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Archives for November 22, 2016

Home on Only Fools And Horses council estate sells for £1.1m

A home on the council estate where Only Fools and Horses was filmed has sold for £1.1million.

Despite the sitcom famously being set in a council block in Peckham, south London, Del Boy and Rodney’s flat in ‘Nelson Mandela House’ was actually Harlech Tower in Acton, west London.  

The former sink estate was built between the 1950s and 1970s and the sale of the new build townhouse is part of a massive £600million regeneration programme.

The 1,736 sq ft mews house which comes with a front garden, two decked terraces, a garage and ‘timber-effect’ flooring has sold for a record amount on the estate.

Despite Only Fools and Horses (cast pictured left: Buster Merryfield, Nicholas Lyndhurst and David Jason) famously being set in Peckham, south London, Del Boy’s home in ‘Nelson Mandela House’ was actually Harlech Tower (right) in Acton

Now, a 1,736 sq ft house set over four floors which comes with a front garden, two terraces, a garage and ‘timber-effect’ flooring has sold for a record amount on the estate

Now, a 1,736 sq ft house set over four floors which comes with a front garden, two terraces, a garage and ‘timber-effect’ flooring has sold for a record amount on the estate

The 1,736 sq ft mews house which comes with a front garden, two decked terraces, a garage and ‘timber-effect’ flooring has sold for a record amount on the estate

The 1,736 sq ft mews house which comes with a front garden, two decked terraces, a garage and ‘timber-effect’ flooring has sold for a record amount on the estate

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It is believed to be the first time a property on the estate has broken through the seven figure barrier. 

The house was built by Countryside Properties, who are undertaking the regeneration of the estate in partnership with housing provider LQ and Ealing Council.

Harlech Tower was shown in the opening credits of Only Fools and Horses. The tower block still stands and will come down as part of the longer-term regeneration of the estate, which will take until 2024. 

Under the ambitious new scheme 50 tower blocks are set to be demolished by 2024 and replaced by 2,500 new properties consisting of both private and affordable housing. 

And while the Trotter brothers’ flat was kitted out with naff 1980s fittings, garish wallpaper and a dodgy video recorder, the flat which has just sold is the epitome of tastefulness – complete with walnut finish doors, stone worktops and two roof terraces.

The iconic Trotters' Independent three-wheeled car parked outside Harlech Tower in Acton, west London 

The iconic Trotters’ Independent three-wheeled car parked outside Harlech Tower in Acton, west London 

The four-bedroom townhouse has been built as part of massive regeneration programme on the former sink estate

The four-bedroom townhouse has been built as part of massive regeneration programme on the former sink estate

And while the Trotter brothers’ flat was kitted out with naff 1980s fittings, garish wallpaper and a dodgy video recorder, the flat which has just sold is the epitome of tastefulness

Under the ambitious new scheme 50 tower blocks are set to be demolished by 2024 and replaced by 2,500 new properties consisting of both private and affordable housing

Under the ambitious new scheme 50 tower blocks are set to be demolished by 2024 and replaced by 2,500 new properties consisting of both private and affordable housing

HOW MUCH WOULD DEL BOY’S FLAT HAVE COST IN 1981?

Only Fools and Horses started in 1981, the year after Margaret Thatcher introduced the Housing Act which extended right-to-buy council homes.

When looking at the location and size of the flat, experts estimate the Trotter flat would sell today for around £330,000 – which means if Del Boy wanted to buy his home in 1981, it would have cost him around £21,000.

The wheeler-dealer duo were well-known traders on the market, constantly trying to sell broken or useless goods to unsuspecting customers.

They eventually became millionaires and bought upmarket apartments – before losing it all again and returning to their faithful flat.  

Mike Woolliscroft, a director at Countryside, told the London Evening Standard: ‘We now look forward to building on the success achieved so far by continuing to engage with the community in the remainder of the regeneration programme.’

The Acton Gardens project has been designed to deliver improvements while minimising impact on the existing community. The redevelopment is organised in phases and a community board has been formed, along with residents’ forums and housing surgeries. 

Alongside the new homes created so far, employment and training opportunities have been created, including a horticulture project to train young people to work in landscaping and gardening. 

All existing residents have the option to be rehoused in new homes at Acton Gardens with 80 per cent choosing to do so.  

The beautiful new build house comes complete with walnut finish doors and stone worktops

The beautiful new build house comes complete with walnut finish doors and stone worktops

 Outdoor spaces around the development are designed to create social, lively places to relax

The real-life tower was in Acton, ten miles northwest of Peckham, where the fictional Del Boy lived (left). When it is redeveloped the new homes will boast outdoor spaces designed to create social, lively places to relax (right)

Raquel (Tessa Peake-Jones), Del (Sir David Jason), Rodney (Nicholas Lyndhurst) and Cassandra (Gwyneth Strong) in a Christmas Only Fools and Horses special

Raquel (Tessa Peake-Jones), Del (Sir David Jason), Rodney (Nicholas Lyndhurst) and Cassandra (Gwyneth Strong) in a Christmas Only Fools and Horses special

The pair enjoy a cup of tea and a chocolate biscuit on the sofa in a September 1981 episode 

The pair enjoy a cup of tea and a chocolate biscuit on the sofa in a September 1981 episode 

Del and Rodney in their flat kitted out with naff 1980s fittings, garish wallpaper and a dodgy video recorder

Del and Rodney in their flat kitted out with naff 1980s fittings, garish wallpaper and a dodgy video recorder

THE BEST ONE LINERS FROM ONLY FOOLS AND HORSES

Rodney on Trigger’s IT skills: ‘Trigger with a computer? Do me a favour, he’s still struggling with light switches.’

Del Boy on Grandad’s cooking: ‘It’s the toughest chicken I’ve ever known. It’s asked me for a fight in the car park twice.’

Granddad on one of his friends deserting during the war: ‘You couldn’t blame him the way them Germans was carrying on. Someone was gonna get hurt.’

Del Boy on Rodney’s failings: ‘You’ve always been the same, even at school. Nothing but books, learning, education – that’s why you’re no good at snooker.’

 Del Boy on Albert’s claim that Lord Nelson (like him) was a sailor who couldn’t swim: ‘Of course he couldn’t swim, he only had one bloody arm. He would have gone around in circles, wouldn’t he?’

Trigger on his father: ‘He died a couple of years before I was born.’

Boycie on visiting Nelson Mandela House: ”I’d like to get away as quick as possible. I’ve left my Mercedes parked downstairs and you know what they’re like on this estate. They’d have the wheels off a Jumbo if it flew too low.’

Trigger on unborn baby Trotter: ‘If it’s a girl they’re calling her Sigourney after an actress, and if it’s a boy they’re naming him Rodney after Dave.’ 

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Article source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3960550/Home-Fools-Horses-estate-sells-1-1m.html

Moffis: Garden Tour featured inspiring homes – Daily Commercial

On the first weekend of November I attended the Annual Mount Dora Garden Tour, sponsored by the Lakes and Hills Garden Club. The tour showcases five private gardens, and this year the garden tour was truly inspiring, with a wide variety of plantings and styles. The first three gardens were on the same street, and each were very unique. One evoked a tribal Polynesian look with its handmade stone sculptures, while another gave you a relaxed, resort feel with its lounge patio and meditation garden. The third house on the street brought to mind an English cottage garden.

To create one of these styles in your yard or all three in different areas, choosing the right plant material, mulch and garden accents are important. For a Polynesian look, choose tropical plants with large, glossy or bold colored leaves. For example, philodendron selloum displays broad, gleaming leaves and the Hawaiian ti plant provides a pop of hot pink color. Palms such as the Chinese fan palm or our native sabal palm, and meandering paths of wood chips or leaf mulch provide a perfect backbone for tropical plantings. Including a water feature such as a koi pond or landscaping around an existing pool with tropical plants will conjure up feelings of Southeast Asia. To add whimsy and complete the look, add an interesting wood or stone sculpture like a tiki or mask.

For a resort feel, provide plenty of places to relax such as hammocks, café tables or lounges. Layer plantings and plant densely so that the mulch is hardly visible. Group like plants and plant in mass around focal points, like an entrance or a favorite resting spot. Select lots of green foliage plants and soothing, cool colors such as blues and soft purples. Avoid warm colors such as reds, yellows and oranges, as these tend to stimulate the viewer. Don’t forget to add a spot to meditate or let your mind wander. A cozy hidden bench under a large shade tree can provide a sweet escape in your own backyard.

An English cottage garden is almost the opposite of the resort feel with its splashes of warm, exciting colors. Plant lots of pinks, yellows and even the occasional blue or purple to achieve this look. Shrub roses, annuals and perennials provide cheerful explosions of color. Plant a pattern or border of a low growing hedge like boxwood, and fill the rest in with roses, herbs and blooming plants. White lattice, arbor structures and a walkway of decorative pavers or bricks can capture the style.

To find your garden muse, visit botanical gardens here in Central Florida. Check out Harry P. Leu Gardens, Bok Tower, Selby and even our own UF/IFAS Lake County Discovery Gardens.

On Saturday we will be hosting our first Greenhouse Plant Sale featuring butterfly plants, wildflowers and bulbs. The greenhouse will be open for the sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. as part of our “Saturday in the Gardens” speaker series. The speaker series will begin at 10 a.m. and will feature an hour long class on Florida bulb gardening. Bulb gardening class participants will learn about the selection and care of bulbs that can be grown successfully in Central Florida. For information, go to lake.ifas.ufl.edu.

For gardening questions, visit our Master Gardener Plant Clinic. For landscape and garden ideas, visit Discovery Gardens. Both are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays at the Extension Services Office, 1951 Woodlea Road in Tavares.

Brooke Moffis is the Residential Horticulture Agent of the UF/IFAS Lake County Extension office. Email burnb48@ufl.edu.

Article source: http://www.dailycommercial.com/news/20161119/moffis-garden-tour-featured-inspiring-homes

5 tips for protecting your garden from cold, animals – Hartford Courant

Winter is on the way to your garden, with its bitter cold and hungry animals. Doris Taylor, Plant Clinic manager at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, offers these tips to protect your plants and save yourself trouble during the cold, snowy months.

Clear the way. Trim ground covers such as English ivy and myrtle back to the edge of the path or driveway to make it easier to shovel or blow snow.

Prepare for snow. A heavy snow load can bend or break the branches of multi-stemmed evergreen shrubs such as arborvitaes, junipers and yews. To prevent harm, tie the stems loosely together with strips of cloth or other soft, stretchy material. Don’t use wire or cable ties. “Any stiff material can rub and damage the stems when they flex in the wind,” Taylor said. 

RELATED: TRENDING LIFE STYLE NEWS THIS HOUR

Water new plants. All trees, shrubs and perennials need to store water in their root systems. “The ones you planted this year don’t have enough roots yet to collect much water,” Taylor said, so you need to water them until the soil freezes. “Evergreens are especially vulnerable to drying out in winter if you don’t water them in fall,” she said.

Spread mulch. A layer of plant matter, such as chipped or shredded wood or leaves, will enrich the soil and keep plants from sprouting during winter warm spells. Spread about an inch of mulch over all perennial beds. Make a wide, even layer about 3 inches deep around trees and shrubs. Don’t pile the mulch against the plants; keep it a couple of inches away from shrubs’ stems or trees’ trunks. “That way, animals can’t burrow through it and eat the bark,” Taylor said.

Guard against animals. “When rabbits and other animals get hungry in winter, they often will eat the tender bark of young trees and shrubs,” Taylor said. Protect a shrub by encircling the entire plant with a cylinder of chicken wire, fastening the ends together securely. For a tree with a single trunk, use a smaller cylinder of metal mesh, called hardware cloth, or buy flexible, well-ventilated plastic tree protectors at the garden center.

Beth Botts is a staff writer at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle (www.mortonarb.org).

For tree and plant advice, contact the Arboretum’s Plant Clinic (630-719-2424 or plantclinic@mortonarb.org).

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Article source: http://www.courant.com/ct-sun-1127-garden-morton-20161121-story.html

Earth-friendly tips for autumn | Home & Garden | timesonline.com

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Article source: http://www.timesonline.com/lifestyles/homeandgarden/earth-friendly-tips-for-autumn/article_dda5a492-acfb-11e6-9c94-6ba222707ee1.html

Fashion-inspired exhibition at Matthaei Botanical Gardens features living dresses

November 21, 2016

By Joe Mooney

The University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens turns to the world of couture for inspiration for the holiday exhibition Avant Garden—Weaving Fashion and Nature Together.

Avant Garden explores the role of plants as the source of raw materials for textiles and the inspiration for fashion’s designs, colors and shapes. The exhibition will also highlight plants from Matthaei’s conservatory collection and their historical and cultural roles as they relate to cultivation, sustainability, textiles and dyes.

A highlight of the exhibition is a collection of six custom outfits created from plant materials such as ferns, succulents, bromeliads, moss, tree bark and others.

“We wanted to take the exhibition in a truly different and creative direction and challenge staff here to create costumes using only plant material,” said David Betz, the gardens’ visitor engagement manager.

Succulent cocktail dress. Courtesy the University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum

Succulent cocktail dress. Courtesy the University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum

As with all of the exhibitions at Matthaei, Betz says that Avant Garden “makes use of the amazing collection of plants we have right here in the conservatory.”

Avant Garden is the brainchild of Matthaei’s events coordinator, Allison Correll, who refined the concept for months before bringing it up at an exhibition brainstorm meeting.

“It’s a ‘Project Runway’ idea,” Correll said, “in the sense that we challenged ourselves to create the outfits from one set of materials—in this case plant materials only.” At the same time, she said, “it allowed us to highlight the long-standing but sometimes subtle role plants have in shaping our ideas of fashion. And that includes not just textiles made from plants but also colors, patterns and designs that the world of plants gives us.”

Complementing Avant Garden’s plant theme is “Nature by Design,” a display of community art in a variety of media including paintings, photographs, sculpture, ceramics and others. Family and kids’ activities are also planned throughout the exhibition.

Both exhibitions are free and open to the public from Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016, to Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017.  Matthaei Botanical Gardens located at 1800 Dixboro Rd. in Ann Arbor, and is open 10 a.m–4:30 p.m daily, with extended hours until 8p.m. on Wednesdays.

Matthaei Botanical Gardens will also host an artisans market 10-4:30 p.m. Sunday, December 4, where fine art and hand-crafted items will be for sale by local artists.

 

Article source: http://arts.umich.edu/news-features/fashion-inspired-exhibition-at-matthaei-botanical-gardens-features-living-dresses/

Australian National Landscape Architecture Awards

The Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA) has presented this year’s National Landscape Architecture Awards. The winners span an eclectic mix of typologies ranging from penguin viewing platforms to waterfall trails and healing gardens. The AILA chose 40 state-level finalists from ten categories: Civic Landscape; Parks and Open Space; Infrastructure; Cultural Heritage; Land Conservation; Tourism; Urban Design; Research, Policy and Communication; Communities; Gardens and International.

“The winners range in focus and theme, but all have appreciated the merit of urban green spaces and sustainably minded infrastructure to promote health, social and economic prosperity for urban and regional communities,” the AILA said in a press release.

Lady Cilento Children's Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

Lady Cilento Children's Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

Lady Cilento Children's Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

Lady Cilento Children's Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital. (Lyons Architecture)

AILA National Civic Landscape Award of Excellence
Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, Brisbane
Conrad Gargett

Landscape architecture firm Conrad Gargett were duly rewarded for their inclusion of a “Healing Garden” at the Brisbane hospital. With the design based around the concept of a living tree, 11 gardens—primarily used for therapy and recreation—can be found on the rooftops. 23,000 plants can also be found on the building’s green extensive roof.


Nanjing Tangshan Geopark Museum. (Courtesy Hassell Studio)

Nanjing Tangshan Geopark Museum. (Courtesy Hassell Studio)

AILA International Award of Excellence
Nanjing Tangshan Geopark Museum
Hassell

According to the AILA, the project is an “experiential and immersive gateway and forecourt” for the Nanjing Tangshan Geopark Museum, which was designed by Parisian architect Odile Decq. Multidisciplinary firm Hassell integrated a network of pathways and gardens into a 15-hectare park that includes a 300 million-year-old Paleozoic quarry.


McCulloch Avenue Boardwalk. (Courtesy Site|Office)

McCulloch Avenue Boardwalk. (Courtesy Site|Office)

AILA National Award for Parks and Open Space
McCulloch Avenue Boardwalk
Site Office

Completed on a “modest” budget, the McCulloch Avenue Boardwalk sets travellers within the diverse topography and landscape of the site. “What could have been a simple boardwalk through a dune has become an experiential journey that rewards the user with a sense of pride and enjoyment,” said the AILA. “No longer will be the destination be the focus.”


Mackenzie Falls Gorge Trail. (Courtesy Hansen Partnership)

Mackenzie Falls Gorge Trail. (Courtesy Hansen Partnership)

AILA National Parks and Open Space Award of Excellence
MacKenzie Falls Gorge Trail
Hansen Partnership

Creating new routes through Grampians National Park, urban design, planning, and landscape architecture firm Hansen Partnership were able to cast MacKenzie Falls Gorge (one of Australia’s largest waterfalls) in a new light. Bolted steel bridges and mesh pathways are able to endure flooding and fires (but can’t protect you from spiders).


Forest Edge Garden, Lower Hunter Valley. (Courtesy Dianna Snape/Jane Irwin Landscape Architecture)

Forest Edge Garden, Lower Hunter Valley. (Courtesy Dianna Snape/Jane Irwin Landscape Architecture)

AILA National Gardens Award of Excellence
Forest Edge Garden
Jane Irwin Landscape Architecture

Jane Irwin Landscape Architecture approached this project with the view to blend the garden into the terrain. The result was a subtle and elegant series of interventions that kept the existing landscape in harmony with the dwelling through careful design, plant species selection, and water management.


Penguin Plus viewing area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

Penguin Plus Viewing Area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

Penguin Plus Viewing Area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

Penguin Plus Viewing Area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

Penguin Plus Viewing Area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

Penguin Plus Viewing Area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

Penguin Plus Viewing Area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

Penguin Plus Viewing Area, Phillip Island. (Courtesy Phillip Island Nature Parks)

AILA National Tourism Award of Excellence
Penguin Plus Viewing Area
Tract Consultants with Wood Marsh Architecture

On Phillip Island, tourists can catch glimpses of penguins both inside and outside this curvaceous, topographic timber structure by planning and design firm Tract Consultants with Wood Marsh Architecture. “The work is beautifully detailed and provides a replicable prototype for the development of other components of this fragile landscape into the future,” said the AILA.


Get sunflowered by Get Sunflowered. (Courtesy Reactivate Latrobe Facebook)

Get sunflowered by Get Sunflowered. (Courtesy Reactivate Latrobe Facebook)

AILA National Award for Communities
Get Sunflowered
OUTR Research Lab, RMIT University

Get Sunflowered saw new life come to the Latrobe Valley in Victoria, Australia. Community events include cleaning, planting, weeding, watering, and “harvesting”—all accompanied by local live music, food, and entertainment. The AILA praised Get Sunflowered for making use of a forgotten place which has been subject to a population and economic shift.


Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) by Room 11 and McGregor Coxall. (Courtesy Room11)

AILA National Award for Civic Landscape
Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park (GASP!) Stage 2
McGregor Coxall

Multidisciplinary firm McGregor Coxall’s work the second stage of the Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park pays extensive tribute and homage to the dramatic landscape of Wilkinson’s Point. The “build it and they will come” approach has paid dividends and is, according to the AILA, a well-used civic and cultural space. “It has captured the imagination of locals and visitors as well as being recognized nationally and abroad.”


Sydney Park Water Re-Use Project by Turf Design. (Courtesy Ethan Rohloff)

Sydney Park Water Re-Use Project by Turf Design. (Courtesy Ethan Rohloff)

AILA National Award for Infrastructure
Sydney Park Water Re-Use Project Stage 2
Turf Design Studio and Environmental Partnership

Juggling numerous constraints, Turf Design Studio and Environmental Partnership educate visitors to Sydney Park on environmental issues and the value of inner city green space. Integrating ecology, play, stakeholder management, engineering and sustainable water management requirements within an existing and well-loved inner city park is a difficult brief in any context,” the AILA said. “The project beautifully expresses the forms, shapes, context, ecology and management of water, while also focussing on people, place, habitat and ecology.”


Shipwreck Coast Master Plan. (Courtesy McGregor Coxall)

Shipwreck Coast Master Plan. (Courtesy McGregor Coxall)

AILA National Award for Land Conservation
Shipwreck Coast Master Plan
McGregor Coxall

Shipwreck Coast in South Victoria is a popular tourist destination on the Australian southeast coast. Tourists, however, are the issue at hand with their presence threatening the site they flock to. Tackling this challenge, McGregor Coxall (in their 4th mention in the full list of 40) tie in habitat preservation with investment opportunities while maintaining and amplifying the sight-seeing experience–something which is a must for the economic prosperity of the area.

Article source: https://archpaper.com/2016/11/2016-australian-national-landscape-architecture-awards/

Mini-golf course with artistic twist planned for Bartram’s Garden

Bartram’s Garden, a 45-acre oasis just west of the Schuylkill River, has long been considered a hidden gem in Philadelphia. But the historic garden is ready to shed that reputation, starting with plans to build the Links, a mini-golf course, on its grounds.

Peter Angevine, the mastermind behind the idea, knows most folks’ gut reaction is to think of the kitschy courses one finds down at the shore. But, he assures, the concept puts an artistic and educational twist on the summer past time.

“We’re looking to take mini golf, which is a very familiar traditional and iconic American tradition, and use it in a number of different ways,” explains Angevine. “We’re exploring its potential to be beautifully designed and sculptural by having different artists interpret each hole.”

Angevine, who owns Little Baby’s Ice Cream, has partnered with Robert Blackson, the director of Tyler School of Art’s Department of Exhibitions and Public Programs. With Blackson’s help, they hope to find both local and international artists to design a total of nine holes, each one representing some “some unique facet of the history or ecology of Bartram’s Garden.”

William Bartram’s drawing of the first alligators he ever encountered while in Florida.
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Bartram’s Garden is a 45-acre National Historic Landmark that dates back to 1728, when John Bartram began gathering one of the most varied collections of plant species in the country.

The hope, Angevine says, is that with the expected spring 2017 opening of Bartram’s Mile and the expected soar in visitors to the garden as a result, the mini golf course will be just another more engaging way to educate visitors, especially Southwest Philly residents, about the site’s significance.

“The reality of the situation is that this is their backyard,” says Angevine.

He and Blackson are inviting artists to visit the garden and work with curator Joel Fry to identify which part of Bartram’s story they want to highlight in their design. “We don’t want for this to be one of those kind of back-of-the-napkin, flash-in the-pan type thing,” says Angevine.

Three artists have already designed the first three holes. Mark Dion took on the first hole, dubbed the “Alegator,” which debuted at the garden’s October Harvest Festival. The hole tells the story of William Bartram’s pet alligator, which he brought to the Schuylkill River from his travels down to Northern Florida in 1766.

Design proposal by Stacy Levy

Stacy Levy’s designed hole will feature the American Rhododendron, which was discovered by Frederick Traugott Pursh and John Bartram in the mid-1700s. Another artist, Rudy Shephard, is working with local teens for his design.

Angevine estimates that the total cost of the course will be $120,000. That’s not including the $15,000 already awarded by the Knight Foundation as seed money. Most likely it won’t open until well after Bartram’s Mile.

While the plan is for the golf course to bring in some revenue for the free garden, Angevine says, “Part of the conversation the whole time has been to create a system where it would be free for many audiences, but not all.” There’s no firm plan in place, but one idea is that neighbors who live within a specific radius have their fees waived.

“Bartram’s is really interested in shedding that ‘hidden gem’ reputation and becoming more of a real public amenity of Philadelphia,” says Angevine.

Article source: http://philly.curbed.com/2016/11/21/13697828/bartrams-garden-the-links-mini-golf-course