardeners: Albeit we are new to this scale of gardening, accept that you will have plant losses and general failures of planting from year to year. Do not take the failures personally as we did – and still do, depending on the plant. 

Robyn and Peter Ireland


 – NZ House Garden

Next nz-house-garden story:

My favourite space: Small Auckland living room just the right size

life style Homepage

Article source: http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home-property/nz-house-garden/89085537/garden-of-the-week-queenstown-gardens-awardwinning-landscape

Watch | Wall colours that can reduce stress

Refrain from posting comments that are obscene, defamatory or inflammatory, and do not indulge in personal attacks, name calling or inciting hatred against any community. Help us delete comments that do not follow these guidelines by marking them offensive. Let’s work together to keep the conversation civil.

Article source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/home-garden/watch-wall-colours-that-can-reduce-stress/articleshow/57267368.cms

Creative Gardening Tips for the Spring Season

Gardeners often focus on the science of their hobby: how much water and sunlight their plants need and how to improve soil quality and keep pests at bay. But there can be a lot of artistry behind the craft as well — from how you harvest and enjoy flowers to how you convert unused spaces of your home into a viable indoor edible garden.

Put your creativity to good use this spring season by gardening with style.

Indoor Gardening

For those who don’t have an outdoor garden or yard, the dream of enjoying your own freshly picked fruits and vegetables may seem out of reach. However, the nooks and crannies of your home can be creatively rendered into productive growing zones. And experts say that nearly all homes can support indoor gardening.

“Whatever the size of your home, there will be a selection of edible plants you can grow indoors, as long as you have some natural daylight filtering in,” says Zia Allaway, author of “Indoor Edible Garden: Creative Ways to Grow Herbs, Fruit and Vegetables in Your Home.” “The areas where plants will grow can be windowsills, beneath a skylight or even in a dark, unlit area if you install grow lights.”

In “Indoor Edible Garden,” a highly visual guide full of practical tips and stylish ideas, Allaway offers step-by-step directions for everything from creating suspended shelves and hanging jars for growing herbs to mounting edible orchids onto bark and displaying them on walls. She points out that those embarking on indoor gardening should first evaluate the level of time they can commit.

“Just remember that unlike other projects in the home, such as decorating and cooking, all gardening projects require some aftercare. So, if you have a busy schedule, choose crops that will tolerate less watering and feeding.”

Flower Arranging

While your flower garden is likely a beautiful work of art in and of itself, you can spread the joy by harvesting your flora and bringing the beauty indoors. Floral arrangements add vitality to any interior space.

“For me, every arrangement starts with the container. Think about what mood or style you want to evoke, and remember, anything can be a container as long as it can be made watertight,” says Rachel Siegfried,” author of “The Flower Book: Natural Flower Arrangements for Your Home,” which explores 60 flowers, bloom-by-bloom in portraiture, including quick-reference profiles and tips.

Siegfried recommends that, when selecting flowers for your arrangement, pay attention to shapes, textures and colors to achieve good balance. Start with a primary focal flower and build out with a couple of secondary focals, a final flourish, and foliage.

For her part, she relies on instinct. “I get a ‘buzz’ when I find a good combination,” she says.

From flowering bouquets to spicy pepper plants, apply creativity to your gardening this spring.


Source via StatePoint

Article source: http://www.charlestonchronicle.net/113691/2152/creative-gardening-tips-for-the-spring-season