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Archives for November 17, 2016

Cool Spaces: ThornCreek Winery & Gardens in Aurora is an unexpected gem (video, photos)

AURORA, Ohio — If a trip to Napa Valley for fine wine and breathtaking views is out of the question, you can have a similar experience closer to home at ThornCreek Winery Gardens in Aurora.

The two-level winery, on eight acres of more than 10,000 flowering shrubs and trees, is filled with rich, warm wood throughout, a massive stone fireplace and thick oak barrels for fermenting as well as atmosphere.

ThornCreek comes as a surprise to visitors who see it for the first time, especially since Aurora isn’t exactly known as wine country, says General Manager David Walker.

“We had a guy who lives nearby walk in recently, and said, ‘Nobody told me this was here,'” Walker says. “When guests visit ThornCreek for the first time, we are happy to give them a personal tour of the winery facility and the grounds. We have people traveling to us from all over the state just to see the award-winning gardens and taste our award-winning wines.”

ThornCreek, at 155 Treat Road, is owned by David Thorn, who says his love of fine wine, fine cuisine and beautiful outdoor surroundings gradually led to the winery and gardens.

In 1995, Thorn co-founded DTR Associates, a landscape design/build company in Chagrin Falls. In 2005, he was ready for new professional challenges and needed space to expand his landscaping business, so he began looking for property with enough acreage to accommodate a production facility, design offices and space to creatively display his work. He came across the Treat Road site that included the aging Dankorona winery.

Rather than eliminating the old winery completely, Thorn decided to close its door for two years and renovate every square inch of the building and grounds, sell the existing wine inventory and produce new wines that matched ThornCreek’s fresh brand that focuses on quality fruit produced from grapes found in the best fields in the country.

“Share the Experience” is ThornCreek’s tag line, and drives every business decision that Thorn says he makes. The unique spaces inside and out, the local and organic menu along with national award-winning wine draw visitors, whether it’s for a relaxing experience, large wedding, large corporate function, non-profit gala or private one-of-a-kind party.

“I’ve spent a lot of time painstakingly creating really special spaces that people can enjoy, whether it’s an intimate dinner for two, or an event with three hundred people plus,” says Thorn.

The first floor of ThornCreek is done as a European-style tasting room decorated with rich, warm brown wood from beams that were purposely crafted to mimic old barn beams. Customers love to cozy up to the fireplace where there’s a small tufted love seat and a couple of cloth chairs. The tasting room features live music Thursday through Sunday.

The room also is brightened with bursts of colorful dried flower arrangements, including a massive one over the fireplace. A fallen white birch tree that Thorn came across one day was chopped back a bit and now stands potted in the tasting room, with soft lights dangling from its branches.

There are colorful paintings by Chagrin Falls artist Lisa Eastman, whose works include luminous landscapes, throughout. Eastman also designs the labels for ThornCreek’s wine bottles.

Downstairs ThornCreek is known as the “lounge underground.” During winter months, visitors can gather there for drinks and a meal amidst the huge stainless steel barrels and French oak barrels that not only are used for fermenting, but add to the setting.

“It’s an actual wine cellar where you can sit and be a part of the aging process of our wine,” says Thorn.

Since opening, the grounds have been transformed into lush gardens, patio spaces, a lawn area and a culinary herb garden used to enhance ThornCreek’s seasonal dishes, such as artisan French brie and duck meatballs.

In 2013, ThornCreek added a tented garden and entertainment space complete with a waterfall, babbling brook, lush plantings and twinkling lights that can accommodate up to 250 people. That same year, ThornCreek introduced another wine, its 10th wine.

ThornCreek doesn’t grow its own grapes. Instead, the winery sources premium produce from around the country. Fermenting and blending is done onsite. Earlier this year ThornCreek, in the annual Tasters Guild International wine-judging contest, won silver awards for its Riesling and Cabernet Sauvignon, and a bronze for its Merlot.

Thorn says what makes ThornCreek unique is that each space inside and out “has its own ever-changing flavor and style.”

Article source: http://www.cleveland.com/insideout/index.ssf/2016/11/cool_spaces_thorncreek_winery_gardens_in_aurora_is_unexpected_gem_video_photos.html

Palm Beach Gardens adding first park with children’s zip lines

Palm Beach Gardens is about to get a new park unlike any other — its first with two children’s zip lines.

One of the zip lines at the park at the intersection of Holly and Ironwood Drives will be accessible for children with physical disabilities. The City Council voted 4-1 Wednesday to purchase about $106,800 of playground equipment for the park Thursday night.

Facebook users, follow @PostonGardens for the latest news and updates.

The small park will also have benches, a bike rack, fencing, landscaping and walkways.

Councilman Bert Premuroso said plans in the past always called for a passive park, one with benches and picnic tables but no playground equipment. He said he has concerns about the number of people the park will attract, which could lead neighbors to turn against it, he said.

+Palm Beach Gardens adding first park with children’s zip lines photo

Palm Beach Gardens is creating a park with a playground at the intersection of Ironwood and Holly Drives. The playground will … read more

To read the latest news from Palm Beach Gardens, go to mypalmbeachpost.com/gardens

Palm Beach Gardens Purchasing Director Km! Ra said city staff talked to six neighbors, including those who live in the two homes that will directly face the park. They support it, he said. It won’t have a parking lot, so it’s only expected to attract residents who can walk there, he said.

Vice Mayor Eric Jablin said the small lot across from Palm Beach Gardens Elementary School “cries out” for a park with a playground.

+Palm Beach Gardens adding first park with children’s zip lines photo

Palm Beach Gardens is creating a park with a playground at the intersection of Ironwood and Holly Drives. The playground will … read more

“If we just put a few benches out and make it pretty, kids aren’t going to hang around,” he said.

Mayor Marcie Tinsley said either type of park will be a nice addition but as a compromise suggested putting up a sign with a photo at the site for a month to get feedback from residents.

Councilman Carl Woods said he has an “ear to the ground,” in the neighborhood, and residents want the park. The sidewalk on which kids walk home from school runs right past the future park.

After she was assured it’s intended to be a true neighborhood park with no extra parking, Councilwoman Maria Marino said officials chose the right design.

City Manager Ron Ferris pointed out the park is only for small children and has no lights. The park won’t be nearly as active as those with amenities such as ball fields and tennis courts, he said.

“It’s just there for the children,” Ferris said.

Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/news/local/palm-beach-gardens-adding-first-park-with-children/ns9PD/

Answers to gardening questions found in UW-Extension publications

The mission of the Winnebago County Master Gardener Association is this: “To provide research based horticulture education, community service and environmental stewardship to our community in affiliation with the University of Wisconsin-Cooperative Extension.”

The Master Gardener program was initially conceived to assist Extension agents in answering the public’s questions on home gardening and landscaping. To become certified, Master Gardeners undergo approximately 36 hours of training.  To remain certified, a minimum of 24 hours of continuing education are required every year.  Some Master Gardeners have been gardening for 30 or more years before becoming certified, while others are relatively new to the pursuit.

Whether experienced or new, no Master Gardener knows everything about gardening or has all the answers to your questions. What we do have, though, is access to science-based university research that we use to answer your questions.

Today, much of that information is available free of charge to the general public. There are two UW-Extension websites that offer a plethora of information and advice.

The first is the Learning Store, https://learningstore.uwex.edu, where 325 bulletins are listed under the Lawn and Garden category alone. After selecting “Lawn Garden” on the left side of the screen, you can choose among the following: Flowers Gardens, Fruit, Lawns Turf, Soils, Trees Shrubs, Urban Community Gardens and Vegetables. When you click on a category, at first it appears that you must pay to get the information, and indeed you may order a paper copy of the bulletins if you wish. However, when you click on a publication title, there is an option to view the entire publication in PDF format. You can read the information on the screen or print it on your home computer.

If you do not have computer access, you can see the entire list of Learning Store publications at the UW-Extension office in the James P. Coughlin Center, 625 E. County Road Y, Oshkosh, across from the fairgrounds. From that list, you can print bulletins out immediately from the computer at the counter for a small per page fee. Extension personnel will be glad to help you.

As an aside, along with horticultural information, the Learning Store offers hundreds of other bulletins on an extremely wide variety of interesting topics, way too many to list here.

Another Extension website, hort.uwex.edu, holds additional horticultural information. Drop-down menus include Fruits, Vegetables, Trees Shrubs, Flowers, and an Other Topics category which consists of Pests, Wildlife, Community Gardens and Weeds Invasive Plants. When selecting a topic, it first appears that there are only a few related publications, but there are many more – be sure to click on “Previous Entries” and/or “Next Entries” at the bottom of the page to see them all.

When using the hort website, you may find yourself back at the Learning Store site, as all the Lawn Garden Learning Store publications are linked there.

Lawanda Jungwirth is a UW-Extension Master Gardener.  Email her at ljungwirth@charter.net

Article source: http://www.thenorthwestern.com/story/life/2016/11/16/answers-gardening-questions-found-uw-extension-publications/93960218/

Tips on gardening and a sweet place for waffles

It’s not too early to be thinking about next year’s garden, especially if you think some more training would be appropriate. Here in Howard County, we are fortunate to have access to the Master Gardener Training program that is offered by the University of Maryland Extension, Howard County Office.

Registration is now open for the next training program that will begin Jan. 25 through March 29. Classes meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Mondays and Wednesdays at the extension office in Ellicott City.

Training will cover plant, insect and disease problems along with other topics such as sustainable gardening practices and its environmental impact. Registration is required and the fee for the training is $195. Call the extension office at 410-313-2707 for a registration packet.

The mission of the Master Gardeners, according to the web site (extension.umd.edu/mg/locations/howard-county-master-gardeners), “is to educate residents about safe, effective and sustainable horticultural practices that build healthy gardens, landscapes and communities.” A willingness to volunteer time is an essential for the master gardener. Don’t be put off if you feel you lack hands-on experience: if you are interested in gardening, want to learn more about it, apply. And, if you have other skills, such as writing, computer knowledge or graphics design, apply. Lack of hands-on experience in the garden should not deter potential applicants. Anyone with a keen interest in gardening — and especially those with other skills and interests, such as writing, graphics and computer knowledge — is encouraged to apply.

Article source: http://www.baltimoresun.com/ph-ho-n-highland-1117-20161117-story.html

5 garden tips for the week starting Nov. 12



More tomatoes

In autumn, tomatoes often grow beautifully but stop producing. Here’s a way to get one more crop from them this season. First, stop watering the tomatoes and trim back the tops of the plants a few inches (not much). Then “root-prune” them by inserting a shovel its full length down one side of each plant near the trunk. This shock treatment will stimulate them to form more fruit. Water only if and when the plants wilt; and if frost comes before they ripen completely, harvest green tomatoes for cooking, or let them ripen on the counter inside.

Water less

If you haven’t already done this, reduce automatic sprinkler settings for watering fruit trees, roses, landscape beds and even lawns. With the weather cooling, plants don’t need as much moisture. By early next month for most of us, automatic sprinklers can safely be turned off practically until spring. No sense wasting our precious water — or your precious money to pay for unneeded irrigation.

Winter harvest

Plant your winter garden soon, if you haven’t gotten around to it yet. Winter veggies include beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbages, carrots, cauliflower, Chinese peas, garlic, leeks, lettuces, onions, peas, radishes, snap peas, spinach, Swiss chard and turnips. To be sure the ground is loose, friable and fertile, add aged steer manure or other organic soil amendments as needed before planting. Replant favorites as you harvest them, anytime through early February.

Color your world

For garden color from now until spring, take time to plant annuals and hardy perennials. Ornamental cabbages, calendulas, candytuft, cyclamen, dianthus, forget-me-nots, larkspur, pansies, Iceland poppies, primroses and snapdragons, stocks and violas will sport their stuff quickly and continue through spring. Also put in bulbs, such as anemones, crocus, daffodils, hyacinths and tulips. These won’t flower so quickly or as long, but you’ll be glad you planted them when they show up next spring.

Decorating idea

Take time to enjoy the astonishing reds, yellows, oranges and purples of autumn leaf colors in Liquidambars, Boston ivy and even grape vines. Take pictures to make a collage, or prepare and photograph an autumn-leaf screen saver for your computer. Or do it the old-fashioned way by pressing the prettiest leaves between layers of wax paper. Remember that? Wax paper folded in half over a wooden dowel at the fold, leaves inserted in between the top and bottom of the wax paper, towel, press it with a hot iron to seal the wax, then tie yarn or string to the dowel ends to hang it up.

Article source: http://www.dailybreeze.com/lifestyle/20161113/5-garden-tips-for-the-week-starting-nov-12

5 garden tips for the week starting Nov. 12



More tomatoes

In autumn, tomatoes often grow beautifully but stop producing. Here’s a way to get one more crop from them this season. First, stop watering the tomatoes and trim back the tops of the plants a few inches (not much). Then “root-prune” them by inserting a shovel its full length down one side of each plant near the trunk. This shock treatment will stimulate them to form more fruit. Water only if and when the plants wilt; and if frost comes before they ripen completely, harvest green tomatoes for cooking, or let them ripen on the counter inside.

Water less

If you haven’t already done this, reduce automatic sprinkler settings for watering fruit trees, roses, landscape beds and even lawns. With the weather cooling, plants don’t need as much moisture. By early next month for most of us, automatic sprinklers can safely be turned off practically until spring. No sense wasting our precious water — or your precious money to pay for unneeded irrigation.

Winter harvest

Plant your winter garden soon, if you haven’t gotten around to it yet. Winter veggies include beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbages, carrots, cauliflower, Chinese peas, garlic, leeks, lettuces, onions, peas, radishes, snap peas, spinach, Swiss chard and turnips. To be sure the ground is loose, friable and fertile, add aged steer manure or other organic soil amendments as needed before planting. Replant favorites as you harvest them, anytime through early February.

Color your world

For garden color from now until spring, take time to plant annuals and hardy perennials. Ornamental cabbages, calendulas, candytuft, cyclamen, dianthus, forget-me-nots, larkspur, pansies, Iceland poppies, primroses and snapdragons, stocks and violas will sport their stuff quickly and continue through spring. Also put in bulbs, such as anemones, crocus, daffodils, hyacinths and tulips. These won’t flower so quickly or as long, but you’ll be glad you planted them when they show up next spring.

Decorating idea

Take time to enjoy the astonishing reds, yellows, oranges and purples of autumn leaf colors in Liquidambars, Boston ivy and even grape vines. Take pictures to make a collage, or prepare and photograph an autumn-leaf screen saver for your computer. Or do it the old-fashioned way by pressing the prettiest leaves between layers of wax paper. Remember that? Wax paper folded in half over a wooden dowel at the fold, leaves inserted in between the top and bottom of the wax paper, towel, press it with a hot iron to seal the wax, then tie yarn or string to the dowel ends to hang it up.

Article source: http://www.sgvtribune.com/lifestyle/20161113/5-garden-tips-for-the-week-starting-nov-12

Work begins on memorial garden for Sir Nicholas Winton

The first spades went into the ground last week for a garden commemorating the late Sir Nicholas Winton.

The latest tribute to Sir Nicholas, one of Maidenheads most famous residents, is expected to open to the public next spring in Oaken Grove Park, Maidenhead.

The garden’s design reflects the story of Sir Nicholas’ great deeds, where he helped arrange for hundreds of children to be brought to safety on what later became known as the Czech Kindertransport, on the eve of the Second World War.

Cllr Samantha Rayner, cabinet member for culture and communities, said: “We have worked very closely with his family to find the most fitting memorial, and we feel that an outdoor space for relaxation and contemplation will do just that.”

The garden will comprise of a winding path lined by timber railway sleepers, areas of wild flowers and an ornamental pond and fountain. Along the path, several stones will be inscribed with inspirational quotes by Sir Nicholas.

The path will lead visitors up to a ‘place of sanctuary’ in the form of a raised mound, accessed by a bridge over a pond.

Nick Jnr, son of Sir Nicholas, said: “I think the whole design is a fitting tribute to my father and the journey that was made.

“I’m just really happy that the community will be able to share what will be such a tranquil place to relax and reflect.”

Cllr Simon Werner, ward councillor for Pinkneys Green, said: “It is an honour to say that Sir Nicholas Winton was one of our residents and I think this is a wonderful way to pay our respects to such a gentle and generous man.”

The park was chosen as Sir Nicholas lived much of his life in Pinkneys Green, until he sadly died last year at the age of 106.

Article source: http://www.maidenhead-advertiser.co.uk/gallery/maidenhead/107250/work-begins-on-memorial-garden-for-sir-nicholas-winton.html

World Leader in Modern Design Opens at Westfield Garden State …

“Garden State Plaza is a new market for us, so we expect that a lot of people will experience Design Within Reach for the first time,” says DWR CEO John Edelman. “We’re excited about the opportunity to engage the community, especially during this time of year. We believe shoppers will look to DWR as a resource as they prepare their homes this holiday season.”

The experience at the new DWR Paramus Studio will be unlike that offered by any other furniture retailer in the area. A glowing installation of hundreds of pendant lights, the Light Cloud, welcomes customers to the space at both entrances and invites them to discover the company’s extensive product assortment. The Studio displays thirty-six room vignettes that integrate iconic classics by designers such as Charles and Ray Eames or George Nelson with pieces designed by emerging designers like Egg Collective, Norm Architects and Chris Hardy.

Shoppers looking to individualize their décor will love the Swatch Wall (itself a piece of beautiful design), which shows off more than 300 of the thousands of upholstery options available from the likes of Maharam fabrics and Edelman® and Spinneybeck® leather, and the opportunity to see how products will look in their own homes using the DWR 3-D Room Planner.

DWR continues its partnership with New York-based architecture firm DFA to bring the Paramus Studio to life, as well as enlisting the help of Light Studio LA in creating dramatic lighting design throughout the space.

DWR Paramus Studio is at One Garden State Plaza, Paramus, NJ, 07652. The Studio can be reached at 201.843.2650 from 10am–8pm Monday–Saturday; closed Sunday. Design Within Reach is hiring: dwr.com/careers.

About Design Within Reach, Inc.

Design Within Reach, Inc., founded in 1998 and headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, is the world leader in authentic modern design. The company sells its furniture and accessories to residential and commercial customers through retail Studios in North America, via the Web at dwr.com, by phone at 1.800.944.2233 and through the Contract division at dwrcontract.com. Design Within Reach, Inc., is a subsidiary of Herman Miller, Inc. For additional images and information, contact Kim Phillips at pr@dwr.com.

About Herman Miller, Inc.

Herman Miller is a globally recognized provider of furnishings and related technologies and services. Headquartered in West Michigan, the global company has relied on innovative design for over 100 years to solve problems for people wherever they work, live, learn and heal. Herman Miller’s designs are part of museum collections worldwide, and the company is a past recipient of the Smithsonian Institution’s Cooper Hewitt National Design Award. Known and respected for its leadership in corporate social responsibility, Herman Miller has been included in the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index for the past 12 years and has earned the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s top rating in its Corporate Equality Index for the past nine years. In fiscal 2016, the company generated $2.26 billion in revenue and employed nearly 8,000 people worldwide. Herman Miller trades on the NASDAQ exchange under the symbol MLHR.

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161115/439701

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161115/439702

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161115/439703

Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160906/404401LOGO

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/world-leader-in-modern-design-opens-at-westfield-garden-state-plaza-in-time-for-the-holiday-season-300363546.html

SOURCE Design Within Reach, Inc.

Related Links

http://dwr.com

Article source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/world-leader-in-modern-design-opens-at-westfield-garden-state-plaza-in-time-for-the-holiday-season-300363546.html

Treasure Valley gardening events includes classes on growing indoors in winter

Saturdays, Nov. 19 and Dec. 10

Indoor Kitchen Gardening in Winter: 12:30 p.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Workshop on growing all types of edible greens in your home through the winter. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or info@madelinegeorge.com.

Monday, Nov. 21

Growing Fruit in the Treasure Valley: 9 a.m. to noon at the University of Idaho Extension Center, 29603 U of I Lane, Parma. Join fruit tree expert Essie Fallahi to enjoy a class that addresses general grape and fruit tree (including peach, plum and apple) selection and production. Emphasis will be on factors to consider for boosting fruit production. Following a lecture, the group will travel to the orchard to learn proper pruning techniques. $12 Idaho Botanical Garden members, $17 nonmembers. Register: 343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Friday, Nov. 25

Indoor Kitchen Gardening in Winter: 11 a.m. at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Workshop on growing all types of edible greens in your home through the winter. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or info@madelinegeorge.com.

Saturdays, Nov. 26 and Dec. 3

Terrarium Building Workshop: 12:30 p.m. Nov. 26 and 11 a.m. Dec. 3 at Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road Parkway, Boise. Craft a mini eco-system with foliage, succulents, cactus and more. Feel free to bring your vessel. Free. RSVP to 995-2815 or info@madelinegeorge.com.

Article source: http://www.idahostatesman.com/living/home-garden/article115185368.html

Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy Students Visit The Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute

Less than a month after opening its freshwater research center, the Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute (TNACI) began acting on its mission of educational outreach by hosting a mentoring workshop with students from Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy.

On Nov. 15, 11 students from CGLA visited TNACI’s state-of-the-art facility on the banks of the Tennessee River as part of a yearlong mentoring program with Tennessee American Water, one of the aquarium’s sponsors.

“I want the students to make a connection between us providing drinking water that comes from the river to organizations like the Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute and the role they play in being a good steward of the watershed and educating the community about the importance of healthy rivers,” said Tennessee American Water external affairs manager Daphne Kirksey. “We’re also trying to broaden their view on career options, and seeing the labs here and meeting some of the scientists will help do that.”

TNACI scientists Dr. John Ennen and Dr. Bernie Kuhajda answered students’ questions and discussed the choices they made in school that led them into the field of aquatic biology. They also stressed the importance of effective communication and outreach efforts to the success of conservation programs.

Afterward, TNACI watershed educator Erin Durant took the students on a tour of the 14,000-square-foot facility, including the multi-purpose educational space as well as fully equipped genetics and morphology labs. Outside, students were shown how the building actively serves its conservation mission through architectural and landscaping choices such as a 6,000-gallon cistern employed for gray water use inside the building and the exclusive presence of non-invasive plants on the grounds.

TNACI will continue acting as a hub of inspiration for future generations of scientists in the coming months. On Jan. 28, 40 high school students from throughout the region are expected to visit the field station for the first annual Freshwater Youth Summit. TNACI director Dr. Anna George will deliver a keynote address. The students will meet with conservation leaders from the region, who will lead discussions about freshwater issues that threaten the Southeast’s treasure trove of aquatic biodiversity. Participants will then brainstorm ideas for conservation projects they will help put into action in their own communities.

“It’s important to imprint upon them that this richness is in their backyard and part of their heritage and then equip them to do something to protect it,” Ms. Durant said. “That’s a huge part of our mission — to mentor the next generation of freshwater scientists.”

The summit will last from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mandatory pre-registration is $20 and can be completed athttps://community.tnaqua.org/events/member-programs/youth-freshwater-summit.  Each student will receive lunch and a swag bag with reusable items as part of their admission packet.

High school teachers interested in leveraging TNACI’s new facility or its scientists to enhance their curriculums can contact Durant at eod@tnaqua.org .

For more information about TNACI, its new facility and its conservation initiatives, visit www.tnaqua.org/protect-freshwater

Follow the Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute on social media via www.facebook.com/TennesseeAquariumConservationInstitute or www.twitter.com/tnacigogreen

Article source: http://www.chattanoogan.com/2016/11/16/336279/Chattanooga-Girls-Leadership-Academy.aspx