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Archives for February 11, 2017

Coming up: Raleigh Home Show, Open Nursery & Garden Days, more

Raleigh Home Show

The Raleigh Home Show is coming Feb. 17-19 to the Downtown Raleigh Convention Center.

This year’s Home Show has special guests Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge, also known as The Fabulous Beekman Boys; and John Gidding from HGTV shows “Designed to Sell” and “Curb Appeal: The Block.”

The show will also feature the Idea House, a 1,400-square-foot house built right inside the convention center. The Idea House features multiple bedrooms, a kitchen, bathroom, dining area and more. Guests can get ideas to implement in their own homes.

You can also check out The Recipe Cooking Stage presented by The Recipe and the News Observer, Homegrown Marketplace and more.

Admission is $7-$10 (free admission on Feb. 17 – Hero Day – for those with valid active or former military, police, fire or EMT ID). Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Friday; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.

Winter Open Nursery and Garden Days

Plant Delights Nursery and Juniper Level Botanic Garden’s Winter Open Nursery and Garden Days take place over two upcoming weekends: Feb. 24-26 and March 3-5.

It’s a chance to shop for native, rare and unique perennial plants and stroll through Raleigh’s Juniper Level Botanic Garden. You can also take advantage of free 15-minute talks in the “Garden Chat” series. The presentations take place during each day of Garden Days, and are led by Tony Avent and PDN staff. The talks will highlight seasonally prominent plants, cultural information and garden design ideas.

The Juniper Level Botanic Garden is a private, not-for-profit, 28-acre campus containing research, breeding, educational and display botanic gardens, funded by 12% of sales revenue from Plant Delights Nursery.

Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 24-25 and March 3-4; 1-5 p.m. Feb. 26. and March 5.

Get more information and directions at plantdelights.com or jlbg.org.

How to buy healthy plants

Sarah P. Duke Gardens in Durham hosts a “Buy Healthy Plants And Plant Them Well” class as part of its Extension Gardener Series on Thursday, March 2.

Plants stand a better chance of thriving in your garden when they start off healthy. This presentation will review what you should look for when purchasing and planting plants.

Instructor Chris Apple, Durham County Extension master gardener, will discuss plant sources; how to evaluate a plant; how to correctly plant a tree, shrub, groundcover or perennial; and then what is necessary to establish a plant.

The class takes place from 6:30-8:40 p.m. at the Doris Duke Center (no parking fees after 5 p.m.). The event is free but registration is required by calling 919-668-1707.

Vegetable garden workshop

The N.C. Botanical Gardens in Chapel Hill will hold a “Soil is Everything: A Vegetable Garden Workshop” from 1:30-3 p.m. Sunday, March 5.

It’s a good hands-on outdoor experience for those wanting to learn more about soil testing and sampling, different soil types, building your soil, the pros and cons of raised beds (with and without edges), the effects of tillage on soils, soil amendments and more.

The class is led by permaculture designer and organic gardener Greta Lee, and Carolina Campus Community Garden educator Claire Lorch. It costs $15 ($10 for members). Get more info at ncbg.unc.edu.

Triad Orchid Society Show

The 2017 Triad Orchid Society Show, “March of Orchids,” takes place March 3-5 at the AB Seed Education Annex (8432 Norcross Road) in Colfax, across from the Piedmont Triad Farmer’s Market.

Regional orchid societies and individual hobbyist growers will exhibit orchid plants in bloom, many in unusual or rarely seen genera and recent hybrids not available at big-box and grocery stores. This is an American Orchid Society judged show with ribbon awards.

There also will be plants and pottery available to purchase from local vendors, plus raffles and prizes.

Admission is $5 for adults, children 12 under free with an adult. Hours: 1-5 p.m. March 3, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. March 4, 1-5 p.m. March 5.

For more information visit facebook.com/triadorchidsociety or triadorchidsociety.org.

Article source: http://www.newsobserver.com/living/home-garden/article131681439.html

Creating small-space landscapes

Gardeners are often faced with small spaces when landscaping. In urban areas, lots are typically fairly small. Even in situations where lots are larger, restricted-space areas often need to be addressed on the small scale.

Although creating small-scale gardens may seem easier to deal with than larger ones, careful planning is just as, or even more, critical. The choice and use of building materials; the choice and placement of plants, textures, shapes and colors; the activities that will take place in the landscape; and the positioning and flow of traffic are all matters of concern. When every square inch counts, a well thought out plan is essential because the prospective viewer is going to be closer to the landscape and thus more aware of every detail.

The concept of good design can mean different things to different people, and no one design is absolutely right for a given situation. To get you started in the right direction, however, certain design considerations are worth bearing in mind when you are pondering how to go about laying out a small-scale landscape.

Often, small gardens are located adjacent to or in close proximity to the home. This is important when considering the style of your garden. The style of the garden should reflect the location and style of surrounding buildings. Look for established neighborhood features, such as neighborhood buildings, parks or old gardens, and take inspiration from them. The building materials used in the garden should also relate to and harmonize with the building materials used in the house.

For instance, stucco Spanish revival homes might incorporate Spanish landscape elements into their landscape style, while homes with a relaxed Acadian-style architecture are complemented by informal, natural elements in the landscape. You can learn more about styles of landscapes and their characteristics from any good landscaping book.

When I lived in New Orleans, my home was a late 1800s Victorian Eastlake-style house. The Victorian period generally favored formal elements in the landscape — symmetry, geometric layouts of beds, straight lines — and the exuberant use of color. This was the style I adopted for my very small backyard garden. The style selected has a great influence on the way the garden is laid out and the plants and the building materials used.

My selection of building materials was also influenced by my home and neighborhood. After looking around, I chose such building materials such as laid brick, lattice, wrought iron, clapboard, French doors and stained glass for structures and surfaces and terra-cotta pots to embellish the patio. Remember, your landscape will not exist in a vacuum, and you should feel free to draw on existing surroundings for inspiration.

One last comment on style and materials: Remember that the style and décor of rooms that have a view of the garden should also be considered because the garden will visually become a part of those rooms and should harmonize with them.

Everyone’s garden is unique based on their tastes and needs. Once the fundamental style of a garden has emerged, the actual form and layout are largely dictated by how it will be used.

The first step in drawing a landscape plan is to list your family’s needs that can be fulfilled by the garden. Do you need privacy, a patio for outdoor entertainment or shade? Are you an avid gardener, or do you need to minimize maintenance? How about vegetables, flowers, pets, children’s play areas and work areas? Taking inspiration from John F. Kennedy, I sometimes say, “Ask not what you can do for your landscape; ask what your landscape can do for you.”

After you have determined the general style, how the landscape will be used and what it needs to provide, it’s time to begin drawing a plan. The area can be carefully measured and a scale drawing produced to work with, or simple sketches can suffice.

The desired features of the garden, based on the chosen style and needs, are arranged and re-arranged on paper until you are satisfied with the results. If existing features will be retained, make sure you include them in the plan.

At this stage in developing your plan, you need to determine the size and shapes of beds, outdoor living areas and other features. This is an artistic phase and will be substantially guided by the style you have chosen. Take your time. Feel free to look through landscaping books for inspiration and ideas.

When choosing plant materials, keep in mind the smaller scale of the situation, and select plants that are compact, dwarf or slow-growing. It is very easy to over-plant or select plants that grow too large for their location. This creates additional maintenance as frequent pruning will be needed to keep plants in control. Always find out the mature size of the trees and shrubs you are considering to make sure their size is appropriate.

Help, if you need it, is available. If you are unsure of your final plan, consult with a licensed landscape architect to iron out the rough spots.

Article source: http://www.thetowntalk.com/story/life/2017/02/10/creating-small-space-landscapes/97755470/

New Ideas On Display At Home & Garden Show in Wheeling

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Mother Nature promises to cooperate this weekend and bring a bit of spring-like weather to the Ohio Valley, just in time for visitors to enjoy the 48th annual Home and Garden Show at WesBanco Arena in Wheeling.

This three-day event is the largest of its kind in local area and is free to the public. The show is open from 3-7 p.m. today, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

The home show is a project of the Wheeling Area Chamber of Commerce, and is sponsored by DeNoon Lumber and WTOV-9.

Chamber officials said this year’s show “will help you get inspired and ready to renovate.”

“We are very excited to have several new vendors to complement our returning favorites which will make the weekend a well-worth-it trip for everyone,” Chamber Marketing and Special Events Coordinator Jane Dombroski said.

The Home and Garden Show will feature vendors of a wide variety including decorating, remodeling, flooring, windows, outdoor furniture, kitchen, landscaping and more.  In addition, there will also be a craft show in the upper concourse of the arena.

Chamber spokeswoman Mary Fahey said this family-friendly event has something special for children on Saturday. She noted there will be a bounce house, a clown making balloon animals and face-painting for the younger set.

As for the number of booths this year, Fahey said, “We are full.”

In addition, there will be more food vendors on site during the three days and a variety of crafters around the concourse area.

Article source: http://www.theintelligencer.net/news/community/2017/02/new-ideas-on-display-at-home-%E2%80%88garden-show-in-wheeling/

How to make the most out of a flower and garden show visit

Less expensive than a cruise, attending a flower and garden show is the perfect escape from winter. As you surround yourself with display gardens, with new plants and must-have gadgets, you become inspired and excited to plan for spring.

Here is how to get the most out of your visit as well as upcoming shows near the Poconos. 

What to expect

There are two types of events: a home and garden show and a flower and garden show. The former includes house/home projects, such as replacing windows, as well as gardening ventures. Examples are the recent NE Home and Garden Show at the Mohegan Sun Pocono Arena and the upcoming Philly Home and Garden Show. A flower and garden show, such as the Philadelphia Flower Show, focuses exclusively on gardens.

Whichever type you attend, expect to see colorful floral exhibits and garden landscape displays. You will learn some new gardening techniques and ideas, especially if you attend one of the seminars offered at the show. You will find the best resources in landscape and design services, and obtain expert advice and tips from landscape and gardening professionals. Sometimes there is a booth where Penn State master gardeners are available to answer your tough gardening questions. You may browse a vendor area with plants, tools and gifts for sale. There are often hands-on activities for all ages and levels of gardening. You may enter a favorite plant in a horticultural contest. 

Taking children and dogs to the show

Most flower shows have children’s events on their schedules. The New Jersey Flower and Garden Show holds the Great Zucchini Race and a junior flower show each year. The last Sunday of the Philadelphia Flower Show is always Family Day when there are kid-friendly activities including a teddy bear tea party. They have a family lounge where you can relax on any day when your children need a break. In the family lounge there are ongoing movies and activities. The Philadelphia Flower Show also has Fido Friday when show-goers take their four-legged friends. Your canine must have a tag with proof of current rabies vaccine. You and your dog can attend “Yappy Hour” from 6 to 9 p.m. 

Ten tips for fully enjoying a flower show

1. Plan ahead.

If you are travelling to a large flower show, you may want to visit the event’s website for advanced ticket information, hotel accommodations, directions and parking reservations. The website may give a floor map with descriptions of the exhibits so you can plan your route based on your interests. If you are interested in attending seminars, look for the online schedule of presentations. Note special events and themes. Plan to spend four to five hours at a large show. If you want to avoid the biggest crowds plan to arrive early, or after 3 p.m. weekdays. Target areas of special interest first, then any others you visit will be a bonus.

2. When you arrive, if you didn’t print one from the show website, make sure you buy a map and program.

3. Wear comfortable walking shoes such as hiking boots or sneakers, as a large show covers many acres. If needed, check beforehand whether wheelchairs or motorized scooters are available to rent. I know of at least one large show — the Chelsea Flower Show in London — that bans strollers. In any event, it’s best to carry young children in backpack-style carriers so they have a better view.

4. Bring a tote bag for purchases: You know you’ll make some. I avoid carrying a heavy pocketbook, however, remembering that less is more.

5. Bring a sweater. The temperature may be low to keep the plants and flowers looking their best. It is preferable to dress in layers.

6. Be prepared to take many pictures. I carry a camera as well as my smartphone.

7. Carry a small notebook or take notes on your phone. Record the names of plants, ideas or designs you would love for your garden.

8. Plan quiet time. Eat in restaurants at off-peak times to avoid lines. Take bottled water and an energy snack in case you need to wait. New to the Philadelphia Flower Show this year is the quiet Garden Spa where you can make your own potpourri or essential oils and enjoy a massage.

9. Talk to the exhibitors: You will find they have a wealth of information. They are passionate gardeners and will love sharing their knowledge with you. Pick up their leaflets for later.

10. Don’t compare your plants and gardens with those at the show, becoming depressed that yours don’t look as wonderful. Remember the flowers and gardens at the show only need to look good for a week. Yours will look great for much longer. 

Where to go

Philly Home and Garden Show, Feb. 17-19, Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at Oaks. Top landscaping companies create more than 5,000 square feet of inspirational gardens showcasing the latest techniques, ideas and must-have products for 2017. 

New Jersey Flower and Garden Show, Feb. 23-26, New Jersey Convention and Expo Center at Edison, New Jersey. The Garden State’s largest flower and garden show, this year’s theme is “Color the World.” Featuring gardens with an international flair, horticultural competitions, gardening presentations, seminars, an indoor marketplace and the Standard Flower Show presented by the Garden Club of New Jersey. 

Lehigh Valley Flower Show, March 10-12, Allentown Fairgrounds. This year’s theme is “Celebrate Gardens of the World.” The area’s top landscapers each picked a country from around the world and will celebrate that nation’s flowers and cultural interests, including natural habitat. Experts will give demonstrations and seminars. Penn State master gardeners will have a display and be available to answer your gardening questions. 

PHS Philadelphia Flower Show, March 11-19, Pennsylvania Convention Center. This year’s theme is “Holland: Flowering the World.” This show is the nation’s largest and longest running event, featuring displays by the world’s premier floral and landscape designers. In addition to the garden displays there are competitions in horticulture and floral arranging, gardening presentations and demonstrations, special events, and a mammoth indoor Marketplace. 

I love visiting a garden show in winter to smell the damp soil and marvel at how the designers coaxed all those flowers into bloom in February or March. It makes me feel spring is not that far away. See you at the show. 

Pamela T. Hubbard gardens in Effort and is a Penn State Master Gardener, extension.psu.edu/monroe. Penn State Master Gardeners of Monroe County can provide speakers on a variety of gardening topics. For information, call Penn State Extension in Monroe County at 570-421-6430.

 

Article source: http://www.poconorecord.com/entertainmentlife/20170210/how-to-make-most-out-of-flower-and-garden-show-visit

Creating small-space landscapes

Gardeners are often faced with small spaces when landscaping. In urban areas, lots are typically fairly small. Even in situations where lots are larger, restricted-space areas often need to be addressed on the small scale.

Although creating small-scale gardens may seem easier to deal with than larger ones, careful planning is just as, or even more, critical. The choice and use of building materials; the choice and placement of plants, textures, shapes and colors; the activities that will take place in the landscape; and the positioning and flow of traffic are all matters of concern. When every square inch counts, a well thought out plan is essential because the prospective viewer is going to be closer to the landscape and thus more aware of every detail.

The concept of good design can mean different things to different people, and no one design is absolutely right for a given situation. To get you started in the right direction, however, certain design considerations are worth bearing in mind when you are pondering how to go about laying out a small-scale landscape.

Often, small gardens are located adjacent to or in close proximity to the home. This is important when considering the style of your garden. The style of the garden should reflect the location and style of surrounding buildings. Look for established neighborhood features, such as neighborhood buildings, parks or old gardens, and take inspiration from them. The building materials used in the garden should also relate to and harmonize with the building materials used in the house.

For instance, stucco Spanish revival homes might incorporate Spanish landscape elements into their landscape style, while homes with a relaxed Acadian-style architecture are complemented by informal, natural elements in the landscape. You can learn more about styles of landscapes and their characteristics from any good landscaping book.

When I lived in New Orleans, my home was a late 1800s Victorian Eastlake-style house. The Victorian period generally favored formal elements in the landscape — symmetry, geometric layouts of beds, straight lines — and the exuberant use of color. This was the style I adopted for my very small backyard garden. The style selected has a great influence on the way the garden is laid out and the plants and the building materials used.

My selection of building materials was also influenced by my home and neighborhood. After looking around, I chose such building materials such as laid brick, lattice, wrought iron, clapboard, French doors and stained glass for structures and surfaces and terra-cotta pots to embellish the patio. Remember, your landscape will not exist in a vacuum, and you should feel free to draw on existing surroundings for inspiration.

One last comment on style and materials: Remember that the style and décor of rooms that have a view of the garden should also be considered because the garden will visually become a part of those rooms and should harmonize with them.

Everyone’s garden is unique based on their tastes and needs. Once the fundamental style of a garden has emerged, the actual form and layout are largely dictated by how it will be used.

The first step in drawing a landscape plan is to list your family’s needs that can be fulfilled by the garden. Do you need privacy, a patio for outdoor entertainment or shade? Are you an avid gardener, or do you need to minimize maintenance? How about vegetables, flowers, pets, children’s play areas and work areas? Taking inspiration from John F. Kennedy, I sometimes say, “Ask not what you can do for your landscape; ask what your landscape can do for you.”

After you have determined the general style, how the landscape will be used and what it needs to provide, it’s time to begin drawing a plan. The area can be carefully measured and a scale drawing produced to work with, or simple sketches can suffice.

The desired features of the garden, based on the chosen style and needs, are arranged and re-arranged on paper until you are satisfied with the results. If existing features will be retained, make sure you include them in the plan.

At this stage in developing your plan, you need to determine the size and shapes of beds, outdoor living areas and other features. This is an artistic phase and will be substantially guided by the style you have chosen. Take your time. Feel free to look through landscaping books for inspiration and ideas.

When choosing plant materials, keep in mind the smaller scale of the situation, and select plants that are compact, dwarf or slow-growing. It is very easy to over-plant or select plants that grow too large for their location. This creates additional maintenance as frequent pruning will be needed to keep plants in control. Always find out the mature size of the trees and shrubs you are considering to make sure their size is appropriate.

Help, if you need it, is available. If you are unsure of your final plan, consult with a licensed landscape architect to iron out the rough spots.

Article source: http://www.thetowntalk.com/story/life/2017/02/10/creating-small-space-landscapes/97755470/

Home and Garden events – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

GARDEN

Boerner Botanical Gardens: Winter Tree Identification, 10 a.m. March 11. $10 FBBG member/$15 non-member. Whitnall Park, 9400 Boerner Drive, Hales Corners. Information: (414) 525-5653; www.boernerbotanicalgardens.org

Burlington Garden Center: Gardening, planting and lawn care workshops and seminars; prices vary. 5205 Mormon Road, Burlington, (262) 763-2153; burlingtongardencenter.com

The Elegant Farmer: Farm Kitchen Bakery, Deli Market, open daily 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Highway ES and J, Mukwonago. (262) 363-6770; www.elegantfarmer.com

Elmbrook Garden Club: Meeting and program “Endangered Bats of Wisconsin” with speaker William Mueller, 6:30 p.m. March 2. Club meets first Thursday of the month. Public welcome. Brookfield Library, 1900 N. Calhoun Road, Brookfield. Laura Skoff, (414) 614-6489.

Greendale Park Recreation: Bus trip to Chicago Flower Garden Show, 8 a.m. March 23. $50 Greendale resident/ $60 non-resident. Registration is first-come, first-served basis. Info: (414) 423-2790.

Growing Power: Winter Market, 8 a.m.-noon Saturdays. 5500 W. Silver Spring Drive.

Herb Society of America- Wisconsin Unit: Lemony Snippets: A Series of Lemon Herbs Symposium, 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. March 4. $65; registration deadline is Feb. 25. Woman’s Club of Wisconsin, 813 E. Kilbourn Ave., Info: Joan, (262) 377-1461; www.herb-society-wisconsin.org

Lynden Sculpture Garden: Family Day Fiber Fest Finale, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Feb. 26. Free. Experience art in nature through its collection of more than 50 monumental sculptures sited across 40 acres of park, lake and woodland. Tours and classes for all ages. 2145 W. Brown Deer Road. (414) 446-8794; lyndensculpturegarden.org

Milwaukee Art Museum Garden Club: Guest speaker Christine Miller presents “Ice Age Trail Demystified: Photos and Stories,” 10 a.m. Feb. 17. Reservation required for lunch. Lubar Auditorium, Milwaukee Art Museum, 700 N. Art Museum Drive. (414) 224-3200.

Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory: “The Great Train Robbery” Garden Train Show, open daily, (through April 2). G-scale trains crisscross a landscape of canyons, small towns and miniature plants. 524 S. Layton Blvd., (414) 257-5600.

Ozaukee Master Gardeners: All About Herbs lecture series presents “Herbscaping,” 7 p.m. March 16. The Pavilion, Ozaukee County Fairgrounds, W67-N866 Washington Ave., Cedarburg. ozaukeemastergardeners.org

REALTORS Home Garden Show: Indoor and outdoor home improvement tips, gardening advice and cooking demonstrations, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Marxh 24-25; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. March 26; 4-8 p.m. March 29-30; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. March 31-April 1; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. April 2. Admission $8. Wisconsin Exposition Center, State Fair Park, 640 S. 84th St., West Allis. (414) 778-4929; www.mkehgs.com

Rotary Botanical Gardens: A 20-acre nonprofit botanic garden open year-round, with a visitor center and meeting facility offering classes and workshops. 1455 Palmer Drive, Janesville. Information: (608) 752-3885; www.rotarybotanicalgardens.org

Urban Ecology Centers: Provide year-round educational programs for kids, families and adults of all ages that foster ecological understanding and provide outdoor science education at three locations: Riverside Park, 1500 E. Park Place, (414) 964-8505; Washington Park, 1859 N. 40th St., (414) 344-5460; and Menomonee Valley, 3700 W. Pierce St., (414) 431-2940.

Victory Garden Initiative: Gardening classes and events which bring a community together around growing food. Information: (414) 431-0888; http://victorygardeninitiative.org

  • Fruity Nutty Affair. Feb. 23.

Waukesha County Expo Center: Home, Garden Landscape Show, 3-8 p.m. Feb. 24; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 25; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Feb 26. Forum Bldg., 1000 Northview Road, Waukesha. (262) 548-7200; www.waukeshacounty.gov/expocenter/

Wisconsin Public Television Garden Expo: Gardening and landscaping exhibitors, seminar and demonstrations, with guest speakers and farmers market, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Feb. 12. $10. Alliant Energy Center, 1919 Alliant Energy Center Way, Madison. wigardenexpo.com

Zoological Society of Milwaukee: Conservation Education department offers environmental education classes for children and families. Information: (414) 258-5058; www.zoosociety.org/Education/

HOME

Beulah Brinton House: Historic home open for tours, 1-4 p.m. Feb. 18. 2590 S. Superior St., (414) 744-5674; bayviewhistoricalsociety.org

Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion: Guided and self-guided tours of Flemish Renaissance revival mansion are available year round, featuring handcrafted woodwork, original wall coverings and 19th-century artwork. 2000 W. Wisconsin Ave., (414) 931-0808; www.pabstmansion.com

Charles Allis Art Museum: The mansion holds Charles and Sarah Allis’ collection featuring 19th-century French and American Paintings, original and antique furnishings. 1801 N. Prospect Ave., (414) 278-8295; www.cavtmuseums.org

Hales Corners Library: What’s It Worth? Antique Appraisal event with author and expert Mark Moran, 1:30-4:30 p.m. March 4. Free. Register for appraisal by Feb. 20. Hunt Room, 5885 S. 116th St., Hales Corners, (414) 529-6150.

Historic Milwaukee Inc.: Nonprofit educational organization provides walking tours, guided bus tours, slide shows and lectures. (414) 277-7795; www.historicmilwaukee.org

  • Remarkable Milwaukee 2017 Event. Feb. 23. The Best Place, Historic Pabst Brewery.

Kenosha History Center: “Brass Treasures” exhibit explores the domestic side of brass and its importance to Kenosha manufacturing, featuring everyday items like urns, bells and candlesticks. Hours: 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; noon-4 p.m. Sunday. 220 51st Place, Kenosha, (262) 654-5770.

Kenosha Public Museum: National Quilt Day features demonstrations and activities, March 18. 5500 First Ave., Kenosha, (262) 653-4140.

Lowell Damon House: Colonial home open for visitors and tour groups throughout the year. 2107 Wauwatosa Ave., Wauwatosa. (414) 273-8288; www.milwaukeehistory.net

Milwaukee NARI: “Remodeling Done Right” Home Improvement Show, noon-8 p.m. Feb. 16; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Feb. 17-18; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 19. Daily presentations and demonstrations by home improvement specialists. $8 in advance; $10 at the door. Wisconsin Exposition Center, State Fair Park, 640 S. 84th St., West Allis. (414) 771-4071; www.milwaukeenari.org

Old Courthouse Museum: Delayed Desires: America’s Post-War Consumer Boom Exhibit, showcases artifacts and advertising from the West Bend Company and Regal Ware Inc., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. 320 S. 5th Ave., West Bend. (262) 335-4678; www.HistoryIsFun.com

RAM Wustum Museum of Fine Arts: Classes for adults and children. 2519 Northwestern Ave., Racine, (262) 636-9177; www.ramart.org

Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum: Italian Renaissance-style villa features fine and decorative arts dating from the 15th to the 18th centuries, and a formal garden. General admission to the museum and grounds is $7 adults, $5 students, seniors, and veterans. 2220 N. Terrace Ave. (414) 271-3656; www.cavtmuseums.org

Wade House Historic Site Visitor Center:  “Restoring the Past: Frames, Boxes and Springs” program provides hands-on historic vehicle restoration activities, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Feb. 18, 25, and March 18. W7965 State Highway 23, Greenbush. Family $19; adults $7; students/seniors $6; children $3.50. (920)526-3271; www.wadehouse.org

Waukesha County Technical College: Hands-on noncredit personal enrichment courses. Classes held at 327 E. Broadway, Waukesha. (262) 691-5578; www.wctc.edu/non-credit

Wisconsin Museum of Quilts Fiber Arts: Classes, lectures and special events with visiting artists. N50-W5050 Portland Road, Cedarburg, (262) 546-0300.

The Woodworker’s Gym: Fully staffed, public-access woodworking shop offering classes and access to professional grade tools. 3220 N. 126th St., Brookfield. (262) 373-9411; www.thewoodworkersgym.com

To submit calendar information, please send information about your event three weeks before the event or the registration deadline. Please include a daytime phone number in case of questions.

Send information to Fresh calendar, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, P.O. Box 371, Milwaukee WI 53201 or email to jsfeat@journalsentinel.com, with “Attention Fresh calendar” in the subject line.

Article source: http://www.jsonline.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/02/09/home-and-garden-events/97294536/

Downtown Reedsburg design ideas wanted

The Reedsburg Design Downtown team is asking residents to participate in a survey that will help direct consultants from the University of Wisconsin-Extension ahead of a possible May visit.

The team aims to develop design guidelines for everything from parks and landscaping to business hours and parking. It would like those who live, work or shop in the city to complete a survey sharing their opinions on Reedsburg. It can be found at http://bit.ly/2lnlZku.

People who don’t have Internet access can still take the survey by stopping by City Hall in Reedsburg, said Brian Duvalle, building inspector, planner and zoning administrator for the city of Reedsburg. Plans are also underway to have surveys available at the Reedsburg Public Library.

The group would like to have surveys completed by March 20, he said.

Results will be used by consultants to assess what people want to see happen in Reedsburg. The project is not just dedicated to downtown; it has grown to encompass the community.

Help needed

The visit’s success will depend on local participation. The Reedsburg Area Chamber of Commerce is looking for people to write letters of support as well as anyone who can make food for a potluck or house a consultant for the weekend. Those who are interested should contact Kristine Koenecke, executive director, at ed@rucls.net or 608-524-2850.

Experts who work with the UW have visited other small towns to collect feedback, look at different aspects of the community and offer suggestions for improvement. Downtown business owner Peggy Albert said the project will involve numerous groups such as churches, schools and city officials, just to name a few. It may be as easy as inviting family and friends to the potluck meal.

Support doesn’t necessarily mean a financial contribution, Koenecke said. It can be in the form of a dish for the community potluck, help organizing the visit or just attending one or both public gatherings. There will be two community meetings and presenters would like to see as high a turnout as possible.

Koenecke added that consultants try to provide a workable plan; they don’t just offer expensive suggestions. Some changes may cost around $300 while others could be thousands.

“They are supposed to give us a range of options,” she said.

Koenecke noted that this is an opportunity for people to let their opinions be heard. The consultants’ visit could not only shed insight on growth areas but also reveal how the city can play to its strengths.

“We’ve got a lot of assets,” she said. “We just want to enhance those assets.”

Article source: http://www.wiscnews.com/reedsburgtimespress/news/local/article_c9e3de65-d88f-5dc6-94c7-d44f3f3d5a33.html

Home and Garden events – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

GARDEN

Boerner Botanical Gardens: Winter Tree Identification, 10 a.m. March 11. $10 FBBG member/$15 non-member. Whitnall Park, 9400 Boerner Drive, Hales Corners. Information: (414) 525-5653; www.boernerbotanicalgardens.org

Burlington Garden Center: Gardening, planting and lawn care workshops and seminars; prices vary. 5205 Mormon Road, Burlington, (262) 763-2153; burlingtongardencenter.com

The Elegant Farmer: Farm Kitchen Bakery, Deli Market, open daily 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Highway ES and J, Mukwonago. (262) 363-6770; www.elegantfarmer.com

Elmbrook Garden Club: Meeting and program “Endangered Bats of Wisconsin” with speaker William Mueller, 6:30 p.m. March 2. Club meets first Thursday of the month. Public welcome. Brookfield Library, 1900 N. Calhoun Road, Brookfield. Laura Skoff, (414) 614-6489.

Greendale Park Recreation: Bus trip to Chicago Flower Garden Show, 8 a.m. March 23. $50 Greendale resident/ $60 non-resident. Registration is first-come, first-served basis. Info: (414) 423-2790.

Growing Power: Winter Market, 8 a.m.-noon Saturdays. 5500 W. Silver Spring Drive.

Herb Society of America- Wisconsin Unit: Lemony Snippets: A Series of Lemon Herbs Symposium, 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. March 4. $65; registration deadline is Feb. 25. Woman’s Club of Wisconsin, 813 E. Kilbourn Ave., Info: Joan, (262) 377-1461; www.herb-society-wisconsin.org

Lynden Sculpture Garden: Family Day Fiber Fest Finale, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Feb. 26. Free. Experience art in nature through its collection of more than 50 monumental sculptures sited across 40 acres of park, lake and woodland. Tours and classes for all ages. 2145 W. Brown Deer Road. (414) 446-8794; lyndensculpturegarden.org

Milwaukee Art Museum Garden Club: Guest speaker Christine Miller presents “Ice Age Trail Demystified: Photos and Stories,” 10 a.m. Feb. 17. Reservation required for lunch. Lubar Auditorium, Milwaukee Art Museum, 700 N. Art Museum Drive. (414) 224-3200.

Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory: “The Great Train Robbery” Garden Train Show, open daily, (through April 2). G-scale trains crisscross a landscape of canyons, small towns and miniature plants. 524 S. Layton Blvd., (414) 257-5600.

Ozaukee Master Gardeners: All About Herbs lecture series presents “Herbscaping,” 7 p.m. March 16. The Pavilion, Ozaukee County Fairgrounds, W67-N866 Washington Ave., Cedarburg. ozaukeemastergardeners.org

REALTORS Home Garden Show: Indoor and outdoor home improvement tips, gardening advice and cooking demonstrations, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Marxh 24-25; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. March 26; 4-8 p.m. March 29-30; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. March 31-April 1; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. April 2. Admission $8. Wisconsin Exposition Center, State Fair Park, 640 S. 84th St., West Allis. (414) 778-4929; www.mkehgs.com

Rotary Botanical Gardens: A 20-acre nonprofit botanic garden open year-round, with a visitor center and meeting facility offering classes and workshops. 1455 Palmer Drive, Janesville. Information: (608) 752-3885; www.rotarybotanicalgardens.org

Urban Ecology Centers: Provide year-round educational programs for kids, families and adults of all ages that foster ecological understanding and provide outdoor science education at three locations: Riverside Park, 1500 E. Park Place, (414) 964-8505; Washington Park, 1859 N. 40th St., (414) 344-5460; and Menomonee Valley, 3700 W. Pierce St., (414) 431-2940.

Victory Garden Initiative: Gardening classes and events which bring a community together around growing food. Information: (414) 431-0888; http://victorygardeninitiative.org

  • Fruity Nutty Affair. Feb. 23.

Waukesha County Expo Center: Home, Garden Landscape Show, 3-8 p.m. Feb. 24; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 25; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Feb 26. Forum Bldg., 1000 Northview Road, Waukesha. (262) 548-7200; www.waukeshacounty.gov/expocenter/

Wisconsin Public Television Garden Expo: Gardening and landscaping exhibitors, seminar and demonstrations, with guest speakers and farmers market, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Feb. 12. $10. Alliant Energy Center, 1919 Alliant Energy Center Way, Madison. wigardenexpo.com

Zoological Society of Milwaukee: Conservation Education department offers environmental education classes for children and families. Information: (414) 258-5058; www.zoosociety.org/Education/

HOME

Beulah Brinton House: Historic home open for tours, 1-4 p.m. Feb. 18. 2590 S. Superior St., (414) 744-5674; bayviewhistoricalsociety.org

Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion: Guided and self-guided tours of Flemish Renaissance revival mansion are available year round, featuring handcrafted woodwork, original wall coverings and 19th-century artwork. 2000 W. Wisconsin Ave., (414) 931-0808; www.pabstmansion.com

Charles Allis Art Museum: The mansion holds Charles and Sarah Allis’ collection featuring 19th-century French and American Paintings, original and antique furnishings. 1801 N. Prospect Ave., (414) 278-8295; www.cavtmuseums.org

Hales Corners Library: What’s It Worth? Antique Appraisal event with author and expert Mark Moran, 1:30-4:30 p.m. March 4. Free. Register for appraisal by Feb. 20. Hunt Room, 5885 S. 116th St., Hales Corners, (414) 529-6150.

Historic Milwaukee Inc.: Nonprofit educational organization provides walking tours, guided bus tours, slide shows and lectures. (414) 277-7795; www.historicmilwaukee.org

  • Remarkable Milwaukee 2017 Event. Feb. 23. The Best Place, Historic Pabst Brewery.

Kenosha History Center: “Brass Treasures” exhibit explores the domestic side of brass and its importance to Kenosha manufacturing, featuring everyday items like urns, bells and candlesticks. Hours: 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; noon-4 p.m. Sunday. 220 51st Place, Kenosha, (262) 654-5770.

Kenosha Public Museum: National Quilt Day features demonstrations and activities, March 18. 5500 First Ave., Kenosha, (262) 653-4140.

Lowell Damon House: Colonial home open for visitors and tour groups throughout the year. 2107 Wauwatosa Ave., Wauwatosa. (414) 273-8288; www.milwaukeehistory.net

Milwaukee NARI: “Remodeling Done Right” Home Improvement Show, noon-8 p.m. Feb. 16; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Feb. 17-18; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 19. Daily presentations and demonstrations by home improvement specialists. $8 in advance; $10 at the door. Wisconsin Exposition Center, State Fair Park, 640 S. 84th St., West Allis. (414) 771-4071; www.milwaukeenari.org

Old Courthouse Museum: Delayed Desires: America’s Post-War Consumer Boom Exhibit, showcases artifacts and advertising from the West Bend Company and Regal Ware Inc., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Friday; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. 320 S. 5th Ave., West Bend. (262) 335-4678; www.HistoryIsFun.com

RAM Wustum Museum of Fine Arts: Classes for adults and children. 2519 Northwestern Ave., Racine, (262) 636-9177; www.ramart.org

Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum: Italian Renaissance-style villa features fine and decorative arts dating from the 15th to the 18th centuries, and a formal garden. General admission to the museum and grounds is $7 adults, $5 students, seniors, and veterans. 2220 N. Terrace Ave. (414) 271-3656; www.cavtmuseums.org

Wade House Historic Site Visitor Center:  “Restoring the Past: Frames, Boxes and Springs” program provides hands-on historic vehicle restoration activities, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Feb. 18, 25, and March 18. W7965 State Highway 23, Greenbush. Family $19; adults $7; students/seniors $6; children $3.50. (920)526-3271; www.wadehouse.org

Waukesha County Technical College: Hands-on noncredit personal enrichment courses. Classes held at 327 E. Broadway, Waukesha. (262) 691-5578; www.wctc.edu/non-credit

Wisconsin Museum of Quilts Fiber Arts: Classes, lectures and special events with visiting artists. N50-W5050 Portland Road, Cedarburg, (262) 546-0300.

The Woodworker’s Gym: Fully staffed, public-access woodworking shop offering classes and access to professional grade tools. 3220 N. 126th St., Brookfield. (262) 373-9411; www.thewoodworkersgym.com

To submit calendar information, please send information about your event three weeks before the event or the registration deadline. Please include a daytime phone number in case of questions.

Send information to Fresh calendar, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, P.O. Box 371, Milwaukee WI 53201 or email to jsfeat@journalsentinel.com, with “Attention Fresh calendar” in the subject line.

Article source: http://www.jsonline.com/story/life/home-garden/2017/02/09/home-and-garden-events/97294536/

John Begnaud: Keep landscape safe

SAN ANGELO — It is easy to overlook the obvious in garden design and maintenance. Beautiful plants, judiciously maintained in an attractive arrangement accented by functional and attractive features, are the goal. We sometimes forget to consider the effects that landscapes and gardens have on human safety and property protection.

Injuries or deaths from falling trees and limbs have been in the news recently and have occurred for centuries. It is not prudent to forgo planting trees because of the possibility of future damage or injury. But it serves us well to inspect older trees and identify cavities, limb rots and trunk injuries that may weaken the structural integrity of the tree.

Healthy trees and limbs seldom fall or break unless in the path of a major wind or ice storm. Trauma resulting from storms, old or new, are usually the culprit here in the West. Limbs that break and are not correctly pruned to clean the wound can often result in a decay point. It may take years before bacteria and fungi along with the collection of rainwater destroy enough of the internal wood for the wound to become dangerous to people or property.

An annual inspection of old trees during the winter, when leaves are thinnest, and pruning season is best.

DANGER FROM BELOW

In addition to above-ground safety concerns of landscapes, we have ground-level hazards at times. Walking surfaces need to be as smooth as possible, especially for handicapped and the aged.

Trees can affect the safety of sidewalks and patios as well. When planted too close to hard surfaces, tree roots or buttress flare (expanding trunk bottom) can crack and eventually raise or un-level the surface. This can also affect foundations and footings.

Tree removal may be the long-term solution, but it is a hard to deal with option in West Texas. We are often asked if tree roots can be cut, and the answer is yes, but not without possible side effects. Removal of too many major roots, especially on the same side of the tree, can influence the stability of the tree in strong winds.

Altering or rerouting the walking surface may be a good option if there’s room to expand. Cutting and removing the damaged unlevel walking surface and replacing it with a more flexible raised surface may also be an inexpensive option.

Surfacing tree roots within the landscape and turf area are also hazards, but they can be dealt with by redesigning landscape areas to shelter and hide these trip hazards. Beds may be constructed and planted that will restrict human traffic. This is very important in public places.

A standard recommendation of locating trees in the landscape is to place them no closer than 10 feet from a permanent foundation or walking surface, and 15-20 feet is even safer. Trees are different in their pattern of root growth, and some trees such as cedar elm and Chinese pistache have less invasive surface roots and are often used as street trees and can be closer to concrete surfaces.

Safety should be a consideration in landscaping, as it is with everything.

John Begnaud is a retired Tom Green County Extension agent for horticulture.  Contact him at jebegnaud@gmail. com. 

More:

• BEGNAUD: Get a jump on spring
Once winter begins to offer some warmer and not so windy days, we can ease back into gardening and landscaping….

• WATKINS: Grandma’s Yellow Rose is a superstar
Consider giving your valentine a rose bush to plant that can provide beautiful roses for years to come….

Article source: http://www.gosanangelo.com/story/life/columnists/john-begnaud/2017/02/11/john-begnaud-keep-landscape-safe/97709984/

John Begnaud: Keep landscape safe

SAN ANGELO — It is easy to overlook the obvious in garden design and maintenance. Beautiful plants, judiciously maintained in an attractive arrangement accented by functional and attractive features, are the goal. We sometimes forget to consider the effects that landscapes and gardens have on human safety and property protection.

Injuries or deaths from falling trees and limbs have been in the news recently and have occurred for centuries. It is not prudent to forgo planting trees because of the possibility of future damage or injury. But it serves us well to inspect older trees and identify cavities, limb rots and trunk injuries that may weaken the structural integrity of the tree.

Healthy trees and limbs seldom fall or break unless in the path of a major wind or ice storm. Trauma resulting from storms, old or new, are usually the culprit here in the West. Limbs that break and are not correctly pruned to clean the wound can often result in a decay point. It may take years before bacteria and fungi along with the collection of rainwater destroy enough of the internal wood for the wound to become dangerous to people or property.

An annual inspection of old trees during the winter, when leaves are thinnest, and pruning season is best.

DANGER FROM BELOW

In addition to above-ground safety concerns of landscapes, we have ground-level hazards at times. Walking surfaces need to be as smooth as possible, especially for handicapped and the aged.

Trees can affect the safety of sidewalks and patios as well. When planted too close to hard surfaces, tree roots or buttress flare (expanding trunk bottom) can crack and eventually raise or un-level the surface. This can also affect foundations and footings.

Tree removal may be the long-term solution, but it is a hard to deal with option in West Texas. We are often asked if tree roots can be cut, and the answer is yes, but not without possible side effects. Removal of too many major roots, especially on the same side of the tree, can influence the stability of the tree in strong winds.

Altering or rerouting the walking surface may be a good option if there’s room to expand. Cutting and removing the damaged unlevel walking surface and replacing it with a more flexible raised surface may also be an inexpensive option.

Surfacing tree roots within the landscape and turf area are also hazards, but they can be dealt with by redesigning landscape areas to shelter and hide these trip hazards. Beds may be constructed and planted that will restrict human traffic. This is very important in public places.

A standard recommendation of locating trees in the landscape is to place them no closer than 10 feet from a permanent foundation or walking surface, and 15-20 feet is even safer. Trees are different in their pattern of root growth, and some trees such as cedar elm and Chinese pistache have less invasive surface roots and are often used as street trees and can be closer to concrete surfaces.

Safety should be a consideration in landscaping, as it is with everything.

John Begnaud is a retired Tom Green County Extension agent for horticulture.  Contact him at jebegnaud@gmail. com. 

More:

• BEGNAUD: Get a jump on spring
Once winter begins to offer some warmer and not so windy days, we can ease back into gardening and landscaping….

• WATKINS: Grandma’s Yellow Rose is a superstar
Consider giving your valentine a rose bush to plant that can provide beautiful roses for years to come….

Article source: http://www.gosanangelo.com/story/life/columnists/john-begnaud/2017/02/11/john-begnaud-keep-landscape-safe/97709984/