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Archives for February 18, 2017

Lecture series: plans for Montpelier gardens – Belfast – Waldo …

Belfast — The Belfast Garden Club Evening Lecture Series continues Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 6:30 p.m. with a talk, “The Revolutionary Nature of Early 18th Century English Gardens and Henry Knox’s Vision for Montpelier,” given by Anne Perkins.

Belfast Free Library is co-sponsoring the talk, which will take place in the library’s Abbott Room, and is free and open to all.

General Henry Knox Museum, also known as Montpelier, has developed a plan for the museum’s grounds that incorporates not only elements based on research into Knox’s intentions for his estate, but also elements common to the grand gardens and estates of the 18th century. This landscape plan will serve as the proper setting for Montpelier, the recreation of Knox’s home in Thomaston, and as a site for educating visitors about horticultural and agricultural practices of the late 18th century.

Anne Perkins, co-chairman of the Montpelier landscape committee, will describe the landscape plans for the museum, their development, and the individual elements that will make up the grounds, focusing on how they fit into 18th-century landscape design and how they will be used for education.

As a professional, culinary, herb, fruit and cut flowers grower, Perkins farms Headacre Farms in Owls Head. She also designs gardens that integrate annual and perennial plants, vegetables, fruits, flowers and herbs through her design business, Gardens of Use and Delight.

Belfast Garden Club has promoted civic beautification and presented speakers to stimulate the knowledge and love of gardening since 1929. Next on its evening winter lecture series will be a talk on “Japanese Garden Design” March 28, with Lee Sligh and Liz Stanley of Lee Schneller Fine Gardens.

For more information about these programs, call the library at 338-3884, ext. 10. For more information about Belfast Garden Club, visit belfastgardenclub.org.

 

Article source: http://waldo.villagesoup.com/p/lecture-series-plans-for-montpelier-gardens/1625821

Planning for a new garden

UC Master Gardeners of Napa County ( http://ucanr.edu/ucmgnapa/) answer gardening questions on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9 a.m. to noon, at the UC Cooperative Extension office, 1710 Soscol Ave., Suite 4, Napa, 707-253-4143.

Article source: http://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/columnists/master-gardener/planning-for-a-new-garden/article_c96233b8-7638-5780-a381-76df5f0a0a1d.html

Now Anyone Can Build Ikea’s Experimental Garden – Fast Co. Design

A few months ago, Ikea’s innovation lab Space10 released a garden structure called the Growroom. Aimed for neighborhood use by city dwellers who don’t have backyards, the spherical wooden planter is meant to be a way to grow food locally and sustainably.

On Friday, Space10 published the entire set of building instructions for the structure for free online, allowing anyone with a hammer, 17 sheets of plywood, and access to a CNC milling machine or laser cutter to build their own. (Plants not included.)

Designed by the architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum, the Growroom is walk-in spherical structure with a bench inside so you can recharge among the plants. Unlike the original structure that debuted in Copenhagen, the open-source version is made entirely of plywood, making it easier for people to build on their own.

When the lab started receiving requests to buy or exhibit the Growroom from all over the world, it decided to open-source the structure because shipping instructions and materials across the planet didn’t fit its goal of encouraging local, sustainable farming. A spokesperson for Space10 says the team knows the design will be used in Helsinki, Taipei, Rio de Janeiro, and San Francisco, and they hope it will pop up in more cities around the world.

The structure itself isn’t very pretty—and you need community space to build it in. Then there’s the matter that once you’ve built it, your work has just begun. You have to keep the plants alive.

The article has been updated to clarify how the garden is intended to be used.

Slideshow Credits:

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Photo: Alona Vibe;


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Photo: Alona Vibe;


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Photo: Alona Vibe;

Article source: https://www.fastcodesign.com/3068284/wanted/now-anyone-can-build-ikeas-experimental-indoor-garden

In the Garden: Big week for gardeners with top shows calling

Next week is a big one for gardeners in B.C. with two key shows competing for attention: B.C. Home + Garden Show in Vancouver and the second biggest event of its kind in North America, the Northwest Flower and Garden Show in Seattle.

Both shows run from Feb. 22 to 26 and will feature top-notch display gardens as well as a bounty of experts dispensing advice on everything from the latest plant trends to creative landscaping and design ideas.

A highlight at the B.C. Home + Garden Show at B.C. Place Stadium will again be our Vancouver Sun Gardener’s School, a forum I started 15 years ago. The lineup of speakers includes many local experts, knowledgable gardeners and experienced designers. Their presentations are intended to inspire, educate and entertain.

Egan Davis, head of the horticultural training program at the University of B.C. Botanical Garden.


Egan Davis, head of the horticultural training program at the University of B.C. Botanical Garden.

supplied photo /

Vancouver Sun

Egan Davis, head instructor at the University of B.C. Botanical Garden’s horticultural training program, will explain how to make your garden more water-wise by using drought-tolerant plants and creative techniques such as mulching and clever use of ground cover plants.

Image (13) gary-lewis_thumb.jpg for post 174368


Gary Lewis.

Gary Lewis, owner of Phoenix Perennials — a cutting-edge Richmond nursery that has become popular with gardeners as a prime source for the latest and trendiest plants — will talk about weird and wonderful plants, no doubt drawing on some of his experience travelling in South Africa and Australia.

David Tracey will be one of the speakers at the Gardener's School.


David Tracey will be one of the speakers at the Gardener’s School.

supplied photo /

Vancouver Sun

David Tracey, author of the No. 1 bestselling Vancouver Tree Book, will share his knowledge and insight on how we can protect and enhance the urban forest, as well as how we can learn to identify specific trees in our neighbourhood.

Brian Minter, Chilliwack’s well-known garden centre owner, broadcaster and author, will focus on the dynamic role that plants play in our lives every day. Studies have shown that quality landscaping not only helps houses to sell faster but can also help reduce crime and create a more learning-friendly environment for children. Minter will no doubt touch on these and other upbeat aspects of gardening and the benefits of being around plants.

Janis Matson is an expert at picking the right tree for the right spot.


Janis Matson is an expert at picking the right tree for the right spot.

Mark van Manen /

PNG

Janis Matson and Conway Lum are two of my favourite garden experts, and I often go to them to get advice and answers.

As an experienced garden designer and maintenance landscaper, Matson knows all about the best cultivars of plants for local gardens. As an instructor at Kwantlen Horticultural College, where she helps train future landscape professionals, she also has excellent knowledge about common plant problems, making her the perfect person to answer your toughest questions. At the Gardener’s School, she’ll talk about the best plants to pick to make your garden look fabulous.

Into the swing of growing vegetables. One of the quirky ideas Steve Whysall will be presenting the Gardener's School.


Into the swing of growing vegetables. One of the quirky ideas Steve Whysall will be presenting the Gardener’s School.

supplied photo /

Vancouver Sun

Lum has been the go-to problem-solver at the GardenWorks store in Burnaby for years, and is also a past winner of the B.C. Landscape and Nursery Association’s Communicator of the Year award. He will explain how to get the best from your fruit trees; how to care for them, prune them and deal with pest and disease problems. If you have garden problems, I know Lum will have the solution for you.

Mike Lascelle will be talking about rare and unusual fruit.


Mike Lascelle will be talking about rare and unusual fruit.

supplied photo /

Vancouver Sun

Since food gardening is still one of the biggest trends, Mike Lascelle, from Amsterdam Greenhouses and Garden Centre in Pitt Meadows, wants us to know more about the revolution in unusual, even rare fruit. This will be a fascinating introduction to new and unusual varieties, as well as little known or under-appreciated fruit that can be grown locally.

Leanne Johnson, chief operating officer of the GardenWorks chain of garden centres, will share her ideas about how we can grow groceries on balconies and patios.

Carson Arthur, outdoor design and lifestyle expert, will also focus on food gardening, notably urban farming and how to make the best use of a small outdoor space.

Looking for a design for your new garden? Or perhaps you want to add some new landscape features?

Reinier van de Poll, who has been designing and installing gardens for years, will again be at the school to offer his help, particularly for those who want to create a beautiful getaway in their backyard.

I will offer more than 20 ideas to make your garden more exciting, and your gardening life more fun. I will be talking about plants as well as clever and quirky design ideas and inspiring decorative touches. Over the years, I have visited dozens of gardens, here and abroad, and have picked up some great ideas for planting schemes, as well as imaginative decorative features. I want to share some of the best ones with you and have some fun doing it.

• For more information about the Home + Garden Show go to bchomeandgardenshow.com.

Primula theatres can look dramatic. Steve Whysall will be featuring this one in his talk at the Gardener's School

Related

Showtime in Seattle

Northwest Flower and Garden Show in Seattle, the second biggest in the U.S. after the show in Philadelphia, has chosen “a taste of spring” for its main theme.

Held in the Washington State Convention Centre, this five-day show, which started in 1989, will again feature 23 sumptuous garden displays, built by local landscapers, nurseries and horticultural groups.

The show is famous for its large marketplace featuring more than 300 exhibitors, selling everything from greenhouses and garden tools to all the latest garden gizmos and accessories.

The speaker program is comprehensive. The show boasts it has the “finest roster of free talks of any garden show in the world.” But it is the lavish show gardens that attract the crowds. Each garden attempts to interpret the theme of the show in a unique way.

There will be a Naples-style pizza garden, a Japanese “hanami” (cherry blossom viewing) garden as well as an English Victory garden, with a knot garden and edible garden evoking images from gardens from the Elizabethan era to the Second World War.

An orchid garden set for a wedding banquet should cause a stir, and there is little doubt that the Villa Primavera Garden, inspired by Italy’s Amalfi coast, will push all the right buttons.

Many gardeners here seize the opportunity to travel to Seattle to see the show and perhaps stay overnight and make an early spring getaway of the adventure. There is no reason gardeners can’t attend both shows, even if they do happen to be on simultaneously.

• For more information about the Seattle flower show, go to www.gardenshow.com.

swhysall@postmedia.com

twitter.com/stevewhysall

Creative plant schemes like this one featuring wisteria, phormium and a fan palm will be featured in Steve Whysall's talk at the Gardener's School.


Creative plant schemes like this one featuring wisteria, phormium and a fan palm will be featured in Steve Whysall’s talk at the Gardener’s School.

supplied photo /

Vancouver Sun

LOOK WHO’S TALKING AT B.C. HOME + GARDEN SHOW

Feb. 22

5:30 p.m. — Reinier van de Poll: A Getaway in your own Backyard

7 p.m.—Conway Lum: Why Does my Fruit Tree not Produce Flowers and/or Fruit? Fruit tree quirks.

Feb. 23

3 p.m. — Brian Minter: The Dynamic Role Plants Play in People’s Lives

5 p.m. — Steve Whysall: 20+ ideas to make your garden fabulous this spring.

7 p.m. — Janis Matson: Star Plants: The Ones that Make Gardening Look Easy

Feb. 24

2 p.m. — Steve Whysall: 20+ ideas to make your garden fabulous this spring.

4 p.m. — Carson Arthur: Urban Farming — Making the most of your small outdoor spaces.

6 p.m. — Mike Lascelle: The Rare Fruit Revolution

7:30 p.m. — Janis Matson: Star Plants: The Ones that Make Gardening Look Easy

Feb. 25

12:30 p.m. — Egan Davis: Water Wise Gardening

2 p.m. — David Tracey: Your Home in the Urban Forest

4 p.m. — Gary Lewis: Weird and Wonderful Plants of the World

5:30 p.m. — Steve Whysall: 20+ ideas to make your garden fabulous this spring.

7 p.m. — Conway Lum: Why Does my Fruit Tree not Produce Flowers and/or Fruit? Fruit tree quirks.

Feb. 26

1 p.m. — Steve Whysall: 20+ ideas to make your garden fabulous this spring.

2:30 p.m. — Leanne Johnson: Growing your own Groceries on Balconies and Patios

Related

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Is there more to this story? We’d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email vantips@postmedia.com.

Article source: http://vancouversun.com/life/homes/gardening/in-the-garden-big-week-for-gardeners-with-top-shows-calling

Grow with KARE: Home and Patio Show

Grow with KARE: Home and Patio Show

Article source: http://www.kare11.com/news/grow-with-kare-home-and-patio-show/409434797

Local garden experts say not to worry about winter damage

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2017-02-18 sc-whattodowithplants

The dead bulbs of a camellia plant at the Linnaeus Teaching Garden remain after a fluctuating winter season. Some plants are pushing out new growth due to the early warm temperatures, but there is no need to worry about the plants if there’s a late-season freeze in March or April. “Plants will have new growth that gets burned off two, three or four times, but it will put more growth right back out again and again,” said Barry Fugatt, Tulsa Garden Center director of horticulture. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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A nandina plant at the Linnaeus Teaching Garden is covered in dead leaves due to the fluctuating weather experienced across Oklahoma. Many plants didn’t have time to harden off in preparation for the early low temperatures in the area felt in December. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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Brown leaves cover a bush at the Linnaeus Teaching Garden after enduring the frigid winter temperatures in December. Most plants will recover from the season when the weather warms up more consistently, but there is no rush to prune to dead foliage at this time, said Barry Fugatt, Tulsa Garden Center’s director of horitculture. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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Brown leaves and branches cover a bush at the Linnaeus Teaching Garden on Wednesday. Area professionals advise holding out on pruning and shearing old foliage from plant until later when the warm weather is more consistent. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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Director of horticulture at the Tulsa Garden Center Barry Fugatt walks through the entrance to the Linnaeus Teaching Garden on Wednesday. The garden center is home to many plants that have suffered from winter’s inconsistent weather, but many of the plants will recover without assistance on their own once the risk of a hard freeze passes. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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Barry Fugatt, director of horticulture at the Tulsa Garden Center surveys the plants in front of the Linnaeus Teaching Garden. Many plants in the region suffered from freezing temperatures and are starting to push out new growth due to early srping-like conditions. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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Barry Fugatt, director of horticulture at Tulsa Garden Center, says the early single-digit weather in December damaged many plants, but recent warm weather has some plants showing new growth. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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Young leaves are starting to push out from various plants at the Linnaeus Teaching Garden in Tulsa. The recent warm weather has some plants getting ready for spring. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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The unseasonably warm February is causing some plants to produce new growth and area gardeners to worry about the risk of a late-season freeze. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World

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Barry Fugatt, director of horticulture at the Tulsa Garden Center, walks through the entrance of the Linnaeus Teaching Garden, where some plants have suffered winter damage. IAN MAULE/Tulsa World



Two kinds of winter damage

When temperatures plummet into the 20s or teens, plants can become prone to freezing. Here are the two ways your plants may experience winter damage.

Chill injury: This type of damage occurs when the plant is exposed to temperatures near the freezing point. Tropical and tender plants are much more susceptible to this kind of damage. It can be seen in the form of dark spots or wilting in leaves.

Freeze damage: This happens when moisture inside the plant expands as it freezes, which can break through the plant’s cell walls.


Posted: Saturday, February 18, 2017 12:00 am
|


Updated: 1:25 am, Sat Feb 18, 2017.

Local garden experts say not to worry about winter damage

By Jessica Rodrigo
Tulsa World

TulsaWorld.com

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0 comments

New leaves and buds are starting to peek out from beneath their brown winter disguises, while other plants seem to have taken it “right on the chin,” said one Tulsa horticulturist.

The combination of frigid temperatures in December and spring-like weather in February have caused some gardeners concern over the well-being of their gardens and landscapes. For Barry Fugatt, Tulsa Garden Center’s director of horticulture, most of the questions from those gardeners can be answered quite easily.

“Don’t be in such a rush to jump in. Most of what I see will grow out of it just fine,” he said of the winter damage.

Some plants have experienced more winter damage than others, but there is quite a range even in the same plant species. For example, some nandinas or azaleas have been “fried” by the freezing temperatures felt in December, but heartier varieties are beginning to show their spring greenery.

Because the weather can be so unpredictable, it’s hard to know if that new growth is going stick around long enough to mature into the spring. Another round of freezing temperatures could burn off that growth, but it’s not something the plant can’t handle, Fugatt said.

“Plants will have new growth that gets burned off two, three or four times, but it will put more growth right back out again and again,” he said. “Plants are highly sophisticated. They can read the weather and will respond to it.”

When it comes to plants that look brown and dreary, give them a little bit of time to recover on their own. Though he understands the urge to shear the plant back or apply fertilizers, Fugatt said there’s no need to do that just yet. There’s no danger by leaving the brown leaves and branches on the plant until the weather is more consistently warm — it’s possible in this region to get hit with a late freeze or snow storm as some previous years have demonstrated. The damaged foliage will likely drop when it’s ready.

“There are some plants that look beat up, but that doesn’t mean they’re dead,” added Paul James with Southwood Landscaping and Garden Center. “Fear not, the plants will come back and will start to produce new growth when it warms up again.”

Concerned customers have come to the south Tulsa nursery asking about their plants, and he’ll tell them with confidence there’s nothing to worry about right now.

“It’s typical weather in Oklahoma. Yes, plants are budding out a tad early, but it’s not a bad thing assuming we don’t get some freezing temperatures in March or April — or even May,” he said.

If there is cold weather, covering plants with blankets can provide a little extra protection, but some plants, including winter greens and vegetables, can withstand cooler conditions as long as they stay above freezing. Also, watering plants in the cooler months is just as important as it is during the growing season.

A few species of trees will put out buds naturally this time of year, Fugatt said, pointing to magnolias. But that’s part of the plant’s process of transitioning from winter to spring — it’s a sign of a healthy tree.

Some of the discoloration of leaves, with brown spots or yellowing, is cosmetic damage. The outermost leaves may have experienced damage from cooler temperatures, which can be as mild as in the 40s, but will return to a normal green hue when spring truly arrives.

“I feel the gardener’s pain,” he said. “It’s disappointing for all of us to see our plants in this shape.”

Jessica Rodrigo 918-581-8482

jessica.rodrigo@tulsaworld.com

Twitter: @EatsEatsEats

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More about Barry Fugatt

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Saturday, February 18, 2017 12:00 am.

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Article source: http://www.tulsaworld.com/homepagelatest/local-garden-experts-say-not-to-worry-about-winter-damage/article_1c59c884-4bd9-5af8-9d91-d309a9a069e4.html

19 home and garden events Feb. 18 and beyond – The Courier


Events

Purdue Master Gardener Program Seeking NewVolunteers. The training session will be offered to residents of Floyd, Clark and Scott counties, and surrounding areas. Participants commit to volunteer 35 hours to be a certified Purdue Master Gardener sharing their knowledge while providing leadership and service in educational gardening activities within their communities. Training will be held Mondays from 6-9:15 p.m. through April 10, the Prosser School of Technology, 4202 Charlestown Road, New Albany. $175 ($25 deposit is requested to hold your spot). Gina Anderson, 812-948-5470.

Seed Starting Workshop with Bethany Pratt. St. Matthews Feed Seed, 225 Chenoweth Lane, 10 a.m. today. Learn how to start your crops from seed. $5. 502-896-4473.

Louisville Nature Center Bird Walks. Lobby, 3745 Illinois Ave., 10 a.m. today. Rod Botkins will lead the walk. Participants 18 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. If you have binoculars, bring them. Free, donations accepted. 502-458-1328.

Succulent Workshop with Tom Huckaby: St. Matthews Feed Seed, 225 Chenoweth Lane, 10 a.m. Wednesday. Learn how to how to plant and maintain succulents. Succulents and pots available at a discounted price for participants. Sio and other potting materials provided. 502-896-4473.

The Farmer and The Foodie Maggie Keith and Lindsey McClave: From Garden to the Table. Atria Senior Living, 300 E. Market St., 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 25. Maggie Keith, the Farmer, will share her agricultural knowledge of how the food they use is grown and raised; Lindsey McClave, the foodie (and Courier-Journal restaurant critic), will create some simple recipes that combine the spirit of Kentucky with her flair for global cuisine. Coffee and breakfast pastries also provided. Presented by Waterfront Botanical Gardens. $20, $15 members. Information and reservations: waterfrontgardens.org/events; 502-276-5404.

Home, Garden Remodeling Show. Kentucky Exposition Center, 937 Phillips Lane, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. March 3-4; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. March 5. See the latest products and services for our home. $10, $9 seniors, free for ages 15 and younger. 502-367-5000.

The Gardens of Southern France: A Dinner Travelogue with Paul Cappiello. Yew Dell Botanical Gardens, 6220 Old Lagrange Road, Crestwood, 6:30-8:30 p.m. March 22. Features and evening with traditional French cuisine, wine pairings and Yew Dell’s executive director Paul Cappiello sharing his experiences traveling through the gardens of southern France. Catered by Red Hog, Blue Dog’s new Artisan Butcher Shop Restaurant. $80, $70 members. 502- 241-4788; yewdellgardens.org.

The Kentuckiana Herb Society Spring Education Day:Silver Cilantro. Huber’s Orchard Winery, Borden, Indiana, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. March 25. Peggy Theineman, owner of Theineman’s Green Haus, Cox’s Creek, Ky, will discuss Silver Herbs. Author Stephen Lee, the “HerbMeister,” will discuss changes in herb culture over the past 25 years including the Herb of the Year – Cilantro. Reservations are needed by March 17. Registration fee is $40 and includes presentations, continental breakfast, buffet lunch, raffle, and marketplace vendors. www.kentuckianaherbsociety.org or Jett Rose, jettellen@yahoo.com; 812-590-4604.

Louisville Nature Center Wonderful World of Weeds. The Louisville Nature Center and the Food Literacy Project at Oxmoor Farm is partnering to offer a two-part weed education series (10 a.m. March 25 and April 5). Registration is required by March 23rd. $40. 502-458-1328.

Sunnyside Master Gardener Spring Lecture Series: The Road to a Beautiful Garden. Clark County REMC, 7810 State Road 60, Sellersburg, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. April 1. Karen Bryant will discuss, A Spring Garden Calendar; Anitia Mosiman will discuss, Edible Landscaping; and Dr. Tom Turpin will discuss, Good Bug/Bad Bug. Reservations are needed by March 11. $30 per person, includes breakfast and lunch. Contact, Gina Anderson, 812-948-5470.


Classes

Smart Gardens and Landscapes. Research Center, Bernheim Forest, Exit 112 off Interstate 65, Clermont, 10 a.m.-noon today. Make plans for your edible ornamental garden and learn about plant and site selection, garden design, site preparation, labeling and the care and maintenance of the garden. Registration is needed by 4 p.m. Feb. 17. $15, $10 members. (502) 955-8512. www.bernheim.org.

Gear Up For Gardening. Louisville Free Public Library, Main Branch, 301 York St., 6:30-8 p.m. Thursdays through March 23. Led by Master Gardener June Sandercock. Sandercock will discuss what is new, new plant introductions, new gardening and landscape design concepts, new ways for planting and maintaining spaces and new ways to approach everyday issues. Free. To register call, 502-574-1623.

Clark County Vegetable Gardening Class: The After Dinner Garden Conversation. Clark County 4-H Fair Grounds, Charlestown, 7-9 p.m. Thursdays through Sept. 14. Gardening enthusiasts and beginners to gardening learn how to successfully raise vegetables in their communities and backyards. Registration is by Feb. 10. $20 for the series. 812-256-4591.

Spring Blooming Natives. Bullitt County Extension Office, 384 Halls Lane, Shepherdsville, 6-8 p.m. March 2. Learn about what is blooming wild in Kentucky. Free. Pre-registration is required, call 502-543-2257.

Growing Squash Gourds. Bullitt County Extension Office, 384 Halls Lane, Shepherdsville, 6-8 p.m. March 14. Learn how to grow decorative squash and gourds for crafts and other uses. Free. Pre-registration is required, call 502-543-2257.

Spraying Fruit Trees. Bullitt County Extension Office, 384 Halls Lane, Shepherdsville, 6 p.m. March 20. Learn the when, what and how of spraying fruit trees. Part of the Orchards Production Series. Free. Pre-registration is required, call 502-543-2257.

Pruning Thinning Fruit Trees. Bullitt County Extension Office, 384 Halls Lane, Shepherdsville, 6 p.m. April 10. Learn how to prune to improve health and quality of fruit trees. Part of the Orchards Production Series. Free. Pre-registration is required, call 502-543-2257.

Grafting Fruit Trees. Bullitt County Extension Office, 384 Halls Lane, Shepherdsville, 6 p.m. April 24. Hands on techniques for grafting fruit trees. Part of the Orchards Production Series. Free. Pre-registration is required, call 502-543-2257.


Meetings

Hosta Society meeting. Lyndon City Hall, 515 Wood Road, 7 p.m. Thursday . Speaker: Alice Kimbrell from Yew Dell Gardens.

Email items to listings@courier-journal.com. Deadline for next Saturday’s column is noon Tuesday.

Article source: http://www.courier-journal.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/02/17/home-garden-events-feb-beyond/97919304/

Bright colors and bold rocks for 2017 gardens



With our wet weather and fluctuating temperatures, it’s hard to get into the mood for gardening, but here are some hot trends to consider for you garden from Monrovia Nursery.

Small sized luxury: If you’re working with a small space in your garden, add scaled-down versions of iconic plants such as hydrangeas, roses, berries, conifers and clematis to the garden.

Floratourism: More travelers these days are spending their vacation hours at national parks, botanical gardens and arboretums, then using them for inspiration in their own gardens.

No waste movement: Gardeners and gardens are being influenced by the “no waste” food movement. A third of households are now growing food. If you a more tradition flower and shrub garden, ease into the movement by growing perennial herbs or add some vegetable in among your established landscaping.

Color chameleons: Gardeners are gaga over color-changing plants that provide consistent year-round beauty. A good choice is fuss-free conifers look beautiful in all seasons, but add some surprising color in the winter.

Extreme naturalism: Don’t be afraid to add natural elements in your garden. Rocks, boulders and untouched hedges can add an integrated sense of structure to your garden, and is a growing trend for 2017.

Climate adaptation: We’ve been focused on saving water in our gardens and landscape for several years, and we should continue to focus on California natives and drought-tolerant plants.

Bright, bold colors: Don’t shy away from brilliant oranges, feverish reds, neon yellows, vivid purples, deep, dark reds and black-purples in your garden this year.

One-pot wonders: Containers filled with different sorts of plants has been replaced by a trend of using one type of plant per pot, such as a compact hydrangea and new varieties of pomegranates, lavenders, succulents and berries.

Article source: http://www.record-bee.com/lifestyle/20170217/bright-colors-and-bold-rocks-for-2017-gardens