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Archives for October 6, 2016

Home, garden, grilling experts to share expertise at free clinics – The Register

More than three dozen free how-to clinics for better homes, gardens and outdoor grilling are slated for all three days of the Lane County Home Improvement Show this Friday through Sunday at the Lane Events Center, 796 W. 13th Ave., in Eugene.

Keynote presenters Mad Dog Merrill of Wisconsin will host nine clinics, all on outdoor grilling of foods (see story on Page 12). The popular duo attracted capacity audiences when they last presented at the home show eight years ago.

Other experts will cover topics such as remodeling, interior design, pest control and more productive gardening. The seminars will be held on three stages:

Grilling Stage in the North Exhibit Hall;

Project Stage in Room 4-West off the South Lobby;

Remodel it Now! Stage in Room 4-East off the South Hall.

Friday, Oct. 7

5:30 p.m. “Tailgating With a Flare.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

5:30 p.m. “Express Your Design Style.” Quartz, Glass, Tile Stone Innovations.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Kelli Hemphill, Stone Works International.

6 p.m. “Fall Planting for Homegrown Fruit Berries.” Project Stage; by John Fischer, “The Relaxed Gardener.”

6:30 p.m. “Remodeling Your Empty Nest.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Magda Zafer CKD, CBD, CAPS — Neil Kelly Design/Build Remodeling.

7 p.m. “Caring for Native Birds in the Winter.” Project Stage; by Dick Lamster, Audubon Society of Lane County.

7:30 p.m. “It’s All About Grillin’ Meat — Rubs, Sauces, Mops Marinades.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

7:30 p.m. “Kitchen Remodels — Designs to Budgets.” 10 Winners of $100 goodie bag. Remodel it Now! Stage; by Ericka Arowcavage, Signature Kitchen Design.

8 p.m. “Why Are My Trees Dying?” Project Stage; by Lauren Grand, OSU Extension forester.

Saturday, Oct. 8

10:30 a.m. “Edible Winter Gardens Lasagna Composting.” Project Stage; by John Fischer, “The Relaxed Gardener.”

11 a.m. “Grillin’ Up Pre-Game Hors d’oeuvres.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

11:30 a.m. “How to Make a Lifelong Home — Aging in Place with AARP Home Fit.” Project Stage; by Michele Scheib, AARP.

Noon. “Inspiring Kitchen Remodels.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Stefanie Hunt, Neil Kelly Design/Build Remodeling.

12:30 p.m. “Tree Talk with Sperry Tree Care: Trees to Shrubs — Soil to Watering.” Project Stage; by Alby Thoumsin Nathaniel Sperry, certified arborists.

1 p.m. “There Ain’t Nothing You Can’t Grill!” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

1 p.m. “Outdoor Space Remodeling: Making Rooms in the Landscape.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Jon Clark Lytton Reid, Rainbow Valley Design Construction.

1:30 p.m. “Been There — Killed That. The Best NW Plant Who Lived.” Project Stage; by Mary-Kate Mackey, garden writer.

2 p.m. “10 Remodeling Secrets to Stay in Your Home Forever.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Steve Moir, Moir Construction.

2:30 p.m. “Tiny Houses — Facts to Fun!” Project Stage; by Keith Schneider, Bohemian Cottages.

3 p.m. “Granite vs. Quartz Countertops — Designs to Functionality.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Michele Linbarger, Roman’s Marble, Granite Tile.

3:30 p.m. “Planting Fall Garlic.” Project Stage; by Pat Patterson, OSU Extension Master Gardener.

4 p.m. “It’s All About Grillin’ Meat — Rubs, Sauces, Mops Marinades.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

4 p.m. “Kitchen Remodels — Designs to Budgets.” 10 winners of $100 goodie bag. Remodel it Now! Stage; by Ericka Arowcavage, Signature Kitchen Design.

4:30 p.m. “Going Ductless, More Comfort, Less Money.” Project Stage; by Curt Meyers and Kathleen Berry, The Heat Pump Store.

5 p.m. “Planning a Successful Remodel.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by David Zarzycki, general contractor.

6 p.m. “Grillin’ Up Post-Game Desserts.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

Sunday, Oct. 9

10:30 a.m. “Do it Yourself Ductless Heat Pump Installation.” Project Stage; by Rick Gregg, The Heat Pump Store.

11 a.m. “Tailgating With a Flare.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

11 a.m. “The Truth Myths about Quartz, Stone Granite Countertops.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Laureen Youngblood, American Home Stone.

11:30 a.m. “Drying Fruits Vegetables — Healthy Snacks the Easy Way.” Project Stage; by John Fischer, “The Relaxed Gardener.”

Noon. “Custom New Homes: The Design-Build Approach.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Alec Dakers and Tobin Newburgh, Rainbow Valley Design Construction.

12:30 p.m. “Moles, Voles Gophers — Driving You Crazy? Tips to Regain Your Sanity and Yard.” Project Stage; by Grant Williams, Ultimate Pest Control.

1 p.m. “There Ain’t Nothing You Can’t Grill.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

1 p.m. “Interior Design — Tips, Tricks Trends for Your Home.” One winner of a home décor prize. Remodel it Now! Stage; by Patty Nelson, Designer, La-Z-Boy Furniture.

1:30 p.m. “Small Trees Play Big Roles — Best Selections for Urban Landscapes.” Project Stage; by Mary-Kate Mackey, garden writer.

2 p.m. “Contracts Contractors — 10 Ways to Stay Protected During Construction Projects.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Joshua Shafer, Stonewood Construction.

2:30 p.m. “An Affordable, Worry-Free Solar Option: Community Solar.” Project Stage; by Brian Johnson, EPUD Resource Analyst.

3 p.m. “Getting Healthy on the Grill.” Grilling Stage; by Mad Dog Merrill, America’s Grillologists.

3 p.m. “Key to Comfortable, Efficient Homes.” Remodel it Now! Stage; by Darek Smith, Neil Kelly Home Performance.

3:30 p.m. “Creating Easy Affordable Compost Bins — Composting Tips.” Project Stage; by OSU Extension Master Gardener/Compost Specialist.

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Article source: http://registerguard.com/rg/life/homeandgarden/34801330-72/home-garden-grilling-experts-to-share-expertise-at-free-clinics.html.csp

Kent Garden Club and library to present Tovah Martin

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Kent When you need nature close by, terrariums are the answer. If you’ve always yearned to host plants indoors, but failed — this lecture will come to the rescue. The solution is crystal clear — glass can serve as a solution to bond botany and you. With the aid of a terrarium, you can host nature almost anywhere: in your parched apartment, your dim office cubicle, or your less-than-ideal home growing environment. Terrariums are like personal assistants — they put your indoor gardening chores on autopilot. These “small worlds” introduce beauty, botany, whimsy, sophistication, and sparkle into any décor simply, elegantly, and inexpensively. This lecture explains exactly how to work with terrariums. Not only will we share all sorts of recycling ideas for enlisting everything from vases to cake stands, fishbowls, lemonade pitchers, cookie jars, etc for growing plants and showcasing nature, but we’ll talk about how to select appropriate plants. And most importantly, this illustrated lecture will demonstrate precisely how to plant glass enclosures of all types, sharing secrets for success to incorporate green into your life, no matter how busy your schedule might be.

Join the Kent Memorial Library and the Kent Garden Club as they welcome horticulturalist, author and photographer Tovah Martin on Saturday, October 22, 2 p.m. at the Kent Town Hall, 41 Kent Green Boulevard, Kent. Her topic is “Terrariums You.” And her book The New Terrarium will be available for purchase signing.

An avid (verging on obsessed) gardener indoors and outside, Tovah Martin is the author of many gardening books – most recently The Indestructible Houseplant (2015, Timber Press) which follows the success of The Unexpected Houseplant (2012, Timber Press) and The New Terrarium (2009, Clarkson Potter) as well as the popular Tasha Tudor’s Garden (1994, Houghton Mifflin). A freelance writer, her articles have appeared in publications throughout the country including Country Gardens, Garden Design, Traditional Home, Martha Stewart Living, O the Oprah magazine, Old House Interiors, Horticulture magazine, Yankee, Passport, Connecticut Cottages Gardens as well as The Daily Telegraph in Europe. In addition to being the 2012 Writer in Residence for the new Victoria magazine, she is an accredited Organic Land Care Professional through NOFA, an honorary member of the Garden Club of America and the recipient of their medal for outstanding literary achievement. In 2013, she received the Gustav Mehlquist Award—the highest honor bestowed by the Connecticut Horticultural Society. She has appeared on the Martha Stewart Show, PBS television series and the CBS Sunday Early Show as well as many other television and radio broadcasts. She speaks throughout the country and has lectured aboard the QE2. Tovah can be found at www.tovahmartin.com and she posts on facebook at Plantswise by Tovah Martin.

Her book will be available for purchase and signing. This event is free and open to the public. To register or for more information call the Library, 860-927-3761; email kmlinfo@biblio.org; stop by the Library; or visit the Library’s online calendar at kentmemoriallibrary.org.

The Kent Memorial Library’s mission is to enrich the lives of individuals and the community by providing materials, programs, and services to encourage reading, learning and imagination. The Kent Memorial Library is located at 32 North Main Street, Kent

Submitted by Kent Memorial Library.

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Kent When you need nature close by, terrariums are the answer. If you’ve always yearned to host plants indoors, but failed — this lecture will come to the rescue. The solution is crystal clear — glass can serve as a solution to bond botany and you. With the aid of a terrarium, you can host nature almost anywhere: in your parched apartment, your dim office cubicle, or your less-than-ideal home growing environment. Terrariums are like personal assistants — they put your indoor gardening chores on autopilot. These “small worlds” introduce beauty, botany, whimsy, sophistication, and sparkle into any décor simply, elegantly, and inexpensively. This lecture explains exactly how to work with terrariums. Not only will we share all sorts of recycling ideas for enlisting everything from vases to cake stands, fishbowls, lemonade pitchers, cookie jars, etc for growing plants and showcasing nature, but we’ll talk about how to select appropriate plants. And most importantly, this illustrated lecture will demonstrate precisely how to plant glass enclosures of all types, sharing secrets for success to incorporate green into your life, no matter how busy your schedule might be.

Join the Kent Memorial Library and the Kent Garden Club as they welcome horticulturalist, author and photographer Tovah Martin on Saturday, October 22, 2 p.m. at the Kent Town Hall, 41 Kent Green Boulevard, Kent. Her topic is “Terrariums You.” And her book The New Terrarium will be available for purchase signing.

An avid (verging on obsessed) gardener indoors and outside, Tovah Martin is the author of many gardening books – most recently The Indestructible Houseplant (2015, Timber Press) which follows the success of The Unexpected Houseplant (2012, Timber Press) and The New Terrarium (2009, Clarkson Potter) as well as the popular Tasha Tudor’s Garden (1994, Houghton Mifflin). A freelance writer, her articles have appeared in publications throughout the country including Country Gardens, Garden Design, Traditional Home, Martha Stewart Living, O the Oprah magazine, Old House Interiors, Horticulture magazine, Yankee, Passport, Connecticut Cottages Gardens as well as The Daily Telegraph in Europe. In addition to being the 2012 Writer in Residence for the new Victoria magazine, she is an accredited Organic Land Care Professional through NOFA, an honorary member of the Garden Club of America and the recipient of their medal for outstanding literary achievement. In 2013, she received the Gustav Mehlquist Award—the highest honor bestowed by the Connecticut Horticultural Society. She has appeared on the Martha Stewart Show, PBS television series and the CBS Sunday Early Show as well as many other television and radio broadcasts. She speaks throughout the country and has lectured aboard the QE2. Tovah can be found at www.tovahmartin.com and she posts on facebook at Plantswise by Tovah Martin.

Her book will be available for purchase and signing. This event is free and open to the public. To register or for more information call the Library, 860-927-3761; email kmlinfo@biblio.org; stop by the Library; or visit the Library’s online calendar at kentmemoriallibrary.org.

The Kent Memorial Library’s mission is to enrich the lives of individuals and the community by providing materials, programs, and services to encourage reading, learning and imagination. The Kent Memorial Library is located at 32 North Main Street, Kent

Submitted by Kent Memorial Library.

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Article source: http://www.countytimes.com/articles/2016/10/06/life/doc57f6aa7134673125047604.txt

Recycled wine corks in your garden

Guests who pay attention to my wooden bowls full of wine corks often ask in amazement or horror if my husband and I consumed all that wine alone? Laughing, we assure them that the answer is a definite no! However, we’ve had our fair share. If they only knew of the many bags I have stored in the garage, overspilling with wine corks.

The secret is that over time, generous friends and family have saved their corks for us, adding to the collection.

Today, my bags and decorative bowls are empty.  

Organic wine corks (never use plastic or silicone corks) make excellent moisture-retaining mulch, ideal for container planting and small-scale gardens.

This week, my container plants received a thick layer of protective cork mulch, just in time for the approaching fall and winter months. The corks are recycled, the plants are protected and watering is kept at a minimum. It takes longer for cork to break down, compared to other green waste mulch. The additional bonus is that cork does not retain water and are therefore resistant to mold. 

Avoid applying cork in areas where you might find standing water during heavy rain. As we all know, cork will float. 

Apply a 2- to 4-inch thick layer of organic corks to your potted outdoor plants, covering the exposed soil.

Use full-size corks for large plants, such as New Zealand flax, lavender, rosemary, boxwood, olive shrubs, manzanita, large succulents/aloe and citrus trees.

Let the wine corks remain where they fall or use your creative side and have fun while stacking or lining the corks into a decorative pattern.

In a smaller garden, consider replacing old bender board with two rows of empty wine bottles, turned upside down and placed side by side. Fill the planter with a layer of cork, protecting your plants from heat and cold.

Use small chunks of organic cork for smaller pots and plants. It works great for both indoor and outdoor use, such as low-growing herbs, vegetables, small-sized succulents and annuals.

Pull out the cutting board and a sharp knife.

Place a few corks on the chopping board at a time and chop away until you have a bowl full of desired sized mulch. If this is too tedious of a process for you, there is a faster option.

Use a blender.

Place a maximum of 12 corks in the blender cup and start your blender at the lowest level. Then quickly turn up the speed to the highest level. Don’t forget to keep the lid on or you will be cleaning cork of your walls for the rest of the evening. Continue the process until you have as much mulch as you need.

Article source: http://syvnews.com/lifestyles/columns/the_garden_of_eva/recycled-wine-corks-in-your-garden/article_00c5e67f-8592-55d4-8768-c40d3342deb4.html

Floating new ideas for water solutions

October 5, 2016

From desalination to homes with dual pipe systems, scientists and policy analysts exploring wide-ranging strategies

Editor’s note: This is the second in a three-part series examining the work that ASU is doing in the realm of water as a resource in the arid West. Today, we explore technology and innovative approaches.

To reach the floating docks at Temple Bar Marina on Lake Mead, you have to cross a 200-yard-long gangway stretching across cracked mud flats that used to be the lake bottom.

Mike Reisbig moored his boat there on an August afternoon. The Huntington Beach man, a football coach at Long Beach City College in California, has been coming to Temple Bar for about 50 years.

“I’ve noticed a lot of changes,” he said. “I’ve been here when the water’s all the way up, going to the spill wells, to where it is today. It’s a scary sight. You don’t know whether you’re going to be able to get your boat on the water anymore or not. It’s such a beautiful place. It’s the only place I’ll bring this boat. … It’s getting scarier each year, trying to figure out how to get it in the water. We seem to figure out a way and get it in. This is the best lake I’ve ever been to, and I’m going to keep going.”

His parents discovered the lake decades ago.

“It just has become one of those things the family does,” Reisbig said. “Believe it or not, I brought a 3-month-old baby up here with this heat in this boat, so she could experience this lake. I know she doesn’t remember any of it, but she comes up here every year. It’s just what the family does. I have yet to find a better place to bring a boat. It’s perfect out here. You’ve got your rough days, and you’ve got your beautiful days. It’s just perfect. It doesn’t get better.”

Mike Reisbig of Huntington Beach, California, hands ropes to his wife, Lori, as they prepare to back out of their slip and begin their daylong excursion on Lake Mead on July 28. His family has been visiting Temple Bar Marina for about 50 years, and he has seen the reservoir’s water levels go through many changes. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

Like Reisbig, hydrologists, policy analysts and researchers are figuring out ways to keep going in the arid West. Here you’ll hear about technology and innovation behind water.

Straws in the ocean

It’s possible that the West will someday get to the point where new water supplies need to be found. One possibility being discussed in Arizona is building a plant to remove salt from seawater in Mexico on the Gulf of California.

The idea is in the early stages, but the broad outline of how it would work goes like this: Arizona builds it, Mexico uses it, and we take their Colorado River allotment.

Building — and permitting — a plant in California would be so expensive it’s not on the table.

“A lot of people are very pessimistic about desalination and its future,” Rhett Larson said. “I’m one of the optimists. I actually think that it’s going to be a big part of water-supply solutions, and probably sooner than people realize.

“The technology’s come a lot further. A lot of people think about desalination as just, ‘Well, it’s insanely expensive and nobody will ever do it,’ but the technology has come a long way and I think it has a really bright future.”

Larson is a fifth-generation Arizonan.

“I grew up worrying about water,” he said. “I’m one of the weirdos who actually went to law school wanting to be a water lawyer.”

Larson, an associate professor in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, is a senior research fellow with the Morrison Institute of Public Policy and sits on the advisory board of the Morrison Institute’s Kyl Center for Water Policy.

A privately owned desalination plant opened in Carlsbad, California, last December. Under a 30-year operating agreement with the San Diego County Water Authority, the plant produces 56,000 acre-feet per year. Most water managers call an acre-foot — one acre covered by water a foot deep — enough water for a suburban family for a year.

“That water’s cheaper for San Diego (residents) than pumping the water from the Colorado River,” said Larson, pointing out that the river water would require the construction of a pipeline across the state.

Sarah Porter, director of the Kyl Center for Water Policy at ASU, is not a believer.

“I think a lot of the talk about desal (desalination) is wishful thinking,” she said. “People want an easy fix.”

Sarah Porter (pictured addressing the Southwestern Regional Water-Energy Nexus meeting on Sept. 8 in Tempe), the director of the Kyl Center for Water Policy at ASU, thinks desalination is wishful thinking. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

Desal water from the Carlsbad plant is selling at more than $2,000 per acre-foot. SRP water is about $16 per acre-foot. Putting $2,000 acre-foot water on crops doesn’t make any sense.

“I think if we build a desal plant in Mexico, and that water were used in Mexico as a substitute for Colorado River water, I’m not sure how Mexico’s allotment of river water results in residential water,” Porter said. “The percentage that’s agricultural water is extremely cheap water, and it’s hard to figure out how you could use ocean desal for crops in a way that made sense.”

Desal plants also need constant demand. We usually build infrastructure and then demand catches up with it.

“I don’t think we should build something before we have the demand for it,” Porter said. “It’s a huge investment. … If we do get desal, (who pays for it) will definitely be municipal users, not growers.”

The ick factor

Reusing water is a huge part of the solution to close the demand gap.

“You don’t need a new supply if you’re reusing,” pointed out John Sabo, a School of Life Sciences professor who studies riverine ecology and freshwater sustainability. Reclaimed water is also cheaper than desalinated seawater. “We do need to work at becoming more efficient, because in the future that’s going to be our primary source for growth.”

ASU’s Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research (CAP LTER) program studies urban ecology. It has been ongoing for the past 20 years. Biological, physical, engineering and social scientists are studying eight aspects of what happens when you plop a city in a desert. Nancy GrimmGrimm is a professor in the School of Life Sciences, in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Senior Sustainability Scientist in the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability; director, Central Arizona–Phoenix Long-term Ecological Research Project, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability; co-director, Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability; and affiliated faculty, Center for Biodiversity Outcomes, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability. directs the project and has worked on it since the beginning.

One part of the study was looking at the reuse of treated wastewater for drinking water across the United States.

“The findings would be surprising to you, because there’s a lot more reuse of water in that particular interaction — between treated wastewater and reuse as drinking water or as municipal water — than you would think,” Grimm said.

“In some places it becomes really important during droughts. So in Texas, for instance, some of the cities are definitely using a pretty high proportion of the treated wastewater as municipal water supply. So there’s sort of what they call the “yuck” factor, the “ick” factor associated with that, but there’s really quite a lot of research that suggests that the water is quite safe.”

One of Sabo’s ideas is homes with two sets of pipes: one for potable water and one for reused water, which would go into the toilet, onto landscaping, etc. It would be an expensive retrofit, but one that could be gradually phased in. (When electricity came along, not everyone had their homes wired at once, for example.)

Golf courses and fake lakes already use reclaimed water.

“Why can’t everybody have some access for their outdoor watering to treated wastewater?” Grimm asked. “Those kinds of ideas are things that we’re exploring in CAP LTER, with people from the community, so government officials, people from flood-control districts in Maricopa County, various community leaders and so forth, we’ve been having these workshops that are creating what we’re calling sustainable future scenarios for Phoenix.”

A large concrete block that once anchored a dock sits on dry land. The shoreline is now several hundred yards away. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

Phoenix has been using reclaimed water on a huge scale since the 1960s. It cools Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, irrigates farmland and recharges aquifers. The city will use even more in the future, water services director Sorensen said.

“We’ve been pioneers in that, literally decades ahead of other communities,” she said. “Its importance will increase in the future. … That means the value of reclaimed water will increase. It means the importance of really managing our wonderful aquifer here increases exponentially.”

Future H2O

One of ASU’s three main water initiatives is Future H2O, unveiled by Sabo at a White House Water Summit in March. It’s a five-year plan focused on identifying opportunities for domestic and global water security. ASU researchers will partner with private and public sectors to find solutions to difficult water problems. The whole idea is to focus on the situation at hand, rather than hoping it will change.

“Where are the opportunities of the future to do better?” Sabo described it.

It has five pillars, one of which is aimed at averting what water managers call “the Silver Tsunami,” the imminent retirement of a lot of water professionals with institutional memory and expertise.

“The opportunity is the next generation is going to be more capable of harnessing the technology that surrounds us because they’re embedded in that technology,” Sabo said. “They know how to use it. The next generation is going to build on what the incumbents have left us, which in Arizona is quite strong.”

Two other areas of focus are:

• Developing funding for an urban landscape design and renovation campaign that reduces residential outdoor water use in at least one Phoenix metro service area by a third by 2025.

• Delivering research and advice to at least 10 of the largest corporate water users in the U.S. to scope, plan and implement restoration projects at scales that improve water reliability in stressed water basins nationwide.

Sabo created a software tool that helps corporations apply analytics to how they use water, simultaneously helping water conservation, habitat restoration and their bottom lines. It’s being used by Dow Chemical at their west Texas operations on the Brazos River.

“It tells Dow how to meet their water bottom line for manufacturing by creating wetlands instead of creating gray infrastructure,” said Sabo.

The nature of desert cities

One of things Grimm’s long-term desert cities project looks at is how storm water moves through the city and how it’s handled.

She’s interested in the idea that cities are potentially really good experimental test beds for thinking of water as a unified system. She envisions a city water department that manages drinking water, wastewater and storm water holistically.

“Some of that is going on in Phoenix, because Phoenix has been pretty innovative about things like reusing treated wastewater for watering golf courses and filling up fake lakes and things like that,” she said.

What happens when you plop a city in the middle of a desert? How does that affect the way water moves and behaves?

“We know very little about that,” said hydrologist Enrique VivoniVivoni is an associate professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; sustainability scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability; affiliated faculty, Center for Biodiversity Outcomes, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability., an associate professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration. 

Vivoni is interested in how changes in climate and land cover affect water as a resource. He uses observations of sensors and satellite data and computer modeling of hydrological systems.

“The movement of hydrologists studying cities in depth is actually very new,” he said.

Most other schools specialize in natural systems hydrology, like rivers, mountain watersheds and wetlands.

“None of them have this special expertise on human-environment relations in cities, where water is important currency,” Vivoni said. “Humans are primarily going to be urban dwellers moving forward. As a species, more than half of us live in cities. We do all these changes around us, and we have almost no clue about how the system works internally.

“Part of my work at ASU is on that angle: understanding, measuring, quantifying and eventually predicting how water moves, is transformed and flows through desert cities. My work focuses on arid and semi-arid areas.”

The Temple Bar rock formation glows at sunset on Lake Mead, near the Temple Bar Marina, on July 27. Photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

 

What does climate change and covering land with a city do, in concert or separately, to alter hydrological systems? When it comes to hydrology, codes and regulations don’t have much to offer: Don’t create more runoff than would have been produced without the development, make sure that water has a place to go, and that’s about it.

“We don’t tell our developers, ‘Make sure your development does not increase urban heat,’ ” Vivoni said. “That’s not in our regulations. What I’m trying to get at is we’ve built cities with very little hydrologic and atmospheric science in mind. ‘Just do it. The consequences we’ll figure out later.’ ”

What Vivoni’s group does is provide datasets, models and model outputs that can inform policy from science.

“I think we have to be a little more proactive about our water resources,” he said. “That’s going to require more science in our agency.”

Vivoni feels there needs to be more emphasis put on soft infrastructure: plans, policies, procedures, modeling systems, operational plans that say if the drought is this severe, we’re going to do this; if it’s that severe, we’re going to do that.

“How can we prepare the planners, the cities, the decision-makers with information and knowledge beforehand so that there are plans in place that can be followed under the eventual drought that will eventually hit us someday? That’s squarely in the academic world, and ASU is well-prepared with its social science and natural science expertise to contribute to that.”

Bridging the gap between science and policy is called “sociohydrology.” It’s a recognition that the natural science community hasn’t taken humans into account well enough in their work.

Government used to speak only to consultants.

“We’re at a phase now where academia is starting to play a role,” Vivoni said. The university provides consulting that’s broader than just an engineering goal that needs to be met.

“It can’t only be from one angle,” he said. “It can’t only be from the engineering angle, and it can’t only be from the anthropological angle. It has to be from some combination of lenses. … We’re trying to improve models that can be used in context with stakeholders, to have them have access to tools that can enhance decision-making. I’m at the technical back end of that. I’m not the person with the skills to interface directly with the Phoenix water manager.”

How ASU ended up bridging the gap between science and government

Water in the West in general has historically been a by-product of agriculture. Grady Gammage Jr. explained how ASU arrived where it is now.

Gammage (son of ASU’s third president) wears a lot of hats. If there’s a public or private board making important decisions about the state, you can count on seeing him there. He is an academic, a lawyer, an author, a real-estate developer and a former elected official.

At ASU, Gammage is a senior fellow at ASU’s Morrison Institute, the Kyl Center for Water Policy, and a senior scholar at the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability. He also teaches at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

When he was in high school, he had a summer job with Salt River Project. “I’d get to drive around and look at the dams,” he told an oral history interviewer in 2007. “That was sort of my first exposure to Western water issues a little bit.”

“We study water, we think about water, we produce water, we build big water projects, all because of the heritage of the Bureau of Reclamation and John Wesley Powell and the creation of the great Western water projects,” he told ASU Now. “That means that the places where water has historically been studied the most are the land grant institutions, where it’s a by-product of the study of agriculture. The (University of Arizona) has been the water school, forever, and it is a world leader in hydrology and those kinds of things. That’s been weird, because ASU should have been the land grant school. Agriculture is here; it was never in Tucson. But, for historical reasons, it happened differently. ASU has had to come at this from the non-agriculture perspective.”

“I think the niche for ASU is more to focus on the arid West and the way in which water and water rights are managed and adjudicated going into the future. … The Kyl Center for Water Policy is a really good idea.
— Grady Gammage Jr. 

Gammage thinks that’s beneficial to the perspective ASU brings to water, because the West isn’t about agriculture any more. It’s about people and cities.

“Sometimes that historical overhang of the cultural legacy of water in the West distorts the way water is studied and planned and dealt with,” he said.

Gammage said ASU’s policy orientation — “big-picture water policy” — has evolved over the past 10 or so years.

“I think the niche for ASU is more to focus on the arid West and the way in which water and water rights are managed and adjudicated going into the future,” he said. “That’s why I’m excited about Rhett (Larson) being here. The Kyl Center for Water Policy is a really good idea. To me, that’s the more comfortable niche to exploit: the legal and policy aspects of water. That’s what I do; that’s what I like. I’m not a scientist.” 

 

The water series

Part 1: The current situation and how we got here.

Part 2: Science and research.

Part 3, coming Friday: Law, policy, challenges — and some good news.

 

Video and top photo by Charlie Leight/ASU Now

Article source: https://asunow.asu.edu/20161005-solutions-asu-water-resources-research-part-two

Caledonia architect wants to see damaged fountain repurposed

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One of the ideas tossed around about how Geneseo’s damaged fountain base could be used once a replacement base is carved involves cutting it up into small pieces and using it to make jewelry.

Another idea was to use portions of the granite to make small statues, possibly of Emmeline the bear.

But Mayor Dick Hatheway said that, with the village’s attention focused solely on finding a suitable source of pink granite with which to replace the damaged fountain base, there hasn’t been much time to spare for thoughts of what to do with the chunk of stone that’s sat in Main Street for the past 128 years.

“We’ve been so focused on getting the thing repaired we have not really looked at what we’re going to do with the basin,” said Hatheway. “We just haven’t gone there yet at all.”

One man who doesn’t want to see the stone cut up is landscape designer Ken Estes, owner of Estes Country Gardens and Design in Caledonia.

“I think it’s silly,” said Estes in reference to the idea of cutting up the old base and using it to make jewelry. “Things like that, typically… you buy it, it ends up on a shelf or in storage or ends up in a landfill.

Instead, Estes wants to see the damaged base continue in its function as a water feature, albeit in a different way.

“Whether that break becomes a spill way into a pond less type water feature (or) you create some way for water to come out of the middle like it used to – there’s probably a number of different things you could do to utilize that and have it be a water feature,” he said. “You could fill that cracked opening with other stones mortared into place and have the bowl contained or possibly have the water spill over the edge of the bowl.”

The damaged fountain base could be moved to one of Geneseo’s parks, said Estes, or somewhere on the campus of SUNY Geneseo – “it could go anywhere.”

Estes said he just wrapped up a landscaping project at a private residence in Geneseo complete with gardens, walkways, a pond, two waterfalls and a stream at a cost of about $30,000.

But relocating and repurposing the damaged fountain base wouldn’t need to cost that much.

“To relocate it, do a pondless system with it would probably cost $10,000 to ($30,000), depending on the amenities you’d put with the fountain itself which theoretically could be done over time,” he said. “The design could be the community’s of what it wants the fountain turned into with professional insight on what’s doable.”

Hatheway said that, once the village has a replacement fountain base lined up, it would probably form some kind of committee together to brainstorm ideas for the fountain and possibly request proposals from members of the village.

And while Estes certainly wouldn’t be averse to designing a new water feature built around the original fountain base, his main concern is making sure it’s preserved as one piece and not scattered to the winds.

“That’s the original, regardless of the fact it got run into,” he said. “It still has some historic significance in my opinion.”

Article source: http://www.thelcn.com/lcn01/caledonia-architect-wants-to-see-damaged-fountain-repurposed-20161006

Xeriscape Garden Tour this weekend

Xeriscape, pronounced “zeer-eh-scape,” is a term combining ‘xēros,’ the Greek word for ‘dry,’ with ‘scape’ taken from the word ‘landscape.’

Article source: http://www.svherald.com/news/xeriscape-garden-tour-this-weekend/article_0b6c4688-8aa1-11e6-93ae-67b38e2672f4.html

Beautification Committee to hold fall cleanup in October

THOMASTON — The Beautification Committee is planning a major fall clean-up of downtown’s Kenea Park, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday, October 29.

Fall cleanup is an important role in getting every garden ready for winter, said Chairman Mary Beth Johnson. The committee members will be cleaning garden areas and trimming back from the summer growth.

Their biggest project over the years has been Kenea Park, the centerpiece to Thomaston’s downtown. After almost decade of landscaping, planting, etc., the park is now considered the “jewel of Thomaston.”

“We need volunteers to work in the garden but are also looking for someone who can make phone calls, some secretarial work,” said Ms. Johnson. “It doesn’t require one bit of time in the dirt. The most challenging part of finding and keeping volunteers is the volunteer work is not steady. We have a big blast in the spring and fall, a very labor intensive time. Then it tends to require occasional maintenance in the other seasons. There are many other projects I would like to do for example something for Earth Day but need help to accomplish.”

Kenea Park has gone through many transformations over the years, from a working three-tier fountain and carriage hook ups, to the modern-day gazebo and vintage clock. The clock, located on the south end of the park, has seen better days as of late, but was recently approved for refurbishment by the Board of Selectmen and Board of Finance.

What is known as Kenea Park now, thanks to Edith Kenea in recognition of her contributions to the town’s beautification, was always host to concerts and town meetings, dating back to the 1800s. The “Images of America – Thomaston” book, written by Historical Commission Chairman Joe Wassong, has many images of the park in its many forms. Town events were held on the property even before the historic St. Thomas Church, the park’s neighbor, was built.

The committee is in charge of the landscaping and beautification of Kenea Park’s garden beds, Seth Thomas Park’s flower beds, Firehouse Island flower garden, Library Island flower garden, Opera House flower gardens, Center Street Traffic Island plantings, Reeve’s Field Marker flower bed and Nystrom’s Pond entryway garden.

The Beautification Committee of Thomaston, originally founded in the spring of 1988 by Bea Fuller and several Thomaston residents, takes its job seriously, maintaining the town’s well-traveled gateways.

“There are many wonderful things we could be doing, but at this point we need to rebuild our volunteer base,” said Mary Beth Johnson, chairman of the Beautification Committee. “We care for eight public gardens in Thomaston. The biggest is Kenea Park.”

The Beautification Committee also needs help with fundraising. Those interested in volunteering for the Beautification Committee of Thomaston can pick up a form in the First Selectman’s office, e-mail Mary Beth Johnson at mbjohnson56@yahoo.com or call her at 860-307-8779. Most of the committees’ communication is done by e-mail.

According to Ms. Johnson, volunteer hours are “very flexible” and generally done during the weekday and the weekend, depending on the volunteer’s availability.

Anyone interested in sending a donation should make checks payable to The Edith L. Kenea Park Fund for use by the Beautification Committee and mail it to the Edith L. Kenea Park Fund, c/o Town Treasurer, 158 Main Street, Thomaston 06787.

Article source: http://www.primepublishers.com/towntimesnews/news/top_stories/beautification-committee-to-hold-fall-cleanup-in-october/article_9332d876-8b2c-11e6-8440-3b82fbb2009d.html

What to do with strawberry beds, stink bugs: Master gardeners’ tips …

Summer may be over, but gardening questions keep on coming. Get answers from Ask an Expert, an online question-and-answer tool from Oregon State University’s Extension Service. OSU Extension faculty and master gardeners reply to queries within two business days, usually less. To ask a question, simply go to the OSU Extension website and type in a question and the county where you live. Here are some questions asked by other gardeners. What’s yours?

Q: How do you prepare strawberry beds for fall? – Marion County

A: In  Growing Strawberries in Your Home Garden, Bernadine Strik, berry specialist for OSU Extension, says:

“To renovate June‑bearers in the hill system, mow off foliage 2 inches above the crown, remove and burn or bury all plant debris, and remove all runners through the fall. Remove all plantings that are no longer productive or that lack vigor (generally, plantings that have had three fruiting seasons). Start a new planting in another location during the last year your existing planting is fruiting.”

In western Oregon, there’s no need to protect strawberry plants from winter cold. In eastern Oregon, protection might be necessary. Minimize cold damage by covering plants with 2 to 3 inches of loose straw after temperatures first drop below freezing. Remove straw once the risk of severely cold temperatures has passed. It’s important to avoid placing straw on the plants too early or leaving it on too late in spring. – Terry Hart, OSU Extension master gardener

Brown marmorated stink bugs  

Q: I have had an infestation of stink bugs in my garden and house for three or four years. I naively thought that they would die out during winter. Mostly they just get in the house and even reproduce there. They are incredibly prolific. I do not use pesticides as a rule but hand extermination is not working. I read online that there was no pesticide for this pest and that birds are the only natural predators. It also said that they are a threat to fruit, particularly peach trees. I have one and its fruit was quite damaged last season. – Multnomah County

A: We’ve had stink bugs in Oregon for many years, some types of which are actually beneficial in the garden. Most of them are known to find shelter in structures over the winter, and they’re more a nuisance than anything. However, the brown marmorated stink bug, is an invasive pest that has, in fact, done much damage in gardens and nurseries and could have damaged your peaches. It’s distinguishable by the white lines on its antennae. In the event you have positively identified the brown marmorated stink bug, you might consider reporting it.

Even though you might have stink bugs in your fruit trees, the damage may have been done by a myriad of other types of insects (and pathogens).

There is currently no treatment for stink bugs. Keeping any type of insect out of your home requires that you fill any access means, since they have to get in some way. PestWorld.org provides tips for controlling stink bugs.

Finally, there is some evidence to believe that a natural enemy of the stink bug, the tiny, parasitic wasp called Trissolcus japonicus, may proliferate in sufficient quantity to impact the numbers of stink bugs over time. Until then, we’re just going to have to live with them. – Kristena LaMar, OSU Extension master gardener

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Article source: http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2016/10/strawberry_beds_stinkbugs_osu.html

Tips to get your garden through the fall – News

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Article source: http://www.newspressnow.com/life/home_garden/tips-to-get-your-garden-through-the-fall/article_955fdc3b-5704-5674-8da4-f1e066fc812c.html