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Archives for February 19, 2017

Extension Connection: Dreaming of Spring

Posted: Sunday, February 19, 2017 12:15 am

Extension Connection: Dreaming of Spring

This winter, teasingly warm days have been interspersed with a fair share of chilly winds and gray skies.

Those quick warm spells have kept me chomping at the bit for the return of spring.

Until that time comes, I stay occupied by dreaming of the endless garden possibilities and making to-do lists for the coming growing season!

If you are still in the clutches of winter hibernation and haven’t begun planning for the coming year, here are a few things to keep on your mind as planting time gets closer.

Have you taken soil samples lately?

Soil tests should be taken at least every three years, or sooner if you notice your yard or garden are not looking as they should.

As long as the ground is workable and the soil is dry (avoid working the soil right after it rains), you can take and send your samples to Virginia Tech’s Soil Testing Lab, which will analyze and return your results within a few weeks.

Knowing what your soil is lacking and how you can amend it will help lay a strong foundation for a successful growing season.

You can pick up soil testing kits at your local Extension office.

Working our way up from the soil, the next thing to think about is the space you have available for growing.

Have you built raised beds, been eyeing that sunny patch of lawn, want to try growing in containers, or maybe this is the year you’ll join a community garden?

Depending on the amount of space you have, you can begin brainstorming what you want to grow. What do you like to eat? What do you have access to – saved seeds, shared seeds, leftover seeds from last year, or do you have access to free or inexpensive plants later in the year?

Start with what you have available and build your garden from there.

The answer to a lot of these questions will be integral in purchasing and planting decisions.

Another part of what you grow can be decided solely by aesthetic appeal.

Does your garden need more color, height, texture or points of interest?

This is a perfect time to think back on the past year and what elements you might like to incorporate in 2017.

Gardens are always open to new inspiration, focal points, plants. The possibilities of garden design are limited only by imagination. They are a way to extend the personality and design of your home and existing landscape.

Do have gardening questions, need garden or yard recommendations and/or guidance for the coming year, or have an insect or plant to identify? Check in with our Extension Master Gardener Help Desk volunteers from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday to Friday by calling your local Virginia Cooperative Extension office.

— Submitted by Kathleen Reed, Agriculture Extension Agent, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Roanoke Office

Submitted by Kathleen Reed, Agriculture Extension Agent, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Roanoke Office

More about Garden

  • ARTICLE: Extension Connection: Dreaming of Spring
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  • ARTICLE: BROWN M. Marie Keith

More about Gardening

  • ARTICLE: Extension Connection: Dreaming of Spring
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  • ARTICLE: Pepper spray prompts evacuation of Orange County hotel
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More about Economics

  • ARTICLE: Extension Connection: Dreaming of Spring
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  • ARTICLE: Wallmeyer: Lack of job skills hurts rural Virginia

on

Sunday, February 19, 2017 12:15 am.


| Tags:


Garden,



Gardening,



Economics,



Botany,



Soil,



Virginia Cooperative Extension,



Agriculture,



Plant,



Gardener,



Volunteer,



Dreaming

Article source: http://www.roanoke.com/nrv/community/extension-connection-dreaming-of-spring/article_debce587-7bba-5301-9c44-90717b836f3e.html

Landscape Designers, Urban Planners and Architect are Invited to …

A’ Design Award Competition Announces Final Call for Entries to 7th International Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards

Como, Italy (PRWEB) February 19, 2017

Today, A’ Design Award Competition has released final call for entries to A’ International Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards 2016-2017, entries are accepted from Landscape Designers, Urban Planners, Garden Designers, Municipalities and Landscape Design Companies.

Registration to the A’ International Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards is is free, designers, urban planners and architects can register at A’ Design Awards to submit their work. Every project will receive a preliminary score for their entries, hence projects that pass the preliminaries can proceed with nomination. International panel of jury members are looking into every submission of 7th Annual International Landscape Planning and Garden Design Award in order to select best works that will be widely promoted by prestigious A’ Design Award Competition.

The following are some example projects that could be submitted to A’ Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards https://competition.adesignaward.com/winners-category.php?CATEGORY=62

Deadline for entries to A’ Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards is on February 28, 2017.

Winners will be announced on April 15, 2017 when receiving a highly respected A’ Design Prize. A’ which contains a series of PR, marketing and publicity tools to celebrate the status of winning the Landscape Planning Awards. The Prize for Good Landscape Planning Design contains not only contains a series of PR, marketing and publicity tools but Design Excellence Certificate, Lifetime license to use the A’ Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards Winner Logo, Yearbook of Best Designs and Exclusive Design Award Trophy. In addition, winners of 7th Edition of A’ Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards will be entitled to participation to Exhibitions of Awarded Works, will be granted Two-Person Invitation to the A’ Design Awards’ Gala-Night together with inclusion in World Design Rankings, Designer Rankings, Landscape Planning Design Classifications.

Additional Details could be found at https://competition.adesignaward.com/competitions/landscape.html

Registrations could be made at https://competition.adesignaward.com/registration.php

About A’ Design Awards

The A’ Design Award Competition has been established to highlight best design projects from across the globe hence main idea of A’ Design Award is to create a global awareness and understanding for good design practices and principles in all design fields. The ultimate aim of the A’ Design Awards is to push designers, companies and brands worldwide to develop innovative and sustainable projects that creating benefits for society. To learn more about the A’ Design Awards and the A’ International Landscape Planning and Garden Design Awards please visit http://www.designaward.com

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/02/prweb14080552.htm

View Comments and Join the Discussion!

Article source: https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/17/02/p9069159/landscape-designers-urban-planners-and-architect-are-invited-to-take-a-

Landscape designer focus of new film at Tower Hill Sunday

BOYLSTON — Six-time Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmaker Karyl Evans’ latest work is rooted in her love of horticulture and unearths new information on the great but nearly forgotten talent of an early star of the garden design world.

Evans’ film, “The Life and Gardens of Beatrix Farrand,” will be shown from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 26 at Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive.

Evans, of New Haven, is a fellow at Yale University as well as a director, producer, editor and writer. In 2016 she won the Best Director Emmy Award for her one-hour documentary “Letter from Italy, 1944: A New American Oratorio,” narrated by Meryl Streep.

Evans will present her new film at Tower Hill and answer questions from the audience, one of which will likely be “Who was Beatrix Farrand?” As the 40-minute film explains, Farrand (1872-1959) was a visionary landscape architect who developed stunning gardens for college campuses, public spaces and the estates of the wealthy. Her garden designs were groundbreaking, so to speak, and while her ingenious design philosophy has stood the test of time, many of her gardens and her notoriety for the most part haven’t.

This omission troubled Evans, who set out three years ago to make a film that would restore Farrand’s reputation to its proper place in landscape design history, and perhaps lead to restoration of some of her forgotten gardens as well.

“I found out that so little is known about her and I think, as a filmmaker, one of the exciting things is bringing to life someone that maybe people don’t know about,” Evans said. And when the truth is learned, “people are surprised and they can’t believe she did all this and they never knew about her,” she said.

Some of Farrand’s gardens still survive and thrive. The most well-known perhaps is at Dumbarton Oaks, the estate in Washington, D.C., that lent its name to a 1944 conference held there that laid the foundation for the United Nations. People involved in horticulture will likely be familiar with Garland Farm in Maine, home of the Beatrix Farrand Society, and the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden in Seal Harbor, Maine, on Mount Desert Island.

Farrand’s work also can be seen at the East Garden at the White House and the Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden, and on the campuses of Yale and Princeton universities. Closer to Worcester, Farrand designed the sunken garden at the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, Connecticut, in which the museum’s popular Sunken Garden Poetry Festival is held each year.

But Farrand had some 200 commissions over her 50-year career and many of those gardens have fallen into neglect. To learn about and film them, Evans visited more than 40 Farrand gardens across the country and dug up garden plans and biographical information at 30 archives.

“My goal was to show the exceptional contributions of her work and the struggle she had along the way,” Evans said.

One of Farrand’s struggles was just getting herself trained in the newly emerging field of landscape architecture, which wasn’t yet offered as a specific degree program anywhere. She went to Harvard to study the horticulture aspect, then to Columbia, where she sought out tutors to teach her civil engineering. Travels through Europe followed, where Farrand visited all the great gardens and took extensive notes.

“She was driven and really talented,” Evans said. “She was from an East Coast elite family so you think, ‘Oh, it must have been so easy for her,’ but when you were from an East Coast elite family back then, you certainly didn’t take up a profession, so to me the way she was able to figure out how to get educated and challenge the social norm for the time was very impressive.”

Another obstacle was one many women still face today: being taken seriously in an almost exclusively male-dominated field. Farrand was comfortable with supervising (usually male) workers at a garden site and putting forth her ideas to others working on a project (again, usually male).

“Maybe it shouldn’t have surprised me that she wasn’t that well-respected at the time,” Evans said. “Being from upper-class society, she had no qualms about speaking up, and she was articulate and told people what she wanted, but they were really taken aback by her level of confidence and there was some pushback.”

Nevertheless, Farrand was the only woman among the 11 founders of the American Society of Landscape Architects and went on to run a highly successful landscape design office in New York.

Evans was drawn to Farrand’s story because of her strength as a role model, and to help keep some of her lost gardens from sinking into oblivion.

“In this political climate, we need women who are looked at as being really intelligent and contributing to our society,” she said. “And wouldn’t it be great if we had these beautiful gardens restored because I think we need more beauty in the world right now.”

To register for the screening, visit www.towerhillbg.org or call (508) 869-6111. The cost is $5 for members and $20 for nonmembers.

XXXX

Also, the TG got this nice note recently from internationally noted artist Stephen Knapp of Princeton: “Whenever you folks have done a feature on my work, whether in the paper or your magazine, I’ve been peppered for requests of when I’m going to show in New England. I haven’t shown in New England for almost a decade. … This is a wonderful exhibit at the Gallery at Eastern Connecticut State University and it is up for a bit longer.”

The show closes Feb. 23 and would be worth the short jaunt down I-395 to Willimantic, where Eastern Connecticut is located. Knapp paints with light, using light bulbs and glass to create gorgeous multilayered expressions of color and form, usually on a large scale. The show, “Elemental Light,” also includes work by Alexander Harding, a Connecticut photographer who is equally entranced by light’s infinite expressions.

An illuminating video of Knapp’s work can be seen at www.facebook.com/Lightpaintings1/

Article source: http://www.telegram.com/entertainmentlife/20170218/landscape-designer-focus-of-new-film-at-tower-hill-sunday

Rice County Master Gardeners annual Horticulture Day

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Article source: http://www.southernminn.com/faribault_daily_news/community/article_8f9e34d5-cc39-564d-b0fc-960b7c81cdaa.html

How to grow a garden in a small space – News – Houma Today …

Gardeners are often faced with small spaces when landscaping. In urban areas, lots are typically fairly small. Even in situations where lots are larger, restricted-space areas often need to be addressed on the small scale.

Though creating small-scale gardens may seem easier to deal with than larger ones, careful planning is just as, or even more, critical. The choice and use of building materials; the choice and placement of plants, textures, shapes and colors; the activities that will take place in the landscape; and the positioning and flow of traffic are all matters of concern. When every square inch counts, a well thought out plan is essential because the prospective viewer is going to be closer to the landscape and thus more aware of every detail.

The concept of good design can mean different things to different people, and no one design is absolutely right for a given situation. To get you started in the right direction, however, certain design considerations are worth bearing in mind when you are pondering how to go about laying out a small-scale landscape.

Often, small gardens are located adjacent to or in close proximity to the home. This is important when considering the style of your garden. The style of the garden should reflect the location and style of surrounding buildings. Look for established neighborhood features, such as neighborhood buildings, parks or old gardens, and take inspiration from them. The building materials used in the garden should also relate to and harmonize with the building materials used in the house.

For instance, stucco Spanish revival homes might incorporate Spanish landscape elements into their landscape style, while homes with a relaxed Acadian-style architecture are complemented by informal, natural elements in the landscape. You can learn more about styles of landscapes and their characteristics from any good landscaping book.

When I lived in New Orleans, my home was a late 1800s Victorian Eastlake-style house. The Victorian period generally favored formal elements in the landscape – symmetry, geometric layouts of beds, straight lines – and the exuberant use of color. This was the style I adopted for my very small backyard garden. The style selected has a great influence on the way the garden is laid out and the plants and the building materials used.

My selection of building materials was also influenced by my home and neighborhood. After looking around, I chose such building materials such as laid brick, lattice, wrought iron, clapboard, French doors and stained glass for structures and surfaces and terra-cotta pots to embellish the patio. Remember, your landscape will not exist in a vacuum, and you should feel free to draw on existing surroundings for inspiration.

One last comment on style and materials: Remember that the style and décor of rooms that have a view of the garden should also be considered because the garden will visually become a part of those rooms and should harmonize with them.

Everyone’s garden is unique based on their tastes and needs. Once the fundamental style of a garden has emerged, the actual form and layout are largely dictated by how it will be used.

The first step in drawing a landscape plan is to list your family’s needs that can be fulfilled by the garden. Do you need privacy, a patio for outdoor entertainment or shade? Are you an avid gardener, or do you need to minimize maintenance? How about vegetables, flowers, pets, children’s play areas and work areas? Taking inspiration from John F. Kennedy, I sometimes say, “Ask not what you can do for your landscape; ask what your landscape can do for you.”

After you have determined the general style, how the landscape will be used and what it needs to provide, it’s time to begin drawing a plan. The area can be carefully measured and a scale drawing produced to work with, or simple sketches can suffice.

The desired features of the garden, based on the chosen style and needs, are arranged and re-arranged on paper until you are satisfied with the results. If existing features will be retained, make sure you include them in the plan.

At this stage in developing your plan, you need to determine the size and shapes of beds, outdoor living areas and other features. This is an artistic phase and will be substantially guided by the style you have chosen. Take your time. Feel free to look through landscaping books for inspiration and ideas.

When choosing plant materials, keep in mind the smaller scale of the situation, and select plants that are compact, dwarf or slow-growing. It is very easy to over-plant or select plants that grow too large for their location. This creates additional maintenance as frequent pruning will be needed to keep plants in control. Always find out the mature size of the trees and shrubs you are considering to make sure their size is appropriate.

Help, if you need it, is available. If you are unsure of your final plan, consult with a licensed landscape architect to iron out the rough spots.

— Dan Gill is an LSU AgCenter horticulturist. You can hear his call-in radio show Saturday mornings on WWL-AM in New Orleans.

Article source: http://www.houmatoday.com/news/20170219/how-to-grow-garden-in-small-space

It’s time to plan your 2017 garden, landscape

Veggies

Veggies

Your choices of what to include in your vegetable garden is fairly simple: What do you like to eat? (Metro Creative Connection)



Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2017 11:45 pm

It’s time to plan your 2017 garden, landscape

By Jim Faddis
jim.faddis@theindependent.com

theindependent.com

Planting time is a month or two away, but it’s not too early to start thinking about gardening and landscaping ideas.

“This is a great time to be doing planning such as where to plant, what to plant,” said Teresa Wayne, greenhouse manager at Lewis Greenscape in Grand Island.

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More about Agriculture

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on

Saturday, February 18, 2017 11:45 pm.


| Tags:


Agriculture,



Botany,



Steve Williams,



Day Lily,



Elizabeth Killinger,



Teresa Wayne,



Gardening,



Perennial,



Tomato,



Nursery

Article source: http://www.theindependent.com/life/it-s-time-to-plan-your-garden-landscape/article_b3a568e0-f485-11e6-a178-0f9fe9177f8b.html

Gallery sends out call for garden art

A call for works for a garden art exhibit in March has been sent out. The gallery is looking for artwork with a garden theme, which could include depictions of window boxes, pots, flower beds, garden scenes, pieces intended for display in gardens or landscaping and can be made of any medium.

Article source: http://www.wahpetondailynews.com/news/gallery-sends-out-call-for-garden-art/article_7c0b5b56-f2d2-11e6-908c-7b3af5f5b9bc.html

What to see and do at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show | The …

The Northwest Flower Garden Show, the region’s largest garden show, opens Wednesday at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. The show will continue through Sunday (Feb. 26).

Here’s what you won’t want to miss:

Display gardens: 20 garden designers will create temporary pop-up garden displays with a theme of “Taste of Spring.” Designers will incorporate edibles, cooking outside and outdoor room features. Check out the display from Tacoma’s Father Nature Landscapes Inc. and Tacoma garden designer Sue Goetz. Their team project will have a cocktail hour theme with midcentury touches. Olympia’s Nature Perfect Landscaping and The Barn Nursery, with design by Landen Moore, will address outdoor cooking with a pizza oven and a woodsy backdrop.

Tasting Corner: New at the show this year are specialty food companies offering tastes of one-of-a-kind products. Vendors include Seattle locals Belle Epicurean, Tom Douglas’ Rub With Love, Bonnie B’s Peppers and Indi Chocolate. Don’t miss Tacoma’s The Art of Crunch, a food company offering biscotti.

Vendors: More than 350 exhibitors will offer home decor, garden equipment, bee refuge equipment, fountains, hardscape materials, potted plants, seeds, decorative gates and railings, garden sculptures and floral paintings.

Lectures: More than 100 how-to seminars by some of the country’s top garden experts on three stages. Featured personalities include this paper’s garden columnist, Marianne Binetti, as well as Seattle garden personality Ciscoe Morris and Goetz from Creative Gardener. Topics range from edible gardening to pruning Japanese maples.

Container Wars: At 11 a.m. daily at the show, garden personalities will battle in a live-action competition of container plantings. Binetti will host.

Show details

When: 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (Feb. 26).

Where: Washington State Convention Center, Seattle.

Cost: $22 at the door or $5 discounted early-bird tickets through Tuesday (Feb. 21) at gardenshow.com/tickets.

Information: gardenshow.com.

Article source: http://www.theolympian.com/living/home-garden/article133208174.html

How to grow a garden in a small space

Gardeners are often faced with small spaces when landscaping. In urban areas, lots are typically fairly small. Even in situations where lots are larger, restricted-space areas often need to be addressed on the small scale.

Though creating small-scale gardens may seem easier to deal with than larger ones, careful planning is just as, or even more, critical. The choice and use of building materials; the choice and placement of plants, textures, shapes and colors; the activities that will take place in the landscape; and the positioning and flow of traffic are all matters of concern. When every square inch counts, a well thought out plan is essential because the prospective viewer is going to be closer to the landscape and thus more aware of every detail.

The concept of good design can mean different things to different people, and no one design is absolutely right for a given situation. To get you started in the right direction, however, certain design considerations are worth bearing in mind when you are pondering how to go about laying out a small-scale landscape.

Often, small gardens are located adjacent to or in close proximity to the home. This is important when considering the style of your garden. The style of the garden should reflect the location and style of surrounding buildings. Look for established neighborhood features, such as neighborhood buildings, parks or old gardens, and take inspiration from them. The building materials used in the garden should also relate to and harmonize with the building materials used in the house.

For instance, stucco Spanish revival homes might incorporate Spanish landscape elements into their landscape style, while homes with a relaxed Acadian-style architecture are complemented by informal, natural elements in the landscape. You can learn more about styles of landscapes and their characteristics from any good landscaping book.

When I lived in New Orleans, my home was a late 1800s Victorian Eastlake-style house. The Victorian period generally favored formal elements in the landscape – symmetry, geometric layouts of beds, straight lines – and the exuberant use of color. This was the style I adopted for my very small backyard garden. The style selected has a great influence on the way the garden is laid out and the plants and the building materials used.

My selection of building materials was also influenced by my home and neighborhood. After looking around, I chose such building materials such as laid brick, lattice, wrought iron, clapboard, French doors and stained glass for structures and surfaces and terra-cotta pots to embellish the patio. Remember, your landscape will not exist in a vacuum, and you should feel free to draw on existing surroundings for inspiration.

One last comment on style and materials: Remember that the style and décor of rooms that have a view of the garden should also be considered because the garden will visually become a part of those rooms and should harmonize with them.

Everyone’s garden is unique based on their tastes and needs. Once the fundamental style of a garden has emerged, the actual form and layout are largely dictated by how it will be used.

The first step in drawing a landscape plan is to list your family’s needs that can be fulfilled by the garden. Do you need privacy, a patio for outdoor entertainment or shade? Are you an avid gardener, or do you need to minimize maintenance? How about vegetables, flowers, pets, children’s play areas and work areas? Taking inspiration from John F. Kennedy, I sometimes say, “Ask not what you can do for your landscape; ask what your landscape can do for you.”

After you have determined the general style, how the landscape will be used and what it needs to provide, it’s time to begin drawing a plan. The area can be carefully measured and a scale drawing produced to work with, or simple sketches can suffice.

The desired features of the garden, based on the chosen style and needs, are arranged and re-arranged on paper until you are satisfied with the results. If existing features will be retained, make sure you include them in the plan.

At this stage in developing your plan, you need to determine the size and shapes of beds, outdoor living areas and other features. This is an artistic phase and will be substantially guided by the style you have chosen. Take your time. Feel free to look through landscaping books for inspiration and ideas.

When choosing plant materials, keep in mind the smaller scale of the situation, and select plants that are compact, dwarf or slow-growing. It is very easy to over-plant or select plants that grow too large for their location. This creates additional maintenance as frequent pruning will be needed to keep plants in control. Always find out the mature size of the trees and shrubs you are considering to make sure their size is appropriate.

Help, if you need it, is available. If you are unsure of your final plan, consult with a licensed landscape architect to iron out the rough spots.

— Dan Gill is an LSU AgCenter horticulturist. You can hear his call-in radio show Saturday mornings on WWL-AM in New Orleans.

Article source: http://www.dailycomet.com/news/20170219/how-to-grow-garden-in-small-space

Ruling the roost

Thanks to the Chinese Year of the Rooster, the big bird is the hottest motif in 2017. The rooster, according to the Chinese calendar, represents hard work, diligence, and keeping time and order. Update your home decor with the motif to usher in positive energy.

BRING THE BIRD HOME

Keep an eye out for interesting rooster items when you go out shopping. Try adding an embossed rooster on a tile in the kitchen or on a plate. Even rooster prints or a rooster motif on cushions can bring in some good chi.


ENTER the ROOSTER



Keep your home’s entrance clean. Place a new door mat, or go for a fresh coat of paint. Make sure this area is well-lit and looks inviting. Be sure the doorbell works. The living room is considered to be the element of fire and is your wealth and prosperity corner. The centre of the house is responsible for bringing good luck. Metal elements are good for the area. Avoid fire colours and elements here.

Get the rooster home

Follow these feng shui rules

– De-clutter. Cleanse your home by adding a pinch of sea salt to the mop water.

– Display yellow flowers at the foyer close to the main door.

– Hang a six-rod metal wind chime in the south of the living room.

– In the west of the living room, go for a red-dominant decor or turn on bright lights to mitigate arguments. You can also place a red-coloured stone or porcelain figurine.

– Keep the northwest sector quiet and clean or suspend 6 I-ching coins with red tassels to keep sickness at bay.

– Display a gem tree at the eastern side of the living room.

– Place water features at southeast for wealth and good luck.

– A figurine of a pair of birds, ducks or a rooster in the northeast of the living room is good for romance.

– Place a figurine of peacocks or images of birds at the entrance.

– Place green plants towards east or southeast sectors.

– Place three bamboo stems in a blue vase with water in the southwest corner of your living or home (but not in bedrooms) to counter theft, burglary.

– Don’t place anything in red or a fire element in southwest.

– Don’t disturb west sector of the home or garden with renovation. If necessary, start with symbolic hacking at northeast or southeast before moving west.

– Don’t place crystals or earth elements at south sector.

– Don’t use shades of red or bright lights at northwest direction especially bedrooms.

(

Inputs by SBS Surendran, feng shui expert)


Article source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/home-garden/ruling-the-roost/articleshow/57184959.cms