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Archives for February 1, 2017

Local vendors, design celebs part of Antiques & Garden Show

Local vendors, design celebs part of Antiques  Garden Show

The Antiques and Garden Show will take place on Feb. 3 – Feb. 5 at the Music City Center in Nashville.

It’s one of the largest shows in the country with exhibitors from all over the nation, including two from Franklin.

Avec Moi on Main Street and Scarlett Scales Antiques will have booths at the show, along with other vendors showcasing garden spaces, horticultural items and antiques.

During the three-day event, TV Host and Interior Designer, Nate Berkus will be the keynote speaker on Friday. You’ve seen him on the “Oprah Winfrey Show,” the “Nate Berkus Show” and you may have even shopped his latest design collaboration with Target. Now, you can learn more from the interior designer himself. Berkus will also be signing copies of his book, The Things That Matter, following his presentation.

Other speakers throughout the weekend include:

  • Brooke and Steve Giannetti, California-based design duo and authors of Patina Style and Patina Farm;
  • Mary McDonald, an LA-based award-winning interior designer and star of Bravo TV’s “Million Dollar Decorators” and “Property Envy;”
  • Robert Leleux, author and founder of the Southern Style Now Festival;
  • Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller, interior design power couple behind Carrier and Company Interiors in New York City and authors of Carrier and Company: Positively Chic Interiors;
  • Nathan Turner, California-based interior designer and special projects editor at Architectural Digest;
  • Tara Guérard, Charleston-based award winning wedding and event planner.

Tickets are now available at on the Antiques and Garden Show website. Be sure to follow Antiques and Garden Show on Facebook for the latest updates.

Article source: http://springhillhomepage.com/local-vendors-design-celebs-part-of-antiques-garden-show/

Garden club to hold talk on Mount Vernon estate


RUMSON — Dean Norton, director of horticulture at George Washington’s estate in Mount Vernon, Virginia, will present “Welcome Home George Washington: The History, Beauty, Use and Importance of Garden Landscapes at Our First President’s Home” from 11 a.m.-noon on Feb. 7 at the Rumson Country Club, 163 Rumson Rd., Rumson.

The free lecture is open to the public.

Even as he led the new country through the Revolutionary War and took on the responsibility of being the nation’s first president, George Washington’s mind was rarely far from the lush gardens and majestic views at Mount Vernon.

Washington was very interested in garden design, particularly the naturalistic style of 18th-century English landscape designer Batty Langley. He oversaw all aspects of the landscape at Mount Vernon and designed walks, roads and lawns and planted hundreds of native trees and shrubs. His gardens provided food for the mansion’s inhabitants and guests.

All four of the principal gardens at Mount Vernon have been researched, restored and replanted, including the upper pleasure garden, lower (or kitchen) garden, botanical garden and the fruit garden and nursery.

“Our goal at Mount Vernon is to so accurately maintain and represent the gardens at Mount Vernon that if George and Martha Washington were to return, they would feel right at home,” said Norton.

Reservations are not required for the lecture. More information can be obtained by contacting Liz Card, club president, at eetecard@verizon.net.

Article source: http://www.gmnews.com/2017/01/26/garden-club-to-hold-talk-on-mount-vernon-estate/

Growing tiny gardens

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ften an afterthought in contemporary home construction, the generic landscape is typically both unimaginative and uninspiring.

Fortunately, there are options awaiting the more adventurous.

Edible landscaping can beautify the yard, supply food and inspire a homeowner for years. This practical approach involves the integration of food-producing plants with ornamentals in the garden setting.

While adhering to basic design principles, simply plant non-edible vegetation with favorite fruits, herbs and vegetables. The integration is easily accomplished, aesthetics are enhanced, and the yard becomes a source of healthy meals for the family.

Edible landscaping first gained attention in the 1980s by Rosalind Creasy, a resident of Los Altos, California. As a lifelong gardener, landscape designer and avid cook, Creasy did what seemed logical she reconstructed her front yard with dwarf fruit trees, vegetables and herbs, while the rest of America was still having a love affair with the lawn.

She recognized the impracticality of lawn maintenance, which included wasted water, natural resources and the reliance of petroleum-based fertilizers.

As a global traveler, Creasy observed America was unique in not using the front yard for food production amidst other landscape perennials.

The author of several books, her first titled, Edible Landscaping, contains photographs by the author, design ideas, and easy-to-follow information in the newest edition.

One of the most compelling subjects in Creasys writings is the abundance derived from a 100-square-foot garden. Her realization that most information online had a bias toward commercial growers rather than home gardeners became the inspiration to quantify just how much was possible in a small growing space.

Equipped with starts from her local nursery, she dedicated a 5-by-20-foot area for edibles only. She selected varieties known to be bountiful or too expensive to buy at the local market. Her garden bed received eight hours of sun a day. Transplanting with organic fertilizer, she filled her garden bed with the following:

Two tomato plants Better Boy and Early Girl;

Six bell peppers, two California Wonder, two Golden Bell, one Orange Bell and one Big Red Beauty;

Four zucchini two Green Raven and two Golden Dawn;

Four sweet basil;

18 lettuce plants six Crisp Mint Romaine, six Winter Density Romaine and six Sylvestra Butterhead interplanted among tomatoes and peppers.

After years of gardening, Creasy maintained the soil and used organic fertilizers that ensured a rapid growth rate for every start. Within a few weeks she was picking outer lettuce leaves for salad, and harvesting 230 individual salads in just over a month.

Other vegetables gradually filled the bed, with a total April to September yield as follows:

Tomatoes 77.5 pounds;

Bell peppers 15.5 pounds;

Lettuce 14.3 pounds;

Basil 2.5 pounds;

Zucchini 126 pounds.

Creasys calculations comparing market prices for organic produce, and deducting start-up and growing costs, showed a savings of $683.40. A friend of Rosalinds who lived in Iowa performed a similar accounting for the same amount of organic produce relative to pricing in her state, and estimated a $975.18 savings. That was in 2009, and in todays economy it could be greater.

In 2009, 84 million households in the U.S. were gardening. Creasy determined that if half that number, 42 million, created a 100-square-foot garden by removing a lawn, it would reduce 96,419 acres, or 150 square miles, of lawn cultivation. Not only would natural resources be spared, but the savings on fresh produce would be $14.4 billion.

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O

ften an afterthought in contemporary home construction, the generic landscape is typically both unimaginative and uninspiring.

Fortunately, there are options awaiting the more adventurous.

Edible landscaping can beautify the yard, supply food and inspire a homeowner for years. This practical approach involves the integration of food-producing plants with ornamentals in the garden setting.

While adhering to basic design principles, simply plant non-edible vegetation with favorite fruits, herbs and vegetables. The integration is easily accomplished, aesthetics are enhanced, and the yard becomes a source of healthy meals for the family.

Edible landscaping first gained attention in the 1980s by Rosalind Creasy, a resident of Los Altos, California. As a lifelong gardener, landscape designer and avid cook, Creasy did what seemed logical — she reconstructed her front yard with dwarf fruit trees, vegetables and herbs, while the rest of America was still having a love affair with the lawn.

She recognized the impracticality of lawn maintenance, which included wasted water, natural resources and the reliance of petroleum-based fertilizers.

As a global traveler, Creasy observed America was unique in not using the front yard for food production amidst other landscape perennials.

The author of several books, her first titled, “Edible Landscaping,” contains photographs by the author, design ideas, and easy-to-follow information in the newest edition.

One of the most compelling subjects in Creasy’s writings is the abundance derived from a 100-square-foot garden. Her realization that most information online had a bias toward commercial growers rather than home gardeners became the inspiration to quantify just how much was possible in a small growing space.

Equipped with starts from her local nursery, she dedicated a 5-by-20-foot area for edibles only. She selected varieties known to be bountiful or too expensive to buy at the local market. Her garden bed received eight hours of sun a day. Transplanting with organic fertilizer, she filled her garden bed with the following:

•Two tomato plants — Better Boy and Early Girl;

•Six bell peppers, two California Wonder, two Golden Bell, one Orange Bell and one Big Red Beauty;

•Four zucchini — two Green Raven and two Golden Dawn;

•Four sweet basil;

•18 lettuce plants — six Crisp Mint Romaine, six Winter Density Romaine and six Sylvestra Butterhead — interplanted among tomatoes and peppers.

After years of gardening, Creasy maintained the soil and used organic fertilizers that ensured a rapid growth rate for every start. Within a few weeks she was picking outer lettuce leaves for salad, and harvesting 230 individual salads in just over a month.

Other vegetables gradually filled the bed, with a total April to September yield as follows:

•Tomatoes — 77.5 pounds;

•Bell peppers — 15.5 pounds;

•Lettuce — 14.3 pounds;

•Basil — 2.5 pounds;

•Zucchini — 126 pounds.

Creasy’s calculations comparing market prices for organic produce, and deducting start-up and growing costs, showed a savings of $683.40. A friend of Rosalind’s who lived in Iowa performed a similar accounting for the same amount of organic produce relative to pricing in her state, and estimated a $975.18 savings. That was in 2009, and in today’s economy it could be greater.

In 2009, 84 million households in the U.S. were gardening. Creasy determined that if half that number, 42 million, created a 100-square-foot garden by removing a lawn, it would reduce 96,419 acres, or 150 square miles, of lawn cultivation. Not only would natural resources be spared, but the savings on fresh produce would be $14.4 billion.


Article source: http://www.currypilot.com/features/eventsandactivities/5031188-151/growing-tiny-gardens

U of I Extension hosts gardening webinar series

The University of Illinois Extension Effingham County will be hosting a series of gardening webinars where you can learn gardening tips from University of Illinois Extension horticulture experts. The webinar classes are live and you can interact with the presenters. The afternoon webinars will be offered at the University of Illinois Extension office, 1209 Wenthe Drive, Effingham. Evening sessions are also offered that you may participate in from the comfort of your own home. Sessions are offered free of charge. Dates and descriptions of webinars being offered are as follows:

• Seed Starting – Growing plants from seed is both rewarding and cost effective. Join Kim Ellson, Extension Horticulture Educator, as she discussed key elements for successful seeding this spring; Thursday, Feb. 2, at 6:30 p.m., evening session

• How to Have Healthy Houseplants – Houseplants add life and beauty to a home. Rhonda Ferree, Extension Horticulture Educator, will provide simple tips to select and care for houseplants; Tuesday, Feb. 14, at 1:30 p.m., Afternoon Session at the University of Illinois Extension Effingham office; Thursday, Feb. 16, at 6:30 p.m., evening session

• Moth Orchids – Start an Orchid Odyssey – As the most highly evolved flowers on earth, orchids are an amazingly diverse plant family growing in desserts, mountains, marshes, northern woods, Illinois forests, and even our homes. In this webinar, state Master Gardener Coordinator Sandy Mason, will help you learn how to grow, repot and even rebloom moth orchids; Tuesday, March 7, at 1:30 p.m., afternoon session at the University of Illinois Extension Effingham office; Thursday, March 9, at 6:30 p.m., evening session

To register to participate in the live afternoon or evening webinar sessions, go to http://web.extension.illinois.edu/cefj/. If you are unable to participate in the live sessions being offered, they will also be recorded and shared on the University of Illinois Extension’s YOUtube channel for later viewing.

If you need a reasonable accommodation to participate in this program, contact the U of I Extension Office at 217-347-7773.

Article source: http://www.effinghamdailynews.com/community/u-of-i-extension-hosts-gardening-webinar-series/article_14b30f30-e66f-5e00-b568-42c85728ea7d.html

Three Simple Ways to Stop Weeds In Your Garden Early – Lifehacker



Planting season will soon be here, and if you’re planning a garden, you should also consider how you’re going to control weeds. Our friends at the Old World Garden Farms suggest leaving behind the harsh herbicides this year and opting for these gentler treatments, from mulch to a weed torch that looks fun to use.

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Bottom line, they make three major suggestions:

  • The Vinegar Solution: Using vinegar to handle weeds is a tip we’ve mentioned before, and even tested ourselves (without much success, sadly, but lemon juice and boiling water work well), but others have had better luck. It’s worth a shot, especially considering how versatile vinegar can be.
  • Reach for the Mulch: Mulch is a great way to stifle weeds and keep them from growing, and Old World Garden Farms notes that it’s their exclusive weed control method, so that counts for a lot. Consider bare soil your enemy after planting, and if you’re worried about spending a ton of mulch, check out our tips to getting cheap—or free—mulch for your garden.
  • The Weed Torch: This tip requires you go buy something just for the weeds, but at least it’s not strictly a consumable like weed killer. A simple hand-held propane weed torch will do the job nicely, and leave the rest of your plants happy. Hit the link below for a specific suggestion.

Of course, weed killer is common, but if you’re growing food, you might consider a less invasive method first, and then opt for the weed killer if things get out of hand. For more tips—and more on these tips—hit the link below.

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3 Great Ways To Stop Weeds This Year Without Using Harsh Chemicals | Old World Garden Farms

Photo by Nathan Torkington.

Article source: http://lifehacker.com/three-simple-ways-to-stop-weeds-in-your-garden-early-1791621149

7 Seed-Starting Tips for Smarter Indoor Gardening – Earth911.com

Spring is just around the corner. I repeat, spring is just around the corner. Can you believe that winter is already almost over? Do you know what that means? It means we’ll get more sunshine (and maybe even some more rain) and it will be time to really starting digging into our spring garden plans!

Indoor gardening is just the start

Just because we still have a month and a half to go until spring arrives doesn’t mean we can’t get started on our spring gardens now. If you can get a jump-start on planning your spring garden, you can actually reduce your gardening costs.

How, you ask? I have one simple answer for you: indoor gardening.

It is so much more affordable to start a garden from seeds than from seedlings if you know what you’re doing. Seeds are far less expensive and easier to come by, too. Plus, you can buy them any time of year and store them until you’re ready to use them. Try doing that with seedlings!

Image Credit - Grigoriev Ruslan/Shutterstock

Indoor gardening can be incredibly rewarding. Photo: Grigoriev Ruslan/Shutterstock

While I grew up planting seeds directly into the ground in our garden because we lived in a very temperate climate, I live in a much colder climate now with a much shorter growing season. That means we have to start our garden from seedlings or start our seeds indoors so we can transplant them once the weather is warm enough. There is no other option in many parts of the country.

If you haven’t started seeds indoors for your garden before, it’s so easy! And you’ll get the satisfaction of knowing that you used green gardening practices from the start. You won’t have to worry about accidentally buying plants that were sprayed with neonicotinoids or started with GMO seeds, either.

Indoor gardening can be incredibly rewarding. The satisfaction you get from growing a garden from seed is tremendous. Just seeing the food on your plate grow from a seed to a nourishing meal is very rewarding. It’s a great lesson for kids to learn where their food really comes from, too!

Ready to try out indoor gardening once and for all and start your seeds? Give these seven tips for starting seeds indoors a try.

1. Choose Organic, Open-Pollinated Heirloom Seeds

If you’re going to the trouble of growing your own food, you also want to make sure you’re choosing seeds that are sustainable. By choosing organic seeds, you’re choosing seeds that never encouraged the use of toxic pesticides and herbicides. By choosing open-pollinated heirloom seeds, you’re ensuring that you can save seeds and use those seeds to start your garden in years to come. Seeds from hybridized plants can’t be saved, so if sustainability is a concern for you, steer clear.

2. Select Your Seed-Starting Containers

Woman planting seeds for indoor gardening

Containers and soil make a big difference when it comes to indoor gardening. Do your homework. Photo: Syda Productions/Shutterstock

There are so many different seed-starting containers to choose from! You can make your own upcycled seed starters or you can buy something premade from your local gardening store. No matter which way you go, you’ll want to make sure that excess water can drain from the container. You’ll also want to consider where you’ll keep your seed-starting containers. If it’s somewhere that can be water damaged, you’ll want to choose a method that will reduce that risk.

3. The Right Soil Does Make a Difference

You can definitely find very cheap soil — many dollar stores even carry potting soil this time of year. However, if you want your seeds to germinate and turn into beautiful plants, you are better off choosing a quality soil. Quality seed-starting mixes are designed to reduce the risk of your seedlings succumbing to rot from soil-borne pathogens. A good soil mixture will also retain water and allow airflow at the same time. Consider those factors when choosing your soil.

4. Make Sure Your Plants Get Enough Light

During the winter months in some locations, getting enough light can be a real challenge. You typically can’t get enough light from windows during the winter months. Once your seeds have germinated and your plants have sprouted, they’ll need adequate light to continue their growth. You can use supplemental lighting in your house where you keep your seedlings. Fluorescent lights work well and don’t cost a fortune to run.

Another option is to keep your seedlings on a rolling cart in the garage. Every morning, you roll them out into the sunshine. Then every evening, you roll them back inside. Not only will this ensure they’re getting enough sunlight, but it will keep them from the frigid nighttime temperatures.

5. Don’t Forget the Nutrition!

While your soil mixture may start with enough nutrients in it, your hungry little seedlings will quickly consume them. Once that happens, you will need to add nutrients to your soil if you want the seedlings to thrive. You can absolutely buy some wonderful soil nutrients, but you can also make your own! According to this source, you can even make your own liquid soil nutrients for free. Making your own fertilizer tea is a great way to make your garden even more sustainable and affordable.

6. Keep Your Seedlings Toasty and Warm

Seeds need warmth to sprout. It’s that warmth combined with the moisture and light that triggers a seed to sprout. If you’re using a fluorescent light to give your seedlings light, that should be enough warmth. If, however, it still seems frigid in the area where you keep your seedlings, you can buy a seedling heat mat that you place under the plants to keep them warm. Keep in mind that you’ll want the temperature to be around 75 degrees for several hours of the day. You’ll also want the temperature to go up or down around 10 degrees each day, too. This ensures that the seeds will germinate and thrive.

7. Set a Timer for Best Results

If you have trouble remembering to turn on and off your lights or seedling warmth mat, then use a timer! You can set a reminder on your phone each day if that works for you. Better yet, you can get timers that plug into the wall just like a surge protector. Then you plug the light or seedling mat into the timer and set the hours you want it to run. The timer does all the work for you — the light or mat gets turned on and off at the time you designated.

Are you an indoor gardening guru with great seed-starting tips? What can you share?

Feature image Alena Brozova/Shutterstock

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Article source: http://earth911.com/home-garden/seed-starting-tips/