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Archives for January 29, 2017

Design show features projects meant to lift communities | Home and …

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Article source: http://siouxcityjournal.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/design-show-features-projects-meant-to-lift-communities/article_8ee6bcb2-957f-5ba3-a5cb-c8e805060330.html

Audubon program to focus on functionality in garden design

The Potomac Valley Audubon Society’s monthly program for February will feature a presentation entitled “Design Considerations: Functionality of Plants in a Garden.”

The program will be held at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8 at the at the Hospice of the Panhandle facility in Kearneysville.

Admission will be free and everyone is welcome to attend.

The speaker will be James Dillon, a certified Horticulturalist who owns and operates Native Havens LLC, a landscaping and gardening firm in Kearneysville.

His presentation will emphasize the importance of considering plant functions as well as aesthetics in designing gardens, to ensure that the results are not only visually beautiful but resilient and beneficial to local birds and pollinating insects.

Dillon has a Bachelor of Science in Biology from East Carolina University and has been working in the field for more than 13 years, most notably at the Delaware Center for Horticulture.

His landscape and garden designs emphasize native plant selections, environmental benefits and low maintenance.

He has designed several rain gardens in the region and volunteers for the Monarch Alliance, designing butterfly waystations for them.

The Hospice facility’s address is 330 Hospice Lane, Kearneysville. The Audubon events will be held in the main meeting room of the facility’s Main Office building.

There is plenty of parking at the facility.

For more information go to www.potomacaudubon.org or contact Krista Hawley at adultprograms@potomacaudubon.org or 703-303-1026.

Article source: http://www.shepherdstownchronicle.com/page/content.detail/id/515912/Audubon-program-to-focus-on--functionality-in-garden-design.html?nav=5089

Design your vegetable garden for success | Gardening …

A well-designed vegetable garden is a wonderful source of fresh produce for the chef, but it can also be a favorite garden destination, a place to retreat to and relax. If you plan it right, a kitchen garden can be the prettiest planting on your property.

Start by choosing a site that meets the requirements of the plants. Vegetables of all kinds flourish in sun, so find a spot that gets a good eight hours of direct sunlight. Your site should be level, on a part of your property that you walk past every day, and convenient to the kitchen. It’s important to have a nearby source of water so you don’t have to drag a hose or carry watering cans too far. These are the basics. After that, let your imagination go.

“Design is often what is missing from the vegetable garden, yet it is the most important element to enjoying the garden,” says Ellen Ecker Ogden, who recommends including a bench, table, pergola or arbor in the design to make it more inviting. “It’s a nice way to say, ‘I like it here. I don’t just come here to work and pull weeds,’” she says.

Ogden, the author of “The Complete Kitchen Garden,” went to art school, but “then I turned into a gardener,” she says. She balanced her interests by becoming a kitchen-garden designer. Her four-square garden in Vermont is as pretty as it is productive, with lettuce and greens growing in sweeping curves, lozenges and circles instead of traditional rows. “It’s really a visual thing for me as much as it is a food thing,” she says.

Most people start with a space that’s too big. “They have an appetite to grow everything,” Ogden says. Instead, pick and choose your crops just as you would at a market. The selection of fresh produce at local markets expands every year, so maybe you don’t need to grow your own eggplant or zucchini. Instead, you might want to concentrate on salad greens, Ogden says, especially if you’re a new gardener. “They grow fast, there are not many pests and they have really high nutrition per square foot,” she says.

Instead of growing six tomato plants, you might decide to make room for just one or two, perhaps a cherry tomato and one other. That leaves room for herbs, such as basil and oregano, to help those tomatoes taste even better.

Color should also play a role in your choices, just as it does in flower beds. Plant a mixture of red and green lettuces, or train golden wax beans up a tepee. Flowers grown right alongside your vegetables not only fill the garden with bright colors, but also attract pollinators and beneficial insects that help manage pests in your vegetable beds. Ogden loves to plant nasturtiums in her kitchen garden. She likes calendulas and marigolds, especially the little signet marigolds called “Lemon Gem.” She also relies on the flowers of some vegetable crops to add a flourish. Scarlet runner beans have bright red blooms that attract hummingbirds. Okra flowers look like sunny yellow hibiscus.

Texture is a big element in interesting gardens, too. Frilly lettuces look like a luxurious ruffled petticoat around the edge of a vegetable garden. Shiny red and green peppers sparkle among the foliage. The feathery tops of carrots and the spiky foliage of onions and leeks give the eye a lot of contrast to enjoy. Herbs of all kinds add still more texture, as well as fragrance.

To give a vegetable garden even more character, build upward. In Ogden’s garden, an arbor lifts pole beans up into the light. Peas, cucumbers and even melons can be grown on a sturdy trellis. Just remember, tall elements should be placed toward the back of the garden (which should be on the north side) so they do not shade out crops in front.

Sprawling plants may need a place of their own. Especially if you have a small garden, pots are a great way to grow more crops without giving up much space in the ground. Ogden plants pumpkins in half a whiskey barrel near her driveway instead of giving them space in her kitchen garden. Last year, she also grew tomatoes, summer squash and potatoes in pots.

Vegetable gardening doesn’t have to be hard or expensive, Ogden says. Start small, with beds no more than 4 feet wide. Sketch out a pretty planting plan on paper, and leave plenty of room for generous paths. Make liberal use of steppingstones so you don’t compact your soil while working in your beds. Sow seeds or plant transplants of a good variety of crops you can harvest over a long season. Then, look forward to spending some time in your garden every day, inspecting its progress, thinning and weeding if necessary, and harvesting a few leaves of lettuce or fresh tomatoes for your dinner salad. And don’t forget that garden bench. “Food is important and functional, but it’s important to me to have the garden look nice, too,” Ogden says. In a well-designed kitchen garden, you can count on a bumper crop of satisfaction.

Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 33 cents a day.

Article source: http://www.buckscountycouriertimes.com/life-style/gardening/design-your-vegetable-garden-for-success/article_6177ac7e-e4d4-11e6-9d89-57f75b5e48ae.html

Things to do in Atlanta this weekend: Jan. 27-Jan 29 – Access Atlanta

Whether you’re planning to remodel your home, or looking for landscaping ideas for your yard, the Atlanta Build, Remodel and Landscape Expo has you covered. Get a chance to talk to experts, take part in seminars, watch demonstrations and peruse flooring, cabinetry, finished, siding and more.

Article source: http://www.accessatlanta.com/events/smyrna-oysterfest-things-metro-atlanta-this-weekend/xKERwPMQVHk4aXJpQ3SBxJ/

Home Show unveils ideas for four decades

Jim Carlson, owner of Carlson’s Barnwood Co. in Cambridge, Illinois, dismantles an old barn to salvage and remanufacture the wood.

Article source: http://qctimes.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/home-show-unveils-ideas-for-four-decades/article_215b04a0-c941-56bc-a0ad-9469079f60c7.html

O’Meara: Don’t miss Landscaping with Colorado Native Plants Conference – Loveland Reporter

If you go

What: Landscaping with Colorado Native Plants conference, presented by the Butterfly Pavilion, Colorado State University Extension, Colorado Native Plant Master Program, Colorado Native Plant Society, Denver Botanic Gardens, and High Plains Environmental Center

When: Saturday, Feb. 11, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Where: Thomas M. McKee 4-H, Youth Community Building, The Ranch Events Center at Larimer County Fairgrounds, , 5280 Arena Circle, Loveland

Cost: $35-$90

More info: landscapingwithcoloradonativeplants.wordpress.com

Conference and seminar planners have been busy this winter, planning an array of classes to expand gardeners’ minds and feed their souls. If you’re looking to change up your landscape by going back to natives, check out the Landscaping With Colorado Native Plants Conference on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Ranch Events Center in Loveland.

Now in its second year, this blockbuster natives event features design, construction and inspiration for using natives in your garden.

Kicking off the event is a panel of experts and viewing of Hometown Habitat film clips, celebrating native plant landscapes in our area. Moderator Susan Tweit, author and plant biologist, will lead an inspiring discussion with Connie Holsinger, founder of Habitat Heroes Project; Alison Peck, designer with Matrix Gardens; and Linda Boley, a Habitat Hero.

Carol OMeara

Participants can choose to attend five smaller breakout sessions, focusing education on what helps you plan for success with native plants. The list of topics includes: Native Plants for Western Slope Gardens by Denver Botanic Gardens’ Nick Daniel; Designing with Native Plants by Susan J. Tweit; and Creating Native Plant Landscapes: Can Do Ideas for Beginners (two-part talk) by designer Anne Clark.

In session two, check out: Southeast and Plains Area Natives by Don Barnett, and Establishing Natives: Native Plant Whisperer by Jim Borland, a consultant, horticulturist and radio host. Session three offers Mountain Gardening with Natives: Firewise and Waterwise by CSU Extension Agent Irene Shonle; or Dryer Plants for a New Landscape Era by local plant legend Kelly Grummons.

Sessions four and five include Gardening with Native Plants of the Front Range by CSU Extension agent Deryn Davidson; Plant This, Not That: Colorado Native Plant Alternatives to Common Garden Plants by Colorado Native Plant Society’s Jennifer Bousselot, a CSU instructor; Ask an Expert: Follow up Questions and Conversation conference partners panel; and Water Conservation and Water Requirements for our Native Plants by Denver Botanic Gardens’ Dan Johnson and Northern Water’s Mary Hattendorf.

There’s even a track for pros, with Landscape Restoration: Native Plants on a Bigger Scale by the Butterfly Pavilion’s Amy Yarger and Jim Tolstrup, executive director of the High Plains Environmental Center; Creating Homes for Native Plants by Alison Peck; and Propagation of the Native Plants of the Interior West: Secrets Revealed by Fort Collins Wholesale Nursery’s Scott Skogerboe.

Lunch, drinks and snacks are provided with your registration fee and vendor booths will be open during registration, lunch and breaks.

Article source: http://www.reporterherald.com/lifestyles/ci_30748584/omeara-dont-miss-landscaping-colorado-native-plants-conference

Think Spring: 9 Gardening Trends for 2017…

James Zahn

About James: A work-from-home Dad with a pair of daughters (Released in 2009 and 2012) – James Zahn is THE ROCK FATHER™. 

Bringing over two decades of experience in the entertainment industry into the family realm, Zahn is an Illinois-based Entertainment Writer, Media Personality, Commentator, Adventurer and Raconteur. 

He is a member of The Toy Insider Parent Advisory Board, a writer for the Netflix #StreamTeam, and serves as a Brand Ambassador and spokesperson for several Globally-recognized pop culture and lifestyle brands in addition to consulting for a number of toy manufacturers.

Creatively, James has directed/edited music videos, lyric videos, and album trailers for bands such as FEAR FACTORY, has appeared as an actor in feature films and commercials, written comic books, and performed in bands. He currently serves as an artist manager and video director for Napalm Records’ PRODUCT OF HATE.

James and/or his work have been featured in/on CNN, NBC, G4, The Chicago Tribune, Blogcritics, Fangoria, Starlog, The River Cities’ Reader. Slowfish, Oil, and more. He’s appeared as a music expert on CNN’s AC360, has been quoted in BusinessWire, CNN and Babble, in addition to making appearances on ABC News, WGN and more. In the past he served as a writer for  Fandango Family and PBS KIDS, penned articles for Sprout, and was a contributor to Chicago Parent.

Learn more here. 

Connect with James on Facebook or Twitter.

www.facebook.com/therockfather

Article source: http://therockfather.com/lifestyle/gardening/garden-blog/item/5047-think-spring-9-gardening-trends-for-2017

O’Meara: Don’t miss Landscaping with Colorado Native Plants Conference

If you go

What: Landscaping with Colorado Native Plants conference, presented by the Butterfly Pavilion, Colorado State University Extension, Colorado Native Plant Master Program, Colorado Native Plant Society, Denver Botanic Gardens, and High Plains Environmental Center

When: Saturday, Feb. 11, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Where: Thomas M. McKee 4-H, Youth Community Building, The Ranch Events Center at Larimer County Fairgrounds, , 5280 Arena Circle, Loveland

Cost: $35-$90

More info: landscapingwithcoloradonativeplants.wordpress.com

Conference and seminar planners have been busy this winter, planning an array of classes to expand gardeners’ minds and feed their souls. If you’re looking to change up your landscape by going back to natives, check out the Landscaping With Colorado Native Plants Conference on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Ranch Events Center in Loveland.

Now in its second year, this blockbuster natives event features design, construction and inspiration for using natives in your garden.

Kicking off the event is a panel of experts and viewing of Hometown Habitat film clips, celebrating native plant landscapes in our area. Moderator Susan Tweit, author and plant biologist, will lead an inspiring discussion with Connie Holsinger, founder of Habitat Heroes Project; Alison Peck, designer with Matrix Gardens; and Linda Boley, a Habitat Hero.

Carol OMeara

Participants can choose to attend five smaller breakout sessions, focusing education on what helps you plan for success with native plants. The list of topics includes: Native Plants for Western Slope Gardens by Denver Botanic Gardens’ Nick Daniel; Designing with Native Plants by Susan J. Tweit; and Creating Native Plant Landscapes: Can Do Ideas for Beginners (two-part talk) by designer Anne Clark.

In session two, check out: Southeast and Plains Area Natives by Don Barnett, and Establishing Natives: Native Plant Whisperer by Jim Borland, a consultant, horticulturist and radio host. Session three offers Mountain Gardening with Natives: Firewise and Waterwise by CSU Extension Agent Irene Shonle; or Dryer Plants for a New Landscape Era by local plant legend Kelly Grummons.

Sessions four and five include Gardening with Native Plants of the Front Range by CSU Extension agent Deryn Davidson; Plant This, Not That: Colorado Native Plant Alternatives to Common Garden Plants by Colorado Native Plant Society’s Jennifer Bousselot, a CSU instructor; Ask an Expert: Follow up Questions and Conversation conference partners panel; and Water Conservation and Water Requirements for our Native Plants by Denver Botanic Gardens’ Dan Johnson and Northern Water’s Mary Hattendorf.

There’s even a track for pros, with Landscape Restoration: Native Plants on a Bigger Scale by the Butterfly Pavilion’s Amy Yarger and Jim Tolstrup, executive director of the High Plains Environmental Center; Creating Homes for Native Plants by Alison Peck; and Propagation of the Native Plants of the Interior West: Secrets Revealed by Fort Collins Wholesale Nursery’s Scott Skogerboe.

Lunch, drinks and snacks are provided with your registration fee and vendor booths will be open during registration, lunch and breaks.

Article source: http://www.coloradohometownweekly.com/lifestyles/ci_30748584/omeara-dont-miss-landscaping-colorado-native-plants-conference

New Extension agent Pettis takes reins of county horticulture

Henderson County has another new Cooperative Extension agent, dedicated full time to home and commercial horticulture in the county, one of the largest in the state for greenhouse production. 

Steve Pettis, 43, a Georgia native and University of Georgia graduate, started just over a week ago with the Extension and comes with a long background in gardening. 

Marvin Owings, county Extension director, said Pettis is a “seasoned horticultural agent,” one with a “tremendous amount of experience in the green industry.” He’ll be handling nurseries, greenhouses, sod and more with the commercial half of his responsibilities, Owings explained. The county ranks second in the state for green industry production, with an annual $34 million value, Owings said. 

The other half of Pettis’ responsibilities will be consumer horticulture, helping homeowners with their gardens and landscaping and leading programs like the county’s Master Gardener program. 

That’s something the Upson County, Ga. native is not new to. 

“I began gardening on my grandmother’s farm when I was little,” Pettis said. “We would dig up Irises and Buttercups and other plants and spread them around the yard.”

In high school, he joined Future Farmers of America, which took him on a field trip to UGA, from which he would graduate in 1999 with a degree in horticulture. He earned his master’s in agricultural pest management in 2003. 

He then began working for the Extension service in Gwinnett County, Ga., working mostly with county government and homeowners. 

That county has one of the largest recreation departments in the country, he said, and he did a lot of work with sports fields, turf and landscape plant management as well as training employees and homeowners — 800,000 of which lived in the county, just northeast of Atlanta. 

Later he worked in Rockdale County, Ga., just south of Gwinnett, the entire time living in the Athens, Ga. area. 

His official first day at work in Henderson was Jan. 17, and Pettis said he’s most excited to start meeting the growers in the county to find out what it is they need and want from the new horticulture agent. 

He hasn’t had much time to explore Henderson County over the short time he’s been here, but during the interview process he toured several farms and met some local producers. 

One of the interesting aspects of local horticulture is its variety of growing environments, Pettis said, explaining there are really four distinct growing regions for plants in the county, from the shady side of high mountains to the lower lands by the river. 

Pettis said he’ll be available to help with homeowners’ questions, whether they visit the Extension office, call or email with questions about landscape plants and turf. He plans to make visits and recommend steps they can take to improve the health of their landscapes. 

He’s also heading up the Master Gardener classes, already underway with 22 new master gardeners being trained. 

The position now covers just Henderson County, a change the county Board of Commissioners approved with its fiscal year 2016-17 budget last summer.

Article source: http://www.blueridgenow.com/news/20170128/new-extension-agent-pettis-takes-reins-of-county-horticulture

Agromin gardening tips: Plant and prune between rainy days in February

With February being the rainiest month of the year in southern California and the ground already saturated by January downpours, gardeners need to take into account the wet weather when planning their garden activities this month, says Agromin, an Oxnard-based manufacturer of earth-friendly compost products made from organic material collected from more than 50 California cities. Residents can obtain Agromin soil products in bulk or in bags at Rainbow Environmental Services (gate seven) in Huntington Beach and in bulk at South Coast Supply in Huntington Beach and Los Alamitos.

Prune Rose Bushes: After the chance of frost has past, February is the time to prune rose bushes. Pruning when there is still the possibility of frost can cause damage to any new growth. Clear stems from the center of the bush to bring in light and encourage air circulation. Make sure all dead steams and wayward branches are removed and remaining stems do not touch each other or cross over one another.

Take Care of Snails Naturally: Snails like a cool, moist soil so they thrive in southern California winters. Some natural ways to keep snails at bay: add plants to the garden that snails don’t like including sage, rosemary and mint; place a layer of mulch or crushed eggshells around plants (snails don’t like the rough surface); sprinkle used coffee grounds by the base of plants (also good for the soil).

Cut Back Perennials: The advantage of perennials is they grow year round, but that also means that plants can quickly become overgrown and unruly. Cut back perennials by trimming long stems so they are no more than 10 inches long. Perennials will grow back fuller and healthier in spring.

Continue to Plant Cool Weather Vegetables: Plant all types of lettuce as well as carrots, beets, peas, potatoes and radishes.

Plant A Quick Herb Garden: Plant seasonal herbs that thrive in cooler weather: arugula, chives, cilantro, dill, fennel and parsley.

Trim Low Growing Ornamental Grasses: Low growing ornamental grasses such as blue oatgrass, purple moorgrass, blue fescue and liriope, grow slowly during winter. Take the opportunity to cut back on these grasses so they are only five to six inches tall.

Don’t Over Fertilize Houseplants: Houseplants feel the effects of winter. Their growth slows so don’t overfeed them. Instead, make sure they receive plenty of sunlight and they are kept well watered. Wash leaves to remove dust and grime that may have accumulated.

Add Color To Your Landscape: Get a jump on spring by adding colorful plants already in bloom. Long lasting blooming plants to plant in late February include pansies, violas, primrose, snapdragons and calendulas.

For more gardening tips, go to www.agromin.com.

This article was released by Agromin.

Article source: http://www.oc-breeze.com/2017/01/28/95756_agromin-gardening-tips-plant-prune-rainy-days-february/