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Archives for January 22, 2017

Marianne Binetti On Gardening: Home and Garden shows are …

The end of January is when Home and Garden shows in the area give gardeners a sneak peek at spring while still under the protective roof of an exhibition center. The Tacoma Home and Garden Show runs Jan 26-29 at the Tacoma Dome, and then the biggest garden show on the West Coast — the Northwest Flower Garden Show in Seattle — celebrates spring this year by opening February 22 – 26. (Order early-bird discount tickets online at gardenshow.com)

Although the sights and scents of an early spring are what lure most gardeners and homeowners to these two shows, the growing advice offered by speakers at this show are also worth the price of admission.

Here are the top five gardening tips I’ll be sharing at the Tacoma Home and Garden Show when I speak on the topic of “Gardening on the Dark Side.”

1. There are different types of shade and different types of plants that will live in the shade; some plants such as azaleas will tolerate deep shade but never really flower or grow well. Other plants such as hosta with blue leaves thrive in deep shade but will adapt quite nicely to partial shade. Hostas with gold leaves or fragrant blooms are the most sun-tolerant.

2. Shady spaces can be lit up with golden foliage. Two of the best shade perennials with golden leaves are the lamium ‘Aurea’ (aka ‘Golden Anniversary’) and the flowing ornamental grass called Hakonechloa, or Japanese forest grass. As a bonus, both of these spreading plants are slug- and deer-resistant.

3. If you desire brightly colored blooms in a dark area, such as a shaded porch or patio, grow annuals. Impatiens, begonias, fuchsias and lobelia will bloom their heads off all summer long with no direct sunshine.

4. The shade cast from tall fir and cedar trees is often dry shade — a very challenging situation for many plants. Go native and plant sword ferns, huckleberry, Oregon grape and heucheras (related to our native foam flower) in dry shade.

5. Evergreen shrubs that thrive on the north side of a house or under the canopy of trees include rhododendrons, laurels and yews. But adding dark evergreens to a dark area can be a bit oppressive. Learn how to lighten things us and also some special planting tips to make your shady business prosper.

My other topic at the Tacoma Home and Garden show will be “The Pest-Free Garden,” and I’ll be sharing ideas for dealing with the big three garden terrorists in the NW: deer, slugs and moles. This means more than just a discussion on fences, traps and slug bait. Gardening with the right type of plant material can make all the difference toward turning your landscape into a peaceable kingdom instead of a war zone.

Marianne Binetti has a degree in horticulture from Washington State University and is the author of several books. Reach her at binettigarden.com.

Meet Marianne

Marianne Binetti will speak at the Tacoma Home and Garden Show Jan. 26 – 29. Her lectures will be at 1 p.m. Thursday and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Topics will be “Shady Business: Plants for the dark side” and “The Pest-Tolerant Garden: How to deal with deer, moles and slugs.” Go to OTShows.com for more details.

Article source: http://www.theolympian.com/living/home-garden/marianne-binetti/article127267569.html

Gardening Tips:: Mood swings

Posted: Saturday, January 21, 2017 12:15 am

Gardening Tips:: Mood swings

This week’s column was written by Paul Hetzler, a Cornell Cooperative Extension agent from St Lawrence County. Although Paul lives quite a bit north of us, his winter seems to be a lot like ours!

I’m not claiming it has been a hard winter thus far, just a rather temperamental one. We go from zero to 50 above, then back to single digits all in one week, each transition punctuated by freezing rain, sleet and high winds.

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Saturday, January 21, 2017 12:15 am.

Article source: http://www.thedailymail.net/columnists/weekly_gardening_tips/article_2dc02bac-df27-11e6-b0e6-57596ca0f1c6.html

Garden shows are great for inspiration during the dark, dreary months

The end of January is when Home and Garden shows in the area give gardeners a sneak peek at spring while still under the protective roof of an exhibition center. The Tacoma Home and Garden Show runs Jan 26-29 at the Tacoma Dome, and then the biggest garden show on the West Coast — the Northwest Flower Garden Show in Seattle — celebrates spring this year by opening February 22 – 26. (Order early-bird discount tickets online at gardenshow.com)

Although the sights and scents of an early spring are what lure most gardeners and homeowners to these two shows, the growing advice offered by speakers at this show are also worth the price of admission.

Here are the top five gardening tips I’ll be sharing at the Tacoma Home and Garden Show when I speak on the topic of “Gardening on the Dark Side.”

1. There are different types of shade and different types of plants that will live in the shade; some plants such as azaleas will tolerate deep shade but never really flower or grow well. Other plants such as hosta with blue leaves thrive in deep shade but will adapt quite nicely to partial shade. Hostas with gold leaves or fragrant blooms are the most sun-tolerant.

2. Shady spaces can be lit up with golden foliage. Two of the best shade perennials with golden leaves are the lamium ‘Aurea’ (aka ‘Golden Anniversary’) and the flowing ornamental grass called Hakonechloa, or Japanese forest grass. As a bonus, both of these spreading plants are slug- and deer-resistant.

3. If you desire brightly colored blooms in a dark area, such as a shaded porch or patio, grow annuals. Impatiens, begonias, fuchsias and lobelia will bloom their heads off all summer long with no direct sunshine.

4. The shade cast from tall fir and cedar trees is often dry shade — a very challenging situation for many plants. Go native and plant sword ferns, huckleberry, Oregon grape and heucheras (related to our native foam flower) in dry shade.

5. Evergreen shrubs that thrive on the north side of a house or under the canopy of trees include rhododendrons, laurels and yews. But adding dark evergreens to a dark area can be a bit oppressive. Learn how to lighten things us and also some special planting tips to make your shady business prosper.

My other topic at the Tacoma Home and Garden show will be “The Pest-Free Garden,” and I’ll be sharing ideas for dealing with the big three garden terrorists in the NW: deer, slugs and moles. This means more than just a discussion on fences, traps and slug bait. Gardening with the right type of plant material can make all the difference toward turning your landscape into a peaceable kingdom instead of a war zone.

Marianne Binetti has a degree in horticulture from Washington State University and is the author of several books. Reach her at binettigarden.com.

Meet Marianne

Marianne Binetti will speak at the Tacoma Home and Garden Show Jan. 26 – 29. Her lectures will be at 1 p.m. Thursday and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Topics will be “Shady Business: Plants for the dark side” and “The Pest-Tolerant Garden: How to deal with deer, moles and slugs.” Go to OTShows.com for more details.

Article source: http://www.theolympian.com/living/home-garden/marianne-binetti/article127267569.html

Indoor gardening tips

Never mind that it’s cold outside, you can do some indoor gardening to pass the time. 

Here are some tips:

Seed testing

You can test the viability of old seed by placing individual seeds on a wet paper towel.

Fold the towel over the seed and place it in a plastic food bag. Use 20 seeds for small seed such as lettuce or carrots and 10 for larger ones such as melons or sunflowers. Soak beans and peas overnight before testing. Leave the bag at room temperature for a week – light is unnecessary – and check the seeds for germination.

If fewer than half have sprouted, discard the corresponding packet of seeds.

Plant care

Mite webbing on house plants is a sign of low humidity levels, which can be raised by placing pots on trays of gravel and water.

This is separate from watering, and the base of the pots should sit above the water line.

Misting leaves is ineffective and can promote fungal diseases. Grouping plants together, away from drafts and heat registers, will create a pocket of humidity, but keep sick plants out of the group.

– Washington Post 

Article source: http://www.journalgazette.net/features/home-garden/Indoor-gardening-tips-17130331

Garden Docs: Tips on bare root planting and pruning | The Press …

How do I choose a bare-root tree, and what exactly should I look for as far as its form and health? Why should I plant a bare root instead of a potted tree? — Lyle

Planting bare root allows you to get an early start. Buy now while the supplies are plentiful and fresh.

First check the trunk. There should be no wounds or broken limbs/branches and the tree should be fairly straight with a nice taper to the trunk.

The large lateral branches should be evenly spaced around the tree and spaced far enough apart for future growth. Do visualize how the tree will look as it matures.

Then check the root system. Make sure they are firm, well formed and are not dried out. If all the roots are dark in color, slimy and smell bad, rot has started to set in.

If there is only a little section that looks like this, you can cut that section off with no problem. Planting bare root allows you to visually examine the condition of the root system, whereas containerized trees may have a hidden and compromised root system.

Bare-root planted trees adapt better to existing soils and will develop a better root system and a shorter time. You don’t have to worry about girdled roots or being pot bound. Beside, it is also less expensive to buy bare-root plants than container grown ones.

Garden Tip: After completing your pruning chores and deciding to finish the job by spraying for overwintering insects, fungal and bacterial problems, always clean your spraying equipment before you start and prevent any plant injury and cross-contamination of lingering pesticides in the sprayer. Finish by flushing the sprayer with soapy water followed by a clean-water flush. Drain after each use.

It would be best to have two sprayers, one marked for herbicides and the other marked for fungicides and insecticides. It is very difficult to thoroughly rinse all herbicides out of a sprayer and even a little leftover residue can be harmful to valuable plants.

When is the best time to prune my Buddleia davidii? — Jackie

This summer flower shrub blooms on current season’s wood, so it can be pruned hard, down to 12 inches, after flowering or wait until early spring and the threat of frost is over.

For those readers not familiar with buddleia, it is also known as the summer lilac or butterfly bush and is a favorite flowering shrub of gardeners who like to attract butterflies into their gardens. It is available in many different sizes and many colorful, fragrant and showy (spike-like) bloom choices. It can be evergreen or deciduous, and tends to grow upright with multiple stems that have an arching form. Buddleias require full sun, good drainage and moderate to occasional water. The deer tend to leave it alone but the butterflies and bees love it.

I recently discovered a handy, waterproof folded illustrated pamphlet of butterflies, depicting their life cycle, perfect photos of caterpillars matching the adult butterfly, listings of host plants, seasons they can be seen and much more. The title is “Butterflies of Central and Northern California, A guide to Common and Notable Species” by Jim Brock (Quick Reference Publishing, 2013). This has become my favorite butterfly reference.

Article source: http://www.pressdemocrat.com/lifestyle/6536353-181/garden-docs-tips-on-bare