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Archives for February 5, 2017

Design show features projects meant to lift communities

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Article source: http://bismarcktribune.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/design-show-features-projects-meant-to-lift-communities/article_34caf53c-5ae4-53de-a0c6-93f521e9081a.html

Design show features projects meant to lift communities

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Article source: http://bismarcktribune.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/design-show-features-projects-meant-to-lift-communities/article_34caf53c-5ae4-53de-a0c6-93f521e9081a.html

How to Start Your Flower Garden Design

Melindas Garden Moments is heard Mon.-Fri. at 7:45 and 10:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. on 97.9 WHAV.

Melinda’s Garden Moments is heard Mon.-Fri. at 7:45 and 10:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. on 97.9 WHAV.

Get out the catalogues, colored pencils, graph and tracing paper and start planning your new flower garden.

Start by drawing the basic outline of the garden on plain white or graph paper. Use tracing paper to start experimenting with plant selection and layout. Recycle your mistakes and start with a fresh piece of tracing paper. This method eliminates the need to recreate the base map every time you change your mind.

Once you have the basic design, check out the seasonal interest. Use one sheet of tracing paper to color in the spring blooming flowers. Use another one for summer, one for fall and one for winter.  Evaluate the seasonal interest of your garden design and make changes as needed.

Or make it even more visual by cutting out pictures of the flowers from catalogues or printing them off the internet.

It’s much easier to change things up on paper than once the plants are in the ground.

A bit more information:  Once you decide on a plan, make needed adjustments as you purchase plants and place them in the ground. Garden designs are meant to be fluid from the beginning throughout the life of the garden. For more help on designing your garden, check out my How to Grow Anything: Your Best Landscape in 6 Easy Lessons DVD set.

For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.

Article source: http://www.whav.net/cms/how-to-start-your-flower-garden-design/

How to Start Your Flower Garden Design

Melindas Garden Moments is heard Mon.-Fri. at 7:45 and 10:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. on 97.9 WHAV.

Melinda’s Garden Moments is heard Mon.-Fri. at 7:45 and 10:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. on 97.9 WHAV.

Get out the catalogues, colored pencils, graph and tracing paper and start planning your new flower garden.

Start by drawing the basic outline of the garden on plain white or graph paper. Use tracing paper to start experimenting with plant selection and layout. Recycle your mistakes and start with a fresh piece of tracing paper. This method eliminates the need to recreate the base map every time you change your mind.

Once you have the basic design, check out the seasonal interest. Use one sheet of tracing paper to color in the spring blooming flowers. Use another one for summer, one for fall and one for winter.  Evaluate the seasonal interest of your garden design and make changes as needed.

Or make it even more visual by cutting out pictures of the flowers from catalogues or printing them off the internet.

It’s much easier to change things up on paper than once the plants are in the ground.

A bit more information:  Once you decide on a plan, make needed adjustments as you purchase plants and place them in the ground. Garden designs are meant to be fluid from the beginning throughout the life of the garden. For more help on designing your garden, check out my How to Grow Anything: Your Best Landscape in 6 Easy Lessons DVD set.

For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.

Article source: http://www.whav.net/cms/how-to-start-your-flower-garden-design/

Letchworth’s Daniel Shea recognised with Society of Garden Design’s future designer award

08:22 05 February 2017

Daniel Shea from Letchworth, centre, with his award, Mark Godden of Deepdale Trees and garden designer Ann-Marie Powell.

Archant

A Letchworth garden designer was among the winners at the Society of Garden Design Awards in London.

Letchworth garden designer Daniel Shea’s gamekeeper’s cottage.

Daniel Shea won the Future Designer Award for his Gamekeeper’s Cottage, a two-acre country garden in Hertford’s Letty Green.

The design includes a 15-metre reflection pool, surrounded by perennial-style planting and wild flower meadows.

Daniel said: “It’s a privilege to receive this award and have my work recognised by expert judges and designers.

“I’m hopeful the award will lead to exciting new projects in Hertfordshire in the near future.”

Letchworth garden designer Daniel Shea’s gamekeeper’s cottage.

Presenting the award on Friday last week, garden designer and TV presenter Ann-Marie Powell said: “Daniel is going to go on to excel.”

The Society of Garden Design judging panel called the cottage garden design “an exceptional design that met the client’s brief in a bold yet sympathetic way.

“The design of the garden helps unify the new build into the existing site and complements both the old and the new.

“The articulation of space is handled with great competence and the strong, yet soft architectural planting links everything together and softens any hard lines.”

To find out more about Daniel and his work, see danielshea.co.uk.

Article source: http://www.thecomet.net/news/letchworth_s_daniel_shea_recognised_with_society_of_garden_design_s_future_designer_award_1_4876581

Letchworth’s Daniel Shea recognised with Society of Garden Design’s future designer award

08:22 05 February 2017

Daniel Shea from Letchworth, centre, with his award, Mark Godden of Deepdale Trees and garden designer Ann-Marie Powell.

Archant

A Letchworth garden designer was among the winners at the Society of Garden Design Awards in London.

Letchworth garden designer Daniel Shea’s gamekeeper’s cottage.

Daniel Shea won the Future Designer Award for his Gamekeeper’s Cottage, a two-acre country garden in Hertford’s Letty Green.

The design includes a 15-metre reflection pool, surrounded by perennial-style planting and wild flower meadows.

Daniel said: “It’s a privilege to receive this award and have my work recognised by expert judges and designers.

“I’m hopeful the award will lead to exciting new projects in Hertfordshire in the near future.”

Letchworth garden designer Daniel Shea’s gamekeeper’s cottage.

Presenting the award on Friday last week, garden designer and TV presenter Ann-Marie Powell said: “Daniel is going to go on to excel.”

The Society of Garden Design judging panel called the cottage garden design “an exceptional design that met the client’s brief in a bold yet sympathetic way.

“The design of the garden helps unify the new build into the existing site and complements both the old and the new.

“The articulation of space is handled with great competence and the strong, yet soft architectural planting links everything together and softens any hard lines.”

To find out more about Daniel and his work, see danielshea.co.uk.

Article source: http://www.thecomet.net/news/letchworth_s_daniel_shea_recognised_with_society_of_garden_design_s_future_designer_award_1_4876581

Photographers Capture Photos With Incredible Garden Scenery

Walkway Surrounded by Beautiful Trees in the Spring

This picture was a commended photo in the Beautiful Gardens category.
Image by Mark Bolton. Go to www.igpoty.com for more information about International Garden Photographer of the Year.

Yesterday the 2017 International Garden Photographer of the Year winners were announced and the results are truly breathtaking.

The competition exhibits garden, plant, flower and botanical photography and makes no distinction between professional and amateur photographers.

Five members of the Garden Photographers’ Association in the United Kingdom started the competition in 2007. After many requests from photographers outside the United Kingdom, the competition was opened to all countries and “International” was added to the title in 2008.

Photographers can enter in eight different categories. The categories are as follows: The Beauty of Plants, Beautiful Gardens, Wildflower Landscapes, Wildlife in the Garden, Greening the City, Bountiful Earth, Breathing Space, and Trees, Woods and Forests. The Greening the City category celebrates plants in urban environments. Breathing Spaces is sponsored by The National Trust and displays people enjoying green places.

The judges look for novel approaches to the photograph’s subject. Winners, finalists and highly commended photographers will participate in an exhibition that takes place at the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, London.

The overall winner of the 10th IGPOTY is amateur photographer Lee Acaster, who also won the Trees, Woods and Forests category. Acaster will receive a prize of £7,500 ($9,384) for his shot of a birch tree in Snowdonia, Wales.

“It was a dark and wet morning in Snowdoina, but autumn always offers opportunities,” Acaster told The Courier Mail. “The dark water behind the lake helped to isolate the form and texture of the tree while providing contrast to the dazzling individual leaves.”

The judges called the photo “a stained glass window of nature, steeped in mystery and metaphor.”

Below is a selection of some of the winners, finalists and highly commended photos from this year’s submissions.

Article source: http://www.totallandscapecare.com/landscaping-blog/igpoty-10/

Photographers Capture Photos With Incredible Garden Scenery

Walkway Surrounded by Beautiful Trees in the Spring

This picture was a commended photo in the Beautiful Gardens category.
Image by Mark Bolton. Go to www.igpoty.com for more information about International Garden Photographer of the Year.

Yesterday the 2017 International Garden Photographer of the Year winners were announced and the results are truly breathtaking.

The competition exhibits garden, plant, flower and botanical photography and makes no distinction between professional and amateur photographers.

Five members of the Garden Photographers’ Association in the United Kingdom started the competition in 2007. After many requests from photographers outside the United Kingdom, the competition was opened to all countries and “International” was added to the title in 2008.

Photographers can enter in eight different categories. The categories are as follows: The Beauty of Plants, Beautiful Gardens, Wildflower Landscapes, Wildlife in the Garden, Greening the City, Bountiful Earth, Breathing Space, and Trees, Woods and Forests. The Greening the City category celebrates plants in urban environments. Breathing Spaces is sponsored by The National Trust and displays people enjoying green places.

The judges look for novel approaches to the photograph’s subject. Winners, finalists and highly commended photographers will participate in an exhibition that takes place at the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, London.

The overall winner of the 10th IGPOTY is amateur photographer Lee Acaster, who also won the Trees, Woods and Forests category. Acaster will receive a prize of £7,500 ($9,384) for his shot of a birch tree in Snowdonia, Wales.

“It was a dark and wet morning in Snowdoina, but autumn always offers opportunities,” Acaster told The Courier Mail. “The dark water behind the lake helped to isolate the form and texture of the tree while providing contrast to the dazzling individual leaves.”

The judges called the photo “a stained glass window of nature, steeped in mystery and metaphor.”

Below is a selection of some of the winners, finalists and highly commended photos from this year’s submissions.

Article source: http://www.totallandscapecare.com/landscaping-blog/igpoty-10/

Learn how to design a home pollinator garden

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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Last summer, the Albuquerque City Council unanimously designated Albuquerque as a Bee City USA. To support the citywide activities planned for the year, the Albuquerque Chapter of the New Mexico Native Plant Society will present a landscape design workshop for home pollinator gardens next weekend.
Checkerspot butterflies feed on nectar-rich flowers like orange sneezeweed.

Checkerspot butterflies feed on nectar-rich flowers like orange sneezeweed.

To survive, native pollinators need the pollen and nectar from native plants. Urban areas and new development offer little habitat for our butterflies and other pollinators. Home landscapes can provide an important resource for butterflies, birds, bees and bumblebees displaced by development. (Most native bees don’t sting!)

“Many pollinators are adapted to specific plants and can’t feed on the exotics so often used in landscaping,” said George Miller, president of the Albuquerque Chapter of the Native Plant Society. “Ninety-five percent of songbirds feed their nestlings butterfly and moth caterpillars that occur only on native plants. But with up to 80 percent of urban landscapes planted with exotic flowers, shrubs and trees, our native pollinators are rapidly disappearing.”

Pollinator gardens are designed with pollen and nectar plants that bloom from early spring to late fall. Besides providing food for pollinators, habitat gardens beautify a landscape with three seasons of color. Native shrubs, such as Apache plume and desert olive, are the first to bloom and provide food for pollinators emerging from hibernation. Fall bloomers, like chamisa, goldenrods and sunflowers, let pollinators stock up on pollen before hibernation.

Birds are also an important member of any backyard habitat landscape. Red flowers, like penstemons, sages and claret cup cacti, attract hummingbirds, and sunflowers provide summer food for goldfinches and other seed eaters.

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Beside flowers that provide food for pollinators and birds, every backyard habitat garden needs a water source and plants that provide shelter, protection and nesting sites.

“We hope people will come with an idea and go home knowing how to create a backyard oasis,” Miller said.

Local experts will discuss how to design gardens that attract butterflies, bees and birds, and what plants to use. Speakers include Miller, author of “Landscaping with Native Plants of the Southwest”; Judith Phillips, landscape designer and author of “Growing the Southwest Garden: Regional Ornamental Gardening”; Olivia Carril, author of “The Bees in Your Backyard: A Guide to North America’s Bees”; Steve Cary, author of “Butterfly Landscapes of New Mexico”; and Virginia Burris, award-wining local habitat designer.

Article source: https://www.abqjournal.com/942947/learn-how-to-design-a-home-pollinator-garden.html

Learn how to design a home pollinator garden

………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ………. ……….

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Last summer, the Albuquerque City Council unanimously designated Albuquerque as a Bee City USA. To support the citywide activities planned for the year, the Albuquerque Chapter of the New Mexico Native Plant Society will present a landscape design workshop for home pollinator gardens next weekend.
Checkerspot butterflies feed on nectar-rich flowers like orange sneezeweed.

Checkerspot butterflies feed on nectar-rich flowers like orange sneezeweed.

To survive, native pollinators need the pollen and nectar from native plants. Urban areas and new development offer little habitat for our butterflies and other pollinators. Home landscapes can provide an important resource for butterflies, birds, bees and bumblebees displaced by development. (Most native bees don’t sting!)

“Many pollinators are adapted to specific plants and can’t feed on the exotics so often used in landscaping,” said George Miller, president of the Albuquerque Chapter of the Native Plant Society. “Ninety-five percent of songbirds feed their nestlings butterfly and moth caterpillars that occur only on native plants. But with up to 80 percent of urban landscapes planted with exotic flowers, shrubs and trees, our native pollinators are rapidly disappearing.”

Pollinator gardens are designed with pollen and nectar plants that bloom from early spring to late fall. Besides providing food for pollinators, habitat gardens beautify a landscape with three seasons of color. Native shrubs, such as Apache plume and desert olive, are the first to bloom and provide food for pollinators emerging from hibernation. Fall bloomers, like chamisa, goldenrods and sunflowers, let pollinators stock up on pollen before hibernation.

Birds are also an important member of any backyard habitat landscape. Red flowers, like penstemons, sages and claret cup cacti, attract hummingbirds, and sunflowers provide summer food for goldfinches and other seed eaters.

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Continue reading

Beside flowers that provide food for pollinators and birds, every backyard habitat garden needs a water source and plants that provide shelter, protection and nesting sites.

“We hope people will come with an idea and go home knowing how to create a backyard oasis,” Miller said.

Local experts will discuss how to design gardens that attract butterflies, bees and birds, and what plants to use. Speakers include Miller, author of “Landscaping with Native Plants of the Southwest”; Judith Phillips, landscape designer and author of “Growing the Southwest Garden: Regional Ornamental Gardening”; Olivia Carril, author of “The Bees in Your Backyard: A Guide to North America’s Bees”; Steve Cary, author of “Butterfly Landscapes of New Mexico”; and Virginia Burris, award-wining local habitat designer.

Article source: https://www.abqjournal.com/942947/learn-how-to-design-a-home-pollinator-garden.html