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Archives for August 23, 2016

Last chance: François Goffinet exhibition, garden designer to billionaires

If you happen to be in Luxembourg, don’t miss this exhibit


Goffinet designed the gardens at Longleat House in England. Image credit: Tom Payne/Shutterstock

For those interested in luxury homes, pure bricks and mortar should not be the sole point of focus – the outside space is important too.

Indeed, in Knight Frank’s Prime Country View 2016 report, a “fabulous garden” is cited to add to the value of a property by as much as 20 percent.

This brings us to the exhibition celebrating the work of internationally renowned garden architect François Goffinet.

When the world’s rich and famous want someone to design their grounds – they call on Goffinet. The Belgium landscape designer has created gardens all over the world from small city gardens to large public and private parks.

His work is based on the philosophy that a garden should be about the harmonious relationship between man and nature.

The art of gardening is the music of space which makes your body vibrate. It is the harmonious arrangement of notes,” he says.

More: Zen and the art of landscape gardening

His client list reads like a who’s who of the world’s billionaires, including European aristocracy to global business giants, who have paid from USD2.2 million up to USD37.5 million for his services.

His famous works include the Donald M. Kendall Sculpture Gardens at the PepsiCo world headquarters in New York, and the gardens at stately homes in England, including Longleat House, Badminton House and Leeds castle.

The Art of Garden Design and its Crafts” is in its final weeks (until 15 September), at Banque de Luxembourg, and is not to be missed by anyone with an interest in beautiful gardens.

Read next: 5 ultimate luxury home must-haves in 2016

Article source: http://www.property-report.com/last-chance-francois-goffinet-exhibition-the-garden-designer-to-billionaires/

Gardening Design Concept: Plant A Theme Garden Utilizing Plants With Animal Names

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Article source: http://www.internetadsales.com/2016/08/23/gardening-design-concept-plant-a-theme-garden-utilizing-plants-with-animal-names/

Cities Expected to Benefit from Anzalduas Bridge Expansion

MISSION – A new lane on the Anzalduas International Bridge is set to bring new revenue for several Rio Grande Valley cities. Before Monday, the bridge only handled passenger traffic. Today, a southbound lane for truck traffic opened.

Bridge officials said they’re waiting to see how many trucks will start using the bridge. According to an early estimate, McAllen officials said the new lane will bring in $800,000 a year in new toll revenue. McAllen, Mission, Hidalgo and Granjeno will share 80 percent of that revenue.

Planners spent $35,000 to add the new commercial lane. They also provided $1.1 million which Mexico used to complete needed improvements on the Mexican side of the bridge.

The superintendent of bridges for McAllen said the cities which partnered for the deal will have to wait before they can collect any money. He explained they first have to pay back the money used to fund the project.

When that’s complete, the city of Granjeno is expected to get one percent of the new bridge revenue. Granjeno Mayor Yvette Cabrera said so far, the bridge hasn’t brought it any continuous revenue.  The small city relies only on revenue from property and sales taxes.

However, city officials already have ideas on how to use the new funds. Cabrera mentioned utilities and providing a stronger infrastructure for the community.

Residents are still recovering from damage storms left in late May. Branches continue to line the main road in Granjeno. “We were basically depending a lot on volunteers and donations. And the good thing is that we had were neighboring cities that helped us out a lot,” said Cabrera.

Jose Almaguer runs a small landscaping service and is part of the ongoing cleanup. He said people in Granjeno are still behind economically, but it’s progressing little by little.

Article source: http://www.krgv.com/story/32817469/cities-expected-to-benefit-from-anzalduas-bridge-expansion

Neighbors weigh in on plans to upgrade busy South Buffalo road

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB)- One of South Buffalo’s busiest roads could be getting a makeover. People living near Abbott Road told News 4 it needs work badly.

Abbott Road runs through the heart of the Irish Heritage District.

“We have some fantastic businesses that have been established, been there for a long time, and a lot of new businesses coming into the area,” said Pat Crowley, who lives nearby.

Along the growing strip, however, there are aging light posts and cracked sidewalks with grass growing through.

“We need new sidewalks, we need better lighting, some innovative ideas that will add to the merchants who are there,” said Crowley.

Crowley joined her neighbors in a packed room Monday night to see possibilities to transform the road. Renderings showed different levels of repair, including repaving, and adding new light posts, flower pots, benches or landscaping.

“You’ve got some aging infrastructure and some dangerous areas,” said Common Council Member Chris Scanlon. “Not everything is up to code and compliance so we need to tackle those things.”

Scanlon told News 4 they’ve been working on a feasibility study since 2012. The renderings showed examples for two intersections but the final project would fix up more than two miles of Abbott Road from Bailey Ave. to Dorrance Ave.

Scanlon said the cost will depend on which option they choose but it could range from $3 million to $9 million of local, state and federal funds.

“It’s a great way to bring greenery into the area, to the street,” said Tim Scherer. “It gives the businesses the chance to upgrade the front of their stores.”

Other people told News 4 they were “underwhelmed” by the plans.

Crowley said she likes the improvements but is worried about the plans for landscaping that would jut out from the sidewalk.

“We get a lot of snow unfortunately and plow service is great but they’ve got to keep moving and they probably forget these are there and they keep on going and they get ruined,” said Crowley.

But everyone seemed to agree this is long overdue.

“It’s time, it’s time,” said Scherer. “South Buffalo is really coming along.”

Before they left, neighbors were asked to fill out a form about what they liked and what they wanted to see added. Scanlon said they will use that input to adjust the plans as they work for a final solution.

You can give feedback by e-mailing Peggy Shea, who works in Scanlon’s office, at mshea@city-buffalo.com.

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Article source: http://wivb.com/2016/08/22/neighbors-weigh-in-on-plans-to-upgrade-busy-south-buffalo-road/

Watchung Grad Returns To His Roots, Grows Landscaping Business

WATCHUNG, NJ — What started as a business venture in high school has turned into a thriving landscape career for Watchung native Bob Adams.

He started ASL Group Design in 2008 and continued with it when he was in Hofstra College for business and communication. Adams would go to classes during the week and work on the weekends. After awhile he landed a fulltime job in the city and sold off most of his business in 2013.

Now Adams is back, and in just 6 months of reclaiming his former business he has tripled its size. He credits his emphasis on customer service and presentation of his equipment as attributing factors to his success.

“Our presentation of equipment and trucks are crucial to a good customer basis,” Adams told Patch. “Meaning we keep our trucks and equipment clean and maintained so we maintain a nice presentation in front of customers because many companies have rusted trucks and equipment. Also our business is customer service so we will jump at anyone’s needs any time of the day, seven days a week.”

ASL Group Design has grown its clientele to include serving Berkeley Heights, New Providence, Long Hill, Chatham, Summit, Basking Ridge, Warren, Watchung and North Plainfield. Essentially all of Somerset and Union counties.

Along with landscape maintenance, Adams specializes in design. He has a knack at creating a brand new design for any home.

“Someone had a new house with no shrubbery and no walkways. I came in with a blank slate and designed all the mulch beds, lighting, patio and walkways,” Adams said. “Same thing with an old house. I can rip everything out and start fresh and design everything fresh.”

Adams prides himself in working with the client’s ideas and designs and takes each resident personally to the nursery to pick out the perfect shrubbery for their home.

“The reason I enjoy doing this is because I can see a house with nothing there and I can envision what would look good and run it by the customer,” Adams said.

Along with design, ASL Group Design also handles fall and spring cleanup and snow removal in the winter. The company runs year round.

To learn more about ASL Landscaping visit www.aslgroupnj.com or call 908-295-7197 or email Robertadams.asl@gmail.com.

(Images provided)



Have a news tip? Email alexis.tarrazi@patch.com.

Article source: http://patch.com/new-jersey/watchung-greenbrook/watchung-grad-returns-his-roots-grows-landscaping-business

53 — Garden Allotments—London’s Kitchen Vision

A Hidden Kitchens story about London’s long tradition of urban garden allotments — and the story of Manor Garden Allotments, a 100 year old community, that found itself in the path of London’s 2012 Olympics.

London’s “allotment” gardens are an unusual and vibrant system of community gardens across the entire city. Tended by immigrants, retirees, chefs and fans of fresh food, the allotments make up a kitchen community like no other.

Wedged between buildings, planted in abandoned open spaces and carved into hillsides, these community plots of open space began to be reserved for neighborhood cultivation with the industrialization of England in the 1860s, when rural people poured into the city.

The allotments flourished with Britain’s “Dig for Victory” movement of World War II, an effort to feed the starving population of London during the war. And today, they are exploding with the organic gardening and “good food” movements, and efforts to food self-sufficiency sweeping the country.

For about 20 years, retiree Charlie Gregory has cultivated his plot at Fitzroy Park Allotment in Hampstead Heath, next to hipster artists and an immigrant couple with three Yorkies. There are apple trees, black currant bushes, blueberries, onions and shallots.

“Everybody knows everybody,” Gregory said. “I’m a bachelor myself. I’m 78 now, and I’m keeping on the go. It’s not expensive. For 27 pounds a year, you’ve got the space of land, you know, and this beautiful spot. You want to keep fit and live to a good old age? Get an allotment!”

London chef Oliver Rowe gets almost all his food from farmers and producers working within the radius of the city’s train system. In the kitchen of Konstam at the Prince Albert, his restaurant in Kings Cross, Rowe’s bread is made of wheat that is grown, milled and baked within 20 miles. The walls of his café are lined with jars of Dartford broad beans, sloe gin berries and sweet squash that he canned last year.

John Kelly, former publisher of Prospect magazine, who once had a plot in north London said that allotments started in the 19th century and were sparked by philanthropy and health concerns.

“So as people fled from agrarian poverty into working in factories, land was given to the city in perpetuity for people to cultivate vegetables,” Kelly said. “The allotment boom really happened in 1940s, 1950s.”

“There were most definitely different communities … The Italian guy opposite me who was fixated on growing Tuscan grapes for wine. And the Irish were there really just to dig… There were posh English ladies creating conceptual art, so you’d see these sort of scarecrows in hand-me-down Versace.”

Talking to people, one place kept coming up: Manor Garden Allotments, a small patch of land in the heart of working-class east London. It is more than 100 years old.

“You’d go past rambling old factories, down a little alleyway, behind the bus depot, lots of rubbish everywhere,” said Julie Sumner, a Manor allotment holder and organizer. But anyone opening a gate to see the River Lea, she said, would find a different scene.

Hassan Ali, a Turkish Cypriot who is a retired mechanic, had an allotment at Manor Garden for almost 20 years. “That place, I tell you, is a dream place — like we were living in heaven,” Ali said.

“I always cook every day something. My friend Reggie, 17 years I know him. Every day we together. And he brings something from his garden, and I bring something, and we cook and eat there, me and Reg.”

But in October 2007, Manor Garden Allotments was bulldozed to make way for a path and landscaping for the 2012 Olympic Games. The loss of the Manor Garden Allotments to the Olympics construction came despite protests and calls for preserving the area.

Today, the Manor Garden Allotment community has been split and relocated into two allotments. One is located in Marsh Lane, or the “Swamp” that was supposed to be a temporary home until after the Olympics. And the other new Allotment site opened in January 2016 at Pudding Mill Lane, Stratford in the heart of East London. Despite set backs and disputes, the allotment community continues on.

Throughout London, these garden allotments bridge many religious and cultural divides. With daily rituals of tea and traditional grilling of meats in garden sheds and outdoor kitchens — families come together in ways that defy the divided times in which we live.

 

Article source: https://www.wbez.org/shows/fugitive-waves/53-garden-allotmentslondons-kitchen-vision/16b8d77e-4bd0-4d8d-93f6-65e6834b6e1b

Annual desert landscaping workshop scheduled for Oct. 15

Environmental Horticulturist Janet Hartin gives a few tips for landscaping in the desert.
Marilyn Chung/The Desert Sun

Article source: http://www.desertsun.com/story/life/home-garden/2016/08/22/desert-horticultural-society-landscaping-workshop/89127892/

WWII vet yields bountiful garden and landscape despite problematic terrain – Scranton Times

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PHOTOS BY BUTCH COMEGYS / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER World War II veteran Sam Toman carved his landscaped property into rocky East Mountain terrain over the last six decades with hard work and innovation.

Image Gallery for WWII vet yields bountiful garden and landscape despite problematic terrain

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Where many people might see obstacles, East Mountain resident Sam Toman sees opportunity.

The city man, who turns 89 in September, proudly shares the stories of his lush Wintermantle Avenue garden and landscaping, which were painstakingly carved out and cultivated over several decades.

Mr. Toman began construction on his homestead, which stretches over two parcels, in the winter of 1954. A World War II veteran, having served in the Army Air Corps, the Bellevue section native worked as a general contractor on commercial, industrial and residential projects.

He built the home he shared with Eleanor, his late wife of 65 years, and their four children, into rocky terrain situated on a steep incline. Over the years, Mr. Toman moved countless tons of dirt and rubble to make way for the house and his garden, which grows in planter boxes and terraces.

The resulting beauty and bounty was a hard-won victory.

“You better believe it,” Mr. Toman said on a recent afternoon, as he nimbly walked the hillside. “It took me years.”

Once he clears and levels the land, Mr. Toman carefully screens the dirt to remove rocks, which he often repurposes in his compost.

“I never bought a pound of soil,” he said.

Among his plants and flowers are azaleas, rose of Sharon, black-eyed Susan, hostas, holly bush, Japanese maple, stargazer lilies, a mini weeping willow, bleeding heart, Hemlock trees, Irish roses, phlox, clematis, tiger lilies, daylilies, rhododendron, ornamental grasses, astilbe, balloon flowers, hydrangea and hibiscus.

He employs a “waste not, want not” philosophy when it comes to the garden, using leftover slate and marble from jobs to add to walkways. He poured all the concrete that reinforces the steps and paths, and built a bench and table from tree stumps and planks. Recycled tires discarded by nearby litterers act as decorative planters, now sporting brilliant coats of red, white and blue.

The yard features two memorial gardens, one for Eleanor, who died in 2011, and one for the couple’s late son, Sammy Jr., who passed away in 2001.

“I wanted to have them close to me,” Mr. Toman said.

Edibles include mint, pumpkins, cucumbers, green beans, tomatoes, sage and butternut squash, which are a big hit with visiting deer.

“They come down every night for a smorgasbord,” Mr. Toman said.

He also shares his vegetables with friends, like his weekly golf buddy, and family, including his other three children, eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Maintaining a viable vegetable garden was something Mr. Toman learned from his mother, who kept one out of necessity when he was young.

“During World War II, you had to have a garden,” Mr. Toman said. “My mother always had one. The front was flowers, the back was chickens and (an edible) garden. So I learned a little from her, naturally.”

These days, with help from his fiancée, Maureen Staples, who has her own section of the garden to tend to, Mr. Toman spends about four hours at a time caring for his yard.

It keeps him young, occupied and in shape. But it’s also a satisfying pastime, he said.

“Just the fact of growing something is nice, improving the land naturally,” Mr. Toman said. “It’s a work in progress. It’s neverending.”

Contact the writer: pwild

ing@timesshamrock.com, @pwildingTT on Twitter.

Meet Sam Toman

At home: Lives in the East Mountain section of Scranton with his fiancée, Maureen Staples. He has four children, eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren, and was married to the late Eleanor Toman for 65 years.

In his garden: plants and flowers, including azaleas, rose of Sharon, black-eyed Susan, hostas, holly bush, Japanese maple, stargazer lilies, a mini weeping willow, bleeding heart, Hemlock trees, Irish roses, phlox, clematis, tiger lilies, daylilies, rhododendron, ornamental grasses, astilbe, balloon flowers, hydrangea and hibiscus; edibles, including mint, pumpkins, cucumber, green beans, tomatoes, sage and butternut squash.

Tips: “The most important thing is composting,” Mr. Toman said. He makes sure to focus on leaves and grasses in his compost to avoid seeds and unwanted growths, and rotates between his barrels so that he only uses compost that’s at least one year old.

Article source: http://thetimes-tribune.com/lifestyles/wwii-vet-yields-bountiful-garden-and-landscape-despite-problematic-terrain-1.2081533

HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW: Tips for avoiding winter moth …

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Article source: http://franklin.wickedlocal.com/news/20160820/how-does-your-garden-grow-tips-for-avoiding-winter-moth-damage-next-spring