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Archives for September 23, 2016

The 5 Designs That Could Replace An Infamous NYC Transit Hub

New York City is finally on the road to getting rid of its heinous Port Authority bus terminal. Yesterday, the Port Authority unveiled five finalist designs for a reimagined terminal as a part of its international design and deliverability contest.

The Port Authority has been exploring the idea of replacing the 65-year-old bus terminal in earnest since 2015. Besides being an eyesore on the outside and a byzantine labyrinth inside, the bus terminal is hugely overburdened with commuters. And with an increase in demand for bus service across the Hudson, it will only get worse: The agency expects to see 337,000 daily commuters pass through the terminal by 2040, an increase of nearly 69% from 2011.

But redesigning the building has been complicated. The contest came under fire after politicians and community members protested that the Port Authority wasn’t sufficiently consulting the public on the project. Then there’s the issue of the estimated price of the proposals, ranging from $3.7 billion to a mind-boggling $15.3 billion. Port Authority makes it clear that these proposals are a starting point for what will likely be a much longer design process. “My instinct is that no one is going to emerge…as the final concept,” Port Authority Chairman John Degnan told AM New York. “There may be ideas in each of them—we certainly like the components that don’t require eminent domain or acquisition of private property. Some of them, you can gauge here yourself, by expense or other consideration, are probably not going to survive.”

Regardless, one of the designs below is expected to serve as a foundation for the redesigned transit hub—and in doing so, will eventually transform the neighborhood, along with the city itself. Check them out below, in order from least to most expensive.

Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

At an estimated cost of $3.7 billion, New York-based firm Pelli Clarke Pelli wants to build a 25% smaller “transit center” located west of Ninth avenue. Dubbed “Times Square West,” the terminal connects the under-construction Hudson Yards to Times Square and aims to bring jobs and retail to the area.

Arcadis of New York, Inc.

The $4.2 billion proposal, proposed by the New York arm of Dutch firm Arcadis, would put a new bus terminal on Dyer Avenue between 9th and 10th avenue—but would only build on land already owned by the Port Authority. The firm’s design calls for a new pedestrian plaza over Dyer Avenue, which would allow for a car-free entrance to the terminal, as well as a new 7 train stop nearby.

Perkins Eastman

New York-based firm Perkins Eastman’s $5.4 billion proposal puts the new bus terminal in the lowest floor of the Jacob Javits Center. It would take all buses, trucks, and ramps off city roads and relocate them underground, as well as connect with a new 7 train station.

Archilier Architecture Consortium

New York-based Archilier Architecture proposes a $7 billion terminal that would connect Hudson Yards with Hell’s Kitchen and redevelop the “no-man’s land” between them. The mammoth, 4-million-square-foot project would create 9.8 acres of rooftop park space, and the swooping, concrete facade would certainly make a statement in the neighborhood. The plan would largely use Port Authority land, but would also require the acquisition of an apartment building, 10 households, and a church.

Hudson Terminal Center Collaborative

The Hudson Terminal Center Collaborative proposal is both the most expensive and extensive of the designs. It proposes that the entire terminal move underground, right underneath the current building. The consortium includes Skidmore, Owings Merrill and AECOM, who is behind the MTA’s Second Avenue Subway project. The plan would take the terminal out of sight, but would also cost the city an incredible $15.3 billion.

[All Images: via Port Authority New York New Jersey]

Article source: https://www.fastcodesign.com/3064024/fast-feed/the-5-designs-that-could-replace-an-infamous-nyc-transit-hub

A Garden Sanctuary of Medieval Magic – The New York Times

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Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/23/t-magazine/design/isabel-julian-bannerman-garden-designer-cornwall-norman-castle.html

Landscaping gateway roundabout

Friday 23 September

Landscaping
gateway roundabout

Landscaping of the Waipaoa
roundabout has begun this week with the removal of weeds and
vegetation.

The landscaping which is being carried out by
Siteworx and Aborcare, is expected to be completed as soon
as inspection work on water utilities is finished.

“The
design and plant selection were chosen to be low
maintenance, open and accessible should we need to carry out
maintenance – particularly as water mains run underneath
the roundabout,” says contracts and assets manager Garrett
Blair.

“In the centre of the roundabout will be wild
iris, native grasses and cabbage trees. Outer gardens will
be planted in an orange coloured Karamu (Coprosma) with
Libertia (NZ iris) instead of the grass pictured in the
image.”

Upgrade works on the roundabout and bridge by
Tairawhiti Roads got under way in May.

The work included
road re-surfacing and concreting of the four approach
islands, repairs made on the bridge hand railing system and
installation of a subsoil drainage system within the garden
to prevent water from affecting the road as it has done in
the past. A guard rail system to help protect the city water
main was also installed in August.

One reason for the
redesign of the roundabout garden was the drainage.
Previously water ran into a shallow ditch around the
perimeter of the roundabout, this meant it seeped under the
road, causing issues like potholes.

Mr Blair says Council
has waited until this road and utility work was complete
before starting on a revamp of the roundabout garden to
avoid duplication or having to re-plant.

“We’ve saved
and will reuse some of the plants back in the roundabout as
only a few species transplant well. The Hebe and grasses
will be used in this and other gardens around the
district.”

“We’ll also be exploring ideas for
installing pou as a focal point to enhance the landscaping
on the roundabout, which will be added at a later
date.”

The rain this week has made the area quite wet.
As soon as the soil is dry enough landscaping will take
about two weeks to
complete.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

Article source: http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1609/S00759/landscaping-gateway-roundabout.htm

The 10-Point.

Good morning,

Web of Intrigue

Yahoo said Thursday that hackers penetrated its network in late 2014 and stole personal data on more than 500 million users, from names and email addresses to telephone numbers and encrypted passwords. The internet company is blaming “state-sponsored” hackers for what may be the largest-ever theft of personal user data. The significance of the disclosure is twofold: that the company says the breach is the work of another nation and because it raises questions about the fate of its pending…

Article source: http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-10-point-1474628426

Waipaoa roundabout landscaping under way


LANDSCAPING of the Waipaoa roundabout started this week with the removal of weeds and vegetation.

The landscaping, which is being carried out by Siteworx and ArborCare, is expected to be completed as soon as inspection work on water utilities is finished.

“The design and plant selection were chosen to be low maintenance, open and accessible should we need to carry out maintenance — particularly as water mains run underneath the roundabout,� said Gisborne District Council contracts and assets manager Garrett Blair.

“In the centre of the roundabout will be wild iris, native grasses and cabbage trees. Outer gardens will be planted in an orange coloured karamu (coprosma) with libertia (New Zealand iris).�

Upgrade works on the roundabout and bridge by Tairawhiti Roads started in May.

The work included road re-surfacing and concreting of the four approach islands, repairs to the bridge hand railing system and installation of a subsoil drainage system within the garden to prevent water from affecting the road as it has done in the past.

A guard rail system to help protect the city water main was installed in August.

Mr Blair said one reason for the redesign of the roundabout garden was drainage.

“Previously, water ran into a shallow ditch around the perimeter of the roundabout. This meant it seeped under the road, causing issues like potholes.�

Mr Blair said the council waited until road and utility work was completed before starting on a revamp of the garden to avoid duplication or having to replant.

“We’ve saved and will reuse some of the plants back in the roundabout as only a few species transplant well. The hebe and grasses will be used in this and other gardens around the district.�

“We’ll also be exploring ideas for installing pou as a focal point to enhance the landscaping on the roundabout, which will be added at a later date.�

It is expected the landscaping will take about two weeks to complete.

Article source: http://gisborneherald.co.nz/localnews/2484775-135/waipaoa-roundabout-landscaping-under-way

Winning garden makes lavish use of difficult space – Pittsburgh Post

Paula Vietmeier’s garden is snugged among several farms on about 1 acre in rural Washington County, but it looks nothing like its neighbors.

She and her husband have taken a one-story, cinder-block building on an overgrown patch of land and transformed it into an Italianate villa, complete with fountain and formal plantings in the front driveway, and lush rear gardens. It was chosen as the winner of the large garden, summer category of the Great Gardens Contest, which is sponsored by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Pittsburgh Botanic Garden. 

The couple originally bought the former cabinet shop to store Rob Vietmeier’s classic car collection. But his wife saw its potential to be much more when she stepped onto the roof. On a clear day, its panoramic vistas include the tallest buildings Downtown. On the Fourth of July, they can see as many as six fireworks displays.

She made up her mind that day to build on top of the existing building, leaving the first floor for up to a dozen cars and the second for the family home. And she made plans for the overgrown backyard.

“I immediately had visions of a woodland garden,” she says.

The couple moved into a trailer on the property and work commenced. After two years of demolition and construction, they had a new home. Then she turned to the garden. A 100-foot swath of shady slope was covered with briers, poison ivy and saplings, not to mention the two storage trailers that needed to be cut up and removed. She cleared the slope and put down landscape fabric, then added boulders for dimension.

“In 2006, I started to bring in lots of my perennials to start filling the sparse landscape,” she wrote in her contest entry.

Among the hostas she planted are ‘Sum and Substance,’ ‘Praying Hands,’ ‘Aphrodite,’ ‘Stained Glass Window’ and ‘Empress Wu.’  She also made use of ferns, adding in ostrich, ladyfern and maidenhair, a collection of astilbes and lots of groundcovers such as creeping Jenny, lamium, ajuga, sweet William and creeping thyme.

Thanks to careful selection, she has created a visual tapestry of both texture and color. Over the years, she has divided the plants over and over again, filling in the 30-foot-wide bed.  Each spring she buys several flats of ‘Angel Wing’ begonias. They add a spark of color, carry the eye down the expansive bed and tie the garden together.   

Mrs. Vietmeier has had some failures along the way. When heavy rains turned part of the slope into a waterfall and washed her plants away, she installed a dry riverbed that is both functional and attractive. She’s also had deer issues, although dogs Tessa and Hanna patrol the grounds and help keep them at bay.

She’s had no formal training in landscaping, but it’s clear she has a good eye and a green thumb. The long garden bed is filled to the brim with healthy, lush plants. She says the space no longer requires lots of maintenance or mulch because the plants have taken over.

She has carefully chosen garden ornaments and placed them throughout. Bird houses scattered about are home to a variety of species.  Large containers are placed around the yard and huge hanging baskets dangle from trees. A tiny fairy garden in a large bowl lives in a gazebo. 

In one corner, against a stucco wall, is a large Norfolk Island pine that she rescued from the trash. It now is quite large and overwinters with her husband’s cars.

She says her husband would rather have cement than garden, but it’s clear he’s proud of her creation. Each year, they have a party where their friends can admire his cars and her garden.

“My.husband and friends call it ‘Paulaville,’” she says, “I love that.”

A visit to Paulaville is a lesson to visitors: How to turn an eyesore into a showstopper.

Susan Banks: sbanks@post-gazette.com.

Article source: http://www.post-gazette.com/life/garden/2016/09/23/Winning-garden-makes-lavish-use-of-difficult-space/stories/201609190180

Let Me See Your Garden, And Your Home, Grow – The Voice-Tribune

Photo by April Tobbe

When it comes to the future of landscape architecture and design, you needn’t look further than your own backyard. According to a 2016 survey conducted by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), there is a growing demand in the industry for extended outdoor living spaces and design elements: fireplaces, lighting, internet connectivity and even sleeping spaces. Consumers are eager for creative and luxurious solutions for outdoor entertaining and living, outspreading their homes into nature.

Louisville landscape architect Josh Myers, owner of Myers+Co. Landscapes, concurs that he has seen that demand increase among his local clientele. “Fortunately,” he says, “there are beautiful and functional ways to extend the use of your outdoor entertaining spaces long after Labor Day.” Most notably, incorporating full-service kitchens, grills, brick ovens, ample counter and food prep space, televisions and refrigerators is no longer a desired afterthought for homeowners and is a design service that extends beyond what many may initially interpret as landscape architecture.

Photo by Cameron Whaley

“My ultimate goal as a landscape architect,” Myers notes, “is to bring the architecture away from the walls of the home and make it look like it belongs there.” This extends beyond traditional yard or garden maintenance but certainly includes those ambiance-enhancing services as well. Lighted landscapes are an additional outdoor living trend that has found an embrace in the local market. “The tech-savvy customer is willing to explore dramatic and creative ways to light their outdoor space,” he explains. “LED lighting is more cost-upfront to install but is one of the easiest things that can result in long-term savings.”

Whether a project is large or small, Myers has noticed that almost all busy clients are striving for low maintenance when it comes to their outdoor space. This includes materials chosen for outdoor living areas. “More and more people are approaching these environments as they would interior design and looking to replicate indoor materials, choosing tile that is consistent with the appearance of hardwood floors or porcelain tile flooring. Of course there are time-tested natural materials for these surfaces, but with traditional pine or cedar decking, you are looking at yearly maintenance as opposed to other composite options. Ipe decking is extremely popular right now.” The two most important deciding factors in making material decisions, he says, are cost and maintenance, with maintenance typically emerging as the decision-maker.

Photo by Cameron Whaley

While water issues tend to be a hot landscaping topic nationally, Myers indicates that conservation projects are still slow to gain interest in Louisville. “While I am approached about using plants that are tolerant to the local humidity and reduced lawn area, which are sustainable elements to a project, I only see pockets of rainwater harvesting or water-efficient irrigation projects. These aren’t yet embraced by most consumers locally. I hope to see the demand for that increase.”

With so many talented local artists in Louisville, Myers does see a trend toward incorporating garden art into more formal spaces whether that be a sculpture piece or fountain. Also – in keeping with the trend of low-maintenance – container gardens and, in some cases, edible landscapes, continue to grow in popularity and, he says, are the perfect way to add seasonal color to the front of a home. “More homeowners wish to represent the fall holidays within their seasonal landscaping. It’s grown beyond just placing a few pumpkins at your doorstep.”

One place that Myers hopes we will all soon be able to look toward for landscaping inspiration is the Waterfront Botanical Gardens for which he is on the planning committee. The vision to create a garden and conservatory of extraordinary beauty may be only in the early stages of planning and fundraising but will serve to engage Louisville with plants and nature and promote an appreciation for a sustainable world. VT

Myers brings a unique perspective to any project as a designer, site engineer and landscape architect. For more information about his portfolio and company, visit
myersandcompanylandscapes.com.

Article source: https://voice-tribune.com/news/cover-story/let-see-garden-home-grow/

Landscaping for Life

The first step was to bring in Fred Hunter from Dreamscape, a landscape design, installation, and maintenance company that specializes in green landscape design and sustainable, organic gardening.

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gay-browne/landscaping-for-life_b_12144392.html

Gardening tips from Ron Young: Flashy Fall flowers – KSLA

(KSLA) –

Fall is here and you might want to start thinking about some colorful and showy cool weather plants for that garden. I have three in mind that are easy to grow and to maintain: Chrysanthemums, Pansies and Ornamental Cabbage or Kale.

Chrysanthemums grow best and produce the most flowers if they are planted in full sunshine. They respond to plenty of food and moisture. There are hundreds of varieties of Chrysanthemums, giving you a multitude of options for height, color, flower size and time of bloom. You can pick and choose to fit your wants and needs when you visit the nursery. They should be planted into well prepared, fertile, sandy soil. Mums don’t like wet feet so the hole should be dug extra deep. You can start with a small plant or large. The plants should be spaced 18-30 inches apart for best results. Feed lightly every 2 weeks with a good balanced all- purpose fertilizer. When the plants are 6 inches tall, pinch about 3/4 of an inch from each branch to promote more blooms and bushier plants. When they reach a foot tall, pinch them again. On the largest flowering variety, it is best to remove all buds except for the one on top. Your Mums should last until first heavy frost.

Pansies are one of the most popular and recognizable cool weather plant. The names pansy and viola are often used interchangeable. Most gardeners know pansies as cool weather flowers with almost heart-shaped, overlapping petals in bright colors and often with face-like center markings. Breeding has produced pansies that are better able to stand up to the cold, but there has not’t been much luck producing more heat tolerant varieties. Many pansies are bi-colored, making them striking plants for their small size. Although delicate, they are surprisingly hardy. Pansies flower best in full sun and will get spindly in deep shade. Although pansies are not fussy plants, they will grow best in a loose, rich slightly acidic soil. When buying plants, choose pansies that are stocky, bushy and have plenty of buds. Avoid plants full of open blooms, because they will be stressed to near exhaustion from working so hard in a tiny pot. As with any long blooming annual plant, pansies appreciate some fertilizer. However too much food will just make them spindly.

Ornamental Cabbage and Kale are probably the easiest cool weather plants to grow in your beds and are almost fool-proof and frost-proof. These annual plants are very showy, and come in a variety of colors, ranging from white to pinks, purples or reds. Ornamental Cabbages and Kales look much the same as their edible cousins, but the ruffled foliage is much fancier and more colorful. They can survive winter temperatures as low as 5° F.  While a sudden cold snap can be deadly, light and moderate frosts will intensify the brilliant coloring of these plants. When purchasing ornamental cabbage or kale, look for a plant with a short rosette-type stem. Generally, if these plants were allowed to become root bound in their pots, they will not get much larger after they are planted, so it may pay to buy the biggest plants you can find, even though they may cost more. Ornamental Cabbage and Kale should be planted in a sunny location in a moderately moist, rich soil.

Now, KSLA get out there and dig in that dirt, plant some color and enjoy the view.

Copyright 2016 KSLA. All rights reserved

Article source: http://www.ksla.com/story/33149204/gardening-tips-from-ron-young-flashy-fall-flowers

Gardening Tips: End of Season Lawn Maintenance (From Evening …

Paul Brannan

Article source: http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/news/14760439.Gardening_Tips__End_of_Season_Lawn_Maintenance/