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Archives for December 4, 2016

Brehob Nursery sells to out-of-state conglomerate

Indianapolis-based Brehob Nursery Inc., a wholesale nursery and landscape distributor with two facilities in the metro area, has been acquired by Kansas City, Missouri-based DCA Outdoor Inc.

The deal closed on Thursday, according to DCA founder and president Tory Schwope. He declined to share financial terms of the transaction or Brehob’s annual revenue.

Brehob, which was founded in 1969, sells its products to professional landscape companies and retail garden centers in Indianapolis and surrounding areas including Bloomington, Terre Haute, Anderson, Louisville and some parts of Illinois. Its two local facilities are located on the south side of Indianapolis at 4316 Bluff Road and in Westfield at 4867 Sheridan Road.

For about 10 months out of the year, Brehob has 170 employees. During the company’s short off-season period, employment drops to about 70  employees who work year-round, Schwope said.  

The company’s former owners, John Brehob and his wife, Judy, will be retiring, but they have agreed to stay on until a new person is hired to run the company, Schwope said. Other than John and Judy Brehob, everyone else will keep their jobs, Schwope said.

“We are excited to see our nursery join the family of companies that Tory Schwope has assembled,” John Brehob said in a news release. “We are confident he will continue the tradition of exceptional quality and service that has been the hallmark of our family and employees.”

IBJ was unable to reach John or Judy Brehob for additional comment Friday morning.

Schwope said Brehob’s strong reputation—and its geographic location—made it an attractive acquisition target.

DCA already serves the Kansas City and Des Moines, Iowa, markets, and the Brehob acquisition gives the company a foothold in Indianapolis.

Indianapolis is culturally and climatologically similar to Kansas City and Des Moines, Schwope said, and all three areas also currently have “a robust construction market.” Construction activity is generally considered a good indicator of the strength of the landscaping market, he said.

Brehob’s history and its strong brand recognition were also a big plus, Schwope said.

“Brehob is a gold-standard distributor. They were one of the pioneers of the industry,” he said.

Because of Brehob’s strong brand identity, Schwope said the company will continue to do business under its existing name, with a small change. It will now be known as Brehob Nurseries LLC, to reflect the fact that it has two locations. Corporate offices will move from the Indianapolis facility to Westfield, which is bigger and better equipped for corporate functions, Schwope said.

Brehob is now one of eight subsidiary companies owned by DCA. Schwope formed DCA earlier this year as a way to vertically integrate nursery stock production, distribution, transportation and sales and marketing.

Schwope started in the industry in 2000 with KAT Nurseries in Kansas City. Over the years he enlarged his holdings by starting or acquiring a number of other companies. 

DCA’s current holdings include agricultural producers Anna Evergreen, Schwope Brothers Tree Farms and Utopian Plants; landscape distributors Brehob Nurseries and KAT Wholesale Outdoor; retail/agritourism business Colonial Gardens; sales and marketing company PlantRight; and transportation company Utopian Transport. 

“We hope to continue to diversify our portfolio,” Schwope said.
 

Article source: http://www.ibj.com/articles/61538-indianapolis-based-brehob-nursery-sells-to-out-of-state-conglomerate

The drought doesn’t mean your HOA has to look like a wasteland

Question: Our homeowner association near Santa Clarita has a problem that most of the other associations around us don’t seem to share. Our association board appears to go out of its way not to approve drought-resistant landscaping or makes it difficult for owners to pick out plants. Several dozen of our 500 or so homeowners have stopped watering because of the drought. Trees, shrubs and lawns are completely dead. Most of the dead grass has even disappeared and all that is left at many properties is just dirt.

When it gets windy the dust and dead grass go everywhere. If it should rain, mud flows down driveways and sidewalks. We look like a wasteland. It drags down the whole community. Our board says it can’t do anything because California state law says boards can’t require owners to water. What are we supposed to do?

Answer: Just because there’s a drought doesn’t mean your association has to look like a wasteland. There is a long history of regulating the outward appearance of homes and landscape in common interest developments. Recent drought laws change the rules but do not deprive an association of its power to reasonably regulate the landscape.

It’s true that a board cannot impose a fine or assessment against an owner for reducing or eliminating the watering of vegetation or lawns during any period for which the governor or local government has declared a drought emergency. But the new laws also encourage the planting of succulents and similar drought-resistant vegetation.

Pastor Joshua Beckley of San Bernardino one year later

Caption Pastor Joshua Beckley of San Bernardino one year later

Pastor Joshua Beckley of the Ecclesia Christian Fellowship Church spoke at a candlelight vigil the day after a terrorist attack killed 14 people and 22 were seriously injured in 2015. A year later, he reflects on the city and how it has changed.

Pastor Joshua Beckley of the Ecclesia Christian Fellowship Church spoke at a candlelight vigil the day after a terrorist attack killed 14 people and 22 were seriously injured in 2015. A year later, he reflects on the city and how it has changed.

90 seconds: 4 stories you can't miss
William Crespo reacts to the sentence

Caption William Crespo reacts to the sentence

William Crespo cries as he talks about his brother, slain Bell Gardens Mayor Daniel Crespo, and the sentence given to Lyvette Crespo.

William Crespo cries as he talks about his brother, slain Bell Gardens Mayor Daniel Crespo, and the sentence given to Lyvette Crespo.

Kanye West 911 Call

Caption Kanye West 911 Call

The original version of this 911 call provided to the Times by the L.A. Fire Department included redacted portions to prevent the release of confidential health information. This condenses audible portions of the publicly released recording to remove silence.

The original version of this 911 call provided to the Times by the L.A. Fire Department included redacted portions to prevent the release of confidential health information. This condenses audible portions of the publicly released recording to remove silence.

Zachary Levine, a partner at Wolk Levine, a business and intellectual property law firm, co-wrote this column. Vanitzian is an arbitrator and mediator. Send questions to Donie Vanitzian, JD, P.O. Box 10490, Marina del Rey, CA 90295 or noexit@mindspring.com.

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-associations-drought-landscaping-20161130-story.html

Monterey Colonial by Roland Coate sits in the original Busch Gardens

This Monterey Colonial, designed by Roland E. Coate, is rooted in Pasadena tradition.

The stately two-story sits on what was once part of Busch Gardens, a park built more than a century ago by brewing magnate Adolphus Busch. Fittingly, a feature of the 1950s home is a balcony embellished in lacy woodwork that provides a vantage point for taking in the leafy grounds.

The details

Location: 571 Busch Place, Pasadena, 91105

neal.leitereg@latimes.com

Twitter: @NJLeitereg

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/business/realestate/hot-property/la-fi-hp-home-20161203-story.html

Garden tips for December – Visalia Times-Delta – Visalia Times

I know how busy December can be with all the holiday celebrations.  If you don’t have time to go out and do your gardening chores, it’s not a problem, they will be waiting for you in January.

However, if you need a break from all the festivities, pulling a few weeds or even a taking a relaxing stroll around your garden can be very good therapy to release holiday stress.

Don’t forget to visit your local nursery for decoration and gift ideas.  Poinsettias and other holiday potted plants will help brighten up the winter gloom.  Most nurseries have an area with lots of ideas, and you won’t have to navigate through the crowds at the malls.

Since poinsettias are probably the top plant purchased this month, here are a few pointers to keep them looking great.  First, bring them into your house ASAP and place near a sunny window.  They do not like cold weather, and it is important not to leave them in the car while shopping.

To keep your plant blooming, maintain a temperature over 65 degrees by keeping it away from cold drafts and not allowing the leaves to touch a cold window.  This will cause the leaves to droop and fall.  Be sure to check the soil and water when dry.

When we are running our heaters, the humidity is very low and the poinsettia can dry out quickly.  While many people believe that the poinsettia plant is poisonous, this is not true, although it is not recommended to eat them.
 
GARDEN CHORES:
 Watch for frost warnings and protect your sensitive plants.  Move potted plants to the eaves, patio or other protected areas.  Plants will survive better if kept moist but not overwatered.  Throw away any mummies left on fruit trees.  

Rake fell leaves and add to the compost or mulch pile unless there is a problem with disease or pests on either the plant or tree.  Do not add diseased debris to your mulch pile.  I use my leaves as mulch around my herbaceous perennials and shrubs. It is a great weed preventer and will help to hold moisture so I can water less all year.

Cool season annual bedding plants and winter vegetables are actively growing and need to be fertilized.

Cold weather crops, such as broccoli, Brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower grow well during the winter and can be harvested as long as they are producing.  Broccoli tip: leave a portion of the stem when harvesting, because additional heads will form just below the point where the first one was cut.  Although these secondary heads will be smaller, they can be harvested and enjoyed later.

After frost danger has passed, cut back asparagus to the ground.  Also, cut back any perennials with blackened leaves or stems.  I usually leave an inch or two above the ground so I can remember where they are.  To neaten up your garden, pull up any summer annuals that have died.  I shred my perennial cuttings and use them as mulch.

CRITTER CONTROL:  After the leaves fall, spray fruit trees and roses with a dormant oil spray to kill any overwintering aphids, mites, scale, etc.

Handpick slugs and snails or set out bait.  To help control them, eliminate their hiding places under debris such as wood or pots.

See any butterflies around your winter veggies?  That cute little butterfly is laying eggs on your prize broccoli or cabbage and will hatch into the cabbage lopper and eat holes in the leaves.

Large plants can survive some damage, however, seedlings could be devoured.  Luckily, they can be easily controlled by spraying with BT (Bacillus Thuringieis), sometimes marketed as caterpillar killer.  Be sure to spray plant leaves thoroughly on the tops and bottoms.

WHAT TO PLANT:  It is nearing the end of the bulb planting season, so nurseries may have them on sale.  Choose healthy firm bulbs and make sure they are not mushy or moldy.  Tulip and hyacinth bulbs should have been pre-cooled in the refrigerator (away from fruit) for six to eight weeks before planting.

Don’t forget to cut greens for holiday decorations.  Holly, firs, junipers, redwood, magnolia, pines and podocarpus foliage are excellent choices.   You can then add nuts, pomegranates, acorns, pinecones and any other seed pods you can find.

Happy Holidays!!

For answers to all your home gardening questions, call Master Gardeners in Tulare County at (559) 684-3325, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9:30 and 11:30 am; or Kings County at (559) 852-2736, Thursday Only, 9:30-11:30 a.m; or visit our website to search past articles, find links to UC gardening information, or to email us with your questions:  http://ucanr.edu/sites/UC_Master_Gardeners/

Article source: http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/story/life/home-garden/2016/12/02/garden-tips-december/94573016/

Sabrina’s gardening to-do list

From fruit tips to Christmas gifts, Sabrina Hahn shares some timely advice for home gardeners.

1. Remove excess fruit on apples, pears and stone fruit so they gain a decent size.


Remove excess from fruit trees. Picture: Astrid Volzke

2. Check out nurseries for your Christmas pressies — they are full of inspiration for the gardener in your life.

3. Rainbow chard that has gone to seed should be pulled out (or leave if you want to save the seed) and new plants put in as the leaves will be bitter.


Pull out rainbow chard that has gone to seed. Picture: Robert Duncan

Did you know?

There has been an increase in the number of strawberry fruit that are sprouting. This is called vivipary where seeds germinate immediately while on the plant.

Do you have a gardening question for Sabrina?

Write to Habitat Ask Sabrina, GPO Box N1025, Perth WA 6843, or email habitat@wanews.com.au.

Please include your full name and suburb. Due to the volume of questions, not all will be answered.


The West Australian

Article source: https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/lifestyle/a/33384696/sabrina-hahns-weekly-tips-for-perth-gardeners/

Survival tips for succulent dish garden | INFORUM

A: Many of these containers don’t have drainage holes in the base, and excess water can easily puddle up inside the bottom. Solid, waxy cacti and succulents are built to conserve moisture, so very little water is needed. The quickest way to kill these desert natives is for their roots to sit in a hidden swamp inside the base of a decorative container. If you haven’t had success in the past, it was likely the container’s fault, not yours.

There are several choices when you receive a decorative dish garden without a bottom drainage hole. A hole can be carefully drilled in the base of some containers. If the dish garden is crowded, it might be a good time to transplant the grouping, giving each plant its individual pot. Or you might transplant the entire group into a larger dish garden with drainage holes.

Succulents can be grown successfully in containers without drain holes if they’re watered very sparingly. When in doubt with this group, it’s always wise to err on the dry side. There’s very little chance of killing a succulent by underwatering. In fact, during our recent house move, we forgot a little grouping of succulents on a window ledge. They sat neglected and unwatered for the four months we were out of the house. They weren’t watered until we moved home and discovered them. They appear none the worse for the experience.

Q: I’d like to try one of the amaryllis kits that I see this time of year in every store from local garden centers to national home improvement chains. The prices seem to vary greatly. Is there a difference in various types? — Dave Hillis, Minot, N.D.

A: Amaryllis are fun and fascinating because they really do live up to the just-water-and-watch-it-bloom package directions. They blossom so readily and so reliably because the flower bud is already formed down inside the bulb, ready to burst forth when moisture triggers the bulb into new growth.

There is a difference in quality, usually reflected in the price. Larger bulbs have a greater pre-formed flower display waiting inside. The largest diameter bulbs often produce more than one flower stalk with multiple blossoms on each stalk. Bulb size is a greater indicator of success than flower color or brand.

To help the amaryllis replenish spent energy so it can store up another interior flower bud for future bloom, apply water-soluble fertilizer every two weeks during flowering and for another month after flowers have faded. Remove spent blossoms as soon as they whither to prevent the amaryllis from wasting energy producing seed pods.

Q: I’m new to growing plants under fluorescent lights. How many hours a day should the lights be left on? — K. Hanson, Alexandria, Minn.

A: The length of time depends a little on the types of plants being grown. If the lights are used to grow houseplants with low light requirements, 12 hours is enough. If seedlings, annual flowers, vegetable transplants, or geraniums are being grown, 15 hours of light is best. Plug-in timers are great labor savers.

Q: Don, I much enjoy and appreciate your writings about plants, nature, horticulture and landscape. I’ve followed your house move, and particularly agree with your recent comment about plants and landscape requiring patience and optimism.

Of late, I’ve wondered if much of today’s social unrest wouldn’t be eased a bit, or eliminated completely if the folks making so much noise had learned a thing or two about honesty and patience by working with nature. Thanks for saying what I was thinking about working with plants being a good character builder. Sorry about your potted plants wandering off. Good for you on the successful house move, for the initial salvage and for outlasting this tear-it-down city. Our own 1917 house is still a decent place to live and play. Thanks for sharing something you value with us readers. — Fuller Sheldon, Mapleton, N.D.

A: My first reaction is to give a good old North Dakota “Aw, shucks, twernt nuthin.” Working with plants is very rewarding. A wise horticulturist once told me “Plants are much more reasonable than most people.” Luckily, both plants and people treat me pretty well. Thanks for your comments.

If you have a gardening or lawn care question, email Don Kinzler at ForumGrowingTogether@hotmail.com. All questions will be answered, and those with broad appeal may be published, so please include your name, city and state for appropriate advice.

Article source: http://www.inforum.com/variety/columns/4171257-survival-tips-succulent-dish-garden

Garden tips for December – Visalia Times

I know how busy December can be with all the holiday celebrations.  If you don’t have time to go out and do your gardening chores, it’s not a problem, they will be waiting for you in January.

However, if you need a break from all the festivities, pulling a few weeds or even a taking a relaxing stroll around your garden can be very good therapy to release holiday stress.

Don’t forget to visit your local nursery for decoration and gift ideas.  Poinsettias and other holiday potted plants will help brighten up the winter gloom.  Most nurseries have an area with lots of ideas, and you won’t have to navigate through the crowds at the malls.

Since poinsettias are probably the top plant purchased this month, here are a few pointers to keep them looking great.  First, bring them into your house ASAP and place near a sunny window.  They do not like cold weather, and it is important not to leave them in the car while shopping.

To keep your plant blooming, maintain a temperature over 65 degrees by keeping it away from cold drafts and not allowing the leaves to touch a cold window.  This will cause the leaves to droop and fall.  Be sure to check the soil and water when dry.

When we are running our heaters, the humidity is very low and the poinsettia can dry out quickly.  While many people believe that the poinsettia plant is poisonous, this is not true, although it is not recommended to eat them.
 
GARDEN CHORES:
 Watch for frost warnings and protect your sensitive plants.  Move potted plants to the eaves, patio or other protected areas.  Plants will survive better if kept moist but not overwatered.  Throw away any mummies left on fruit trees.  

Rake fell leaves and add to the compost or mulch pile unless there is a problem with disease or pests on either the plant or tree.  Do not add diseased debris to your mulch pile.  I use my leaves as mulch around my herbaceous perennials and shrubs. It is a great weed preventer and will help to hold moisture so I can water less all year.

Cool season annual bedding plants and winter vegetables are actively growing and need to be fertilized.

Cold weather crops, such as broccoli, Brussel sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower grow well during the winter and can be harvested as long as they are producing.  Broccoli tip: leave a portion of the stem when harvesting, because additional heads will form just below the point where the first one was cut.  Although these secondary heads will be smaller, they can be harvested and enjoyed later.

After frost danger has passed, cut back asparagus to the ground.  Also, cut back any perennials with blackened leaves or stems.  I usually leave an inch or two above the ground so I can remember where they are.  To neaten up your garden, pull up any summer annuals that have died.  I shred my perennial cuttings and use them as mulch.

CRITTER CONTROL:  After the leaves fall, spray fruit trees and roses with a dormant oil spray to kill any overwintering aphids, mites, scale, etc.

Handpick slugs and snails or set out bait.  To help control them, eliminate their hiding places under debris such as wood or pots.

See any butterflies around your winter veggies?  That cute little butterfly is laying eggs on your prize broccoli or cabbage and will hatch into the cabbage lopper and eat holes in the leaves.

Large plants can survive some damage, however, seedlings could be devoured.  Luckily, they can be easily controlled by spraying with BT (Bacillus Thuringieis), sometimes marketed as caterpillar killer.  Be sure to spray plant leaves thoroughly on the tops and bottoms.

WHAT TO PLANT:  It is nearing the end of the bulb planting season, so nurseries may have them on sale.  Choose healthy firm bulbs and make sure they are not mushy or moldy.  Tulip and hyacinth bulbs should have been pre-cooled in the refrigerator (away from fruit) for six to eight weeks before planting.

Don’t forget to cut greens for holiday decorations.  Holly, firs, junipers, redwood, magnolia, pines and podocarpus foliage are excellent choices.   You can then add nuts, pomegranates, acorns, pinecones and any other seed pods you can find.

Happy Holidays!!

For answers to all your home gardening questions, call Master Gardeners in Tulare County at (559) 684-3325, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9:30 and 11:30 am; or Kings County at (559) 852-2736, Thursday Only, 9:30-11:30 a.m; or visit our website to search past articles, find links to UC gardening information, or to email us with your questions:  http://ucanr.edu/sites/UC_Master_Gardeners/

Article source: http://www.visaliatimesdelta.com/story/life/home-garden/2016/12/02/garden-tips-december/94573016/

Garden tips: Spring surprises | News | Palo Alto Online |

What’s available? Tulips, daffodils, narcissus, hyacinth, ranunculus, freesia, and edible bulbs and tubers.

The choices for edible bulbs and tubers include yellow, red and white potatoes and also red, yellow and white onions, as well as garlic and elephant garlic.

Get these as soon as possible and plant them when you get them. There’s no need for refrigeration because the soil temperature is cooling off and will best determine the start of new growth as the temperature rises in the spring. My experience has also been that bulbs put in the refrigerator get forgotten. They end up drying out too much to be viable.

This month’s tips will include planting techniques, design ideas, some color theory, an idea or two about containers and what to plant over your bulb bed. If you’re too late and cannot find bulbs in the nurseries, then cut out this article and wait until they show up again next year.

1. Plant your bulbs with the correct depth. Usually they come with instructions, but my general rule is to plant them three times’ the height of the bulb deep. And be sure to have the root side down.

2. Lay them out on the surface of the soil so you can see what the show will look like. Then, when happy with the design, dig them in.

3. Bulbs like to be planted in groups. It gives a better show as masses of pink, white, yellow, red and blue appear. If you plant cover plants over the bulbs, you’ll have color while the bulbs are still just starting to grow.

4. If you only have a few bulbs, put them in prominent locations. Then plant over them things like pansies, violas, primroses or ground covers.

5. Note when you buy your bulbs what height your bulbs will be at full bloom. There’s usually a pretty accurate description on the box that your bulbs come in. Put shorter ones in front of taller ones. What this means is plan on not obscuring the view with the tall bulbs, kind of like setting up a group photo of people with taller folk in back.

6. Lighter colors (white and yellow) draw the eye. I think of them as lights that invite you to go outside. At Sunset Magazine where I used to work, we would put these lighter colored flowers at the furthest viewable point of the gardens to draw people out of the lobby and into the gardens. They were also planted in the darkest area of the background thus giving it some lightness and contrast.

7. Putting bulbs in pots makes a stunning effect while still being portable. Plant them shoulder to shoulder to make a dense show. Then plant violas or pansies over them to give color while the bulbs are growing.

8. Bulbs are a complete package. They need water, but not fertilizer, unless they’re going to be naturalized. Naturalizing is best with daffodils and narcissus. It means they will come back every year and possibly even produce new bulbs of their own. Plant them with some bone meal and after the first year include them in your fertilizing program.

9. Color theory takes into consideration all the flowering and evergreen plants around a particular design. Primary colors are red, yellow and blue. Green, purple and orange are secondary colors. Basic good color design has masses of primaries and secondaries mixed. A diversion or specific theme design will have masses of one or the other. An example of this is if you wanted to plant a flower bed in the design of the American flag.

10. Timing your plantings can determine somewhat when the blooms will be. A good way to practice is with paper whites. Start some now, then in two weeks start some more and keep on doing it until you run out.

Good gardening!

Article source: http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2016/12/01/garden-tips-spring-surprises